35 Burst results for "Kleiner"

"kleiner" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

06:18 min | Last month

"kleiner" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"I'm Ed Baxter. And I'm to these Pellegrini. Welcome to Bloomberg wealth with David Rubin's time. Part of our best of Bloomberg series. In this episode, we hear from John dor chairman at kleiner Perkins. Endure Ed is a very well known venture capitalist. Also author of speed and scale. And a niche we had a chance to hear from Dora about his nose for moneymakers. Especially at when it comes to the tech industry. And here's David Rubenstein withdraw Let's listen in. You're one of the most famous venture capitalists in the world, in part because you had a lot of deals that were spectacular. Two of the most spectacular were Google and Amazon. So when you saw the guys who created Google and you saw Jeff Bezos, do you say these are going to create these guys are going to create world class companies or do you say maybe they'll get my money back? What did you think in the first time you met them? So I met Jeff when he was 30 years old and he and I were both computer science kinds of geeks and Amazon had a business plan. It was growing to be the world's best bookseller online. And so I invested, I think it was $8 million for 15% of Amazon and Jeff and I set out to build an amazing world class team and he had a vision which is true to this day that if he had the broadest selection with the most affordable prices in the best customer experience, that flywheel he could get to grow by obsessing on the customer. And yes, I believed he was successful. No, I had no idea that it would be worth $1.2 trillion today. But the same thing happened a few years later when I met two 21 year old Stanford University, PhD dropouts, Larry Page and Sergey Brin. And in that case, I invested $11 million for 11% of the company, which was very controversial. They had no business plan, no revenues. And I asked Larry Page, he sat across the table from me. I said, Larry, how big do you think this can be? Without betting an eyelash, she said, 10 billion. And I said, surely, you mean market cap, right? He said, no, I'm talking revenues. He said to me, John, you have no idea how much we're going to be able to improve search and how important search is for finding all the world's information and services. Let's talk about your background for a moment before we get into the climate issues. On your background, where are you from originally? I'm born and raised in St. Louis, Missouri. What are your father do? My father was an engineer and entrepreneur. He was a great great dad, and he was my hero. So you went off to school at rice, how did you happen to go to rice? Well, I knew I wanted to go to a great engineering school and Caltech and MIT were too far away from St. Louis. But I could drive to rice and I fell in love with the place. So after you graduated, then what did you decide to do? Well, I knew I wanted to start a company with friends. So I decided that I'd tried to learn something about business. I got an MBA degree from Harvard, took a lot of courses in my spare time at MIT, which was great. And fortunately, landed a summer job between my first and second year at a new small chip company by the name of Intel. In that brought me to Silicon Valley, the valley of the hearts delight, these orchards and to Stanford and where I've lived and worked ever since. So you worked for Intel for a while and a leader when you were there, as I understand it was Andy grove. And Andy grove, when you said to him, I'm going to go work at a venture firm that he said that's a great thing to do. No, he said, and he had this way of reaching inside your chest, pulling out your heart and holding it in front of you. And he said, John doerr, don't you really want to be a general manager in a technology company? And I said, well, sure. And he said, well, why don't you come run Intel's add this nonexistent software business. And I said, no, I don't think that's right. I think what I'm going to do is join kleiner Perkins and work on venture capital. And he said, venture capital, that's a real estate business. That's not a real business. So you joined kleiner Perkins. It was then a relatively smaller firm than it is today, I assume. Sure, there were four partners. Eugene kleiner, Tom Perkins. Frank caufield and Burke byers. And it managed some modest amount of money then. Perhaps a $100 million. So did you ever think that the world of venture capital would become the explosive world of technology that has now become at that time? No, I didn't, but I didn't think much about that because what I really wanted was for kleiner Perkins to commit to back me when I found a company that I would start with friends. And they made that commitment because they'd done that several times before. The business plan for Genentech was written inside kleiner's office. The business plan for hybrid tech monoclonal antibodies inside cleaners office. So Eugene and Tom were atypical venture capitalists. They were really themselves engineers and operators and successful entrepreneurs. In the venture world, you're committing relatively small sums compared to the buyout where per deal. But do you have to get all of your partners to agree or can you just say, I'm going to do this? And I hope you'll support me. So inside kleiner, and it may be different in other firms. You don't have to have everyone agree. And indeed, some of our best investments were very controversial. Google was controversial within the partnership and within the industry. It was a $100 million valuation on a company with no revenues and no business plan. And founders with no business experience. And it turned out to be an epic idea in company. That was John doerr, chairman at kleiner Perkins on Bloomberg wealth with David Rubenstein. And cutting up, we'll hear more from door on why he was an early investor in companies trying to slow climate change. Also about his very ambitious plans for saving the planet. That's right, he has a very detailed plan Ed for

kleiner Ed Baxter David Rubin David Rubenstein John dor Amazon Bloomberg Larry Page Pellegrini Jeff Andy grove kleiner Perkins Jeff Bezos Google Intel
"kleiner" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:54 min | Last month

"kleiner" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"I'm Julie Ryan. I'm Ed Baxter. And I'm to these Pellegrini. And you're listening to Bloomberg wealth with David Rubenstein, part of our best of Bloomberg series. And in this episode, we're hearing from John doerr, chairman and kleiner Perkins about venture investing. Also, some insight about what happens once kleiner Perkins invests in your business. Adherence David Rubenstein withdrew on that, let's listen in. When I make a mistake, I only think about it for the next ten or 20 years. How long does it take for you to get over these things? Well, I don't obsess on these, but I won't ever forget. And today, when you read a back somebody, do you monitor them carefully? Do you help them? You open doors for them. What do you actually do other than give them money? It depends what they need. What will help the most? Usually it's recruiting and growing the team. We're in a worldwide rate race to get the most talented people to believe in and pursue the vision. I like to say David ideas are easy, execution is everything. So what do you do to tell them that they can do a better job on climate if it's not their main focus? Let's suppose it's a computer company or a smartphone company of some type. Do you try to get them to focus on climate change as much or not they're concerned as much? No, I try to embrace their plan. Their agenda. And they're coming to us saying what they want to do about climate because they know to retract the talented workers that they're competing for and to retain them. They need to be more than mercenaries. They must be missionaries. So if somebody is looking at you now and says, all right, you're one of the most successful venture investments in the world. What would you say to young people that the qualities it takes to be a great venture investor, you have to have a lot of courage, you have to be willing to do things that other people say, shouldn't be done. What is it that makes a great venture investor? Well, there's different formulas for different people. My good fortune was to have a technical background. To listen very carefully to learn to be inquisitive and to be service oriented. I think venture capital is not a scalable business. I think it's a service industry. And in most service industries, the winners, the mackenzies of the world, are a lot like the CEOs that they serve. They dress like them, they talk like them. And so I think it's important for successful venture investors to be entrepreneurs to have a real connection with the challenges that teams are facing when they're trying to build businesses. That was John doerr, chairman and kleiner Perkins on Bloomberg wealth with David Rubenstein, part of our best of Bloomberg series. All right, let's stick with the

David Rubenstein Julie Ryan Ed Baxter kleiner Perkins John doerr Pellegrini Bloomberg David Bloomberg wealth
"kleiner" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

05:00 min | Last month

"kleiner" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"David Rubenstein with door on all of this. Let's listen in. Your goal is a venture investor was to get good returns and produce good companies and they create jobs. But now you are in the mode to some extent of trying to change the world in a way you think is better. Do you find different kind of person as a result of this? And you find that people like you more because of this or are they like your less because of this? I don't know if they like me or not. But at the start of the Internet revolution I went around and kicked up a lot of controversy declaring that the Internet had been under hyped. I say the same thing today about the climate revolution. I think the move to a new clean energy economy is not some kind of green kumbaya. It's a revolution. There's going to be real winners, real losers. It's imperative that we do this. And as Larry Fink said, there will be a thousand private unicorns. Companies worth a $1 billion working in climate. I think what we're seeing here at Stanford is that climate science is going to become the new computer science. It's where all the young people want to work. For all the right reasons. So take us back to what it's like to be a venture capitalist for a moment. I suppose I'm a Stanford graduate or most likely a Stanford dropout because that seems to be better. I dropped out of Harvard. I dropped out of Stanford and I have a business plan and I want to do something on the Internet or something in climate change and I send an email to John doerr saying I have a good idea. Can I get a meeting with you? How many of these proposals do you get a week? And how do you sift through the ones you can actually meet with? So our team at kleiner Perkins gets 3000 proposals a year. We read them all. We take meetings with about one out of ten, 300 of them, and we'll make in an average year 40 or 50 new investments. So if I'm one of the people one out of ten, they get some meeting with kleiner Perkins and John doerr, what's the best way for me to get the money that I want from you to say I have all the answers. I've thought through these things, is that they have a great slideshow presentation. What is it that actually convinces you to give money to somebody? So we did a survey. We looked backward retrospectively at for 20 years at the largest, most successful investments. What distinguished them from the average kleiner company. The average kleiner investment, by the way, returns its capital 45% of the time. So a majority of the time they don't, they fail. But one of the one of the bedeviling things about venture capital is you can make many, many, many times your money on a very successful investment. And you can only lose one times your money. Those 5 factors, David, were the following. Technical excellence, strategic focus on a large existing or new market. Outstanding management, reasonable financings, and finally a sense of urgency. Those were the 5 distinguishing outstanding factors. And no new venture possesses all those. And so telling your story about how your technology is excellent and you're going to transform this market and being open to help in filling out some of these other needs is what will get us over the finish line. So do you ever have regrets I have regrets on deals that I missed and passed on? I passed on Facebook when Mark was in Harvard. I've didn't think Jeff Bezos were going to make it. I told him that when I first met him, do you ever have regrets on deals you didn't do? Oh, all the time. And it feels I should have found that I didn't even see. When I first came to Silicon Valley, I hung out at Stanford on the second floor of Margaret Jack Saul, and down that hall was Andy beckle scheim who founded sun microsystems. John Hennessy, who became president of Stanford, founded mips Jim Clark of silicon graphics. What I didn't do is go down into the basement. In sandy, we're starting Cisco. So that was a miss on my part. More recently, I had the opportunity to invest in an electric vehicle company. And the conventional wisdom was venture capitalists ought not to invest in electric vehicle companies, not new car companies at all. There have been 400 new car companies in the nation's history. Every one of them but one has gone bankrupt. But I was still very attracted to the market. And we had the choice of backing a brilliant card designer by the name of Henrik fisker or ambitious slightly crazy entrepreneur by the name of Elon Musk. Well, we made the wrong decision. But Tesla did very, very well. And so did electric vehicles And that was John doerr, chairman and kleiner Perkins, on Bloomberg wealth with David Rubenstein. And coming up, we'll hear from door on the secret of venture

Stanford David Rubenstein John doerr Larry Fink kleiner Perkins Harvard Margaret Jack Saul Andy beckle John Hennessy Jeff Bezos David Jim Clark Silicon Valley sun microsystems Facebook Mark Henrik fisker
"kleiner" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:54 min | Last month

"kleiner" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Communities. I'm Brian shook. I'm Ed Baxter. And I'm to these Pellegrini. And you're listening to Bloomberg wealth with David Rubenstein, part of our best of Bloomberg series. And in this episode, we're hearing from John doerr, chairman kleiner Perkins, about venture investing. Also, some insight about what happens once kleiner Perkins invests in your business. And here's David Rubenstein withdrew on that let's listen in. When I make a mistake, I only think about it for the next ten or 20 years. How long does it take for you to get over these things? Well, I don't obsess on these, but I won't ever forget. And today, when you agree to back somebody, do you monitor them carefully? Do you help them? You open doors for them. What do you actually do other than give them money? It depends what they need. What will help the most? Usually it's recruiting and growing the team. We're in a worldwide rate race to get the most talented people to believe in and pursue the vision. I like to say, David, ideas are easy, execution is everything. So what do you do to tell them that they can do a better job on climate if it's not their main focus? Let's suppose it's a computer company or a smartphone company of some type. Do you try to get them to focus on climate change as much or not they're concerned as much? No, I try to embrace their plan, their agenda. And they're coming to us saying what they want to do about climate because they know to attract the talented workers that they're competing for and to retain them. They need to be more than mercenaries. They must be missionaries. So if somebody is looking at you now and says, all right, you're one of the most successful venture investments in the world. What would you say to young people that the qualities it takes to be a great venture investor, you have to have a lot of courage, you have to be willing to do things that other people say, shouldn't be done. What is it that makes a great venture investor? Well, there's different formulas for different people. My good fortune was to have a technical background to listen very carefully to learn to be inquisitive and to be service oriented. I think venture capital is not a scalable business. I think it's a service industry. And in most service industries, the winners, the mackenzies of the world, are a lot like the CEOs that they serve. They dress like them, they talk like them. And so I think it's important for successful venture investors to be entrepreneurs to have a real connection with the challenges that teams are facing when they're trying to build businesses. That was John doerr, chairman and kleiner Perkins on Bloomberg wealth with David Rubenstein, part of our best of Bloomberg series. All right, let's stick with the

David Rubenstein kleiner Perkins Brian shook Ed Baxter John doerr Pellegrini Bloomberg David Bloomberg wealth
"kleiner" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

05:34 min | Last month

"kleiner" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"I'm Ed Baxter. And I've do these Pellegrini. You're listening to Bloomberg wealth. With David ribbons time, part of our best of Bloomberg series. In this episode, we're hearing from John doerr, chairman at kleiner Perkins about venture capital investing and being a very early investor in the Internet. And also at what's the best way to convince door and his colleagues to invest in your company or your business plan if you're pitching it to them. Yeah, and also investing in the controversial electric car market. And putting your money into the shift to a carbon neutral economy. So here's David Rubenstein with door on all of this. Let's listen in. Your goal is a venture investor was to get good returns and produce good companies and they create jobs. But now you are in the mode to some extent of trying to change the world in a way you think is better. You find a different kind of person as a result of this and you find that people like you more because of this or they like your less because of this. I don't know if they like me or not. But at the start of the Internet revolution I went around kicked up a lot of controversy declaring that the Internet had been under hyped. I say the same thing today about the climate revolution. I think the move to a new clean energy economy is not some kind of green kumbaya. It's a revolution. There's going to be real winners, real losers. It's imperative that we do this. And as Larry Fink said, there will be a thousand private unicorns. Companies worth a $1 billion working in climate. I think what we're seeing here at Stanford is that climate science is going to become the new computer science. To where all the young people want to work for all the right reasons. So take us back to what it's like to be a venture capital list for a moment. I suppose I'm a Stanford graduate or most likely a Stanford dropout because that seems to be better. I dropped out of Harvard. I dropped out of Stanford and I have a business plan and I want to do something on the Internet or something in climate change. And I send an email to John doerr saying, I have a good idea. Can I get a meeting with you? How many of these proposals do you get a week? And how do you sift through the ones you can actually meet with? So our team at kleiner Bergman's gets 3000 proposals a year. We read them all. We take meetings with about one out of ten, 300 of them, and we'll make in an average year 40 or 50 new investments. So if I'm one of the people one out of ten, they get some meeting with kleiner Perkins and John doerr, what's the best way for me to get the money that I want from Joseph to say I have all the answers. I've thought through these things. Is it to have a great slideshow presentation? What is it that actually convinces you to give money to somebody? So we did a survey. We looked backward retrospectively at for 20 years at the largest, most successful investments. What distinguished them from the average kleiner company. The average kleiner investment, by the way, returns its capital 45% of the time. So a majority of the time they don't, they fail. But one of the one of the bedeviling things about venture capital is you can make many, many, many times your money on a very successful investment. And you can only lose one times your money. Those 5 factors David were the following. Technical excellence, strategic focus on a large existing or new market. Outstanding management, reasonable financings, and finally a sense of urgency. Those were the 5 distinguishing outstanding factors. And no new venture possesses all those. And so telling your story about how your technology is excellent and you're going to transform this market and being open to help in filling out some of these other needs is what will get us over the finish line. So do you ever have regrets I have regrets on deals that I missed and passed on? I passed on Facebook when Mark was in Harvard. I've didn't think Jeff Bezos were going to make it. I told him that when I first met him, do you ever have regrets on deals you didn't do? Oh, all the time. And it deals I should have found that I didn't even see. When I first came to Silicon Valley, I hung out at Stanford on the second floor of Margaret Jack Saul, and down that hall was Andy beckle shein, who founded sun microsystems. John Hennessey, who became president of Stanford, founded mips Jim Clark of silicon graphics. What I didn't do is go down into the basement. In sandy, we're starting Cisco. So that was a miss on my part. More recently, I had the opportunity to invest in an electric vehicle company. And the conventional wisdom was venture capitalists ought not to invest in electric vehicle companies, not new car companies at all. There have been 400 new car companies in the nation's history. Every one of them but one has gone bankrupt. But I was still very attracted to the market and we had the choice of backing a brilliant card designer by the name of Henrik fisker, or ambitious, slightly crazy entrepreneur by the name of Elon Musk, well, we made the wrong decision. But Tesla did very, very well. And so did electric vehicles. And that was John doerr, chairman and kleiner Perkins, on Bloomberg wealth with David Rubenstein. And coming up, we'll hear from door on the secret of venture

John doerr Stanford Ed Baxter David ribbons kleiner Perkins about venture David Rubenstein Larry Fink Pellegrini kleiner Bergman kleiner Perkins Bloomberg Harvard kleiner Margaret Jack Saul Andy beckle shein John Hennessey Joseph Jeff Bezos
"kleiner" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

05:54 min | Last month

"kleiner" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"To these Pellegrini. Welcome to Bloomberg wealth with David Rubenstein. Part of our best of Bloomberg series. In this episode, we hear from John dor chairman at kleiner Perkins. Endure Ed is a very well known venture capitalist. Also author of speed and scale. And a niche we had a chance to hear from Dora about his nose for moneymakers. Nose for moneymakers, especially at when it comes to the tech industry. And here's David Rubenstein with door. Let's listen in. You're one of the most famous venture capitalists in the world, in part because you had a lot of deals that were spectacular. Two of the most spectacular were Google and Amazon. So when you saw the guys who created Google and you saw Jeff Bezos, do you say these are going to create these guys are going to create world class companies or do you say maybe they'll get my money back? What did you think in the first time you met them? So I met Jeff when he was 30 years old and he and I were both computer science kinds of geeks and Amazon had a business plan. It was growing to be the world's best bookseller online. And so I invested I invested $11 million for 11% of the company, which was very controversial. They had no business plan, no revenues. And I asked Larry Page, he sat across the table from me. I said, Larry, how big do you think this can be? Without banning an eyelash, he said, 10 billion. And I said, surely, you mean market cap, right? He said, no, I'm talking revenues. He said to me, John, you have no idea how much we're going to be able to improve search and how important search is for finding all the world's information and services. Let's talk about your background for a moment before we get into the climate's issues. On your background, where are you from originally? I'm born and raised in St. Louis, Missouri. What are your father do? My father was an engineer and entrepreneur. He was a great great dad and he was my hero. So you went off to school with rice, how did you happen to go to rice? Well, I knew I wanted to go to a great engineering school in Caltech and MIT were too far away from St. Louis. But I could drive to rice and I fell in love with the place. So after you graduated, then what did you decide to do? Well, I knew I wanted to start a company with friends. So I decided that I'd tried to learn something about business. I got an MBA degree from Harvard, took a lot of courses in my spare time at MIT, which was great. And fortunately, landed a summer job between my first and second year at a new small chip company by the name of Intel. And that brought me to Silicon Valley the valley of the hearts to light these orchards and to Stanford and where I've lived and worked ever since. So you worked for Intel for a while and a leader when you were there as I understand it was Andy grove. And Andy grove, when you said to him, I'm going to go work at a venture firm that he say that's a great thing to do. No, he said, and he had this way of reaching inside your chest, pulling out your heart and holding it in front of you. And he said, John doerr, don't you really want to be a general manager in a technology company? And I said, well, sure. And he said, well, why don't you come run Intel's add this nonexistent software business. And I said, no, I don't think that's right. I think what I'm going to do is join kleiner Perkins and work on venture capital. And he said, venture capital, that's a real estate business. That's not a real business. So you joined kleiner Perkins. It was then a relatively smaller firm than it is today, I assume. Sure, there were four partners. Eugene kleiner, Tom Perkins. Frank caulfield and Burke byers. And it managed some modest amount of money then. Perhaps a $100 million. So did you ever think that the world of venture capital would become the explosive world of technology that has now become at that time? No, I didn't, but I didn't think much about that because what I really wanted was for kleiner Perkins to commit to back me when I found a company that I would start with friends. And they made that commitment because they'd done that several times before. The business plan for Genentech was written inside kleiner's office. The business plan for hybrid tech monoclonal antibodies inside kleiner's office. So Eugene and Tom were atypical venture capitalists. They were really themselves engineers and operators and successful entrepreneurs. In the venture world, you're committing relatively small sums compared to the buyout where per deal. But do you have to get all of your partners to agree or can you just say, I'm going to do this? And I hope you'll support me. So inside kleiner, and it may be different in other firms. You don't have to have everyone agree. And indeed, some of our best investments were very controversial. Google was controversial within the partnership and within the industry. It was a $100 million valuation on a company with no revenues and no business plan. And founders with no business experience. And it turned out to be an epic idea and company. That was John doerr, chairman at kleiner Perkins on Bloomberg wealth with David Rubenstein. And coming up, we'll hear more from door on why he was an early investor in companies trying to slow climate change. Also about his very ambitious plans for saving the planet. That's right, he has a very detailed plan

David Rubenstein kleiner John dor Andy grove kleiner Perkins Pellegrini Amazon Intel Jeff Bezos Google MIT St. Louis Larry Page Dora Bloomberg Caltech Ed
"kleiner" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

04:30 min | 10 months ago

"kleiner" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"At kleiner Perkins the famed venture capital fund that is known for investing in such companies as Amazon Google Twitter et cetera He has a new book titled speed and scale and action plan for solving our climate crisis now So there was just a new report that came out It said renewable energy in the U.S. has quadrupled over the past decade so we're all good right There's nothing else to worry about with the climate I wish that was true No I came to this book this project this passion Back in 2006 when Al Gore's movie you remember an inconvenient truth Sure And I took my family and friends to see it We came back for a dinner conversation And went around the table to see what people thought When it came turn for my 16 year old daughter Mary doer she said I'm scared and I'm angry She said dad your generation created this problem You better fix it And I was speechless I had no idea what to say So I set out with partners in my Perkins to understand the extent of the climate crisis even higher Al Gore as a partner And over time over three funds invested a third up to a half of the funds Total about $1 billion in some 70 climate ventures Most of which failed And in fact it's hard It's very hard to grow a climate tech or green tech venture It was pretty lonely in the early days of doing that And we almost lost all of our investments But we stood by these entrepreneurs and they produced companies like beyond meat or end phase or the next smart thermostats and today are worth some $3 billion But that was then this is now I think what's important about now is we need way greater ambition and speed to avert catastrophic irreversible climate crisis I mean the evidence is all around us We've got devastating hurricanes and floods and wildfires and 10 million climate refugees the IPCC says that if we don't reduce our carbon emissions by 2030 by 50 55% we will see global warming overshoot by more than 2°C nearly 4°F And the Paris accords which were agreed to in 2015 if we were achieving them would still cause us to land at around 2°C The bad news is we're not close to achieving any of those goals You talk in the book about cutting emissions in half by 2030 and net zero by 2050 and you reference 6 main areas of attack transportation the electrical grid food protecting nature cleaning up industry and then removing carbon from the atmosphere we were talking about Tesla How quickly do we think that we're going to be past internal combustion engines with a fully electrified transportation network Well that's a great question And we want to put this in context Every year we dump 59 gigatons of carbon greenhouse gas emissions In the atmosphere as if it's some kind of free and open sewer And so the book and the research behind it has built a plan in electrifying transportation and the other 5 for which each of the objectives has three to 5 key results These are Andy grove Intel style very measurable specific steps In transportation it.

kleiner Perkins Mary doer Al Gore Amazon Perkins Twitter Google U.S. IPCC Paris Tesla Andy grove Intel
"kleiner" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:46 min | 10 months ago

"kleiner" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Of kleiner Perkins We're discussing his new book speed and scale and how we can solve the climate crisis I want to talk about some of the things you've said in the book that apply everywhere but are especially applicable to the climate crisis Let's start with quote it seems every dozen years we witness magical ever exponentially larger waves of innovation So so let's start first with climate How and where are those waves of innovation coming that'll help ameliorate the climate crisis Well innovations are happening on many fronts at materials sciences electrochemistry biology The opportunity that the climate transition to a clean energy economy represents is the largest of our lifetimes It's a bigger mobilization than even the effort of the allies to defeat the Nazi axis in World War II You'll remember then we shut down for four years All manufacturing of automobiles and appliances And instead created 268,000 fighter aircraft 20,000 battleships it was a monumental effort dealing with an existential threat And that same level of innovation and ambition is required to win in this climate campaign Other areas of breakthroughs or innovations even becoming a believer that we'll see nuclear fusion.

kleiner Perkins
"kleiner" Discussed on The Daily

The Daily

03:44 min | 1 year ago

"kleiner" Discussed on The Daily

"In two thousand ten brutal proposed to sullivan a month later. He gave notice by the time they married. He had started to make trips to los angeles. A two year odyssey of bouncing couches and trying to arrange coffee dates with directors and producers. I was down to do anything he says i wrote. Telephone hold music for free for free one evening. Jeremy kleiner an executive at plan. B entertainment attended party and noticed someone playing gershwin in the corner of the room. We had just gotten a green light for the script of twelve years of slave and hadn't really gotten into the question of composers kleiner says and here's this guy playing on a grand piano at a cocktail party. Kleiner introduced foretell to the film's director. Steve mcqueen then plan be introduced him to mckay. And then to jenkins and.

Jeremy kleiner sullivan los angeles gershwin kleiner Kleiner Steve mcqueen mckay jenkins
"kleiner" Discussed on Project Keto Podcast

Project Keto Podcast

05:20 min | 1 year ago

"kleiner" Discussed on Project Keto Podcast

"I think there's varying degrees of it just like addiction is a scale. It's not like this black and white thing. I think some people just from my experience of being kind of in the food addiction realm..

"kleiner" Discussed on Project Keto Podcast

Project Keto Podcast

05:06 min | 1 year ago

"kleiner" Discussed on Project Keto Podcast

"And then it happened again in january. I still think it could have been to the c word that i got in january on because it was right at the beginning of twenty twenty and i was like unusually sick for like three weeks was out of work It was really bad. But i was like. Why am i getting these infections. What's going on. And i didn't really connect the dots at the time. That if you're having stuff like that it could be something going out with your gut So twenty twenty one for me was like or twenty twenty for me was like kind of diving into learning about healing the guts Fixing electrolytes like warning about minerals like learning about all this stuff and Now here i am. And i'm still mostly carnivore. I've played around with adding a few things back end but just being more carnivores easy for me But now i have a handle on all that stuff and feeling good. I haven't been sick at all and yeah things have been going really well especially since i've been working on my gut for sure. So what does working on your gut mean. Yes so for me. I had started working a little. Bit with nutrition with judy The friend of mine and she had me start on just some probiotics. And but i also what i wish i had done was started using some. Hcl some For some acid and then some digestive enzymes. That really made a huge difference for me. Because what i found is that i wasn't breaking down my food. I wasn't absorbing nutrients. Because i had done a lot of gut damage prior you know. I had been on. A lot of antibiotics had been on a lot of different medications And so there's there's a lot of prior damage before even into carnivore. And that's probably why i had such severe ibs. I had such severe issues before carnivore even started was because it was my my gut that needed healing so for me like elimination diet is great. But you have to go a little bit deeper and see what's going on your severe despite versus Are you do you have enough stomach acid. Do you have proper enzymatic function. and then i've also added some beauty rate in as well and supplement with peter eight. That's been helpful. So it's been. It's been a lot of stuff that i've done. I still use the probiotics I'm still using the enzymes. And the hcl and the post biotic right now as well but those things are working really well for me..

three weeks january judy one twenty twenty peter twenty eight
"kleiner" Discussed on Project Keto Podcast

Project Keto Podcast

01:35 min | 1 year ago

"kleiner" Discussed on Project Keto Podcast

"What does working on your gut mean. Yes so for me. I had started working a little. Bit with nutrition with judy The friend of mine and she had me start on just some probiotics. And but i also what i wish i had done was started using some. Hcl some For some acid and then some digestive enzymes. That really made a huge difference for me. Because what i found is that i wasn't breaking down my food. I wasn't absorbing nutrients. Because i had done a lot of gut damage prior you know. I had been on. A lot of antibiotics had been on a lot of different medications And so there's there's a lot of prior damage before even into carnivore. And that's probably why i had such severe ibs. I had such severe issues before carnivore even started was because it was my my gut that needed healing so for me like elimination diet is great. But you have to go a little bit deeper and see what's going on your severe despite versus Are you do you have enough stomach acid. Do you have proper enzymatic function. and then i've also added some beauty rate in as well and supplement with peter eight. That's been helpful. So it's been. It's been a lot of stuff that i've done. I still use the probiotics I'm still using the enzymes. And the hcl and the post biotic right now as well but those things are working really well for me. So i might take a break from them Or wean down in a little bit

youtube second year first year one instagram Baxter the carnivore teachers first yoga
Gut Healing and the Carnivore Diet With Sarah Kleiner, Host of the Carnivore Yogi Podcast

Project Keto Podcast

01:35 min | 1 year ago

Gut Healing and the Carnivore Diet With Sarah Kleiner, Host of the Carnivore Yogi Podcast

"What does working on your gut mean. Yes so for me. I had started working a little. Bit with nutrition with judy The friend of mine and she had me start on just some probiotics. And but i also what i wish i had done was started using some. Hcl some For some acid and then some digestive enzymes. That really made a huge difference for me. Because what i found is that i wasn't breaking down my food. I wasn't absorbing nutrients. Because i had done a lot of gut damage prior you know. I had been on. A lot of antibiotics had been on a lot of different medications And so there's there's a lot of prior damage before even into carnivore. And that's probably why i had such severe ibs. I had such severe issues before carnivore even started was because it was my my gut that needed healing so for me like elimination diet is great. But you have to go a little bit deeper and see what's going on your severe despite versus Are you do you have enough stomach acid. Do you have proper enzymatic function. and then i've also added some beauty rate in as well and supplement with peter eight. That's been helpful. So it's been. It's been a lot of stuff that i've done. I still use the probiotics I'm still using the enzymes. And the hcl and the post biotic right now as well but those things are working really well for me. So i might take a break from them Or wean down in a little bit

Judy Peter
"kleiner" Discussed on Project Keto Podcast

Project Keto Podcast

05:32 min | 1 year ago

"kleiner" Discussed on Project Keto Podcast

"The show. I think you so much for having me. Yea i've been following you on instagram for quite a while now and for anybody who doesn't know you. They should definitely go. Check out your instagram. It's carnivore dot yogi. And you also have a really fabulous youtube channel and a podcast called the carnivore for you. Podcast and everything. That you've put out. There has just been so helpful for me with Learning more about how carnivore works. How kito can work Food addiction and even going way beyond diet's going into gut healing and mental health and all kinds of other things so before we really jump into a whole bunch of conversation. I would love if you could share your own personal journey of health with all of us listening. Yeah i mean it's there's a lot i guess but i I didn't really pay attention to my health so much until after i had my daughter and then that was kind of my wakeup call. I had gained a lot of weight in my pregnancy. And i just wanted to be healthy for her and then when she was diagnosed with autism at kind of sped everything up in a bigger direction of like now. I really need to be healthy. Because i want to be able to take care of her so i started getting really curious about health right away. After she was born first of all to help her. I was trying to figure out what would be the best diet for her to help her brain the most and then for me also and so we did everything from obviously we gluten free dairy free right away And then kind of looked a little bit towards paleo before it was called halio then. I decided to become a yoga teacher. Had quit my full time job And found yoga was helping me to kind of cope with being fulltime parent which was new for me and a special needs parent which was new and unexpected and so yoga was helping. So i started to Go to yoga teacher training and it was like right about that time. I decided i also wanted to try veganism because it was touted as this like super healthy diet and a lot of people that did yoga also were vegan and a lot of teachers. I knew or vegan. And so i thought well this is just a natural progression and so I jumped into vinas them. And it was good first and then it started. Having a lot of diminishing returns i would say after the first year and by the end of the second year i was just a total mess Just a lot of injuries cavities. I was very underweight. Can get muscle get injured a lot And can heal from injuries and so finally one of my teachers was like you can do yoga and eat meat at the same time. It's okay and Kind of helped talked me into starting to eat some animal foods again so i started with egg whites and chicken because i was afraid of everything else but i that that helps and Eventually i was eating red meat again. Eventually i went more towards like a paleo diet And that worked for a while for me until it kinda stopped working. And i think it was a lot of the anti nutrients lot of nuts i was eating. Baxter kind of paleo. you know A lot of plants..

youtube second year first year one instagram Baxter the carnivore teachers first yoga
Land of the Giants: The Google Empire

The Vergecast

01:46 min | 1 year ago

Land of the Giants: The Google Empire

"In nineteen nine hundred. Nine marissa mayer was sitting in the most important interview of her life. It was at a startup called google. That needing was at their conference table in the main conference room at one six five university which also happened to be a ping pong table. Meyer would go on to become one of the most prominent executives and silicon valley from two thousand twelve to two thousand seventeen. she was. ceo of yahoo. The back in the late nineties. She was still a student at stanford about to graduate with a master's in computer science and google's cofounders. Sergei brin was not going easy on her sergei did all the talking and quiz mutants. We allow different computer. Science topics had me draw out. Like the graphing of k means clustering and and centuries and how to find the differences in the centers. And things like that. Meyer was a star student so she answered those questions problem. But there was another interviewer in the room and she noticed something was a little off with him. Larry seemed quiet and truthfully obviously somewhat distracted. Larry page the other founder of google. The pair wrapped the interview utterly. They had something else on their minds and the the door opens like you kind of hear. What's going on her side. Then i heard the call and say okay like who's going with us for the kleiner. Pitch kleiner is kleiner perkins the legendary venture capital firm. And i heard a lot of foot traffic heading out the door and then heather horns. The office manager reappeared and said i'm sorry. Larry and sergei had an important venture capitalist pitch this afternoon and they have taken the the majority of the company with thumb. So i think you're going to have to come back tomorrow.

Sergei Brin Marissa Mayer Meyer Google Stanford Yahoo Larry Page Pitch Kleiner Kleiner Perkins Larry Heather Horns Sergei
Notarize online without leaving home

Talking Tech

04:41 min | 2 years ago

Notarize online without leaving home

"In a pandemic still have to get things notarized, but we don't want to go run out in see the notary in person well, pet consol has a solution for you. He's got an APP in a website called notarized Dot Com and he's here to tell us about getting notarized independent DEMOC. Hey, pat tell everybody how this works notarized dot com works just like a facetime call or any of the other apps that you're familiar with the chat with your family or your colleagues, and so you can download the APP store just called notarize or go to notarize dot. com. And you basically upload your document you confirm your identity by answering some questions and you connect with a notary. You Chat You sign you get your PDF, and you're on your way and how much does this? It's twenty five dollars in how does that compare to seeing a notary in person It depends on the market you know summer five, summer twenty, summer fifty You know we like to compare it to the cost of having come someone drive to your house, which is a service you can pay for. That's typically hundred get two, hundred bucks. So it's it's twenty five dollars to have a notary in your pocket twenty, four, seven in less than thirty seconds alrighty, and there's a there's a notary on the other side of the facetime call like. We've got notaries across the country and they answer these calls and they they help you get your document notarized whenever you need it. How long have you been doing this? We've been this about five years now. All. Right. What what got you started. Yes I accompanied previously that I sold the twitter. It was a search business and You know after selling that I needed to get a document notarized I won't. Will I did a lot of people do which is I went down to the UPS store I gotTA notarized I sent it off and I got a phone call. And they said Hey the notary mess this up. So you got to go do it again and that was really what got me thinking about the problem I just I wanted something where I didn't have to go find a notary I wanted to work perfectly every time always be available. and now we've extended the product of businesses. So we've got a lot of really large enterprises on the platform that they use it to automate a really important process like selling a car on boarding a new private wealth Kleiner mortgage for buying a house whatnot how many people use your service daily? Or weekly whatever. tens of thousands. Daily. Weekly weekly Okay and have you seen boost during the pandemic? Yeah. So our business businesses grown about five hundred percent in the last one, hundred, twenty days which has just been incredible. You know in order to meet the demand, we've on boarded more than a thousand new notaries. Built new software so that they can pay get paid instantly. So if you're notary out there listening if you sign up with us, you can get setup serve clients and get paid same day. So twenty five dollars to you keep five or ten or has it work? It depends on the type of transaction in the client, but it's You know it's it totally varies. Okay well, I'm sure notaries out there would love to hear how you be more specific. So how can they make? Yeah. So on a basic transaction, it might be five in a real estate. It might be twenty five or fifty and we've got you know notaries that have been doing this only for a couple of months already made ten thousand dollars working out the platform. It sounds so perfect. I can't imagine why would want to do this in person any idea what the advantage of going in person is. I mean. It's hard to come up with honestly no You know people tend to love the service. If you read our reviews, we've got you know twenty, five, thousand, five star reviews average rating four point nine seven. Mike. That you know people say is we we save them time and people are busy irrespective of the pandemic and to be able to click and connect and get on with life is really compelling. Now is getting your document notarized as big a deal in today's world as it was ten years ago. I mean I I know about it for real estate are there are other uses that that people have to do daily? Yeah so there are some that are required legally and there's others that companies choose to have done. We're actually seeing a lot of companies opt into the process right now that even if they're not required to. It's really about fraud reduction, and if you think about the Internet now everyone's doing things remotely. If you're a business that's selling a car or mortgage or whatnot, you might not have the chance to sit down face to face with your clients. So how do they have the efficiencies of the Internet while still being able to trust the people that they're transacting with and a lot of people are turning to our service? So we think the markets we're seeing the market growing. Already notarize. Dot. com

Dot Com Twitter Democ Fraud Kleiner Mike Dot.
"kleiner" Discussed on Reverie True Crime

Reverie True Crime

05:28 min | 2 years ago

"kleiner" Discussed on Reverie True Crime

"Thank you for tuning in to another special episode. Kathy Connor has been through so much in her life and on top of everything she was brutally beaten by Ted Bundy in. Florida. After he escaped from prison and went on a rampage at her sorority house Cayo Mega. This. Is Kathy Story. Well. I wanted to welcome you and just tell you how much that I admire you and you're an inspiration. So I'm really glad to be talking to you. Thank you very much. And now you. Know had a tragic event when you were five. Yes I lived in Miami and. My first and only really memory of my daddy was he come home every evening in Miami and we had a small house and we had big fans the floor that we're always going on and he'd come home and he would get a cigar and sit in his big leather chair. And between us was a little table and then my little chair. He played Chinese checkers every night now is our night and I think he must let me win some sometimes..

Ted Bundy Kathy Connor Kathy Story Miami Cayo Mega Florida
"kleiner" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

01:47 min | 2 years ago

"kleiner" Discussed on WGN Radio

"The next three hour. Sam Kleiner is the 1st 1 he's the author of The Flying Tigers. The Untold Story of the American pilots who waged a secret war against Japan. And you know, until Sam's book we knew so little about this Kadre of interesting individuals and their role and you'll find out all about it coming up, then. At eight o'clock, We're going to talk to Dr John Lot. One of my favorite people. He first wrote more guns and less crime. And that's when I was introduced to John. And what was most interesting about him, and we'll talk about this in the eight o'clock hour is that he didn't come at the topic with a preconceived agenda. He didn't necessarily think that That guns were quote unquote, good or bad with regard to statistics in their role, and when he looked at the numbers and crunch the numbers, he went, where the research told him to go, and that's something very Very unusual to the gun debate. So we'll talk about that. And his latest book, which is gun control myths and its za great read because it will, in fact, take all of the popular ideas that you hear promulgated major media and such. And well for a black A better word Terram apart. So do that. And then Maryland Singleton will talk to in the nine o'clock hour. She is a medical doctor, an anesthesiologist, a swell as a lawyer. And I've been been talking with her on the air. I was just looking, I think has been going on 20 years now, and she she is the voice of sanity, especially in an insane time, so you can imagine what we'll be discussing with that. So all that Mork coming up in the next three hours with me. Rollie James, Right here on W g and Radio. John.

Dr John Lot Sam Kleiner Rollie James Mork Japan Maryland The Flying Tigers
Andrea Freeman discusses her book "Skimmed: Breastfeeding, Race, and Injustice"

The Electorette Podcast

05:57 min | 2 years ago

Andrea Freeman discusses her book "Skimmed: Breastfeeding, Race, and Injustice"

"I'm Jim Taylor skinner and this is the electorate I'm this episode? A have a conversation with Andrea Freeman. She's a professor at the University of Hawaii and author of the book skimmed. Skimmed, this book, which chronicles allies of America's first reviving set of identical quadruplets, the false sisters, the quadruple tra, born in nineteen, forty, six to any faults of Bratcher woman who had lost her ability to hear in seek as child. Pulling the birth of her quadruplets, the white doctor who delivered them saw an opportunity he sold the to use the sisters for marketing purposes to the highest bidding formula company. There was an exploitative relationship that fall quadruplets for the rest of their lives. GIVES US A book about Race Poverty Exploitation and food policy. Answer and I opened our conversation with her, describing the story of Anti foles and the birth of her quadruplets Foltz was a block and Cherokee woman she lived in reads Phil North Carolina and was married to a tenant farmer. Everybody called P. to his twenty years older than her. She lost the ability to hear and speak in childhood, and she had six kids already when she learned that she was going to have triplets, so because of the high risk of the multiple she went early to the hospital spent a few weeks there, and on the night of their birth she found out there was another little girl hiding behind her sisters, and she had the first recorded. Recorded surviving identical black quadruplets, and so the girls who were very adorable, became instant celebrities. There was reporting about them all over the country. Universal Studios sent a camera person the New York. Times reported it and suddenly Andy May, who was not used to the spotlight became famous. Yes, she had the unfortunate luck of having a really terrible doctor. Right to just put simply he was unethical. In every possible way to premises, was Dr Kleiner, yeah Dr Fred Cleaner he loved to speak vocally about his support of Hitler. He maintained segregated waiting rooms, and he took advantage of the fact that he delivered the quadruplets to begin experimenting on them on the day of their birth. He had theories about the healing powers of vitamin C, and he injected them all with. A fairly large dose on the day they were born then he decided that he would name the girls. Even though anime had picked out her own set of names, and he gave them all the first name Mary, and then the names of his wife, sister, aunt and great aunt, the next thing he did was auction the girls off to the highest bidding Formula Company to Become Their Corporate Godfather. So what was anti doing all of the time? Did she have any say as to what he was doing, so I know about the naming things with the naming she was. was trying to think of names and I think she was going over names with our sister or someone on our family, and they couldn't decide, so he took it upon himself to come up with a name. The name Mary like you mentioned, but all the other decisions are being made. Did he even consult with her I? Know this was nineteen forty-six, so she probably felt that with this white doctor, you know she was black and Cherokee the. She didn't have a lot of choices. Exactly so there's race and class wrapped up in there and no doubt gender and. You know every kind of oppressive element there is that he basically felt that he could do whatever he wanted, and she didn't have the power to stop him, and also her her abilities, and you know she could not speak or here, and he just completely took advantage of her. So do you know about the deal? He made with the with the Formula Company in relation to I mean. was there any justification as to why formula was needed? Because she actually breast feed, she could, but in those days it was not encouraged. Really for anybody is not like now, but especially for. Black Women and poor black woman. There would be no expectation that she would do that, so it's just one of the distinctions so like back then pet milk, the milk which you would, you talked earlier and formula. They were one in the same, okay, so. You talked about this earlier. This was basically just sugar and milk, so it wasn't very healthy. No, it wasn't very. It should have been given to two babies I. Mean Right, yeah, so so the deal that he cut with a formula company. It basically change the trajectory of their lives, so not only was marketing deal, but they were kind of entangled in this for their entire lives. There was something about him, not only did. He cut a deal with the companies, but there's something about the land. They had a house built on land that I think he owned yeah the way that he had the deal made, and he had his sister-in-law, who was also the first woman to ever be a state chief justice. She was the trustee of this deal and he organized it. It so that he and his family would benefit so pet milk purchased some land from his father in law, but the land was just you know Barron and hilly and impossible to actually get anything out of but he had a house built on that land with a nursery with a very large window, and then put an ad in the newspaper, so people could come and pay to look at the girls on the weekends, very reminiscent of human zoos and then he had pet milk pay for nurses, and the nurses were his nurses, and through them he was able to maintain access to the girls throughout their childhood and continue his experiments

Formula Company Jim Taylor Skinner University Of Hawaii Andrea Freeman Cherokee America Bratcher Professor Universal Studios Mary Andy May Foltz Barron Dr Kleiner Trustee Phil North Carolina Hitler
What is venture capital doing to change its mostly white culture?

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

03:26 min | 2 years ago

What is venture capital doing to change its mostly white culture?

"Venture capital doing to change. It's mostly white, mostly male culture. Nothing radical from American public media. This is marketplace tech I'm molly would. So for years, the venture capital industry has been pressured to be more diverse and inclusive invest in more women and people of Color hire more women and people of Color. In the past month we've talked with black startup founders investors about what it will take to drive real change in tech. And they said it'll take work from big silicon valley firms, and the big institutions that invest in those firms called limited partners or LP's. So we called big silicon. Valley, venture capital firm Ilya Fishman is a partner at Kleiner. Perkins I asked him what Kleiner is doing to improve representation in the valley. We do need to lower the barriers to entry and to connect. We also tried to connect new talent with tack in Silicon Valley and so we actually have a program called Kleiner Perkins fellows. We connect them with internship programs in our portfolio companies, and sometimes outside of our portfolio companies. When we started, the program was only seven percent female. It's about fifty percent female today we're about seven percent, Hispanic, and four percent black, and so obviously those are very early starting points, but hopefully we can achieve the same ramp on. Those measures of diversity as we did on gender diversity for program I. Hear you say all this, and it doesn't sound that different from what we've been hearing for. At least almost the twenty years that I've been in this industry. What would it really take to change this culture, would it? Does it take LP's like? Does it take your investor saying? We understand that you're committed to this, but you actually have to have a black partner before twenty twenty two. I mean I. Think ultimately this comes down to us all actually doing the things that we've talked about doing right for us. It's identifying amazing entrepreneurs and founders or executives can become those partners down the line. I would I would love for us to to be able to add a ethnically diverse partner I think committing to a higher by twenty twenty two. Yeah, it's it's hard for me to commit because I wanNA make sure that we actually executed on properly. I guess the question really is. There seems to be agreement that this is a systemic problem that needs systemic solutions. Do you feel like this solutions they are proposing. Are Systemic that they go deep enough. The fundamental systemic change starts with changing the types of people that are in technology and giving more access, and that's why I'm so excited about the fellows program, and that winds up being a feeder to everything else I think it's all happening i. wish it would happen faster. Couldn't you'd be that change I? Mean I hear you and I hear that you're doing these things, but you say you wish it could. Could happen faster and I feel like you're the guy man why my view is I think we are. We are making the changes, and by the way adding Carter's team is something. That's a very significant commitment. Right in general because these these relationships last decades I. Think you have my commitment that we will. We will look and we'll have to look, and we'll can commit to looking for diverse candidates as part of the process. Ilia Fishman is a partner at the venture capital firm. Kleiner Perkins according to at least one survey. Black people make up on the one percent of investment partners adventure firms. That's seven actual people.

Partner Kleiner Perkins Kleiner Ilya Fishman LP Silicon Valley Carter Twenty Twenty
What is venture capital doing to change its mostly white culture?

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

03:26 min | 2 years ago

What is venture capital doing to change its mostly white culture?

"Venture capital doing to change. It's mostly white, mostly male culture. Nothing radical from American public media. This is marketplace tech I'm molly would. So for years, the venture capital industry has been pressured to be more diverse and inclusive invest in more women and people of Color hire more women and people of Color. In the past month we've talked with black startup founders investors about what it will take to drive real change in tech. And they said it'll take work from big silicon valley firms, and the big institutions that invest in those firms called limited partners or LP's. So we called big silicon. Valley, venture capital firm Ilya Fishman is a partner at Kleiner. Perkins I asked him what Kleiner is doing to improve representation in the valley. We do need to lower the barriers to entry and to connect. We also tried to connect new talent with tack in Silicon Valley and so we actually have a program called Kleiner Perkins fellows. We connect them with internship programs in our portfolio companies, and sometimes outside of our portfolio companies. When we started, the program was only seven percent female. It's about fifty percent female today we're about seven percent, Hispanic, and four percent black, and so obviously those are very early starting points, but hopefully we can achieve the same ramp on. Those measures of diversity as we did on gender diversity for program I. Hear you say all this, and it doesn't sound that different from what we've been hearing for. At least almost the twenty years that I've been in this industry. What would it really take to change this culture, would it? Does it take LP's like? Does it take your investor saying? We understand that you're committed to this, but you actually have to have a black partner before twenty twenty two. I mean I. Think ultimately this comes down to us all actually doing the things that we've talked about doing right for us. It's identifying amazing entrepreneurs and founders or executives can become those partners down the line. I would I would love for us to to be able to add a ethnically diverse partner I think committing to a higher by twenty twenty two. Yeah, it's it's hard for me to commit because I wanNA make sure that we actually executed on properly. I guess the question really is. There seems to be agreement that this is a systemic problem that needs systemic solutions. Do you feel like this solutions they are proposing. Are Systemic that they go deep enough. The fundamental systemic change starts with changing the types of people that are in technology and giving more access, and that's why I'm so excited about the fellows program, and that winds up being a feeder to everything else I think it's all happening i. wish it would happen faster. Couldn't you'd be that change I? Mean I hear you and I hear that you're doing these things, but you say you wish it could. Could happen faster and I feel like you're the guy man why my view is I think we are. We are making the changes, and by the way adding Carter's team is something. That's a very significant commitment. Right in general because these these relationships last decades I. Think you have my commitment that we will. We will look and we'll have to look, and we'll can commit to looking for diverse candidates as part of the process. Ilia Fishman is a partner at the venture capital firm. Kleiner Perkins according to at least one survey. Black people make up on the one percent of investment partners adventure firms. That's seven actual people.

Partner Kleiner Perkins Kleiner Ilya Fishman LP Silicon Valley Carter Twenty Twenty
So Many Protests

Atheist Nomads

06:08 min | 2 years ago

So Many Protests

"What's the level beyond tea party like? What's the next big boss so okay? Idaho's Idaho Freedom Foundation. I'm not sure who really the big bosses. I don't know fits Betsy Devos's family. Yeah they're definitely part of it. Her brother Eric. Prince is the head of Blackwater. Yeah so far right wing conservative family that wants to get public education and who own their own army. Yeah there's shock. Yeah yeah this is a family who wants to privatize everything brave. Because they've already shown how they can privatize and military exactly yeah. I don't know how well known it is but all of those numbers on how many troops are in Iraq. Were all about half with the real numbers were because of Blackwater and quote Mercenary Contractors. No of course mercenaries. Yeah Yeah and so anyway the the Devos and the Prince family are. They're actively involved in all of this funding some of the groups in particular the group that that's behind the Michigan New York Virginia rallies that Donald Trump tweeted about right because he had his own hand. I'm sure in making those I mean. He's actively said that. Oh Yeah He. He's actively saying that. He has all of the power. Not The governor's but the governors have to be doing everything and we should be doing all this sheltering in placing and not shutting out of these businesses but liberate these states because Second Amendment right which is a convoluted convoluted convoluted argument at best. It's not even a convoluted argument. It's it's not even an argument. He's you can't say trump can't say that he has absolute control over this because he doesn't especially when he also follows that with the. I'm completely not responsible for any of this right. He's trying to have his cake and eat it too. Which only works with far right wing groups that are being funded by a family that gets their money from government contracts war profiteering Yup and I mean today. The day of recording. We We had a big protest down the neighborhood. Park Kleiner Park in Meridian. It was a bunch of women in their kids. They're all playing on the playground. Equipment Co. Cram packed in there Because it was public property and they had a right to have access to it It was also funded by Freedom Foundation. And that's that's a logical follow-up to the protests that happened on Saturday on the purchase happened on Saturday with more than a thousand people in attendance at the Idaho State Capitol the Idaho. Freedom Foundation was the main group behind it but there were libertarians. Gun rights groups anti VACs groups all. They're waving their flags. Yeah it was. It was not a pretty scene. There is a lot of hostility. There were people being abused. Beaten I wouldn't say beaten but there is a couple of people who got pushed around and the cops protected the whole time. The people are getting pushed around or the people doing the pushing of the people. Doing the pushing no the people who were there protesting the cops are there to make sure that nobody got really hurt. But that didn't stop these people from hurting people who were protesting their protest. Yeah and a lot of these people were carrying guns. Yeah it was open. Carry season out there. It was which because that's what that's really about. Which if you're having a I know there are people who would argue this. But in my opinion a protest with guns is not a peaceful protest. No because the gun automatically is a sign of intimidation not right. If it's I mean that's how I feel if you have a rally with a bunch of people with guns that scary. Yeah with people with guns. That looks to me. A Lot. Like a military formation a rebel group of militia a peaceful protest in this case they weren't marching basically a peaceful protests. There does the other side feel that they can also protest so do you have equal protests anti protest groups going on in protests. Like this one where there was a lot of open Kerry. There was a lot of angry yelling people. There was no chance for an anti protest to develop because those people would have been in actual danger right and the whole point of this protest was too loudly and very aggressively. Threatened the government. Yeah and got away. Scot-free technically everyone in that protest committed a misdemeanor by being there yet but committee and getting charged with and actually be punished for are very different and also. There's no way that the state of Idaho could arrest more than a thousand people. Oh please tell me that. There's no way to tell if even five percent of them have guns. Yeah Yeah. It's really frustrated. Heather Scott from northern Idaho was of course all behind it. It's just it blows my mind that she's running that nobody's running against her so she's guaranteed in for the next. You know what the. Hell

Idaho Donald Trump Idaho Freedom Foundation Betsy Devos Freedom Foundation Blackwater Eric Prince Heather Scott Iraq Park Kleiner Park Meridian Michigan New York Virginia Kerry
Stripe goes Fast for $20M

Equity

00:56 sec | 2 years ago

Stripe goes Fast for $20M

"Move on to our second round of the day which is fast twenty million dollars series that actually. I covered this morning or yesterday but it came out this morning. Stripe led the round which is very interesting stripe of course as equity listeners. Know Gun to that. Brouhaha with Phoenix and it was Kleiner right or is it okay? Cool News they lead the series. A facet raised over money last year founders dom Holland and Allison Bar Allen. I knew allison from twitter Uber. It's a pretty interesting company. What they're trying to do is build a kind of the flock better for lightweight logging identity and checkout service. That can work across the Internet. So payments aren't tied to like facebook or Google or an apple pay and they have rolled out there logging product and a couple of places in the Roy another checkup product. Sometime soon. Their goal is to be a non premium priced a checkout

Allison Bar Allen Stripe Kleiner Dom Holland Facebook Twitter Phoenix ROY Apple Google
Dr. Marc Bubbs on Gut-Biomes, Phone-Vacations, Sleep and a Human First Perspective to Athletic Performance

Just Fly Performance Podcast

08:07 min | 2 years ago

Dr. Marc Bubbs on Gut-Biomes, Phone-Vacations, Sleep and a Human First Perspective to Athletic Performance

"Thanks for having me on the performance usually with Canada basketball and work as a consultant as well so if the lead sport and also with recreational clients looking improve their performance and you know my background and nutrition also naturopathic medicine so bringing a bit of a holistic view on an athlete health and human health in terms of performance. And and that's pretty much the philosophy leeann anywhere from people trying to look better feel better all the way up to you know a lot of our guys obviously play in the NBA and people got into the Olympics. And I'm always amazed at how similarities like the problems. We're having a highest level. Could actually be quite similar to the problems. The rest of us are having your trying to perform at work and at home. So there's a lot of similarities but of course definitely differences as well. The answer that that answer kind of takes me to the first question I had for. You is the idea of fitness versus health. And I think we hear that sometimes the sense of someone who looks fit in the gym might not necessarily be healthy or vice versa. And so what's for the for a high performance perspective? Those of us who work with athletes like what's I maybe. It's not a point but is what's that point were poor health really starts to spill over into performance. I mean does it start from square. One does after hit a critical mass in anything. It's probably complex question but what What would be a good would be a good indicator of that that crossover between health and performance or health? It's a fascinating question right. Because we assume the two are are are so intertwined and swearing fitnesses. Obviously the ability form of physical task helping state of well being and they do travel together to a certain degree but then when we really just the tip of the spear they start to veer off and grey paper. Maybe three or four years ago. Now by Paul Larson film off its own. Athletes fit but not healthy and of course. The endurance crowd is is definitely one that the interns athletes are ones that tend to experience that more than than even others right. Kassir pushing the volume. They're pushing the intensity and so this notion around you over training being just a person who's unhealthy right and so from a high performance standpoint. I mean I think when we look at some of the research around again. This is more than the endurance side but international the national level competitors. We see that international competitors get sick forty percent less than national level competitors if you can just show up every day in the gym or every day of practice and not miss days at the end of that year or that block of four years and you're going to be that much further ahead in the competition and so I think it's pretty cool now that we see this athlete health component. You know the skewing first idea being more intertwined with different performance models and you know on the female side of things again on the endurance with endurance sport. We used to just be part and parcel it if you're elite female endurance athlete. You GONNA lose menzies. And that's just part of the part of the story and of course China with experts like Dr Susan Kleiner. You know new new research coming out showing that women who maintain menstrual function which again is sort of a proxy for health right actually performing better as some of these lead levels and so whole notion that if we can keep athletes healthy particularly in you know team sports like forcing basketball or you know what we would call soccer but most the world calls Football Ohio you have. These athletes were so skilled. You know if you if you can get a forty four inch vertical leap and you're the fastest guy in the floor you know. Do we really need all of the things that has just keeping you healthy enough to show up every day. Probably the biggest performance lever. So those are some of the things that you hear being discussed more now and I think it's It's been interesting in practice to be able to see what are some of the less direct things that we can improve someone's performance by just supporting these areas of health. Then allow them to just be them and show up and do the amazing things that they can do. The I really really like that Thought with the showing up in the consistency and the stats behind that and I had a couple of thoughts was just with distance runners in general. I. I always had heard the idea. I think Dan John Coach. Dan John it said something like this. If you go to a masters track meet. The spinners look ten years younger than they really are. And the distance runners look ten years old and it was It was tough one. I always I always like okay. That does seem about right. I guess like it could make sense but then I was. It was like Dr Bruce Lipton stuff and he was talking about DNA. Telomeres and repetitive tasks. Like if the task is alter repetitive eight does something to aid your telomeres. Faster and mccaw. Maybe this is why I don't know I mean I don't want to speak for everybody. Necessarily they're probably becomes that point. We're distance rains good and then turns into too much and maybe trails versus roads or diversity. This is an interesting area to me. Yeah no I think it's really interesting as well. I think as a heuristic kind of works too because you do tend to see that. I think there's a few areas like obviously training outside if you trained in the sun and you live in California Arizona. You're getting all that happens. The skin which can impact but I think the glucose aspect is a really interesting one because we know that if you're not perform on race day as elite endurance athlete you do need a significant amount of carbohydrate and month after month year after year depending on what kind of strategy you're using. I mean that's GonNa those dance to glaciated. End Products are going to start to lead to more more impact the skin. So if you're if you're more focused on how the skin is looking you may want to adopt certain strategies and maybe sacrifice performance would. I don't know if that's a conversation for the pocket. Yeah yeah that'd be the on the very specific on subserve running podcast and looking good or not aging age or something like that I the second thought I had from what you're saying. I love that idea of consistency. I think it's something that we don't we don't necessarily think of like it's not very sexy to be like well you know. Show up and do that as long as possible. I think that when especially elite athletes and I've had talks other talks with coaches on this podcast about some. There's some elite athletes who just have a really bad diet but the question is then right. How long this catches up with you. At what age is going to catch up with yours. What what ages are going to start costing you. I guess that's my My follow up to that is how do athletes with a really poor diet and who are getting away with it and early. Twenty s are these things showing up later is different for everybody What's your take on all that? I mean it's one we see. You know you see sports now like Roger Federer. When he started to thirty four thirty five he started to lose. Some of those majors look like this for him. And of course all of a sudden at thirty six thirty seven. He starts winning majors again. Australian opens repeats and then Wimbledon. Geez guys now thirty seven thirty eight thirty nine you still the top four in the world. I mean he wins. The I guess to the quarter finals of tournaments was still almost the same ease as he did when he was in his mid twenties and that from a generation ago. I mean no when I was growing up north thirty in your tennis player. Men that the drop office was. Pretty Sean Right. So I think a lot of the science around nutrition Sleep obviously recovery. Obviously things like training. I think that's flat curve a little bit and allowed a lot of these athletes to be able to to play a lot longer. I mean you know candidate Basketball Steve. Nash I mean he played until he was forty and he had a back condition. You know I mean that's just playing a point guard position in the NBA is phenomenal. And so I think that's where the buying can be difficult for young athletes because you know nowadays are nineteen or twenty into the League. You know when you're that age you're indestructible right. You're not thinking you're thirty. Everything's just feels great. You can get away with everything and so I think that's one having an environment where people are just making certain decisions Really helps because environment too powerful influence from

NBA Basketball Dan John Dr Bruce Lipton Sean Right Paul Larson Olympics Consultant Canada Roger Federer League Dr Susan Kleiner Soccer Nash Tennis China Ohio Arizona California
"kleiner" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

06:29 min | 2 years ago

"kleiner" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"Hydro hydroxy core Kleiner Clark wine thanks for planning will hear its name right it is like that since many have yet that's it the stock market that's what it is it's a possibility absolutely they've got to look at every single thing it's a malaria drug they also treat rheumatoid arthritis it's widely available it's already been FDA approved it is very minimal side effects so you know this is when you start throwing stuff against the wall and these French doctors and what I've been saying Hey this thing is real let's use this that's not been peer to peer just remember everything's up here at this point in time it's about let's see what's available to us right now on the shelves that may help it's not a cure it's a treatment right that's the thing what's the treatment of this that's the thing well there is a parasite very different from a virus but studies from China showed that he did reduce the ability of the corona virus to enter cells so the studies show some promise but I don't know if it's ready for prime time yet why not what what what's the risk if it's as minimal right because from what I'm hearing from doctors there like already figured out how do we you know can I get it some doctors are saying well I've ordered some because if somebody comes in and they're there at that point where they're not a symptomatic they actually have it and it's affecting them how can I give this it is not just that they also have to give you a what they're saying is and the studies have shown you recover at least in this small sample size in about five to six days when you take it with this certain antibiotic you recover much much faster much much faster in fact within two to three days you're in a much better situation which is what we're looking for again vaccine nine months at super best realistically probably twelve to eighteen months how we treat it how we treat it well that's that's that's what we should be looking for at this moment in time three two three five three twenty four twenty three at Chad Benson shows your Twitter feel free to tweet at me you can text the program as well again California's all locked down big time why as a nation state forty million strong we've been organized around and attack rate as we refer to it about fifty six percent that they have iris will impact about fifty six percent of us you do the math in the state of California that's a particularly large number yeah it is it absolutely is it's a huge number hi Italy's what like sixty million people so you're looking at forty million in a singular state the question ever is asking what where's the money coming from your telling nonessential businesses you can't open right so you have a shoe store you're not gonna be up nobody need ships right we need should do you know what I mean grocery stores these they open people need for pharmacies obviously right places like that those things need to stay open you're asking for two weeks right social distancing will bit of essentially self quarantining many keep a small group of friends maybe you guys get together you figure a way to to get through this thing but then you're asking about the money well the battle is gonna go on the house is on recess for the next couple days because now it's the Senate's turn to to roll out a third phase stimulus plan what does it look like this is what the Senate GOP plan would be two hundred fifty page bill under twelve hundred dollars per person a one time payment that would be an additional five hundred per child the payments would be based on income so individuals making up to seventy five thousand dollars annually or married two hundred fifty you get twelve hundred right income is defined as wages so screwed benefits in any pension income right so if you if you get all those and you have seventy five thousand dollar salary you're gonna get twelve hundred if you make a hundred grand ANA right like that it well if if you make seventy five to ninety nine thousand you'll get something but it will be gradual so you might get a thousand from seventy five to eighty and it works its way down from there right I get five hundred Bucks per child trump thousand dollars per person five hundred dollars per child as soon as possible hoping to get it into people's hands with an three to six weeks six weeks later identical would go out if the president still has us in a state of emergency Democrats two thousand dollars per American followed by subsequent payments stepping down over time again this is all live we get to that point where six weeks from now we've got twenty million infected and you know the half a million deaths right you know but we're still on super lock that and that's still a big if the numbers I'm looking at twenty five thousand by Monday hundred two hundred and twenty eight hundred fifty thousand I next Friday if we're in that range we're not talking desert on people who are have tested positive and and her being treated not a symptomatic pave pay at patients because we we maybe had a situation where where we've had a million people already you might have if they're saying that.

Hydro Kleiner Clark malaria
"kleiner" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

03:24 min | 2 years ago

"kleiner" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"Is the proper question for everyone all right if you say yeah there was sexism in this race everyone says Kleiner and you say no there was no sexism about a bazillion women thank what planet do you live I promise I'll have a lot more things I can't wait to get a lot more to say is wonderful so if there was sexism in the race of course the sexism was at the hands of the Democrats whole race was against other Democrats so either her fellow candidates who weren't sexist toward her or the media perhaps we're also Liberal Democrats are the voters who are also Liberal Democrats she's got a lot to say about that but here's the exercise I'd like to have right now listen if you think a lizard with Warren lost because she doesn't have boy parts down there instead of girl parts sure go ahead let me know eight eight eight six three zero nine six two five triple eight six thirty to be a male but I think the larger question here and I would love to hear your response to this do you think maybe just maybe there's possibly one or two other reasons why people did not support Elizabeth Warren that had nothing to do with her with her boy girl parts do you think maybe there were a couple of other factors involved here that drove people to choose not to vote for Elizabeth Warren that has nothing to do with her being a woman eight eight eight six three zero nine six two five I'd love to hear your opinion if you oppose Elizabeth Warren if you were terrified and and she bolted upright in the middle of the night after having a a cold flop sweat nightmare about the visage of president Elizabeth Warren I would love to hear why you oppose Elizabeth Warren did it have anything to do with anything other than the fact that she was a woman because I think maybe if that maybe I could be wrong but I'm thinking there might have been some other factors here involved with her humiliating devastating embarrassing loss in the democratic primary race for president triple eight six thirty W. M. A. aloe ACT I'm going to get me yes yes that's exactly what she's going to do here is Elizabeth Warren earlier today warning Chris Plante talk about this a lot to it really is just a peppy why why do they have to start every sentence with so Seoul it's just it's there's not a millennial thing is he trying to adopt some millennial thing so she can be you know hip with the kids yes he does that a lot she she adopts little like phrases and and little sayings in little mannerisms so that that she can be relatable to the young kid back I'm going to get me on yeah exactly saying things like that things like that so I was I just wanted interject there I'm sorry I let you finish now please you've earned the right to have your final word here today it's the last time pretty much we'll talk to you for quite some time warning that I am sending my campaign for president all I say this with a deep sense of gratitude for every single person who got in this fight every single person who tried on a new idea.

Kleiner
Coronavirus corrections and the rise of remote work

Equity

09:23 min | 2 years ago

Coronavirus corrections and the rise of remote work

"Let's talk about the markets. There's no avoiding this. If you track technology if you track startups venture capital all that good stuff you see what happens to the public markets and in the last couple of days. It's been a complete shellacking. I think it's pretty much the only way to put it. We haven't seen declines at this magnitude in some time and it's gotten everyone in the talking about what's going on and what might happen next. Danny just giving you a gut check to the listeners. And all of our friends out there. How surprised are you by this eventual and kind of finally happened moment in the US stock market completely? Not surprised I mean I I I. We're not allowed to actively trade but I did trade my 401k portfolio into a money market fund. Like two weeks ago. So I'm quite pleased with the The the choice I actually sold at literally the peak a couple of weeks ago and so so I feel vindicated like my. My retirement is secure all five hundred dollars of it. I was GONNA say this is not actually a show designed to. Let's Brag but I'll give you three points for that one. I'm doing the old fashioned like long term investing. Keep your money where it is. Let it do whatever thing. So we'll see who's right in the end for people just catching up though if you're not active in the US stock market stocks have fallen tremendously over ten percent last couple of days and that was is really been kind of following the US news cycle so as the corona virus. The kind of thing that has come out of the disease world. I'm not a doctor that's best. I can do has become more prevalent both internationally closing more borders impacting more economies heritage anymore trade routes and also popping up here at home. Concern has risen. Also we're beginning to see impacts of the lengthy shuttering of large parts of China reflect it in trade and supply chain disruptions companies like Microsoft booking holdings which ones booking dot com and utanics have highlighted issues in their revenue and earnings coming up so the the slowdown is here after weeks of talking about any kind of expecting it and finally Goldman which you've all heard of they forecasted that. Us companies will have zero growth in twenty twenty which is pretty damning because growth is kind of what powers the stock market's expansion and that's kind of the the bad news. Sas companies are also taking a hit any. Am I missing any Any bad news here. Obviously people are dying Thousands of people are being marooned hundreds of millions in China and around. The world have been quarantined so those are the headlines but I I think what's interesting is is. There's there's two patterns here one is I want to focus in on zoom or let's call Zoom Zoom Zoom. The video conferencing software. That also helps us. Equity is having the best time of its Goddamn effing life so they they have doubled the stock value in just the last couple of weeks from the low sixty S in early December to about one hundred fourteen as a recording the show so eighty eighty dollars per cent and its market. Cap is now at almost thirty. Two billion dollars and I I I'm kind of annoyed by this. But it's Kinda funny just to point out that therefore pe ratio is four hundred. Thirty five right now and to Yahoo Finance has them as overvalued but I do think I do think the virus I mean the upshot of this is that because all the flights are being canceled. You know a ton of conferences. We just heard today that F. Eight the big facebook developer's conference were hearing. People are pulling out of the game developers conference. Sf next month GTC. There's even talk about Tokyo Olympics later this summer possibly being cancelled. I think we're actually going to see a huge gift around remote work. We talk about remote work. We've seen a lot of companies in recent justed around in a company. That's doing like remote conferences. But I think the virus is really going to force companies and decision makers to really ask like. Do you need to fly to do the sales meeting? Do you need to fly to this conference to learn something? Do you need to drive to a seminar and I? I do think we're going to see a shift in the economy where people go actually remote. We're Kinda works okay. We're we have tools and and and it's changed a lot last decade. Yeah I mean won't people might not know this but tech crunch itself as relatively remote I organization and my work history has been majority remote. I worked for with the next web for my first four years as a journalist and they were based in Amsterdam and I was in Chicago and then SF. I never went to the actual office once in that time period so to me this is relatively normal but I think for a lot of folks. He's always been discussed point. Not a re- realize reality so I'll be curious to see if that does work up. Certainly zoom other future of products and other companies. That kind of service people that are not in the same room might do well. I would say given zooms rapid value appreciation that racine's active trading as opposed to fundamental value. But certainly it's a stock to keep in mind if you haven't caught up on what's going on with red at Wall Street beds and the Stock Market. Take a look. It's kind of fun if you WANNA get a window into how the chat rooms of the nineties that helped pump stocks have now turned into semi closed at four. It's quite adventure zoom. I'm not saying it's part of that pump and dump world but it reminds me of some of the value appreciation. We've seen at other stocks that have him in the last couple of months. I think you know this is a question around Tesla. We brought up in a bunch of other stocks. Might take away from that is if you're trading over the counter OTC stocks penny stocks. Okay fine there's not a lot of liquidity. You can actually do a lot on the ticket and whatnot stocks. Let's zoom as an example thirty two billion market CAP company. You have to have a lot of money to move that share price one way or the other. If you're maybe maybe everyone's long and therefore like almost no one's willing to to sell and so therefore your your price gets kind of moved higher and higher but my my assumption is that that's not true and certainly for most of these big tech companies like Microsoft near trillion dollar market cap company. Like ain't no one can you. Can you can be you know. Warren Buffett Go. I'm going to buy the whole stock and the stock price will early move. That's the scale. I think we're talking about love the shares so it might change as the Margaret hits volatility and and whatnot but to me. It was blown way out of proportion. Well I hope so. That would mean there's less manipulation the stock market in values and more reasonable. So let's hope you're right but it is a fun story regardless but let's move along away from the main public markets to talk about a company that wants to join public company world which door dash after quite a long time of hearing to this company will go public kind of a needed win for both. Softbank And the Vision Fund Jordache filed confidentially to go public. And Danny. I want you to tell us the difference between filing to go public and filing privately to go public yes for companies that are under about a billion in revenue the jobs act plenty twelve allows startups to file basically there s one without having to do it publicly so generally speaking in the process you file publicly which means you literally to the web and then the SEC gives you feedback on that dock. You might make changes some some individual if you remember like what was a community adjusted revenue or some of these may not it was community adjusted so it was adjusted. Eba which is already super chested. Right brave ever GonNa give back on that. This purchase designed to encourage companies to go public earlier at least get feedback on there. S ones and to do it in such way like if if the numbers don't turn out well or some things get blocked by the SEC. You have time to sort of recover without kind of embarrassing yourself in public. The reason we actually find out about most of these confidential s ones that the bankers know that they're going to become real public wants and so the file confidentially then leaked to the press and go. Gee someone somewhere has filed something things about this one. Why would the companies do this? Well if you let these file privately when they're smaller it lets them a decrease in the amount of risk they take on making the on ramp to public markets have been easier and the number of companies has fallen sharply in the last. I forget the timeframe like ten twenty years. So this is a way to help. Bolster that number again and also with if you recall back to Osama's private IPO file or private direct listing filing. I guess technically they are putting out press releases saying we've done this. So they're they're filing privately telling you publicly they will go public but it's private for now and that's very twenty twenty but it's also. Kinda key dynamic to understand you look at the IPO market for this year. Now announcing your stealth fundraise. Yes very much like saying we have cool things over here. You may not see them. You're exactly it's the it's the sneaker drop it's yes it's the sneaker. That's the thing when shoes come out for a short period of time. I'm not cool. I turned thirty. I lost all ability to have coolness anymore. Now We're both in our thirties. Now which I think means that will never be cool again on door dash though Danny mentioned that if you have less than a certain amount of revenue you can file privately. Keep in mind that door dashes right about the sides so we have a suspicion that this was kind of the end of the time period in which they could file privately. Because they're about to be to Lart so let's get into the numbers and talk a little bit about what we have here. The company is worth around thirteen billion. But which is a large number not the most valuable private companies have ever seen we work at its Peak Uber Pre IPO. Those were both larger but certainly a decca corn and evaluate company. The company was valued at one point. Four billion in two thousand eighteen to give you understand how fast it's appreciated in value and that is driven by tons and tons of private capital often come in through the lens started after lengthy accounts of Division Fund but the company has attracted capital firm Kleiner and sequoia throughout its history. So a lot of backers. Put a lot of money this company for different reasons at different stages. But it's welland and it has some comps so we're not talking about a company completely abstract Danny. Just run us through some quickly and then we'll talk about its results. Yeah so I think the the the big cop here is so you know Oberlin public. We now have a lot of data from ubereats which is one of its sub business lines but in Q. Four thousand nine hundred ending December.

United States Danny China Microsoft SEC SAS Yahoo Facebook Warren Buffett CAP Olympics Chicago Lart Ubereats Racine Developer
Breaking down the White House's quid pro quo argument

Buck Sexton

10:11 min | 2 years ago

Breaking down the White House's quid pro quo argument

"And I want to keep talking about impeachment I want to bring in Marc Lauter many of you know marquees the trump campaign director strategic communication and former special assistant to the president mark thanks for joining us later Avenue and so you know the war for witnesses has begun to monopolize both sides what do you think we're gonna see moving forward when it comes to this impeachment trial and are we gonna see witnesses well it it doesn't look like it and I think of the fact of the matter is we've got to come to an understanding of what is that it does not matter who they may or may not call as witnesses it's not going to change the fundamental facts of this case that we were in the tree we read the transcript there was no quid pro quo the Ukrainians and made and there was no pressure the aid was released and there were no investigations announced and there is no witness that could be called it's going to change the fundamental facts in this case right and you know we we see that the president's defense team went up there they deliver their closing arguments which many feel you know really collapse the Democrats case for impeachment of course and a lot of people now are talking about the fact that policy agreements don't merit a grounds for impeachment and while this may be great for the president for the campaign when it comes to people going to the ballot box in November of twenty twenty what do you think the long term implications could be for our country and for the potential of impeachment turning into a partisan tool or game well it was ashes for our country long term never in the history of our country and we ever had a one party purely partisan impeachment and that's what this was despite the fact that in the nineties you had Democrats saying you couldn't have a partisan impeachment few even at Nancy Pelosi last spring saying you can't have a one party impeachment and yet here we are I think you know it's not only need to policy Adam Schiff I think you know someone and Louise joined the squad and they took this party right off the cliff and it is a dangerous precedent that they're sitting here and it will be even more dangerous if it gets to the point where any future president or this president can not have a robust discussion and even disagreements with members of his senior staff for with a national security adviser because they're afraid that they're going to get home before a hostile Congress from hostile party and have all of those disagreements expose it will put national security at risk regardless of what party future presidents may represent it isn't the Democrats argue that this is in the interest of national security markets that we keep hearing from them yeah it really was such a national security threat but they had to wait thirty days to even turn the impeachment articles over and they could not use the tools at hand I mean how much is there talking about complaining about witnesses and they didn't clean and these witnesses and they didn't want to avail themselves on the courts to decide on the president's right exactly the privilege of having these conversations which is something the president of both parties going back to the founding of our Republic had just ended Amy just shows you weren't for double standards the Democrats wouldn't have standards at all sure and you know the polls continue to show mark that Americans are broadly opposed impeachment while the support for the president continues to grow and so you know as the Democrats impeachment champ continues and and you know we're not quite at the end yeah but I think one of the things to note here maybe you can touch on this a little bit for listeners as the scrutiny of the bidens crop family business practices I think that's finally increasing to this you know may have had back fired more than the Democrats expected you know especially just days before we head into the Iowa caucus it really is backfiring and and for good reason I mean the American people you don't have to know all the fine details that you can understand when the sitting vice president of the United States he's leaning policy discussions and his son is getting paid by whether it's Ukraine hand or China and now we're coming out and we're finding that they were even more sweetheart deals with members of the Biden family involving his brother and and getting the land deals and contracts which she was not qualified to get there's been other members of the family is now just recently been exposed I'm also getting sweetheart deals and the American people get the realized state we wouldn't tolerate a city council person who's getting hit their family paint on the backside while they're making the official decision and we shouldn't we should expect the same thing that's wrong and my friend and the United States and someone who's running for president to get those same sweetheart deals and nine point on this you know Biden is in trouble when it actually had to come out and say well he now if we if he's nominated or if he wins we won't do that anymore course and you know when you we lucky that going back to impeachment and you know what how this is all kind of come out when it comes the bite and we see the multiple Democrats of course it in swing states coming forward saying they're undecided on the president's gonna name even come over and vote with Republicans Joe Manchin of West Virginia Christensen amount of Arizona children's of Alabama how do you think this is going to play out and you know give give our listeners a preview of what you think the next steps in the in the conclusion of this impeachment hearing and trial it's gonna be well I think there's no question that he will be exonerated by the Senate and again today and there's a very high likelihood just like in the house of representatives in the Senate you will have a bipartisan vote no I don't see any Republicans crossing over which means it is women entirely and engineered Democrat hoax that is being reviewed by bipartisan vote in both houses and house Republicans and Democrats saying no and so I think that will obviously Sir was a strong platform we seen the president's poll numbers going up the impeachment numbers going down and there is not a single person on this campaign with for president trump wanted this to go this way we'd rather talk about the issues the economy rising paychecks buses Democrats went down this path you can be assured that we're going to the fans and maximize it to the most that we can see and we're seeing it hundreds of thousands of people are crossing over into signing up to volunteer and Joan eight and you can look at that rally we just had the other night in New Jersey all places deep blue New Jersey most requested number of tickets ever for a presidential rally and when we look at the daily even further order of the people who were there were Democrats I mean that shows you this problem is bringing new people in the party it's one of those reasons why I think combined with the fact that you got a cell phone socialist and communist sympathizer in Bernie Sanders who's leading their ticket I think every state in the union in an alley in July with the exception possibly being the people's Republic of California right and you know when it when it comes to this impeachment what do you think the effect is going to be that has on the election were obviously seeing a lot of energy very far out from November for the president at these rallies which we covered on the first just a few days ago we think that Altman effects gonna be in and do you truly believe that the Democrats are only doing this because they know they will lose in November and we have American people of course very irritated with that because they see this and they see the Russian collusion house the same way this is time and taxpayer money that's been wasted with no resolve or direct benefit to the American people well I think we may be legal or seeing it and I think that's one of the reasons why the president's supporters rising to the highest levels we've seen since he's taken office in multiple goals and the Democrats know that they're in trouble and yet you have to wonder because you got crazy Maxine waters and others out there who are saying we're not we're going to impeach him again I mean they're already talking about going down this path no one they're going to lose this impeachment and openly talking about impeaching him again I mean this is going to be a never ending cycle they want him impeached from the day he was elected and they're not going to stop until the American people remove them from power in the house of representatives and also send this president back to the White House before we close out mark you know when I ask you a question really talking a little bit later in the show about the chance of a brokered convention for the Democrats obviously you look at the end who's on the ballot for them these primaries and going at Iowa caucus it doesn't seem like any of these candidates could beat president trump do they recognize that you think they're going to go to a broker convention is there even anybody out there that that could even you know compete in November against this president I mean when we see the economic numbers and we see the promises made promises kept from twenty fifteen twenty sixteen all the way till now hundreds of promises that have been kept you think there's anybody out there and could the Democrats even even try to post make that this summer what a looks more and more likely that they might because you do you do and Bernie Sanders is leading in the polls and now you're seeing a lot of the DNC and the mainstream Democrats coming out against him because they're afraid it's almost like twenty sixteen again we're trying to gang up and keep him from getting the nomination but they can't agree on who should get the nomination and it's very possible that they could go into a brokered convention but regardless we we really don't care which one of them comes out on their nominating process they're all gonna have endorsed such radical policies as taking away people's private health insurance a lemonade in the energy independence that our country has now achieved and that her drive up people's agility bills are talking about eliminating millions of people's jobs and just telling them well you can learn to code I mean that's not how we work in America so it will be fairly easy for us to take on whichever one of those crazies actually comes out of their nominations and were fully prepared to together battle a IBM mark Kleiner thank you so much for joining

Marc Lauter Special Assistant Director President Trump
Why Front's Series C matters

Equity

09:11 min | 2 years ago

Why Front's Series C matters

"I'm Alex Wilhelm and once again I have have denny Crichton with me Danny how are you doing. I'm doing awesome. That is that's enthusiasm. You are back in New York. I'm in Providence and I have to say I've I've had enough of this shit. I want some summer but the good news is despite the terrible weather and the time of the year. There is a gazillion things to get to. So I'm going to skip the usual faffing about and jump bright in. I'm going to start the show with front which I need you to explain to me why this particular funding round was such a big deal. Right you'RE GONNA kick off the entire show that so start with why. Hi the Health Care Front. Raise fifty nine million dollars in series C and Here's here's the deal. They didn't have a lead. They had no investors. There no lead V. V. C. WE KNOW Vision Fund. No no sequoia. Although Sequeira did the series B. on they actually lead with a couple of really prominent be to be CEO and founder so lasting Cassia and founder Mike Cannon Brookes octa CEO and Co founder Frederick Harassed Multiplex Co founder and CEO. Ryan Smith Zoom CEO. Eric Yuen. What's interesting here here is is? We're getting to these late. Stage growth rounds at a time when there's more growth money than ever and basically said now we're good we're just gonNA take from really prominent angels. Who all of that exited you know? Kind of startups and. So what's interesting here is twofold one is one the dynamic. VC industry which we can talk about more but to actually kind of the strategy here of front is a B. Two B. Product Arctic. Selling to other kind of B2B startups and so by taking this money from other kind of B. Two B. Sales centered Start founders and see IOS. They're really kind of like buying. I'm from their own customers so to speak right synchronicity. That's connecting the two together. So the fifty nine million dollar round had no lead. VC there was no like Kleiner liner coming in here right in the big check. I'm curious do you think that the disease that previously invested got pro rata in this round or do think it was all just money from these I guess executives turned angels. I think they've got Harada me. I don't think it was in the press. Release that they did but I am sure they did. I'm also not entirely clear that these folks took the entire round. I mean there could have been nate. Twenty or twenty five million dollars slug from around that was announced yama funding from a farm that was announced But nonetheless like the fact that it was positioned this way If you imagine in ten years ago this sort of round first of all wouldn't exist but this ground where we would said Oh a bunch of angels came in late stage. It'd be like well. This company must be doing terribly wrong Novi. ABC was willing to lead the round. Things have changed so much. That founder can literally say God. We got a couple of individuals around at the party. At the craps table they put in fifty nine million bucks. We're going wow unbelievable. They said no to everyone. It's amazing change in time. It is but also I'm kind of embarrassed by the number of people I know on this list. Like I know Frederick a little bit I know Ryan a little but I know Eric a little bit. I think I've met J. I mean I think I need to change industry industries because the the same eight people keep coming up. That's embarrassing to me. I need any new friends. Let's talk about what the company does front is be messaging kind of calms thing. It looks like email works for teams. I'm assuming this is kind of product aimed at customer support customer success kind of groups. Yes affront fronts. Innovation was really for a lot of top companies they have an email like support at techcrunch dot com or press at at Google Dot Com. Which is actually how we reach out to right? And so when that goes into Press Google Dot com on that actually gets centered and moved around the the thousands of people who are in Google Google to figure out how to respond to it. So if he's coming from an ad tech crunch email address like from us he goes to our tech crunch contact if it goes to APEC Asia. Pacific it'll go to someone who's live overnight overnight overseas and so basically thousands of people are accessing the same email inbox and so. Have you ever tried to do your own inbox with g million. No it's basically impossible with one goddamn person on the box. Now you had an hundreds of people all of whom are interacting with the same emails etc and suddenly. It's just a complete mess front. Took that and said Hey. What have we built in box from? Scratch zooming that. There are thousands of people or hundreds of people reading the same tickets reading the same emails. And how can we respond to it. Really really effectively. Huge problem tons of companies have it. They've been super successful. It's only a couple years old and what's interesting is actually the the founders are French It actually has a large Parisian office one founder Laurent Had A decade and enterprise. And then WHO's also female be to be founder of rare breed unfortunately in the industry who CEO up and she. She kind of came out of her master's disagree in two thousand twelve and dived into this and front. So it's a five year. Old Company raised one hundred thirty eight almost one hundred forty million bucks. An insane amount of money ended the speed was raise capitals crazy because their series of ten million was back in May of two thousand sixteen. Then Bam sixty six million early eighteen and then two years later fifty nine million so really. It's pretty frontloaded or backloaded. I'm sorry to kind of where we are in time now. I'm curious to see how much more capital they'll need to scale this to IPO. It's already kind of there. But certainly a lot of star power a lot of customers on this new investment and. I'm kind of curious that this is a trend that will see a flex from companies. That were so hot. We don't even need venture capital all the real stars of our industry the money in It's certainly a new way to approach it absolutely. I think one of the key lessons here at least for me was a company that really figured out product market fit super early on You know if you look at it was founded Five years ago it took two years to build out so uncork. Capital is sort of a firm that argues it focuses on product market fit. They raised three point. One million seed in October two thousand fourteen and then once they sort of got this product market fit. And it's sort of obvious today but looking back in time the idea that there d the SASS product to fix this team oriented email. inbox was sort of not a concept of. Now it's just scaling right it's all sales scaling And so we're seeing the rounds. Get faster and faster. Because they're repeated you you know the sales are repeating assuming the growth is repeating internally. The numbers look great. It's sort of classic SAS business I expect us to see as one hundred millionaire our club as you call it hopefully in the next year or two that there hasn't been announcement around the revenues but I expect it to constitute here about their W. two and a half year over year now has a pretty quickly quickly there probably. I Dunno just guessing. You're twenty thirty million era or somewhere in there and they'll be largest soon enough. Let's talk about the couple world through a different Lens. Though you have been looking at Tau really large funds cutting smaller and smaller Jackson. We're talking about funds at have billions in assets under management writing five seven million dollar checks which seems to make no oh sense. According to the old model of larger funds larger textile works otherwise. They can't really disburse the capital. But that's changing and I want you to tell you why because to fascinating fascinating kind of like nuance about today's venture capital market. Absolutely free front is a great example of this right. So here's a fifty nine million dollar check that no growth stage investor mister. WHO has a billion dollars ready to deploy was able to invest it and so we're seeing once again The largest funds billions of dollars. We had we talked about last week. Show I think we had twenty-one fundraisers that were over five hundred million last year. It was ninety one somewhere in that category so a ton of money deployed and so the idea that you would do early. Stage investments is nuts. Because you can't deploy million dollars a thousand times a year and so the challenges is like. Why are people doing this when I started asking if he sees the answer was well once the the cap tables in the series B and D are out there? They're locked it in a sequeira already in the a benchmarks already in the a founders fund the and they have the capital to deploy in the B A C D E F g all the way through the Sesame Street Alphabet All the way through and so by the time you get to the D. you have no access or in the case of front. No one had access suicide. Basically you have to lock in earlier in earlier and so even if you're the Softbank Vision Fund you WanNa throw four hundred million dollars in series d you have to be in the seed or the series. He's A to start to lock in that Barada to start locking in those early ownership rights. It just gives you more ball control later on because other people are going to kind of knock you out of the way to get around in place and so there's sort of this paradox. Where we're seeing? You know the the largest latest stage funds doing the smallest early stage rows and so that that was a really interesting dynamic that we haven't seen before yeah and the one thing to keep in mind that when I was learning about the BBC World you know maybe a decade ago. Now I was always told that if you couldn't find a new lead investor for the proximate round the next one. It was a very bad signal because it would imply that no one else in the market one to lead your Siri seafood areas to be and having Europe preceding investors. That were leads lead. Your next around was a very bad thing. Now it's entirely flipped on its head because capital is sufficiently unscarred so ample so much flowing around the people want to stay in a company. Preempt preempt that next round they want to lead be and then the as much of the capital to work as they can on a winner to ensure that they can return enough capital to make their large fund contractive enough to raise a second one. So it's a facet of there. Being too much money in the market is certainly a change. Compared to how things used to work it's actually an inversion but it just goes to show how in twenty twenty the way the world works certainly is at least in my experience new. I'm maybe it was like this back in the late. Ninety something but certainly it feels like a new chapter and I presume zoom. Welcome back to what used to be normal when there's less capital around but I don't see that happening for the next eighteen twenty four thirty six months so this this is the way it's going to be Danny presented for the next while.

Founder CEO Eric Yuen Danny Ryan Smith Founder And Ceo Health Care Front Google New York Providence Alex Wilhelm Vision Fund Denny Crichton Sequeira Harada Novi
The Mystery of the iPhone 6

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

03:49 min | 3 years ago

The Mystery of the iPhone 6

"Today the mystery of the iphone six but first we need to go back to nineteen o four and the creation of the vacuum tube before the invention of the Internet. We needed computers. And before we had personal computers we needed integrated circuits and before we add integrated circuits. We had vacuum tubes. You get the idea. Vacuum tubes were the electronic electronic circuitry component required to make telephones radio television and work in the nineteen hundreds to put the limitations of the vacuum tube into perspective. I'll describe an early computer. Consider it filled a twenty by forty foot room. Wade's thirty tonnes and used more than eighteen. Thousand Vacuum Tube so as only fifty percent operational because most of the the time. The technicians were replacing burned out tubes. These tubes auden heated up the room to a hundred twenty degrees now. And William William Shockley the so-called father the transistor that transfers through switch that Apple Faisal flow of electronic signals to create ones and Zeros technology. College over time shrank it down to the size of a virus. But how small is that. Here comes the iphone six. For example sample. It uses the a eight chip which is made up of two billion two billion transistors. There's transistors are now created at the ten nanometer level to put this into perspective considered that a sheet of paper is one hundred thousand nanometers thick so in order to create a ten nanometer sheet of paper one would have to slice a single sheet of paper. Ten Thousand Times thinner to reach that ten nanometer level. You can now you see the growth in vacuum to two nanometer transistor now back to William Shockley. When Shockley semiconductor began operations. Everything thing appeared to be going according to plan shortly after opening shop and recruiting the best and brightest engineers across the country Shockley and his former former Bell lab colleagues Walter Bryan and John Barr Dean. Were notified they all had won the Nobel Prize in physics after after the Nobel Prize celebrations. Everything went downhill quickly. Shockley was known as a brilliant engineer but a horrific manager. He put his employees through a battery of test including psychological tests. Intelligent tests even lie detector tests. Shockley also posted employee salaries publicly publicly and recorded phone calls. He was paranoid individual who believed his workers. Were stealing trade secrets and sabotaging projects. So therefore he wouldn't share findings with his research staff at an insult injury. Shockley was a racist who believe blacks were genetically inferior was subpar implore IQ. So they shouldn't have kids in one thousand nine hundred fifty seven. The aircraft Shockley semiconductor lab started up. The division reached thirty employees. Eight eight of the employees Sheldon Roberts. Eugene Kleiner Victor Greenwich Chair last Julius Blank. Cheen Hornet Robert. Noyce and Gordon Moore. Finally said enough is enough and decided to mutiny. Was the best operation for them. You could say the rest is history. They went on to form Fairchild

William William Shockley Shockley Semiconductor Aircraft Shockley Semiconducto Nobel Prize Thousand Times Eugene Kleiner Victor Greenwic Fairchild Sheldon Roberts Wade Apple Faisal Julius Blank Noyce Gordon Moore Engineer John Barr Dean Bell Walter Bryan Ten Nanometer
With all of Silicon Valley's startup money, where's the investment in climate tech?

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

03:53 min | 3 years ago

With all of Silicon Valley's startup money, where's the investment in climate tech?

"In our climate tech series how we survive. We're in the heart of the tech industry this week. Silicon Valley which which is also the home of the venture capital funds that back a lot of the innovation here and those are concentrated in a quiet office park on one little street called Sandhill road. So what are they doing to invest in climb attack. It's not an area that we've spent a Lotta time in Scott Cooper as a managing partner at andriessen Horowitz it is is a big name firm it helped kick start skype twitter facebook and AIRBNB and Cooper says the VC community is a little shy about climate tek lots lots of them invested heavily in solar and other renewable energy ten or fifteen years ago and lost a lot of money when a bunch of those companies went under I think a lot of the old models unfortunately fortunately assumed or dependent on government subsidies to make the businesses work and given how fickle those are with political climates. There was a lot of heartache when some of those things went way and then fast forward to today. Even if you want to put money into cleantech the scientific innovations you might need for a cool new climate tech solution might not even exist public-address is with S. K. ventures. It's kind of heartbreaking as an investor because it's an area where we'd all like to be much more active but it's not obvious what a large check do that would generate a return within time horizon of a venture fund which is less than ten years basically. It's a lot easier to fund products that are purely digital like APPs or social networks than it is to get into super tricky real world tech like batteries are storage or heaven forbid infrastructure the physical world atoms are a pain in the ass us having to actually work with the physical world slows everything down dramatically these days sandhill road does have some venture capital funds that are investing in sustainability. We we look for mission oriented entrepreneurs that are going after really big problems in big markets reporter is with G to VP cleantech venture fund. That is a spin off from the legendary. VC firm Kleiner Perkins Kleiner decided not to keep green investment in the core fund after all those failures a decade or so ago and Porter says G. Tube EP has a broad definition of sustainability so we're not just investing in clean renewable energy we're investing in Three D. printing wanting and new ways of approaching manufacturing and logistics and collapsing supply chains and food to bring producers and consumers closer together. GDP invest in everything anything from electric buses to buying and selling used cars so long plays toward a greener world but nothing that's obviously going to save us and and then there are a handful of investors who wanna make much bigger faster moves. I think the opportunity is incredibly massive. This is Seth Bannon founding partner at the small venture capital. Oh firm fifty years based in San Francisco. We want people to realize that the technologies to mitigate adapt to the climate crisis can create trillions of dollars worth of wealth fifty years is is investing about fifty million dollars compared to about three hundred and fifty million dollars at G. TO VP. Now the biggest name of the game is breakthrough energy ventures it was launched by Bill Gates and other investors in two thousand sixteen to invest over a billion dollars specifically in clean energy but Bannon says the entire tech industry it needs to step up its super frustrating to me when I see people that control hundreds of millions of dollars and determine what companies ISG funded companies don't tweeting about the next e Gaming Unicorn that they're chasing when you have millions of people people who are being forced to migrate all because of a crisis that technology can solve so when it comes to funding tack to help us adapt to climate change the venture capital. It'll industry that gave us the semiconductor and personal computers and smartphones and social media is still mostly in the shallow end of the

Seth Bannon VP Silicon Valley Scott Cooper Kleiner Perkins Kleiner Bill Gates S. K. Ventures San Francisco Andriessen Horowitz Managing Partner Facebook ISG VC Reporter Founding Partner
Startups looking for funding now have more options

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

06:02 min | 3 years ago

Startups looking for funding now have more options

"This marketplace podcast is brought to you by indeed. Are you hiring with indeed? You can post job in minutes. Set up screener questions than zero in on your shortlist qualified candidates using an online dashboard. Get started today and indeed dot com slash marketplace. That's indeed dot com slash marketplace. And by the Michigan economic Development Corporation, John Rimini founder and CEO at airspace. Experienced technology says in Michigan revolution is in the air. Find out what planet is doing to help businesses make that possible at platinum dot com. That's P. L. A. N. E T, M dot com. Startups looking for funding. Have a lot more options lately from American public media. This is marketplace. Tech demystifying the digital economy, I'm Molly would. Venture capital firms that were invested in lift Uber. And Pinterest just got paid when those companies went public and the banks foundations and pensions that fund, the venture capital funds, we'll get a lot of money too. So, yeah, these big firms will now have more to invest and they'll get more powerful, but the venture industry is changing. There are lots more smaller players like angel investors. Usually really rich people who want to help fund companies and increasingly even everyday investors. Have more ways to get in on the next pre IPO tech unicorn, Jason Calcutta's is a tech entrepreneur and angel investor who got in on Uber when it was still a pipe dream. I asked him how VC is evolving. There are the funds that have been around for decades like sequoia, Kleiner Perkins or benchmark, and those firms have partners who may stay with them for multi decades, and they are the first stops when a founder comes to Santo road or San fr. Francisco. And then there's a new crop of angels. And I went from being essentially a nobody or somebody who was kind of annoying in the industry. This journalist entrepreneur with a big mouth and a big social media following in a podcast to now I'm the first stop were in the first two or three stops for angel investing. I'm the most successful active angel investor in Silicon Valley. So then let's talk about the industry. I mean, we know that these exit is big unicorns. Going public is important for the firms that have funded them and the angel investors that funded them, and how might that money then get funneled back into new startups. Like how important is it to that future person with a PowerPoint injury? It's critically important. I'm in Bolden. Now, having had a couple of grade exits to put more money into my own funds, and put more money to work. So that is a specific phenomenon that occurs, which then benefits the next generation of founders, and we saw that with people who made a lot of money off of Google than invested in Facebook and Twitter, the Facebook and Twitter. Folks, obviously invested in Airbnb and Uber. Yep. One complaint. I have heard actually about venture capital right now is that there's a lot of the same money going into the same big companies and there's maybe not as much diversity. Is it possible that the inflow of money could change that dynamic, and introduce some more innovative investing the venture firms have raised bigger and bigger funds? So the VC's are looking for companies that have a lot more traction, a lot more revenue fuller management teams. So the world's changed the markets are much more efficient, but they're private and this is where the SEC and the investment rules for private companies have to evolve, and we're starting to see that with equity crowdfunding where civilians non accredited investors people with under a million in net worth under two hundred thousand a year in income are being able to write small checks through platforms like Sede invest and Republic. So that's going to be I think the future. And that process is just starting. Ng Jason Kao. Kansas is a tech entrepreneur and angel investor as the number of angel and nontraditional investors in the US has increased. So has the percentage of female investors from five percent in two thousand and four two more like twenty six percent as of two thousand sixteen. And now for some related links. There's a link to a story in entrepreneur magazine on our website marketplace tech dot org. It has the data I mentioned about female angel investors, and actually Alex Conrad over at Forbes, who's also very funny on Twitter has a good piece about how Facebook and its soaring stock over the years has produced a new generation of investors like Jason Calcutta's was talking about, and in fact, lots of them are women who are funding women run businesses who then hire women who might get big payouts if their companies go public or get sold and then might also turn around and become more diverse investors. However, I am definitely aware that a lot of times when we talk about diversity in venture capital. We're talking about adding more white women, so to that effect. There's a good story in fast company about an organization called pipeline angels. It's a boot camp for would be angel investors, and it focuses primarily on. Inclusively meaning, people of color, women non binary end geography. It has training cohorts in Montana. Idaho, Ohio Texas, North Dakota and Minnesota among others. I'm Molly would. And that's marketplace tech. This is APN. This marketplace podcast is brought to you by evident helping businesses create a solid foundation of trust and safety on their platforms. By seamlessly verifying workers unless time. And with more confidence evident also helps companies stay up to date on any changes to relevant information and readily adapt, if and when compliance requirements of all evident is bringing confidence in peace of mind, personal data interactions across the globe. Visit evident ID dot com slash tech to sign up and start running verifications immediately. That's evident ID dot com slash tech.

Twitter Facebook Jason Calcutta Molly Founder And Ceo Founder Entrepreneur Magazine Michigan Economic Development John Rimini Airbnb Jason Kao Michigan Silicon Valley P. L. A. N. E T SEC Pinterest Sequoia
European markets mostly lower with earnings news downbeat

The Frankie Boyer Show

00:51 sec | 3 years ago

European markets mostly lower with earnings news downbeat

"European markets are mostly down with thanks leading to the Kleiner's and investors slightly more cautious admitting smattering of downbeat earnings supports not your pants center. Slipping zero point one percent at three hundred fifty nine after finishing zero point five percent last week Francis. AC forty index falling by zero point five percent. Two four thousand nine hundred ninety one while Spain's banks falling zero point eight percent, eight thousand eight hundred and forty two and Germany's Dax dirty falling by zero point three percent to eleven thousand one hundred and forty four at least put the index remaining flat. Meanwhile, the pushing one hundred is Europe's biggest gainer adding almost zero point three percent to seven thousand and thirty nine most European stocks are treading water though. A smattering of down the economic data has been noted data in Spain showing dead rising jobless levels in January after two months of declines thank an auto are the biggest declines.

Spain Kleiner Francis Europe Germany Three Percent Five Percent Eight Percent One Percent Two Months
Meeker invests in Plaid, Delta tightens animal rules, Salesforce keeps growing

San Francisco Chronicle Business & Technology News - Spoken Edition

01:55 min | 4 years ago

Meeker invests in Plaid, Delta tightens animal rules, Salesforce keeps growing

"You're listening to the spoken edition of the San Francisco Chronicle. Beaker invest in clad. Delta titans animal rules Salesforce, keeps growing by chronicle staff and new services from business a plaid farewell famed venture investor. Mary meeker has made her final deal on behalf of Kleiner Perkins. Two hundred fifty million dollars to plaid which reportedly puts the value of the San Francisco company at two point six five billion dollars. Plaid makes developer tools that help power financial apps and services, including VIN mo- coin base and acorns grow meeker cut ties with Menlo park's Kleiner Perkins in September. And we'll begin raising funds next year for a new firm. She will become a member of Plaid's board and keep her board seats at lending club square and docu sign. Delta titans animal rules, if you're planning a flight longer than eight hours. Delta Airlines says you can't bring an emotional support animal with you as. Of December eighteenth, neither support animals nor service animals will be allowed on any delta flights. If they are under four months old, the airline says exceptions will be made until February first for customers who already bought a ticket and asked to bring support animal airlines are tightening rules on animals saying some have bitten other animals and in one case a delta passenger number of the day fifty billion dollars. That's how much market value Salesforce tower. Right has added since the start of twenty seventeen and its stock has roughly doubled it rose. Almost two point five percent Wednesday to one hundred forty dollars nine cents despite rising competition. Analysts still recommend buying shares.

Delta Titans Kleiner Perkins Plaid Mary Meeker Salesforce Delta Airlines San Francisco Chronicle San Francisco Menlo Park VIN Developer Two Hundred Fifty Million Doll One Hundred Forty Dollars Six Five Billion Dollars Fifty Billion Dollars Five Percent Eight Hours Four Months
Kleiner partner Mary Meeker leaving to start her own venture firm

Daily Tech News Show

03:14 min | 4 years ago

Kleiner partner Mary Meeker leaving to start her own venture firm

"Mary meakers annual internet trends reports are hailed as one of the best evaluations of the industry. She's been doing them or something along those lines for decades now. But Mary meeker will no longer be doing from Kleiner Perkins Gulf field. I'm buyers because meeker joined the VC firm back in two thousand ten, but is now leaving three others to form a new firm. Now, I have to say before I'd looked up who the other three people were. I was like, yeah, women firm, it's not, but that's okay. It's. The street kind of reminds me Tom of our conversation from yesterday about how Microsoft at one point was, you know, all anybody could talk about was sort of antitrust because things do change and Kleiner Perkins is one of the oldest VC firms really of the first dot com. Boom.

Google Microsoft Mary Meeker Mary Meakers Kleiner Perkins Gulf Field Kleiner Perkins Facebook L. Apple Shannon Loeb New York Paris TOM