17 Burst results for "Knuth"

"knuth" Discussed on Artificial Intelligence (AI Podcast) with Lex Fridman

Artificial Intelligence (AI Podcast) with Lex Fridman

04:27 min | 5 months ago

"knuth" Discussed on Artificial Intelligence (AI Podcast) with Lex Fridman

"Showing that he didn't really deeply explore all the huge amount of circumstantial evidence that out there. The battles that are going on out there. There's a lot of people really tensely discussing this. And being showing humility in the face of that battle of ideas, I think is really important. And I've just been very disappointed in so called expertise in the space of science, in showing humility in showing humanity and kindness and empathy towards other human beings. At the same time, obviously I love your dreams of sushi, lifelong pursuit of getting in computer science, Don knuth, like some of my biggest heroes are people that when nobody else cares. They stay on one topic for their whole life and they just find the beautiful little things about their puzzles they keep solving. And yes, sometimes a virus happens or something happens with that person with their puzzles becomes like the center of the whole world because that puzzles becomes all of a sudden really important. But still the responsibilities on them to show humility and to be open minded to the fact that they, even if they spent their whole life doing it, even if their whole community is telling them awards and giving them citations and giving them all kinds of stuff where they're bowing down before them, how smart they are, they still know nothing relative to all the stuff the mysteries that are out there. Yeah, well, I wonder how much we disagree. I mean, these are totally valid issues. And of course, expertise goes wrong in all sorts of ways. It's totally fallible. I suppose I would just say, what is the alternative? What do we just say all information is equal? Because I, you know, as a voter, I've got to decide who to vote for and that, you know, I've got to evaluate and I can't look into all of the economics and all of the relevant science and.

Don knuth
"knuth" Discussed on Lex Fridman Podcast

Lex Fridman Podcast

04:27 min | 5 months ago

"knuth" Discussed on Lex Fridman Podcast

"Showing that he didn't really deeply explore all the huge amount of circumstantial evidence that out there. The battles that are going on out there. There's a lot of people really tensely discussing this. And being showing humility in the face of that battle of ideas, I think is really important. And I've just been very disappointed in so called expertise in the space of science, in showing humility in showing humanity and kindness and empathy towards other human beings. At the same time, obviously I love your dreams of sushi, lifelong pursuit of getting in computer science, Don knuth, like some of my biggest heroes are people that when nobody else cares. They stay on one topic for their whole life and they just find the beautiful little things about their puzzles they keep solving. And yes, sometimes a virus happens or something happens with that person with their puzzles becomes like the center of the whole world because that puzzles becomes all of a sudden really important. But still the responsibilities on them to show humility and to be open minded to the fact that they, even if they spent their whole life doing it, even if their whole community is telling them awards and giving them citations and giving them all kinds of stuff where they're bowing down before them, how smart they are, they still know nothing relative to all the stuff the mysteries that are out there. Yeah, well, I wonder how much we disagree. I mean, these are totally valid issues. And of course, expertise goes wrong in all sorts of ways. It's totally fallible. I suppose I would just say, what is the alternative? What do we just say all information is equal? Because I, you know, as a voter, I've got to decide who to vote for and that, you know, I've got to evaluate and I can't look into all of the economics and all of the relevant science and.

Don knuth
"knuth" Discussed on The Apprenticeship Way with Marc Alan Schelske

The Apprenticeship Way with Marc Alan Schelske

06:28 min | 9 months ago

"knuth" Discussed on The Apprenticeship Way with Marc Alan Schelske

"Through some of those and talk about what that looks like. Yeah sure and i i suppose. In many ways it was a grand prix. A grand effort to avoid using the. Don't throw the baby with the bathwater. That's so old boring. Now that i'm like there's other ways to see this and people are so complex that we need different metaphors and where the shoe fits wear it and where it doesn't don't but even in my case there is a difference between my theological deconstruction which was quite joyful and liberating yes my personal deconstruction in terms of of a meltdown that actually had faith repercussions that like in the midst of trauma. Do i even trust. God is good solid. Still feel theological question. But it's different than my other journey so one was a dramatic meltdown. And the other. Was this kind of cool. Awakening right so again a rushing into metaphors but let me go from renovation which is restoring and revamping existing structures two completely different one in the world of addictions. We have detox which may be one or two weeks long. Then we have rehabilitation which could be months to years long and then we have recovery and that is on the restoration of health As we break free of our attachments harmful habits addictive behaviors and then look at the pain beneath them and bring healing to the things that drove the addictions in the first place. So if i think in terms of of faith than. I'm like you know what i understand when people need to leave church for while for example or stop reading their bible for a while or even not pray for well. I think of that is detox k. Because the and. I had to do this with my prayer life where i had concluded that. My prayers had been reduced to me trying to control circumstances and other people's joy sorrow and choices. I telling god what to do. And when he didn't do it. I was angry at him for disobeying me. It was really bad. Yeah that's upside down place for sure. Oh my goodness so. I saw that thankfully with a spiritual director who cared for me and what what we did was ide- talks from prayer. Because i was so attached to that form and then we reintroduced it slowly as the jesus prayer lord jesus christ son of god have mercy on me. And after about six months of that then i- i- reintroduced the lord's prayer. Because at least jesus gave it to us and it felt very bold and scary. But he's like but you told me when you pray pray this and began. I went into that and over time. My prayer life was rehabilitated. After that period of talks. And now i believe i live in recovery where my prayer life itself is not toxic to me or to others. I i liked that metaphor because it's personal to one's body and i think Then you can apply it both to your own soul as you do your body but also to the body of your faith communities. Isn't it a terrible thing when we feel the need to flee from phase community because it's so toxic that it's killing us and i don't want them to just feel guilted into rushing into another one i get it right now a break but i hope you don't live in the t- detox unit for the rest of your life. It's not it's not healthy either. So that that metaphor right now. What is intriguing to me is by talking about those sort of phases that come from substance abuse recovery. You're actually identifying that there's a different medicine for different needs at at the time right. That detox is. Let's stop the damage. But then the next steps are now talking about learning knuth learning a new way of living and getting to the place where you have a flourishing life. You know that that it had. That's not constantly fighting against what was toxic before those are different kinda phases of the process. And where the deconstruction metaphor is taking apart. And so you've done that now. What to what end you know recovery as a metaphor saying we're going toward a sustainable flourishing healthy life. Yeah there are those who think okay. I've left. I left the faith now and that's forever and that's probably the healthiest thing for me. And then they talk about their. You know when. I deconstructed constructed. And i'm like you have no idea how evangelical you still sound. Construction is just a new word you use for conversion. And then they have testimony of their conversion and then they like treat others as less than for not having their conversion. And you know i see this all the time and my goodness you're still individual. Yeah but actually changed that much. This is just conversion at a second conversion and okay so be it. So i mean maybe you need that. I think i needed but but just like to be a little bit aware then again how. The power dynamics of our old evangelical is that we thought were was so talks. Eq that we may bring that in now with kind of toxic positively about our great deconstruction experience. And isn't it for you and the others going hang on. my experience was deeply traumatic. Yeah and your positively about this does not recognize my trauma and and then they feel silenced and belittled and like they feel like i didn't have good enough testimony right rank right exactly exactly right. Well the trap right. I grew up in a very head oriented fundamentalist faith community and the the main thing. The most important thing was to be right. That i mean having the right doctrine that was what allowed you to enter the church. That was what you were measured on for. Baptism people that were backslid and where people who had backslid from the truth right wasn't even backslid from jesus. It was backslid from the truth. You know and so knowing the right thing was the gold standard. Well folks from that kind of community. Who deconstruct oftentimes they think. End up in a place where it's still about knowing the right thing. The thing that matters that establishes your identity as being. Okay is that you're right. It's just that you've changed the standard.

knuth jesus
"knuth" Discussed on Lex Fridman Podcast

Lex Fridman Podcast

03:51 min | 10 months ago

"knuth" Discussed on Lex Fridman Podcast

"Everybody else has to but but they didn't. They said anybody who can write who can translate for trying to get into the into. The language of their machines is allowed to make for players to on the other hand in the topography industry. I had seen a lot of languages that were developed for composing pages and each manufacturer had his own language for composing pages and that was holding everything back because people were tied to a particular manufacturer and then a new equipment is abandoned. You later but pretty pretty machines. They have to expect to amortize the cost over twenty thirty years. What that. I didn't need income. I already i already had a good job at and My books were people. Were buying enough books. That i that that it would bring me of supplemental income for everything. My kids needed for education. Whatever so there was no reason for me to try to maximize income. Any further income is sort of a threshold function. If you don't have if you don't have enough you you're starving but if if you get over the threshold and you start thinking about philanthropy or else you're trying to take it with you but But there's a i. My income was over the threshold. So i i didn't need to keep it is specifically could see the advantage of of making it open for everybody. You think Most software should be open. So i think that People should charge for non trivial software. But not for trivial. A you give an example. I think adobe photoshop versus on lenox as photoshop has value so it's definitely worth paying paying for the. I mean. I mean will. They keep adding adding stuff. That's doug my wife. And i don't care about but somebody but i mean but they have built in fantastic undo feature for example for shop. Where were you you can go through a sequence of thousand complicated steps on graphics. It could take you back anywhere in that sequence as long with really beautiful elevated. i mean it's it's that's interesting. I didn't think about what algorithm it must be some kind of efficient representation really. Yeah no i mean. There's there's a lot of really subtle nobel prize class creation of intellectual property in in inner and and with patents a limited time to eventually derided of patents that you publish so that it's not secret. Not a trade secret that said you. You've said that. I currently use a bond to lennox on a standalone laptop. It has no internet connection. I carry flash memory drives between the machine and the max day used for network surfing graphics but i trust my family. Jewels only to lennox..

adobe doug lennox
"knuth" Discussed on Artificial Intelligence (AI Podcast) with Lex Fridman

Artificial Intelligence (AI Podcast) with Lex Fridman

05:13 min | 10 months ago

"knuth" Discussed on Artificial Intelligence (AI Podcast) with Lex Fridman

"A pattern. Zach godley but it's not. I could have just as well drawing straws or something. This was a concept invented by editing rainy and they called evolution of random graphs. And if you stood up with with a large number end and you and you repeat this process all of a sudden a big bang happens one half in. It'll be two boys together. Then maybe we'll have have have three on the vendor maybe branch out a little bit but the obvi- separate until we get to one half end and we pass what happened and all of a sudden there's substance to there for the big clump of stuff. That's all join together so it's almost like a phase transition of some kind of it's exactly it's a phase transition but it's a double faced transition in turn it happens. There's actually two things going on at once at this phase transition which is which is very remarkable about okay so so A lot of the most important algorithms are based on random processes and so i want to understand random processes now six there are data structures. That sort of grow this way. Okay so so. So dick kerr. One of the leading experts on on random randomized algorithms has students working looking at this at berkeley and we heard a rumor that the students had found something interesting happening that the students are are generating this similarly this random evolution of of graphs and undertake a stat snapshots a so often take a look at what the graph is and the rumor was that every time they looked there was only one component. That had loops in it. Almost always they do a million experienced at only three or four times. The ever happened to see a loop at at this point know. More than one component with a loop telegraph gets completely full of totally empty and gets more and more worn more ages..

Zach godley dick kerr berkeley
"knuth" Discussed on Lex Fridman Podcast

Lex Fridman Podcast

03:39 min | 10 months ago

"knuth" Discussed on Lex Fridman Podcast

"Now this here we just say we have an points that are totally unconnected and and there are no geometry involved. there no saint some points a further apart than others. All points are exactly are exactly alike. And let's say we have a hundred points and we number them from zero zero two nine nine right now. Let's let's take pie. Digits of pi. So two at a time so we had thirty one forty one fifty nine twenty six. We can look go. Go through pie and silhouette secto we take the first two thirty one forty one and let's put a connection between point thirty one point forty one. That's an edge in the graph. So then we take five nine two six make another edge at the graph gets bigger gets more and more connected as we add these things what time we started out with end points and we add Edges okay each edge. It's completely forgot about edges. We had before we might get an edge twice go. We might get an edge from point to itself but maybe pie is gonna a run afford digits in their cat but anyway revolving a graph at random And a magical thing happens when the number of edges is point four nine and maybe a million and i have a you know four ninety thousand edges then almost all the time it it consists of isolated trees not even any loops life very small number of edges so far listed half an and but if i had point five one hitch so little more than half it. So you know million points five hundred ten thousand edges now. It probably has a one compliment. That's much bigger than the others. We call it. The giant component kicking So can you clarify so. Is there a name for this. Kinda random supercooled cool pie. random graph. Well i ca. I call it the pie. Graph annoying the pie. Graph is actually my pie. Graph is based on on byner representation of pine at the decimal representation of but but but but anyway. Let's suppose. I was rolling dice instead. So so it doesn't it doesn't have to be pi. Any source of the point is every step. Choose totally at random. One of those endpoints choose totally at random. Another one an points mic edge. That's process so there's there's nothing magical about pie. You'll see patrick Sort of saying pie sort of random that nobody knows a pattern zach godley..

patrick zach godley
"knuth" Discussed on Artificial Intelligence (AI Podcast) with Lex Fridman

Artificial Intelligence (AI Podcast) with Lex Fridman

02:44 min | 10 months ago

"knuth" Discussed on Artificial Intelligence (AI Podcast) with Lex Fridman

"The fact that it can do it at all means that there has to be a fast way from so i thought this was a pretty cool theorem and so i tried it out on it on a problem where i knew a stack automaton could do it but i couldn't figure out a way to do it on a regular computer. I thought it was a pretty good programmer. But but by golly i couldn't think of any way to to recognize this language efficiently so i went through. Steve cooks construction. I feel my blackboard with all the everything has stucco. tuck tomasson. Did i wrote down. And i tried to see patterns that and and how did he convert that into a computer program on a regular machine and finally i cite it out. What was what was the thing. I was missing. So that i could say oh. Yeah this is what i should do in my program and now have you should program and and so i would never have thought about who that if i hadn't had his theorem which was purely abstracting actually used to try to intuit how to use the stack automaton for the string matching Yeah so so. The the problem. I i had started with was not the string matching but then i realized that the string matching problem was another thing. Which would also be could be done stack automaton at and so when when i looked at what that told me then i had a nice algorithm for this string matching problem and it told me not exactly what i should remember as as going through the strength and it worked it out and i wrote this little paper called. Automata theory can be useful and the reason was that it was i. I mean i had been reading all kinds of papers about automata theory but it never taught it never improved my programming for everyday problems it was something not published in journals and and and yell it was it was interesting stuff but it was a case where i couldn't figure out how to write the program. I had a theory promo thomas theory. Then i knew how to write the program so this was a book for me change in life. I started to say. Maybe i should learn more comedy and and i i showed this note to bond pratt. And he said he that's simpson or something..

Steve cooks tuck tomasson bond pratt simpson
"knuth" Discussed on Artificial Intelligence (AI Podcast) with Lex Fridman

Artificial Intelligence (AI Podcast) with Lex Fridman

02:26 min | 10 months ago

"knuth" Discussed on Artificial Intelligence (AI Podcast) with Lex Fridman

"That computer science is largely driven by a people who have brains who work who are good at resonating with certain kind of of of concepts and like quantum computers takes a different kind of brain. Ls interesting. yeah it's it's well. Quantum computers is almost like at the intersection in terms of brain Between computer science and physics these they involve both at least at this time But is like the physicists op known. They have incredibly powerful intuition. And thirdly i mean statistical mckay i studied statistical mechanics and and i mean random process is a are related to algorithms and a lot of a lot of ways but there's lots of different places of flavors of physics are different players of mathematics as well But but the thing is i. i don't see well. Actually when they talked to physicist use completely different language in new when they're talking to the writing expository paper so i didn't understand quantum mechanics at all from reading about it and scientific american but but when i read you know how they described it to each other talking about i values and various mathematical terms. That made sense than it made sense to me. But hawking said that every formula you put it in a book. You lose half of your readers until i didn't put any formulas in the book so i couldn't understand his book at all. You can say you understood it but it really really did also spoke in this way so feinman prided himself really strong intuition but at the same time he was hiding all the really good the deep commutation he was doing so so there was one thing that that i was never able to. I wish i had more time to work with. But i guess i could describe it for you. There's there's something that got my name attached to. Its call arrow notation notation for very large numbers..

mckay feinman hawking
"knuth" Discussed on Artificial Intelligence (AI Podcast) with Lex Fridman

Artificial Intelligence (AI Podcast) with Lex Fridman

05:42 min | 10 months ago

"knuth" Discussed on Artificial Intelligence (AI Podcast) with Lex Fridman

"It's a joke down but Two different people will have to learn how to compromise. And i work together and and you're gonna have ups and downs and and crises and so on and so as long as you don't set your expectation on having twenty four hours of bliss then there's a lot of hope for stability but if if if you decide that it's that that there's to be no frustration of the see. You're going to have to compromise your notions of beauty when you write christmas cards. That's the You You mentioned average your firemen with someone. You looked up to yep Probably madame caltech. Well we knew each other. Yeah at caltech You are one of the seminal personalities of computer science cs one for physics have you have. Is there specific things you picked up from him by wave inspiration or So we used to go to each other's lectures. And but but if i saw him sitting in the front row with throw me for a loop actually Missed a few few sentences. What unique story do i have. I mean i. I often referred to his his time in brazil where he Essentially said they were teaching all of physics students the wrong way they were just they were just learning how to pass exams not learning any physics and he said all to prove it. You hear altered any page of this textbook. And i'll tell you what's wrong with this page at any. Did so and the text book had been written by his host and and it was big embarrassing incident but kit proves the is was host if if he was supposed to tell the truth but but anyway it minimizes the way Education goes wrong up in all kinds of fields and has to periodically be brought back from from from a process of giving credential to a process of giving knowledge story..

brazil
"knuth" Discussed on Lex Fridman Podcast

Lex Fridman Podcast

02:42 min | 10 months ago

"knuth" Discussed on Lex Fridman Podcast

"We understand quite so you mean. People people have written thesis about how you can newton holiday binding Will improve the main you out just in time manufacturing or whatever you can you can defer decision instead of doing advanced planning and say i'm going to allocate thirty percent to this fifty chris sale and all kinds of domains. There's an optimally to laziness. Internet cases decision is not made in advance. So instead you you design in order to be flexible to change with the with the way the wind is blowing but so the reason that line resonated with a lot of people is because There's something about the programmers. Mind that wants that enjoys optimization. Those the constant struggle to balance laziness and lay binding with the desire to optimize to the elegance of a well optimized code is something that's compelling to programming. Yeah it's another concept of beauty the mesko weird question so roger penrose has talked about computation. Computers and He proposed that the way the human mind discovers mathematical ideas is something more than a computer that that a universal turing machine cannot Do everything the human mind can do. Now this includes discovering mathematical ideas also includes. he's written a book body consciousness. So i don't know if you know roger but my My daughter's kids played with his kids in nice. So do you think there is such a limit to the computer do you think. Consciousness is more than a computation. Do you think the human mind. The way thinks is more than a computation. I i can say yes or no. But but but i have no reason i mean so. You don't find it useful to an intuition in one way or the other like when you think about algorithms is ananta limits unanswerable. Question in my opinion is his no better than anybody else. You think kasan answerable so you. Don't think eventually simon angels condense on the head of i mean i don't angels anyway. They're there lots of things that are beyond that that we can speculate about..

roger penrose chris ananta roger kasan simon angels
"knuth" Discussed on Artificial Intelligence (AI Podcast) with Lex Fridman

Artificial Intelligence (AI Podcast) with Lex Fridman

03:53 min | 10 months ago

"knuth" Discussed on Artificial Intelligence (AI Podcast) with Lex Fridman

"Don't know what what whether the computer is actually going to be executed that code very much so so people had had a very poor understanding of a what the computer was. Actually i. i made one test were We studied a fortran compiler and it was spending more than eighty percent of its time reading the comments car but as a programmer we were really concerned about how fast it could take complicated expression that had lots of levels of parenthesis and and convert that into something but that was just you know less than one percent of a if we optimized that. We didn't know what you're doing. But but if we knew that it was spending eighty percent of his time on the comments group card in ten minutes we could make the compiler run more than twice as fast. He can only do that once. You've completed the program in study. Where had some kind of profiling that the new. What was important. Yeah so you you don't think. The supplies generally semi. There's something that rings drew across all land that had applied generally but it was. It was only my good look. I said it but he you know. But but i did. But i said it limited context not and i'm glad if it makes people think about stuff because i i know but it applies in another sense to that is Sometimes i will do optimization and in a way that does help the the actual running time but makes the program impossible to change next week. Might be because. I've changed my data stretcher or something that that made it less adaptable so one of the great principles of computer science. It laziness or whatever you call it Late binding don't hold off decisions when you can And and and we understand how was quantitatively valuable that is what what do you mean. We understand. Quite so you mean. People are people have written thesis about how you can newton holiday binding Will improve the main you out just in time manufacturing or whatever you can you can defer decision instead of doing advanced planning and say i'm going to allocate thirty percent to this fifty chris sale and all kinds of domains. There's an optimally to laziness. Internet cases decision is not made in advance so instead you design in order to be flexible to change with the with the way the wind is blowing but so the reason that line resonated with a lot of people is because There's something about the programmers. Mind that wants that enjoys optimization. Those the constant struggle to balance laziness and lay binding with the desire to optimize to the elegance of a well optimized code is something that's compelling to programming. Yeah it's another concept of beauty the mesko weird question so roger penrose has talked about computation. Computers and He proposed that the way the human mind discovers mathematical ideas is something more than a computer that that a universal turing machine cannot Do everything the human mind can do..

chris roger penrose
"knuth" Discussed on Artificial Intelligence (AI Podcast) with Lex Fridman

Artificial Intelligence (AI Podcast) with Lex Fridman

04:38 min | 10 months ago

"knuth" Discussed on Artificial Intelligence (AI Podcast) with Lex Fridman

"All these things were added somebody invented them one by one and millions of things that we inherit okay and It inconceivable that so many billions of things wouldn't have problems and and we get it all right and each one would have no negative effects and so so it. It's barry amazing that much works as does work. It's it's it's incredibly amazing and actually that's the source of my optimism as well including for artificial intelligence so we we drive over bridges we We use all kinds of technology. We don't know how it works. And there's millions of brilliant people involved in building small part of that and it doesn't go wrong and it works then me it works. It doesn't go go wrong. Gruff enough work and we can identify things that aren't working and try to improve them in a saab often sub optimal way. Oh absolutely but but the the kinds of things that i know how to improve require human beings to be rational and i'm losing my confidence. That human beings are rational. Yeah yeah not here. You go again with the worst case Worst case analysis. They may not be rational but they're They're they're clever and A beautiful in their own kind of way. I tend to think that most people Have the desire the capacity to be good to each other and love Out like if they're given the opportunity that's where they lean in the art of computer programming. You wrote the real problem is that programmers have spent far too much time worrying about efficiency in the wrong places and at the wrong times premature optimization is the root of all evil in parentheses or at least most of it in programming. Can you explain idea What's the wrong time. What is the wrong place. For optimization. So first of all the word optimization i started out writing software and optimization was i was a compiler writer so optimization meant making the making a better translation so that would run faster on a on a machine and so an optimized program just like you know you you program a new set optimization level for the compiler so that's one word for optimization And at that time. I i happen to be looking at an unabridged dictionary For some reason. Or other. And i came to optimize is what's the meaning of the word optimizing. It says to view with optimism. And you look in webster's dictionary language in one thousand nine hundred nineteen sixties. That's what optimize me man. Okay now so people started doing cost optimization other kinds of things a whole sub fields of of algorithms economics and whatever are are based on what they call optimization button to me optimization when i was saying that was saying changing the program to make more tuned to the machine and i found out that when a person writes a program here she tends to think that the parts that were hardest to write are gonna be hardest for the computer to execute six six so maybe ten pages of color but i had to work a week writing this page. I am mentally. Think that when the -puter gets to that page is going to slow down right up. Chris oh i don't understand what i do. I bet gabby Anyway this of course silly but it's it it's something that we that we that we don't know we read a piece of co..

barry webster Chris
"knuth" Discussed on Lex Fridman Podcast

Lex Fridman Podcast

04:40 min | 10 months ago

"knuth" Discussed on Lex Fridman Podcast

"So will you do. Is you start writing code and it completes the code for you so for example you start this go to your factoring program. You start you right in javascript and python in any language that trained on You start You right the first line and some comments like what this code does an generate function for you and it doesn't incredibly good job like it's not proably right but often doesn't really good job of completing code for you. Actually whether but how do you know whether it did a good job or not. You could see a lot of examples where he did a good job and so it. It's not a thing that generally starts it gives you So it puts the human in the seat of fixing issues versus writing from scratch defined that kind of idea at all interesting every year. We're going to be losing more and more control over what machines are doing and and people are saying. Well it's cheap. Like when i was at caltech a in this in the sixty s we had this. This guy who who talked a good game he can give inspiring lectures and you'd think while thinks he was talking about an hour later you well. What did he say But but but he really felt that it didn't matter whether computers got the right azar whether it made you happy or not in other words you know if if your boss paid for Okay job you could. You could take care of your white. Happiness is more important than truth. Exactly he didn't believe in truth. He was a philosopher. I like it and somehow you see we're going that way. I mean we're so many more things are are taken over by saying well. This seems to her. And so when there's when there is a competing interest of neither side understands whether decision is being made it you know we. We realize now that it's as bad but consider what happens piped private your online. What when things get even more further detached and each thing is based on something from the previous year. Yeah you start to lose the more you automated it the more you start to lose track of some exponentially exponentially but so that's the dark side. The positive side is the more you automate the more you let humans do what humans do best. So maybe programming this you know. Maybe humans should focus on a small part of programming that requires that genius. The magic of the human mind and the mess. You let the machine generate there. That's the that's the positive but of course it does come with the darkness like automation with what's better. I'm never going to try to write a book about that. I'm never going to recommend to any my students to work for them. So you're on. The side of honor on happens understanding understanding. And i think these things are really marvelous if they if if what they do is you know. Send we have better medical diagnosis or guide. Some scientific experiment or something like this You know curing diseases are whatever but when it went when it affects people's lives in a serious way Joint for writing if you're heading coalbed. Oh yeah this is great. This will make a slaughter hunker. So i see so you have to be very careful like right now. It seems like funding games. It's useful to ride a little jealous script program that helps you with a website but like you said one year passes two years past as five years and you forget you start building on top of it and then all of a sudden you have autonomous weapons systems based on a little world did doesn't matter and that's well in the end the this whole thing ends anyway so But it it pays. There is a heat..

"knuth" Discussed on Lex Fridman Podcast

Lex Fridman Podcast

04:42 min | 10 months ago

"knuth" Discussed on Lex Fridman Podcast

"A and what what would be the defining characteristic of the style. Well mico now. Is it literate programming. So i'm it's combination of english and see mostly but but but if you just looked at the c. part of it you would also probably notice that i don't you know that i use a lot of global. Burials that other people don't expect things in line more than into calling Different subset of see us. Okay but this that's a little bit stylistic but what would literate programming you alternate between english and and see whatever and And by the way people listening to this should look literate programming. It's very interesting. concept that you The proposed and developed over the years. I that's the most significant things. I think to come out of the tech project is it is that i i. I realized that I programs to be read by people and not just by computers and and typography could massively enhanced that and and so i mean. They're just wonder if they're gonna look it up that they should also look up this pope by called physically based rendering by matt far. And gosh who anyway. It got an academy award. But it's but but all the on the graphic effects you see in movies are complex algorithms in this book is the whole book is literate program. It tells you not only how you do all the shading in and bring images that you need for an animation and textures and so on but it also you can run the code and and so I find.

matt
"knuth" Discussed on Artificial Intelligence (AI Podcast) with Lex Fridman

Artificial Intelligence (AI Podcast) with Lex Fridman

02:23 min | 10 months ago

"knuth" Discussed on Artificial Intelligence (AI Podcast) with Lex Fridman

"Computer. Science to machine learning but But anyway it. It was my first experience with machine learning. Okay so here. We had hot. is the program. Well first of all. What is the problem. You're solving what tic-tac-toe. what are we talking about. And then Ryan what House designed right. So you've got you've got a three by three grid and each each each each could be in three states. It can be empty. Eric have excellent all right. So three to the ninth is a what is how big is it. I should know But it's eighty eighty one times eighty one times three so Anyway eight to to the third so that would be that would be to the sixth and but that'd be sixty four hundred anyway during the calculation with it anyway. The three comes from the fact that it's either empty an ex arnav and the stick fifty. What was it was a machine. Had only two thousand ten digit words go from zero zero zero zero two one nine nine nine and that's it and and each word you have attended a number so that's not many bits. I mean i gotta have through type in order to have a memory of every position. I've seen i need three to the ninth bit's okay but it was a decimal machine to it. Didn't have bits but did have it it. It did have strange instruction If you had attended at number that but all the digits were either eight or nine eight nine eight something night that would You could make a test whether it was eight or nine. That was one of the strange things ibm engineers put into the machine. I have no idea what Hardly ever used. But anyway. I needed one digit for every Every position i'd seen zero. It was a bad position was good position. I i.

"knuth" Discussed on Lex Fridman Podcast

Lex Fridman Podcast

02:21 min | 10 months ago

"knuth" Discussed on Lex Fridman Podcast

"But But anyway it. It was my first experience with machine learning. Okay so here. We had hot. is the program. Well first of all. What is the problem. You're solving what tic-tac-toe. what are we talking about. And then Ryan what House designed right. So you've got you've got a three by three grid and each each each each could be in three states. It can be empty. Eric have excellent all right. So three to the ninth is a what is how big is it. I should know But it's eighty eighty one times eighty one times three so Anyway eight to to the third so that would be that would be to the sixth and but that'd be sixty four hundred anyway during the calculation with it anyway. The three comes from the fact that it's either empty an ex arnav and the stick fifty. What was it was a machine had only Two thousand ten digit words go from zero zero zero zero two one nine nine nine and that's it and and each word you have attended a number so that's not many bits. I mean i gotta have through type in order to have a memory of every position. I've seen i need three to the ninth bit's okay but it was a decimal machine to it. Didn't have bits but did have it it. It did have strange instruction If you had attended at number that but all the digits were either eight or nine eight nine eight something night that would You could make a test whether it was eight or nine. That was one of the strange things. Ibm engineers put into the machine. I have no idea what Hardly ever used. But anyway. I needed one digit for every Every position i'd seen zero. It was a bad position was good position. I i.

"knuth" Discussed on The Modern Spiritual Life Coaching Podcast

The Modern Spiritual Life Coaching Podcast

02:29 min | 2 years ago

"knuth" Discussed on The Modern Spiritual Life Coaching Podcast

"Now hot enough. We'll be focusing on diet service particularly for this episode, but it wouldn't be research if we didn't start at the source, so let's briefly skim over the history of carbonated beverages. The first batch of artificially produced carbonated liquids was manufacturer in the late seventeen hundreds, but hot, Dang, the Greeks were already curious about it. Two thousand years before that after noticing what they thought were medicinal benefits from naturally carbonated water springs. The Greeks clever as they were couldn't reproduce the phenomenon at the time, and who knows why I guess they were too busy, revolutionizing the realm of art and science. So a couple of millennia later in seventeen, sixty seven, English, separatist, the natural philosopher and Joseph Priestley sit deadly invented it. A little foreshadowing. This won't be the last time someone accidentally invent something in this video national, considering not just the spring water mentioned before, but the many fermented alcoholic drinks across history, the priestly constructed a lab environment capable of bringing carbonation water with fermenting a bunch of produce a barrel. People were pretty excited about this. In fact in seventeen, seventy, five, a Scottish physician named John Knuth like it so much. He said Hey. I love this machine you've built really could love the fizzy water. Do not like the urine taste though I might try to get the pig bladder out of the blueprints. Blueprints, so he made a better version because nothing says improvement like we made it taste less liked p. and sent word, a priestly about his findings priestly wasn't thrilled. Taking personal offence to his original design. I don't have a direct tap on how he responded, but it was sort of like. This doesn't taste like urine. Your tastes like urine I bet your servants urinated in my servants. Don't that okay I'm paraphrasing, but that last bit was true accusation naturally, it didn't take too long for the dust to settle for priestly to admit that knuth had in fact improved upon his original design. And wouldn't you know what the world thought so too? So it became wildly popular as time went on, folks started improving on that design, even further getting creative with ingredients, sometimes a little too created with ingredients. Or getting a little too close to losing side of the story, there will be some links to a few videos below if you want more on this part of sodas history, but for now let's talk a bit..

John Knuth Joseph Priestley Dang