37 Burst results for "Klein"

Fresh update on "klein" discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

The New Yorker Radio Hour

01:17 min | 4 hrs ago

Fresh update on "klein" discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

"Hour. We'll see what happened when a new APP opened a window for uncensored thought in China, and conversations that people were having on Lian private were suddenly right out in public. I feel like you're in the room just Took a deep collective breath end. It's like how why did you say that? Why would you say that? And she said, I do not appreciate these questions because it made me feel like we are responsible for The crimes that were experiencing and we'll hear from one of the great actors of our era Anthony Hopkins, who spills the trade secrets of a lifetime. Tried to expend to younger actors. If you follow a superb screenplay, it's a road map. And so you don't have to act just keep. It's a simple as you can on know the text. Anthony Hopkins on the New Yorker radio hour. It's just ahead. People, people, people, people, people who ever worked for him. Live from NPR news. I'm Barbara Klein. The Justice Department is appealing. A judge's ruling last week that declared halting evictions during the pandemic was illegal. NPR's Amy held reports. The DOJ says renters need protection to prevent the spread of Govan 19. Federal prosecutors have filed a notice of appeal in the Eastern District Court of Texas. That's where judge ruled last week that the CDC had overstepped its authority by issuing an eviction moratorium. Last year, the CDC ordered landlords to temporarily stop kicking out certain tenants behind on their rent, saying it was a public health measure to slow the spread of covert 19 Group of Texas. Property owners sued and the federal judge sided with them, saying the moratorium was unconstitutional. Justice Department lawyers argue pausing evictions keeps people off the streets and out of crowded shelters in the pandemic. And that the judge's decision does not apply beyond the plaintiffs in the Texas case. Amy held NPR news. The governor of Texas is extending emergency food benefits into March. Saeed a Hassan of member station K E R. A reports more than $200 million in food aid will go to recipients of the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, also known as snap as Texas continues to grapple with the covert 19 pandemic. The state will send more money for food to those enrolled in the program. Governor Greg Abbott and the state's Health and Human Services Commission announced an extension of emergency snap benefits for March totaling about $229 million. Snap recipients will also continue to get a 15% increase in total monthly benefits through June. Officials previously announced they will automatically replace snap benefits for recipients in the 66 counties, where food was lost due to the recent winter storm. I'm saying to her son in Dallas. The future of the Republican Party could get some clarity today is the conservative Political Action Committee, or CPAC, closes its annual conference. Former President Donald Trump gives the keynote address and NPR's Ayesha Roscoe says Republican politicians will be listening closely is because he has so much influence on people who are still in power. There are some high profile Republicans like Congresswoman Liz Cheney, who have said that it's time for the GOP to move. Want from Trump. But it doesn't seem like Republicans are ready to quit him just yet, And people like Senator Lindsey Graham have basically said yes trumps a handful. But there's no way Republicans win without him. It's Trump's first major appearance since leaving the White House nearly six weeks ago. Some Republicans who've defied him, including senators Mitt Romney and Mitch McConnell, and representative list Cheney, Have not been invited to the event. This is NPR news. The U. S. Supreme Court is preparing to hear arguments this week over Arizona's proposed measures that would limit efforts to combat racial discrimination by making it harder to vote. Arizona's one of dozens of states where Republican lawmakers air trying to change election laws, citing concerns about election security. In Williamsburg, Virginia, researchers have rediscovered a building that was once a school for free and enslaved black Children in the 17 hundreds. Sam Turk in of member station. W. H. R V reports Children learned about reading, writing and to accept bondage. The Williamsburg Bridge school taught hundreds of black Children Christianity and tried to convince him that slavery was secret. After shutting in 17 74. The building was moved to another area in Williamsburg. It was repainted remodeled. Soon it's history was lost. Then researchers started looking at the building's archaeology and analyzing documents confirming their theories about its past. Virginia governor Ralph Northam says the rediscovery provides a unique opportunity. The brace school is the oldest surviving schoolhouse for free and enslave black people in the northern Hemisphere. Through this house. We can tell the stories about the people who learned here, officials say they now make the building a research center focused on race, religion and education in America. For NPR News. I'm Sam Turk in Norfolk, Virginia. And I'm Barbara Klein. NPR news Support for NPR comes from NPR stations. Other contributors include the university musical society, presenting Window Pierce and Charlie Robinson and a new play some old black man. On demand march 1st through 12th registration at um s dot or g'kar. Thistles, The New Yorker Radio hour, a co production of W. N. Y. C Studios and The New Yorker. Welcome to The New Yorker Radio hour. I'm David Remnick. Going to talk today with Anthony Hopkins. Hopkins is starring in the new movie The Father, and he's playing opposite Olivia Colman that'll be later this hour. But we're going to start today in a place called clubhouse clubhouse is a virtual space an app that launched about a year ago, and it's a product of Silicon Valley. It's found a particularly powerful niche in China. Jang Fan, a staff writer at The New Yorker, has been spending a lot of time lately in Chinese language chat rooms in clubhouse. Its biggest innovation is the fact that it is based around voice communication. So, um, you launch the app and then immediately shows you this list of rooms that you can join. And you go in there and you can hear actual people talking in real time in their own voice. The conversation's often circle to pretty taboo subjects, and those topics are not discussed because people don't like to leave a trail. So hearing in real time Chinese youth discussing subjects that they have never been allowed to discuss in classrooms or even really in Cafes that's incredibly intriguing and keeps me on there for hours at a time. Clubhouses, which I and came across a woman she's calling DD so if you open up your a clubhouse app. What do you see? Okay, I'm opening the app. So the first room that I see is a DHD Coworking room work. 45 minutes. Chat 15. I don't know what that I say about, um, Tech support career advice Q and a for tech workers. And then yes, some of the more interesting stuff and the occasional chat about Chinese lawn politics. Yeah, I'm not that won t O. I'll try to translate this. I'll read the Chinese title on all trains. Chances. Tino Atala social means woman teacher, The Huns who shall be titled it, Auntie..

Barbara Klein Olivia Colman David Remnick Mitch Mcconnell Anthony Hopkins Dallas Mitt Romney Sam Turk Ayesha Roscoe March 1St Donald Trump W. N. Y. C Studios Williamsburg March GOP Republican Party Liz Cheney 15% Cpac Charlie Robinson
USA gymnastics 'giant' dead after trafficking, sexual assault charges filed

Democracy Now! Audio

00:35 sec | 2 d ago

USA gymnastics 'giant' dead after trafficking, sexual assault charges filed

"Michigan former. Us olympic gymnastics coach. John gathered died by suicide. Thursday moments after he was charged with sexual assault and human trafficking in addition to to charges of sexual assault against children. Get it was accused of enabling former olympic team physician and convicted serial rapists and child. Sexual abuser dr. Larry nassar nassar survivor. Sarah klein was just eight years old when she began training and get her gym on thursday. She said quote he tortured and abused little girls myself included for more than thirty years and was able to cheat

Olympic Gymnastics Larry Nassar Nassar Sarah Klein Michigan John United States
Fresh update on "klein" discussed on Our Body Politic

Our Body Politic

00:35 min | 5 hrs ago

Fresh update on "klein" discussed on Our Body Politic

"My mom said that you're homeless. Who is that? True? The new movie Nomad Land by director Chloe Zhao is that perform Golden Globes in a year with much at stake. The Academy Awards have been pushed back to April. Tonight's Golden Globe winners will be announced just a few days before Oscar voters get their ballots. NEDA Willoughby. NPR news New York Attorney general Leticia James is calling on Governor Andrew Cuomo to issue an official referral to investigate allegations of sexual harassment against him. Cuomo had called for an independent inquiry by a former federal judge. The attorney general says there must be a truly independent investigation, including subpoena power. Two former Cuomo aides have now accused him of sexual harassment. Cuomo denies the allegations, and his office says it will fully cooperate with any inquiry. On Barbara Klein NPR news Support for NPR comes from NPR stations..

Chloe Zhao Barbara Klein Nomad Land Cuomo April NPR Governor TWO Golden Globe Tonight Golden Globes Academy Awards New York Attorney General Leticia James A Year Andrew Cuomo Oscar Few Days Neda
Freshwater fish in "catastrophic" decline, one-third face extinction

Stryker and Klein

01:34 min | 4 d ago

Freshwater fish in "catastrophic" decline, one-third face extinction

"I know I constantly bring shortages to you in a TV news and today is no different. Here's the next thing that there's just too little of. So I guess if you're in the freezer section and you love tilapia and any kind of fish, you should load it into your cart because everyone is obsessed with fishing right now. There's not enough fish. New research shows that one third of all fish like freshwater fish are now facing extinction because no one can everyone is so bored. They're fishing, like crazy and buying. You know, stuff in the grocery store way more than they ever were. So we're out like running out of salmon running out of Philip. What about the most important fish? What? You haven't mentioned the most important fish that I have mentioned on this show, And I believe when you mention this fish, it equals high class. First step trout? No, not fit. Howard. How are the rainbow in Brook trout doing not great because I think pretty much all of those are found in lakes and anyplace where there's fresh water, and I think those are the most catchable like I've only gone fishing a few times, but it was always trout because that was like the easiest thing the dumbest fish. You put the worm on the hook. You twisted around you real it in and you know It's hard to get the fish off the hook. When they're really, really wiggling around. I think we all if we're gonna do all this fish, we're gonna figure out how to get him off the hook school decline yesterday, Allie was saying that the fishing equipment was like back order. You can't get it. So just more proof that Maybe that's a good thing. Maybe they should hold out on releasing more fishing equipment until they can go ahead and restock the Yeah, the fish

Philip Salmon Howard Allie
Episode 56: Best/Worst Remakes and Jamie Sings! - Drive Of THe Week

F That Noise

03:07 min | Last week

Episode 56: Best/Worst Remakes and Jamie Sings! - Drive Of THe Week

"We start every episode with drive of the week if you don't know what a drive is dr a line from a movie or a tv show said with exceptional velocity and volume and this segment belongs to jamie klein. All right ladies. Gentlemen and fucking michael g lombardo. The nineteen ninety five classic. Martin scorsese masterpiece casino. Oh casinos starred the great robert deniro. Joe patchy sharon stone don rickles and kevin us and so we seen. I was going for casino. This is a good drive by sharon stone. Whose nominated academy award for. The film was quite good and this is a good drive that she says to her husband played by robert deniro keith. Takeaway shoulder beaver out of your hair. She calms down. I will let it roll down. I will let her house for five minutes if you gentlemen. Were escorted her out if she happens to not want to leave. Because i don't like that's fine. She gets middling now so good of a dry because she says right to lean so good. Yeah try so much impact at her career win right down the toilet afterwards. Once he did that she's in film hall of fame assche to but if you look what more does she want. But if that i agree with the rest of that i agree all those nominations. Forget it drive of the week. I agree i agree but like if you listen closely now she says fine with a soft s and then she digs in for the fuck. You fine fine. She worked with their accent code. Find really be mad at someone to drive. Something i actually. I don't know if you do. Okay that's fair. Well pete you're man of principle and i applaud you for to digging your heels standard around mmediately buckled on that. That was the driver of the week brought to you by trash. Men media for the latest blu ray. Dvd commentary and reviews had a trash man media dot com and also on facebook and twitter. I just wanna add. Also we just got some new reviews by tyler stephenson just recently posted yours truly and we also have one from travis north. That just got posed a lot of good reviews. Check it out. Also don't forget to check out meet up deserve to step back latest news and absolutely noble shit. Wait i might. Mike was

Jamie Klein Michael G Lombardo Robert Deniro Joe Patchy Sharon Robert Deniro Keith Don Rickles Martin Scorsese Sharon Stone Academy Award Kevin Tyler Stephenson Travis North Facebook Twitter Mike
Giving sources the power to tell their own stories

It's All Journalism

06:40 min | 2 weeks ago

Giving sources the power to tell their own stories

"Breeding is the deputy director of the global reporting center. The center has recently produced documentary series for pbs. Newshour called turning points which uses the empowerment journalism model. Britney's here to talk to us about that series and explain exactly what is empowerment journalism. Welcome to the podcast brittany. Thanks so britney you said before we turn to the that you had. You've heard our podcast and so you kinda know how we start out things. Could you tell us a little bit about how you got involved in journalism and how you ended up at the global reporting center so i think you're probably the first person asked me how i've gotten into journalism since my first day of journalism school but sometimes when i think back on it i'm not even sure how i ended up here but what i think happened was i graduated from undergrad with an english degree in fine arts degree and i was sure that i was going to be a teacher though. I moved to south korea just to sort of try it out and see what it was like to work as a teacher. I was teaching english as a second language. But in a funny way. I sort of missed being a student. I love reading and writing and losing myself in research and so i started to think really hard about what kind of career would lead me to new discoveries into an opportunity to spend more of my life learning and i think that that's really what led need to journalism and so i moved back to canada and enrolled in a master's degree at the university of british columbia. And they have this incredible program that was formerly known as the international reporting program is now known as the global reporting program and that really drew my attention and it gives you a chance to spend a full year working on enterprise investigative work of international journalism. And my year. We were lucky enough to travel to china to report on the emerging environmental movement. And it was just this amazing opportunity to really dig in and learn and after i graduated from my masters a new that daily news was not going to be my thing. I wanted to be somewhere where that freedom to explore a story to stay with it. And i know that those jobs are also a few and far in between but at the time one of our professors at u c was just starting to build a global reporting center and an adviser at the school had recommended me when our director. Peter klein was looking for someone to help out part time so i started working with him in twenty fourteen. Just right after graduating. And i was working part. Time will working some other jobs and just trying to fill out that full time schedule. Then when we launched in two thousand sixteen we had a lot of momentum. And so yeah. I've been with the goal reporting center basically ever since i graduated from a masters. And it's been a really wonderful opportunity in place to work because peter in the team are always willing to listen to new ideas and new projects in there's this openness to experimentation and i even working now with the golden pudding program as their multimedia producer so in some ways. My story is a bit full circle. Because i have both that career that allows me to discover learn but also one where i'm getting to work with students and help them grow in home their skill. So yeah it's been really great. And i i feel like i'm really lucky to have found myself where i am. We have peter klein on the podcast. A couple of years ago. And i remember having a really great conversation with him and he reached out to us about a month ago and said. Hey you should talk to the people about the turning points program that's being produced with pbs newshour. You know this is something interesting something different and had a chance to check out some of the The videos that you guys have produced for that project and it's really really powerful so before we get into that just could you explain what is the mission of the global reporting center. What are the types of stories that it does. Yeah of course so. We thought a lot about this. And i think i mean are small mandate are sort of one liner is global journalism done differently and then when you expand that in what that means split into three distinct areas so the first being the focus on collaboration so we work with journalists from around the world we work with a variety of media partners with researchers and scholars which we're lucky based on our position at the university to sort of have this wealth of scholarship around us an even now at this turning point project working roy subjects we. We don't generally work with fixers. We use journalists partners. So collaboration is really at the heart of what we do. And i think that that sort of sets us apart a little bit because you know. Journalism has been shifting for a long time towards less competitiveness. More sort of working together in this idea that we tell better stories when we're not silent off in working together in that something that we really take to heart and then the other sort of areas that set us apart. Are that experimentation innovation sort of area where we try to do our journalism in different ways. Were open to new methods and new methods. Don't always work out. Sometimes they fail and for us. That's okay because we just want to be able to experiment and try new things and see what works in take those pieces that are successful in and bring them to a new stage in the last focuses on our education avenue so on global reporting program and bringing on students every year to work with us when we have big projects in production like turning points. We like to give students opportunities to work on projects in meaningful ways and allow them in on the production process so that they really get that experience when they're going out into the world they have these pieces that you know they can point to and say that they worked on okay so now is a fair to assume that the the turning points is a collaboration that you're doing with the pbs newshour partnership with pbs newshour. We originally didn't bring on a media partner at the beginning and there were a couple of reasons why we didn't do that. I because we weren't really sure. This method is going to work empowerment journal. The model was very new to us. And so we wanted to make sure that we had that freedom and adaptability to sort of shift change and potentially fail if it was going to fail and so we didn't bring on a partner from the very beginning. We've actually been working on this project since two thousand sixteen

Global Reporting Center PBS Peter Klein University Of British Columbia Britney South Korea Newshour Canada China Peter ROY Newshour Partnership
Can Dogs Be a Prescription for Better Health

Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

04:24 min | 2 weeks ago

Can Dogs Be a Prescription for Better Health

"One thing that learned from the wolves. The death spent a lot of time playing three type of games. The games are chasing wrestling and tug of war. When you think about the skills that they need to master in order to be good hunters is to chase the animal directly to the ground grabbing the leg rubbing the neck and then to tag tag on the neck to kill it and then to rip it to pieces so they can eat so when we look at dogs all play chasing wrestling war now if we look at any sport let's look at the nba or football. Everybody of the position. Dan not all doing the same that everybody else want. He's a point guard one center one day with tom. Brady's role ease of quarterback so dogs are one of them. Some of them going to be really good at chasing some of them going to be really good at at wrestling. Some of them really going to be a tug of war. So when i work with people that tell me. My dog is tugging at my role being the morning immediately. I know the dog is inviting his parents to play a game of tug of war casino. You can win that game the way human toddler or five year old is going to invite you to play the computer game that they know they can win it. They know they're going to kick your butt. It right talks at the same. So when i go back to that klein. It does me the doggy stealing socks in what he's doing with his socks. Iran's away and ascend what do you do when he runs away with his song. He says after. Stop working and chasing anything thing. Ding ding denniston. Is that a dog training problem. No it's a relationship problem and instead the dog wants you to pay attention to him and the owner tells me. But i'm here an icee liza clear here but you're not prison to the relationship. You're not present to you dog. How many relationships do you know where people are completely with each other. I've no idea nothing about each other is no nothing going on between them and i said the only time did dog gets you to be engaged with him. He's when he standing socks and he got it and he says so. What do i do so clearly. The talk training that the is done before was correcting the dog but the problem was that they did not find another way to do what to meet. The dogs needs. If i need a core need is not going to be. Mitt you can get rid of a need is not a preference speak to the dogs and human beings you got it. We need to meet the needs. They'll odd the only way for a dog to meet. The need of interaction is to go into depression and it was a young alive. Happy dog there was no way he would do that. And also the owner was a sweetheart. Incorrect is the way data. Trainers told him to do and god so i showed him how to play games. That met the dog needs those based on these three me Wrestling and tug of war where he was engaged once he made the dog needs. He now had the right to say now. I'm busy working amid to needs not all going to spend all day with you and within couple of these. The problem was fixed because a lot of people in that situation feel like. Oh if i played along with their that's not on my terms of walking the dog around the block and when it needs to poop and pee and other stuff then just want gonna want to do that all day. That's true but you ever right. You don't ever i to tell the dog no more just the way you would tell china more if you. I have been made their needs. Do you see what i'm saying. Absolutely and they need sign any relationship. It's like i see believe me what people tell me about the relationship with each other about the intimate stuff and i'm looking and i'm like how do you expect your husband to stay with you. If you have not been with him for over a decade romantically

Wrestling Ding Ding Denniston Brady NBA DAN Klein Liza Football TOM Iran Mitt Depression China
Nearly 3 million U.S. women have dropped out the labor force

Morning Edition

04:33 min | 3 weeks ago

Nearly 3 million U.S. women have dropped out the labor force

"Not long after Donald Trump arrived at the White House, he disbanded and office that focused on challenges affecting women. President Biden is now resurrecting it. Women's rights groups hope this will help them make progress on things like paid family leave and affordable child care. Here's NPR's Melissa Block. The wish list on Biden's agenda for women is long restoring an expanding reproductive rights, combating gender based violence, reducing maternal mortality, and he's pitched a slew of economic proposals. Major structural disruption requires major structural change. And I feel like thinking big right now is exactly what we need to do. So now is the time That's the co chair of the Biden administration's new gender Policy Council. Jennifer Klein. You know we're seeing because of the health pandemic because of the economic crisis, and, in fact, take care giving crisis that's been layered on top of it. These are core issues core issues, Klein points out that air hitting women hard and especially women of color. Just look at the most recent jobs numbers. In December, women accounted for all 140,000 of the country's net lost jobs. One factor behind that, with so many schools and day care centers closed because of the coronavirus. Many women have had to drop out of the labor force. That's been disastrous, says Joan Williams, director of the Center for Work Life Law at the University of California, Hastings. Mother's already We're at the breaking point in the United States. I mean, we already had a choc your system that was basically a Rube Goldberg machine and the coronavirus brought that machine crashing down. Williams says. What she wants the Biden administration to do is to recognize that Just as we don't expect workers to get to work without physical infrastructure like bridges and roads. We can't expect workers to get to work without a care infrastructure. What would that care Infrastructure look like for Williams? That would mean subsidized neighborhood based child care, paid family leave Universal, pre K and $15 an hour minimum wage, especially during the pandemic. Single moms have had to choose between putting food on the table and leaving young Children home alone. Now. Part of the reason is because the minimum wages so low that there is no way on God's green Earth that those moms can pay for childcare. The paid caregivers are also reeling from the crunch. President Biden highlighted this when he announced his covert 19 relief plan last month. Let's make sure caregivers mostly women, women of color immigrants. Have the same pay indignity that they deserve. Advocates like I Jen poo, director of the National Domestic Workers Alliance, are heartened by what they're hearing from Biden. Her group represents workers, including nannies, home care workers and housekeepers, actually focusing on how we're going to make Thies jobs, good jobs for the 21st century. That you can take pride in and earn a living wage with benefits. That is a really big breakthrough. Conservatives, though, are leery of an agenda that carries a hefty price tag and they warn, will lead to crushing government regulations. Charmaine Yost is vice president of the Institute for Family Community and Opportunity at the Heritage Foundation. My biggest concern is that all of the proposals that I'm hearing coming from their side of things inevitably seem to come back to big government intervention in government programs. As for raising the minimum wage in the midst of a pandemic, when many businesses are suffering so badly if there were a time that you could create, that would be the perfect time to not Raise the minimum wage. This would be it with such a slim Democratic majority in Congress. Biden's agenda could have a tough time gaining traction. But Fatima Goss Graves, who heads the National Women's Law Center, is undaunted. Her group has issued an ambitious list of 100 demands for Biden's 1st 100 days. Basically, what we're asking this administration and Congress to do is effectively walk into gum. We need them to both undo things that have been harmful and have been Holding this country back and launch us forward in a way that we're stronger for it, Graves adds. This president doesn't have the luxury of coasting in Melissa Block NPR news

Biden Administration President Biden Melissa Block New Gender Policy Council Jennifer Klein Biden Joan Williams Center For Work Life Law Donald Trump NPR Williams Jen Poo Rube Goldberg White House National Domestic Workers Alli Klein Hastings University Of California Charmaine Yost
What's Your Everest? With Sara Safari

Camden Boyd's The Happiness Question

05:01 min | Last month

What's Your Everest? With Sara Safari

"I'll sarah it's great to have you on the show. Thank you so much. Thank you for having me. Do you have any questions before we get started. Tell me more about yourself. And what did you start this block. Cats let's see. I started this podcast out of the bit of a depression. That was trying to find out for myself how to be a happier person and through school projects and this show. I've been able to help myself and others be happier still happen to learn every single time i haven't interview. What is the secret to happiness. Now let's see well but if we talked about so far you're talking is going to be completely new but we've talked about relationships. Those are very important. We've talked about money. Buzek just kind of ways to be happier. I'll give you my own definition. Good cheer wore me to death of is leaving at your full potential. Who i like that so doing things that you really wanna do. And then you're happy and that there is a deeper levels to it after you do everything that you wanna do then you realize after doing all of that. There's only two things that really make you happy. The rest is just a surface happiness but the deep happiness there are only two ways of being actually happy one making a difference in the world to having relationships like that. Tell us a little bit more about yourself. I was born in iran. And i moved to the united states when i was twenty and i studied electrical engineering at ucla. And i was working in by companies and then later on. I decided that i want to start teaching and the main part of the story. Is that outof nowhere. I decided to climb mount everest. Seven years they go and then a couple of years a few months. After i decided to climb mount everest i decided to quit and then when i decided to quit i met the founder of the organization in power nepali girls and i decided to climb mount everest again for the second time. I mean just. I didn't do the stein. But i just said to quit right at the beginning but the second time i decided to do it. This time to raise funds and awareness for the girls who become victims of human trafficking or forced to get married at a very young age and then i actually climbed mount everest. And when i was climbing there was a seven point. Eight earthquake in nepal. I survived the earthquake and the avalanches and aftershocks everything about that earth way again came back home. Publish the book starting my own business and here. I am right now. Seven years after that would have been a scarier rake. It was gary. Yeah where were you. When that hit. I was at twenty thousand feed on an ice wall about finish the wall on the edge off the wall. Almost when the earthquake hit us at a decision mount everett above koumura icefall is the most dangerous part of everest in most unstable part of everest grey. I so did you end up making it to the top. No i'd i'd you're talking to my soul right no. We didn't make it to the top because everybody decided to quit climbing. You know there are sherpas which are neb Mountain climbers who are really good at this and they set up their route a rope all the way to the top of the mountain and because of the air raid ten thousand people died today have to call it quits and they had to leave to go. Take care of their families. Their home their belongings was just such a crazy earthquake and then when they left nobody else without them. Klein's evidence or any mountain that area so they let everybody else to leave. Yeah so no. I then make it to the top of everest. I still haven't made it to the top of everest. Even tried a bunch of times. After that i still haven't made it to the top of everest

Buzek Sarah Depression Earthquake Ucla Iran United States Nepal Gary Klein
Ben & Jerry’s New Rain-dough Flavour Is Bursting With Cookie Dough And Rainbow Sprinkles

Stryker and Klein

00:26 sec | Last month

Ben & Jerry’s New Rain-dough Flavour Is Bursting With Cookie Dough And Rainbow Sprinkles

"And Jerry's cookie dough ice cream Now comes with rainbow Sprinkles and ice cream sticks. Rain dough ice cream will be cookie dough ice cream with Sprinkles. It's called Rando Rain does rain. Darcy your fans smile in the workplace thing, chairs. They're They're so good. I love the talk show ice cream that they have Americo own. And this one is right up my alley as well. Rain dough, and that is your Munchie minute. I like

Jerry Darcy Americo
James Comey and Truth in Government

The Book Review

05:41 min | Last month

James Comey and Truth in Government

"Joe klein joins us now to talk about a new book. From james comey. It's called saving justice truth. Transparency and trust. Joe thanks for being here screwed to be with you. All right joe. You don't need any introduction but for those who are not familiar with. Joey is a former writer for the new yorker former columnist for time magazine author of many many books including perhaps most famously when that did not appear with his byline primary colors And a follow up novel running meat and this week he reviews for us at james. Comey's second book so the obvious question. I have to ask i is. How does this book differ from his previous book. Well it doesn't differ very much at all actually except for one thing. He rehearses all of the confrontations he had with donald trump in both books but in the second book he places that in the context of the need for truth and transparency in government. Which i think is a valuable thing. The book is the repetition of the first book but it's not an insignificant repetition because of the the context that he now placed it so the first book higher loyalty was kind of hybrid memoir both from his earlier days as a prosecutor in the department of justice and then for his brief period at the doj under trump but it was also kind of manifesto about justice. It feels like on the surface this new book saving justice is kind of exactly the same thing. Well yeah it is. It is the same thing and it's obviously something that cody feels very strongly about. But i think you know the important thing here is his view of justice and his view of the fbi remember he was the fbi director. Whom trump fired because he allowed the russian investigation continue which resulted after he was fired in the hiring. A bob muller as special investigator but komi has a very distinctive view of justice. And i and its ecclesiastical he sees the members of the justice department all the way down to assisted. Da's out in the country as being part of a sacred priesthood sworn to absolute honesty to complete probity to conducting the business in entirely facts based and nonpartisan manner and you can see how that might conflict with donald trump right. Does he talk about what's happened at the department of justice since his departure. He doesn't talk about that all that much except to say that it has been corrupted by trump trump spent the last four years trying to make it into a partisan weapon to go after his enemies in. Kobe is appalled by that. One of the things that you do in your review is draw the distinctions between trump's view of justice and company's point of view. Is that something that komi himself dozen. The boker was that you. He doesn't to a certain extent. But i teased it out a little bit from me. The most important thing that is kind of gone overlooked about trump if anything can be said to have been overlooked is his view of the world which came out in the second debate with joe biden where he said only low. Iq refugees showed up for their refugee hearings in other words. The smart ones absconded. Only stupid people abide by the laws. Smart people get around it. Only stupid people pay off their creditors. Smart people stiffen and that is donald trump's operating philosophy and unfortunately it seems to be the operating philosophy a lot of his followers and that stands in direct contravention of commes operating philosophy. Which is you gotta tell the truth. I don't think you could find two more temperamentally opposite. People trump and komi. But what's interesting at least in the little bit of this book that i read it seems is a slight shift in tone from the last book i mean in part it seems like he's he is trying to draw contrast he opens up the book with donald trump sort of leaning back in his chair and telling him that putin showed off to him apparently about russia having the best prostitutes in the world. And he's telling that james comey. Yeah that would not go over very well. Comas is a religious catholic and And as i said he's religious about the notion of justice and truth. I mean he tells a story about his early days as a us district attorney where he was working a drug case and he had a government informant named vinny and it turned out that they put vinnie in the witness protection program and vinnie took the opportunity to get married. The problem is that he was also married in his former life which meant he was now a bigamist which is a crime and komi says that it was his absolute responsibility. Even though the bigamy had nothing to do with the drug case in question to tell the other side the defendant's lawyers that vinnie was a bigamist. And that shows you the degree to which komi will go in the defense of the truth almost to the point of myopia. I

Justice Department James Comey Donald Trump Comey Joe Klein Bob Muller FBI Komi Trump Trump The New Yorker Time Magazine Joey JOE Cody James DA Kobe
Interview With Tovah P. Klein

Doug Miles Media

05:19 min | Last month

Interview With Tovah P. Klein

"Joining us today in our book talk. Great to welcome the book that I'm sure there's got to help a lot of parents out there. it's called. How toddlers thrive what parents can do today for children ages two five to plant the seeds of lifelong success. Joined by my client from a new york today and dot com good to have a chance of chaplain for few minutes. How are you today. thank you for having me. i guess everybody says toddlers They're cute and everything but Those those are not easy time for for parents right. So this is a timely book. I would imagine. I hope i hope. So that's the goal. Because it can be. I think perplexing and quite a challenge. What is it about that age. Everybody goes through it. Obviously i guess some more than others. are worse than others. I should say that Is that is that the biggest issue parents have early on after maybe the first few weeks of an infant bring what happens. We have our infants and obviously we learned their communication and we comfort them. We feed them. We do a lot of holding them and taking care of them. But for the toddler who's up on their feet and certainly once they get language around the age of two. They're really separating and they're starting to realize. Hey my own person and i have my own ideas and they are not always what mommy or daddy wants but hey i really need mommy and daddy and i really love them and so they copy between this excitement about being out in the world and on their own and this real need to know that mommy or daddy are there for them no matter what and so i call it a push. Poll of the toddler years of is this their first attempts at becoming independent. And that's where you get. You know what people call wilfulness or defiance. It's really the that young child is still really baby. Saying hey i have my own ideas and that's where it starts to become a challenge for parents particularly for first time. Parents does the first child That's the first time they They have do disciplining right. Yeah i mean it's really about limits setting you know. We always talk about how much young children need from teens. Because if you have a routine that's like setting limit so for example. Mealtime we sit at a table. We eat our food at the. That's setting a limit when the child gets up. Oh you're all done. What it says to them is when we have a meal. We sit at the table. We don't walk around with food and you don't even have to go so far as discipline when you have a lotta routines routines around getting dressed. Bath time dinnertime. Anything that you do. Every day needs a routine. Because that's what helps children know what's going to happen and feel that they have some control almost a Security and they know what it's coming up next most exactly and they don't. They have no sense of time at this age. I think it's hard for adults any of us to really understand what it would be like to not have a sense of time because we look at our watches or we look at the day of the league. And we say oh. What do i do monday. Whereas young children have no capacity to tell time so those routines give them that organization right and you read. It makes them feel safe. All i know. What's next what what i was doing to remember when i was a little kid. Yeah you're right time As much slower than really an aspect of it to you know you know. That's what that's supposed to delight of. Toddlers is live in the moment so when you're in a joyful with their child they're right in know they're like you know playing with something and their joyous and sharing it with you but they don't think about. Oh i need to stop this in a few minutes and move on so the downside of living in the moment and not having the time is it's very hard to move from one thing to another like finish playing the weekend leave for school is very hard for them from your research talking to. I'm sure many many parents what what's the biggest mistake you see the parents dealing with that age group biggest mistake that any of us make particularly with our firstborns. But we can do this with any child is thinking that they're older than they are so our expectations become much more than what the child can actually do and part of that. Is you know once. Our children have language and can really talk and communicate better. First of all there's relief for us. I think there's relief for the child as well. I can communicate a little bit more but we start to think they're much older so one moment you're having a nice conversation saying remember when we go to dinner at that restaurant used to be quiet. Trust own yes. I know that the restaurant but then you get their now cancelled. Still can't keep quiet. That's because they're two or three or four and we think that they're much older than they are and so we kind of bring our expectations down a bit their level. We actually treat them differently in a more supportive way. And that's really what my book is valid. You understand something about how low development is but this is really also a really important crucial time kind of back off a little. Say okay. I understand what my child's doing and just switching parenting techniques. A little bit can really make life that much easier with a toddler.

New York
President Trump Impeached a Second Time

COVID-19: What You Need to Know

03:20 min | Last month

President Trump Impeached a Second Time

"Made president trump the first. Us president impeached twice. Now the senate's turn once that trial begins. Perhaps after joe biden's inauguration january twentieth and aesthetic patera covered at the capitol today an s era. And it's gonna be really interesting to see what happens in the senate now today. We saw senate majority leader mitch. Mcconnell saying he hadn't made up his mind yet when it comes to impeachment sleep which was huge. That's the senate majority leader Saying he's considering possibly voting to convict president trump. It'll be interesting to see whether or other republican senators follow suit. There had been some reporting that mitch. Mcconnell was was looking at impeachment as a way to purge the party of trump because of president. Trump is convicted by the senate. You would not be able to run again in twenty twenty four and that's part of the reason. Impeachment was such an appealing option for democrats. I think what happened today. Though when we saw you know a vast majority of house. Republicans did not vote to impeach. The president there were ten. Did vote to impeach the president but a vast majority of them while condemning president trump condemning his rhetoric condemning his actions. These still didn't feel impeachment was warranted. So i'm really curious to see how senators look at this. Whether they have the same considerations we saw president trump putting out that video shortly after he was impeached. Putting out a pre recorded video during which he tried to condemn the violence at the capitol. It'll be interesting to see whether that's enough for republican senators. Abc's as kotehra with us. Who covered up the capital today. Our white house correspondent karen travers. Now karen go back to something Steve roberts said about we thought that maybe next week president trump would leave washington and hold a rally likely in florida that could be seen as the kickoff to a potential twenty four campaign. There is no talk of that happening anymore. Especially after what happened last wednesday and we don't know what the president is doing between now and when he leaves washington at some point around january twentieth. We don't know what he's gonna do in the weeks right after that but we do know that here. In washington there will be a legal team defending him in the senate impeachment trial. That is not what anybody was predicting Eight days ago simply stunning. Abc's karen travers. Our white house correspondent want to get a final thought from recliner political director rick. Well this is all uncharted territory. I mean to have the cascading crises of the biden presidency. All coming now amid the this impeachment push we. We've seen so many superlatives over the years as you as you noted that the top aaron but this is this is a new one for all of us in a new one for washington we are. We are in a very tense time in this country on a very troubling time Day for for the history books novell. Abc news political director. Rick klein real. Quick to steve roberts. Our political analyst steve over the last two months donald trump has done an indelible and eternal damage to his own legacy. This is self inflicted wounds. The way he handled the post election process the the riots at the capitol he leaves office a diminished and a damaged president in ways. That would not even been imagined before the election no question. Abc news. political analyst. Steve roberts after a stunningly swift response to the capital insurrection by the house impeaching president trump for the second time. I'm aaron katersky abc news.

Senate Mcconnell Karen Travers Mitch Joe Biden Washington Steve Roberts Donald Trump ABC White House Karen United States Rick Klein Florida Biden Abc News Rick Aaron
Leadership & Team Development Consultant

Hacking Your Leadership

04:17 min | Last month

Leadership & Team Development Consultant

"Hi my name is on the liberal. And thanks for listening to the can be Guest series two of the most to inflict Leaders in my life have been to my managers. One i love kenyans taught me how trustworthy an open relationship can be built within a matter of seconds when it was going through the hiring process for job with her in my last two years of studies. One of the steps was to take Off to the testimony came back to interview room and announced new hope very higher score higher than mine and i got the job. I the show. That doesn't have to be the best at everything. And it's a strength to know your exports and even bigger trend is to hire people to fill the gap and be open about it and such an authentic wayne. The other flinch leader in my life was benson a manager. The consultancy walsum during one of the performance reviews who discussed how happy both might employer in the current client. Where about how worked. And how. I was continuously growing this. My silent scope eric. Truce bomb the Person does lead them just to have at least forty five years till retirement. My manager a person whose role can be seen as a making sure that bring money to my company basically told me slow down girl when you do in the long run in one short sentence. Eric me that true leadership can be about caring for your people wouldn't them well and possibly compromise in short term. Wins for the sake of the person's roping in hitting the company's long-term goals the first mistake might does a leader was taking pride in empty part of my cat trumped. Assuming people have to accept me. Just as i used to be a way to straightforward partly due to my cultural background coming from ukraine parking due to my personality. My dad is to tell me when i was a teenager that i'd have problems in my last because of my stubbornness pm to straightforward. And right. he. He took me some time to learn that for successfully getting people on board as a leader. I need to slow down to get softer and more patient. And most importantly to listen more intently and to listen more at all i might know the answer to all the solution. But if others are involved in bringing it to fruition. My job is not to serve this ocean on a silver platter but to help the team explorer situation and finest live together and more often than not the team. Solution will be better than what i thought off because of the diverse perspectives for all. Drink to the table. I believe that the difference between a good leader and a great leader lies in their self-awareness and in the self leadership skills by working on ourselves and become better at understanding our own self. We become more curious about understanding the others more patient and more empathetic every crate leader. I know continues to work some herself and reflects on our progress keeps learning and developing always sees steeper understanding of herself and the others and is committed to identifying her plight spots and improving in those areas often with help with the others. They know god. They don't know everything and a humble to admit that they're ready to collaborate with others to silva kept together as a leader of people end. Developer of talent beat my team. Members klein's friends or community members. I met her success by the depth of the conversation. I'm having with mike people and kind of questions. They're coming to me with often. Get questions like have you always been like this or did you learn it. I want to be like you can me so much lives pulls down to a mindset attitude and if people get inspired and willing to transform their lives through watching me than have succeeded and i'm always happy to answer their questions and more importantly ask questions to help them explore themselves and get the transformation into the reality.

Walsum Benson Wayne Eric Ukraine Silva Klein Mike
Episode 51: When Did You Think You Were Right Only To Find Out You Were Wrong? - burst 05

F That Noise

00:41 sec | Last month

Episode 51: When Did You Think You Were Right Only To Find Out You Were Wrong? - burst 05

"Mine is in no way exciting but it needs to be said nonetheless might biggest thing that i thought was a really good idea and thought that i was really right about turns out. It was completely wrong college. I never gone. I feel like i would not be in debt that i'm in even to this day and i feel like i would have felt feeder anyway. Which is what. I found in college. And i feel like real big echina- steak and i feel like no kids go to college I feel i feel it's fucking bullshit. And what a waste of time. Money cool

Episode 51: When Did You Think You Were Right Only To Find Out You Were Wrong? - Steve Leads Off

F That Noise

00:58 sec | Last month

Episode 51: When Did You Think You Were Right Only To Find Out You Were Wrong? - Steve Leads Off

"Yeah this is easiest this easiest one for me. Man go ahead numb my first marriage. That is without a doubt. That's i was thousand percent on that and fuck is wrong and now that was proven wrong. Really fast yeah also was that he was young off. The wedding was the reception. Was great vinny on jamie running around the dance floor with the video camera in people's faces fucking jet dot. Edu ever getting mad at me though you get mad at me that night. Ask because probably told me matter. Well

Vinny Jamie
Supermodel Stella Tennant's Family Confirms She Died By Suicide: "She Felt Unable To Go On"

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:29 sec | Last month

Supermodel Stella Tennant's Family Confirms She Died By Suicide: "She Felt Unable To Go On"

"We are learning more about the death of supermodel Stella Tennant, and it's very sad news. Her family has confirmed that she took her own life following a struggle with mental health problems. Tenant who was 50 had any enormously successful career is the face of Chanel, Calvin Klein, Barbary and others. Family tells Britain's Daily Telegraph She had been unwell for quite some time. They asked for privacy, but said they were speaking out because they feel it's important to rare raise awareness around mental health.

Stella Tennant Calvin Klein Chanel Daily Telegraph Britain
Rubik’s Cube Movie in the Works From Ashok Amritraj and Endeavor Content

Stryker and Klein

01:46 min | Last month

Rubik’s Cube Movie in the Works From Ashok Amritraj and Endeavor Content

"Over. Wonder woman, A new movie is here to take the spotlight and striker. I wonder if you had something to do with this. Rubiks Cube movie is in the works. Yes, Hi Park. Entertainment and Endeavor content are teaming up to create a feature film based on the bestselling cube in world history. There are literally no other details, but Striker. I think we need to find a way to get you attached to this project. I'd love to get the director or someone from one of the production companies. Get them on the air while you into the movie. Why would you even attach him? He couldn't even sold the thing. Like you said he could. He didn't even do it. But if we can get him a cameo or a scene in the Netflix people on one side there, the guy who couldn't even serve one side of 30 seconds Exactly. I can solve a side in just over 30 seconds and I love the Rubik's Cube. I have never been an official spokesman for the King. Yeah, Being attached to the film. I could be maybe announcer or just a player that a Cuba that just almost made it in life.

Hi Park Rubiks Cube Striker Netflix Cuba
How to Control Cravings

Dishing Up Nutrition

07:20 min | 2 months ago

How to Control Cravings

"My name is leah. Klein showed i am a registered and licensed dietitian and i have been seeing and helping clients with cravings and with a variety of other issues for the past three and a half years at nutritional weight and wellness so nearly every day i like i mentioned i work with clients who are trying to get their cravings under control because this is really a lot of what drives our food decisions how we think about food some of the emotional choices that we make around food and a lot of my clients come in and they are frustrated they are so done with the sugar cravings and they might say to me i am so done and because i know if i have just one i can't stop with just one and then i know the consequences afterwards. I know that i don't feel good. After i indulge. And i know that that's one of the big reasons why i keep gaining weight. Why can't lose weight. But it is so hard to stop with the cookies and the chocolate's when they are just sitting around so like nicki i have personally experienced some of those cravings in the past. I completely understand where they're coming from. And i tried to relate that to them that we've all been in that boat here's ninety seven percent of us have been in this boat at some point one or another and so how again. How do we build in some of those realistic solutions for each individual. Client to help them. Get off of that cycle. yes exactly. we're real people rightly have really well. Good morning and it's nice to be here with you. Leah i'm nikki doreen. I'm also registered and licensed dietitian. I've been helping clients nutritional weight and wellness for about two. And a half years to as i personally have explained that i have dealt with cravings in my own life. I've also had many experiences in my past work experiences with clients or patients actually at a weight loss. Managment clinic where they did weight loss surgeries so i would help them with their eating prior to surgery and then after surgery but one of the biggest things was they had a lot of cravings. That was a lot of reason why those folks were in my office. When i saw them they gained weight. Because of that. And that's a big concern with a lotta people dealing with cravings Some of my patients had to lose one hundred pounds some two hundred some even upwards of four hundred pounds and so if you think about the impact of having a high sugar diet or high carb diet or being having cravings for sugar that can really affect you And you look for solutions other than food. Sometimes mike weight loss surgery now not all of my patients had issues with cravings but many of them did and i think the big thing is they were looking for that solution of weight loss from the surgery and to help them with their cravings. All of my patients were just like everyone else. They wanted to lose weight to be more active. You know to you know if we ever get snow maybe go out and have you know like go skiing or they wanted to walk around. The lake. Walk their dog longer than just a few minutes. They wanted to get into more stylish clothes. They wanted to fit on an airplane. Someday you know comfortably airplane seat. I heard all of those things. They wanted to be able to play with kids or grandkids. All of those were reasons why they wanted to get rid of their cravings and lose weight. Yeah so nikki thinking back then when you were working in that setting and working with these clients had a lot of way to lose You know and this might be a question. Some of our listeners. Wanna know the answer then to the once they had that surgery so you worked with them pre and post surgery but once they had that surgery did weight loss surgery actually help take away their cravings. Unfortunately no and you know quickly learning from working at that clinic that that was the case. The cravings didn't go away. The hunger didn't necessarily go away if it did. It was for a very short period of time and We need to. And so. I spent a lot of time explaining that yes the surge would help them lose weight but not necessarily help them with the cravings and. I really had wish that. When i worked in that clinic that i wouldn't have i knew more about cravings and that biochemical piece in the brain because i think i could have helped my patients more. Yeah so that's just very interesting to know. And i guess i'm curious to know too with those clients that you saw and if that you know if the weight loss surgery didn't necessarily resolved their cravings but what happened in happen those weight loss surgeries. A lot is now. The stomach and the digestive tract has a lot less acreage to it. Like you can't fit as much food in there as usual so now potentially would you say that. sometimes you saw even if people couldn't necessarily Satisfy those cravings with food. Would you see that translate somewhere else. Definitely yes there was definitely some addictive behaviors. That happened because sugar is an addiction. Sugar cravings are a lot of people. Come into our office. You probably hear this. I'm addicted to sugar aso. How i learned about how to help people with cravings was a real clinical experience. You know my clinical experience from the weight loss surgery know clinic showed me that there was an issue out there but once i worked at nutritional wellness i learned about the how to fix those cravings why those cravings were happening and so it helped me myself and it helps it helps all my clients so you know back to you know my previous patients you know they would lose weight you know the first year or two and then all of a sudden weight would start creeping back you know and a lot of them would gain all their way back or some of them would gain a lot of their way back and some of them would even gain more So it was really you know we never got to the root cause those cravings their food. How do we balance their blood sugars. So they get off that cravings train absolutely. Let's circle back. I know you have a couple more stories that you just want to share from your experiences there but we do have to go to our first break so stay tuned. You're listening to dishing up nutrition brought to you by nutritional weight and wellness and many people are told that how they think determines how well they feel. They're told that positive. Thoughts and affirmations are the answer to overcoming depression and anxiety and yes. It's true that positive thoughts and affirmations really can help change the chemical process to create better attitudes in a better mood overall but researchers have actually found that in these modern times many people lack the essential nutrients for brain wellness that supports their overall sense of wellbeing. So today during our breaks we want to share some of those key nutrients that we all really need to achieve a well functioning brain and we'll be right

Leah Nikki Doreen Klein Nicki Sugar Aso Skiing Nikki Mike Depression
Trump pardons Paul Manafort, Roger Stone and Charles Kushner

WTOP 24 Hour News

03:24 min | 2 months ago

Trump pardons Paul Manafort, Roger Stone and Charles Kushner

"Trump parted another batch of loyalists including Roger Stone and Paul Manafort tonight. Charles Kushner, the father of Mr Trump's son in law. Jared Kushner also had his legal record wiped. The president made this new batch of clemencies just after leaving the White House for Mar A Lago in Palm Beach, Florida ABC News Political director Rick Klein joined W. T. O P s Dmitri Sodas to take a deeper look at those pardons, stunning series of names, the kind of list that you can't imagine any other president ever. Compiling about a month before he leaves office. These are political loyalists of the father of his own son in law, Jared Kushner, among them in Paul Manafort, Roger Stone to individuals who remained loyal through some very tough legal times. They really brought upon themselves the president clearly using his power now, on the way out the door to reward loyalists in ways that would be unfathomable. You know the any other administration. This is not The normal channel or the normal course of business. These are not people that would have been pardoned, or Heather senses committed by any other president, but saying oil to President Trump has paid off for them. Can we talk about the Mueller investigation as sprawling and wide ranging as it was essentially being undone here? Is that my my overreaching or is that correct? I think the president is systematically taking away the accomplishments and undermining The very real prosecutorial work that they accomplished particularly with the Paul Manafort conviction. I think the Roger Stone one probably fits into this is well, you had a office inside the Department of Justice that was very aggressively looking for things that were prosecutable, and they found them in many cases, and now the president is coming out and saying This whole thing was Was a witch hunt from the start. And that's That's what his former national security adviser, or, you know, already the beneficiary of one of these pardons one of these computations and I think yes, I think anything associated with Mueller, the president is more inclined than most to say. This is something that I can undo with this pardon power we have heard in recent months. Defenders of the president point to the sheer numbers that is that other presidents maybe take Bill Clinton as an example, may have actually pardoned more people in the end and that President Trump should Not be criticized for using one of the few powers that a president can wield. Shall we say unilaterally, and he can use it, But I think the criticism is very much justified when you realize that this is not the normal process where people petitioned for the Department of Justice, you get a recommendation not to say that other presidents have never used political loyalties, particularly Bill Clinton in the past, But we remember times were Where there was outward lobbying on George W. Bush for Scooter Libby from his own Vice President Dick Cheney. He's still resisted and said, No, I'm not gonna issue that pardon. Actually, he was pardoned ultimately, by President Trump similar for Barack Obama. He did not consider pardons that that would have that kind of personal connection. They went up to the Department of Justice. The president has this part in power, he can use it. It's one of the few unchecked, unchallenged powers, but it's clear that President Trump is using it specifically to single out people that have been loyalty to him to pay off political patron's political donors, people in his own family. It may be setting up the ultimate pardons, which would be potentially pardons of people in the inner inner circle and maybe in his own family. There are partners on the way out the door of his sons of his daughter, Ivanka, maybe of himself. That would be the ultimate tell and truly without precedent. That's ABC News political director Rick Klein, who joined us on Skype.

Paul Manafort Roger Stone Jared Kushner President Trump Charles Kushner Mr Trump Rick Klein W. T. Dmitri Sodas The Normal Channel Mueller Department Of Justice Abc News Donald Trump Palm Beach White House Bill Clinton Heather Florida Scooter Libby
"klein" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

The Ezra Klein Show

03:51 min | 2 years ago

"klein" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

"Hello and welcome. Be Ezra Klein. So on the vox media podcasting network. I've been thinking a lot about trade recently. Obviously, it's been in the news. Donald Trump has has launched trade war, which is not a term I love it makes it sound more vivid and crazy than I think what is going on actually is, but it's a good time to talk about trade. There has been this tendency with Trump to to both recognize it. He reflects some some very real idiological currents and even substantive important critiques in American life in policy, and also that he himself is unusual human and the the ladder can often overwhelm the former. And then because he will often implement the things he's doing, not that well or not that consistently what was originally valuable in it? What was originally something that we should have been discussing just become just more of the Trump carnival of chaos? I think trade has had that quality where he's come in. He's running a trade policy that doesn't make a ton of sense. Even if you agree with his ideas on trade or what you maybe thought his ideas on trade war. But that doesn't mean that we don't need to have a bigger conversation about trade. I think if you watched the lustful action or Hillary Clinton had to come out against the Trans-Pacific Partnership trade deal, which I am among the people who believe that she was not actually that offensively a critical that deal the that that was just where the politics were, but the fact that the politics were such that the democrat got pushed to be against the TPP that the Republican ended up being a an unusual publican against the TPP. It shows that something has happened here has been a real change. I think in the way the economics discipline treats at the very least labor market affects of trade. The work of David author and others, I think, has been very, very influential in forcing people to recognize that while trade may have aggregate gains that the losers really lose and they never get paid back. All this of me thinking a lot about the work of Danny Rodrick. He is an economist and a professor of international political Konami at the Kennedy School of government at Harvard, and he's been for years. I think the most interesting and persuasive critic of the trade consensus in economics and not just a critic, you know, in the sense of he thinks of the studies are wrong, and certainly not a a nuanced critic. You have people who just don't like trade for intuitive or emotional or self interested reasons. He's been someone who I think both understand its benefits, but for a long time has been making not based on political economy that should have been listened to more widely on his work is influenced me for many years. And I think he's just perhaps the most interesting thinker in this space, and a lot of what he said was going to come true has at least in one way or another come true. So it's a, it's a real pleasure to have him on the show. This is a discussion that is not really about Trump's trade war that we get into. It it is really about how to think about trade, not just as an economic fact of life, an an economic pursuit, but as a political one. Right. What what is trade due to countries to sovereignty to borders, to people to questions of distribution and is the way we talk about it in our, you know, using our economic models is that in any way actually relevant. So before we get into that a couple of quick things, there are a couple of days left. If you have a question for me on the upcoming, ask me anything episode. I'll be closing that in just a just a few days early next week. So Email me as recline showed vox dot com. If you want to write down your question and ideally also send it in a voice memo. Although if you can't do that, you can just write it down. That'd be great. You can ask me anything. So again, write it down, send me a voice memo at as recline show at vox dot com. The other ask is if you're not checking out net Netflix explained yet, I really think you should be most recent episode was about the exclamation point and it's about how grammar changes over time and in different mediums about it. Why..

Donald Trump Ezra Klein vox media Trump Danny Rodrick Hillary Clinton Netflix TPP Konami David Kennedy School of government professor Harvard
"klein" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

The Ezra Klein Show

03:51 min | 2 years ago

"klein" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

"Hello and welcome. Be Ezra Klein. So on the vox media podcasting network. I've been thinking a lot about trade recently. Obviously, it's been in the news. Donald Trump has has launched trade war, which is not a term I love it makes it sound more vivid and crazy than I think what is going on actually is, but it's a good time to talk about trade. There has been this tendency with Trump to to both recognize it. He reflects some some very real idiological currents and even substantive important critiques in American life in policy, and also that he himself is unusual human and the the ladder can often overwhelm the former. And then because he will often implement the things he's doing, not that well or not that consistently what was originally valuable in it? What was originally something that we should have been discussing just become just more of the Trump carnival of chaos? I think trade has had that quality where he's come in. He's running a trade policy that doesn't make a ton of sense. Even if you agree with his ideas on trade or what you maybe thought his ideas on trade war. But that doesn't mean that we don't need to have a bigger conversation about trade. I think if you watched the lustful action or Hillary Clinton had to come out against the Trans-Pacific Partnership trade deal, which I am among the people who believe that she was not actually that offensively a critical that deal the that that was just where the politics were, but the fact that the politics were such that the democrat got pushed to be against the TPP that the Republican ended up being a an unusual publican against the TPP. It shows that something has happened here has been a real change. I think in the way the economics discipline treats at the very least labor market affects of trade. The work of David author and others, I think, has been very, very influential in forcing people to recognize that while trade may have aggregate gains that the losers really lose and they never get paid back. All this of me thinking a lot about the work of Danny Rodrick. He is an economist and a professor of international political Konami at the Kennedy School of government at Harvard, and he's been for years. I think the most interesting and persuasive critic of the trade consensus in economics and not just a critic, you know, in the sense of he thinks of the studies are wrong, and certainly not a a nuanced critic. You have people who just don't like trade for intuitive or emotional or self interested reasons. He's been someone who I think both understand its benefits, but for a long time has been making not based on political economy that should have been listened to more widely on his work is influenced me for many years. And I think he's just perhaps the most interesting thinker in this space, and a lot of what he said was going to come true has at least in one way or another come true. So it's a, it's a real pleasure to have him on the show. This is a discussion that is not really about Trump's trade war that we get into. It it is really about how to think about trade, not just as an economic fact of life, an an economic pursuit, but as a political one. Right. What what is trade due to countries to sovereignty to borders, to people to questions of distribution and is the way we talk about it in our, you know, using our economic models is that in any way actually relevant. So before we get into that a couple of quick things, there are a couple of days left. If you have a question for me on the upcoming, ask me anything episode. I'll be closing that in just a just a few days early next week. So Email me as recline showed vox dot com. If you want to write down your question and ideally also send it in a voice memo. Although if you can't do that, you can just write it down. That'd be great. You can ask me anything. So again, write it down, send me a voice memo at as recline show at vox dot com. The other ask is if you're not checking out net Netflix explained yet, I really think you should be most recent episode was about the exclamation point and it's about how grammar changes over time and in different mediums about it. Why..

Donald Trump Ezra Klein vox media Trump Danny Rodrick Hillary Clinton Netflix TPP Konami David Kennedy School of government professor Harvard
"klein" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

The Ezra Klein Show

03:51 min | 2 years ago

"klein" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

"Hello and welcome. Be Ezra Klein. So on the vox media podcasting network. I've been thinking a lot about trade recently. Obviously, it's been in the news. Donald Trump has has launched trade war, which is not a term I love it makes it sound more vivid and crazy than I think what is going on actually is, but it's a good time to talk about trade. There has been this tendency with Trump to to both recognize it. He reflects some some very real idiological currents and even substantive important critiques in American life in policy, and also that he himself is unusual human and the the ladder can often overwhelm the former. And then because he will often implement the things he's doing, not that well or not that consistently what was originally valuable in it? What was originally something that we should have been discussing just become just more of the Trump carnival of chaos? I think trade has had that quality where he's come in. He's running a trade policy that doesn't make a ton of sense. Even if you agree with his ideas on trade or what you maybe thought his ideas on trade war. But that doesn't mean that we don't need to have a bigger conversation about trade. I think if you watched the lustful action or Hillary Clinton had to come out against the Trans-Pacific Partnership trade deal, which I am among the people who believe that she was not actually that offensively a critical that deal the that that was just where the politics were, but the fact that the politics were such that the democrat got pushed to be against the TPP that the Republican ended up being a an unusual publican against the TPP. It shows that something has happened here has been a real change. I think in the way the economics discipline treats at the very least labor market affects of trade. The work of David author and others, I think, has been very, very influential in forcing people to recognize that while trade may have aggregate gains that the losers really lose and they never get paid back. All this of me thinking a lot about the work of Danny Rodrick. He is an economist and a professor of international political Konami at the Kennedy School of government at Harvard, and he's been for years. I think the most interesting and persuasive critic of the trade consensus in economics and not just a critic, you know, in the sense of he thinks of the studies are wrong, and certainly not a a nuanced critic. You have people who just don't like trade for intuitive or emotional or self interested reasons. He's been someone who I think both understand its benefits, but for a long time has been making not based on political economy that should have been listened to more widely on his work is influenced me for many years. And I think he's just perhaps the most interesting thinker in this space, and a lot of what he said was going to come true has at least in one way or another come true. So it's a, it's a real pleasure to have him on the show. This is a discussion that is not really about Trump's trade war that we get into. It it is really about how to think about trade, not just as an economic fact of life, an an economic pursuit, but as a political one. Right. What what is trade due to countries to sovereignty to borders, to people to questions of distribution and is the way we talk about it in our, you know, using our economic models is that in any way actually relevant. So before we get into that a couple of quick things, there are a couple of days left. If you have a question for me on the upcoming, ask me anything episode. I'll be closing that in just a just a few days early next week. So Email me as recline showed vox dot com. If you want to write down your question and ideally also send it in a voice memo. Although if you can't do that, you can just write it down. That'd be great. You can ask me anything. So again, write it down, send me a voice memo at as recline show at vox dot com. The other ask is if you're not checking out net Netflix explained yet, I really think you should be most recent episode was about the exclamation point and it's about how grammar changes over time and in different mediums about it. Why..

Donald Trump Ezra Klein vox media Trump Danny Rodrick Hillary Clinton Netflix TPP Konami David Kennedy School of government professor Harvard
"klein" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

The Ezra Klein Show

03:51 min | 2 years ago

"klein" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

"Hello and welcome. Be Ezra Klein. So on the vox media podcasting network. I've been thinking a lot about trade recently. Obviously, it's been in the news. Donald Trump has has launched trade war, which is not a term I love it makes it sound more vivid and crazy than I think what is going on actually is, but it's a good time to talk about trade. There has been this tendency with Trump to to both recognize it. He reflects some some very real idiological currents and even substantive important critiques in American life in policy, and also that he himself is unusual human and the the ladder can often overwhelm the former. And then because he will often implement the things he's doing, not that well or not that consistently what was originally valuable in it? What was originally something that we should have been discussing just become just more of the Trump carnival of chaos? I think trade has had that quality where he's come in. He's running a trade policy that doesn't make a ton of sense. Even if you agree with his ideas on trade or what you maybe thought his ideas on trade war. But that doesn't mean that we don't need to have a bigger conversation about trade. I think if you watched the lustful action or Hillary Clinton had to come out against the Trans-Pacific Partnership trade deal, which I am among the people who believe that she was not actually that offensively a critical that deal the that that was just where the politics were, but the fact that the politics were such that the democrat got pushed to be against the TPP that the Republican ended up being a an unusual publican against the TPP. It shows that something has happened here has been a real change. I think in the way the economics discipline treats at the very least labor market affects of trade. The work of David author and others, I think, has been very, very influential in forcing people to recognize that while trade may have aggregate gains that the losers really lose and they never get paid back. All this of me thinking a lot about the work of Danny Rodrick. He is an economist and a professor of international political Konami at the Kennedy School of government at Harvard, and he's been for years. I think the most interesting and persuasive critic of the trade consensus in economics and not just a critic, you know, in the sense of he thinks of the studies are wrong, and certainly not a a nuanced critic. You have people who just don't like trade for intuitive or emotional or self interested reasons. He's been someone who I think both understand its benefits, but for a long time has been making not based on political economy that should have been listened to more widely on his work is influenced me for many years. And I think he's just perhaps the most interesting thinker in this space, and a lot of what he said was going to come true has at least in one way or another come true. So it's a, it's a real pleasure to have him on the show. This is a discussion that is not really about Trump's trade war that we get into. It it is really about how to think about trade, not just as an economic fact of life, an an economic pursuit, but as a political one. Right. What what is trade due to countries to sovereignty to borders, to people to questions of distribution and is the way we talk about it in our, you know, using our economic models is that in any way actually relevant. So before we get into that a couple of quick things, there are a couple of days left. If you have a question for me on the upcoming, ask me anything episode. I'll be closing that in just a just a few days early next week. So Email me as recline showed vox dot com. If you want to write down your question and ideally also send it in a voice memo. Although if you can't do that, you can just write it down. That'd be great. You can ask me anything. So again, write it down, send me a voice memo at as recline show at vox dot com. The other ask is if you're not checking out net Netflix explained yet, I really think you should be most recent episode was about the exclamation point and it's about how grammar changes over time and in different mediums about it. Why..

Donald Trump Ezra Klein vox media Trump Danny Rodrick Hillary Clinton Netflix TPP Konami David Kennedy School of government professor Harvard
"klein" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

The Ezra Klein Show

03:51 min | 2 years ago

"klein" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

"Hello and welcome. Be Ezra Klein. So on the vox media podcasting network. I've been thinking a lot about trade recently. Obviously, it's been in the news. Donald Trump has has launched trade war, which is not a term I love it makes it sound more vivid and crazy than I think what is going on actually is, but it's a good time to talk about trade. There has been this tendency with Trump to to both recognize it. He reflects some some very real idiological currents and even substantive important critiques in American life in policy, and also that he himself is unusual human and the the ladder can often overwhelm the former. And then because he will often implement the things he's doing, not that well or not that consistently what was originally valuable in it? What was originally something that we should have been discussing just become just more of the Trump carnival of chaos? I think trade has had that quality where he's come in. He's running a trade policy that doesn't make a ton of sense. Even if you agree with his ideas on trade or what you maybe thought his ideas on trade war. But that doesn't mean that we don't need to have a bigger conversation about trade. I think if you watched the lustful action or Hillary Clinton had to come out against the Trans-Pacific Partnership trade deal, which I am among the people who believe that she was not actually that offensively a critical that deal the that that was just where the politics were, but the fact that the politics were such that the democrat got pushed to be against the TPP that the Republican ended up being a an unusual publican against the TPP. It shows that something has happened here has been a real change. I think in the way the economics discipline treats at the very least labor market affects of trade. The work of David author and others, I think, has been very, very influential in forcing people to recognize that while trade may have aggregate gains that the losers really lose and they never get paid back. All this of me thinking a lot about the work of Danny Rodrick. He is an economist and a professor of international political Konami at the Kennedy School of government at Harvard, and he's been for years. I think the most interesting and persuasive critic of the trade consensus in economics and not just a critic, you know, in the sense of he thinks of the studies are wrong, and certainly not a a nuanced critic. You have people who just don't like trade for intuitive or emotional or self interested reasons. He's been someone who I think both understand its benefits, but for a long time has been making not based on political economy that should have been listened to more widely on his work is influenced me for many years. And I think he's just perhaps the most interesting thinker in this space, and a lot of what he said was going to come true has at least in one way or another come true. So it's a, it's a real pleasure to have him on the show. This is a discussion that is not really about Trump's trade war that we get into. It it is really about how to think about trade, not just as an economic fact of life, an an economic pursuit, but as a political one. Right. What what is trade due to countries to sovereignty to borders, to people to questions of distribution and is the way we talk about it in our, you know, using our economic models is that in any way actually relevant. So before we get into that a couple of quick things, there are a couple of days left. If you have a question for me on the upcoming, ask me anything episode. I'll be closing that in just a just a few days early next week. So Email me as recline showed vox dot com. If you want to write down your question and ideally also send it in a voice memo. Although if you can't do that, you can just write it down. That'd be great. You can ask me anything. So again, write it down, send me a voice memo at as recline show at vox dot com. The other ask is if you're not checking out net Netflix explained yet, I really think you should be most recent episode was about the exclamation point and it's about how grammar changes over time and in different mediums about it. Why..

Donald Trump Ezra Klein vox media Trump Danny Rodrick Hillary Clinton Netflix TPP Konami David Kennedy School of government professor Harvard
"klein" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

The Ezra Klein Show

03:51 min | 2 years ago

"klein" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

"Hello and welcome. Be Ezra Klein. So on the vox media podcasting network. I've been thinking a lot about trade recently. Obviously, it's been in the news. Donald Trump has has launched trade war, which is not a term I love it makes it sound more vivid and crazy than I think what is going on actually is, but it's a good time to talk about trade. There has been this tendency with Trump to to both recognize it. He reflects some some very real idiological currents and even substantive important critiques in American life in policy, and also that he himself is unusual human and the the ladder can often overwhelm the former. And then because he will often implement the things he's doing, not that well or not that consistently what was originally valuable in it? What was originally something that we should have been discussing just become just more of the Trump carnival of chaos? I think trade has had that quality where he's come in. He's running a trade policy that doesn't make a ton of sense. Even if you agree with his ideas on trade or what you maybe thought his ideas on trade war. But that doesn't mean that we don't need to have a bigger conversation about trade. I think if you watched the lustful action or Hillary Clinton had to come out against the Trans-Pacific Partnership trade deal, which I am among the people who believe that she was not actually that offensively a critical that deal the that that was just where the politics were, but the fact that the politics were such that the democrat got pushed to be against the TPP that the Republican ended up being a an unusual publican against the TPP. It shows that something has happened here has been a real change. I think in the way the economics discipline treats at the very least labor market affects of trade. The work of David author and others, I think, has been very, very influential in forcing people to recognize that while trade may have aggregate gains that the losers really lose and they never get paid back. All this of me thinking a lot about the work of Danny Rodrick. He is an economist and a professor of international political Konami at the Kennedy School of government at Harvard, and he's been for years. I think the most interesting and persuasive critic of the trade consensus in economics and not just a critic, you know, in the sense of he thinks of the studies are wrong, and certainly not a a nuanced critic. You have people who just don't like trade for intuitive or emotional or self interested reasons. He's been someone who I think both understand its benefits, but for a long time has been making not based on political economy that should have been listened to more widely on his work is influenced me for many years. And I think he's just perhaps the most interesting thinker in this space, and a lot of what he said was going to come true has at least in one way or another come true. So it's a, it's a real pleasure to have him on the show. This is a discussion that is not really about Trump's trade war that we get into. It it is really about how to think about trade, not just as an economic fact of life, an an economic pursuit, but as a political one. Right. What what is trade due to countries to sovereignty to borders, to people to questions of distribution and is the way we talk about it in our, you know, using our economic models is that in any way actually relevant. So before we get into that a couple of quick things, there are a couple of days left. If you have a question for me on the upcoming, ask me anything episode. I'll be closing that in just a just a few days early next week. So Email me as recline showed vox dot com. If you want to write down your question and ideally also send it in a voice memo. Although if you can't do that, you can just write it down. That'd be great. You can ask me anything. So again, write it down, send me a voice memo at as recline show at vox dot com. The other ask is if you're not checking out net Netflix explained yet, I really think you should be most recent episode was about the exclamation point and it's about how grammar changes over time and in different mediums about it. Why..

Donald Trump Ezra Klein vox media Trump Danny Rodrick Hillary Clinton Netflix TPP Konami David Kennedy School of government professor Harvard
"klein" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

The Ezra Klein Show

03:51 min | 2 years ago

"klein" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

"Hello and welcome. Be Ezra Klein. So on the vox media podcasting network. I've been thinking a lot about trade recently. Obviously, it's been in the news. Donald Trump has has launched trade war, which is not a term I love it makes it sound more vivid and crazy than I think what is going on actually is, but it's a good time to talk about trade. There has been this tendency with Trump to to both recognize it. He reflects some some very real idiological currents and even substantive important critiques in American life in policy, and also that he himself is unusual human and the the ladder can often overwhelm the former. And then because he will often implement the things he's doing, not that well or not that consistently what was originally valuable in it? What was originally something that we should have been discussing just become just more of the Trump carnival of chaos? I think trade has had that quality where he's come in. He's running a trade policy that doesn't make a ton of sense. Even if you agree with his ideas on trade or what you maybe thought his ideas on trade war. But that doesn't mean that we don't need to have a bigger conversation about trade. I think if you watched the lustful action or Hillary Clinton had to come out against the Trans-Pacific Partnership trade deal, which I am among the people who believe that she was not actually that offensively a critical that deal the that that was just where the politics were, but the fact that the politics were such that the democrat got pushed to be against the TPP that the Republican ended up being a an unusual publican against the TPP. It shows that something has happened here has been a real change. I think in the way the economics discipline treats at the very least labor market affects of trade. The work of David author and others, I think, has been very, very influential in forcing people to recognize that while trade may have aggregate gains that the losers really lose and they never get paid back. All this of me thinking a lot about the work of Danny Rodrick. He is an economist and a professor of international political Konami at the Kennedy School of government at Harvard, and he's been for years. I think the most interesting and persuasive critic of the trade consensus in economics and not just a critic, you know, in the sense of he thinks of the studies are wrong, and certainly not a a nuanced critic. You have people who just don't like trade for intuitive or emotional or self interested reasons. He's been someone who I think both understand its benefits, but for a long time has been making not based on political economy that should have been listened to more widely on his work is influenced me for many years. And I think he's just perhaps the most interesting thinker in this space, and a lot of what he said was going to come true has at least in one way or another come true. So it's a, it's a real pleasure to have him on the show. This is a discussion that is not really about Trump's trade war that we get into. It it is really about how to think about trade, not just as an economic fact of life, an an economic pursuit, but as a political one. Right. What what is trade due to countries to sovereignty to borders, to people to questions of distribution and is the way we talk about it in our, you know, using our economic models is that in any way actually relevant. So before we get into that a couple of quick things, there are a couple of days left. If you have a question for me on the upcoming, ask me anything episode. I'll be closing that in just a just a few days early next week. So Email me as recline showed vox dot com. If you want to write down your question and ideally also send it in a voice memo. Although if you can't do that, you can just write it down. That'd be great. You can ask me anything. So again, write it down, send me a voice memo at as recline show at vox dot com. The other ask is if you're not checking out net Netflix explained yet, I really think you should be most recent episode was about the exclamation point and it's about how grammar changes over time and in different mediums about it. Why..

Donald Trump Ezra Klein vox media Trump Danny Rodrick Hillary Clinton Netflix TPP Konami David Kennedy School of government professor Harvard
"klein" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

The Ezra Klein Show

03:51 min | 2 years ago

"klein" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

"Hello and welcome. Be Ezra Klein. So on the vox media podcasting network. I've been thinking a lot about trade recently. Obviously, it's been in the news. Donald Trump has has launched trade war, which is not a term I love it makes it sound more vivid and crazy than I think what is going on actually is, but it's a good time to talk about trade. There has been this tendency with Trump to to both recognize it. He reflects some some very real idiological currents and even substantive important critiques in American life in policy, and also that he himself is unusual human and the the ladder can often overwhelm the former. And then because he will often implement the things he's doing, not that well or not that consistently what was originally valuable in it? What was originally something that we should have been discussing just become just more of the Trump carnival of chaos? I think trade has had that quality where he's come in. He's running a trade policy that doesn't make a ton of sense. Even if you agree with his ideas on trade or what you maybe thought his ideas on trade war. But that doesn't mean that we don't need to have a bigger conversation about trade. I think if you watched the lustful action or Hillary Clinton had to come out against the Trans-Pacific Partnership trade deal, which I am among the people who believe that she was not actually that offensively a critical that deal the that that was just where the politics were, but the fact that the politics were such that the democrat got pushed to be against the TPP that the Republican ended up being a an unusual publican against the TPP. It shows that something has happened here has been a real change. I think in the way the economics discipline treats at the very least labor market affects of trade. The work of David author and others, I think, has been very, very influential in forcing people to recognize that while trade may have aggregate gains that the losers really lose and they never get paid back. All this of me thinking a lot about the work of Danny Rodrick. He is an economist and a professor of international political Konami at the Kennedy School of government at Harvard, and he's been for years. I think the most interesting and persuasive critic of the trade consensus in economics and not just a critic, you know, in the sense of he thinks of the studies are wrong, and certainly not a a nuanced critic. You have people who just don't like trade for intuitive or emotional or self interested reasons. He's been someone who I think both understand its benefits, but for a long time has been making not based on political economy that should have been listened to more widely on his work is influenced me for many years. And I think he's just perhaps the most interesting thinker in this space, and a lot of what he said was going to come true has at least in one way or another come true. So it's a, it's a real pleasure to have him on the show. This is a discussion that is not really about Trump's trade war that we get into. It it is really about how to think about trade, not just as an economic fact of life, an an economic pursuit, but as a political one. Right. What what is trade due to countries to sovereignty to borders, to people to questions of distribution and is the way we talk about it in our, you know, using our economic models is that in any way actually relevant. So before we get into that a couple of quick things, there are a couple of days left. If you have a question for me on the upcoming, ask me anything episode. I'll be closing that in just a just a few days early next week. So Email me as recline showed vox dot com. If you want to write down your question and ideally also send it in a voice memo. Although if you can't do that, you can just write it down. That'd be great. You can ask me anything. So again, write it down, send me a voice memo at as recline show at vox dot com. The other ask is if you're not checking out net Netflix explained yet, I really think you should be most recent episode was about the exclamation point and it's about how grammar changes over time and in different mediums about it. Why..

Donald Trump Ezra Klein vox media Trump Danny Rodrick Hillary Clinton Netflix TPP Konami David Kennedy School of government professor Harvard
"klein" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

The Ezra Klein Show

03:51 min | 2 years ago

"klein" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

"Hello and welcome. Be Ezra Klein. So on the vox media podcasting network. I've been thinking a lot about trade recently. Obviously, it's been in the news. Donald Trump has has launched trade war, which is not a term I love it makes it sound more vivid and crazy than I think what is going on actually is, but it's a good time to talk about trade. There has been this tendency with Trump to to both recognize it. He reflects some some very real idiological currents and even substantive important critiques in American life in policy, and also that he himself is unusual human and the the ladder can often overwhelm the former. And then because he will often implement the things he's doing, not that well or not that consistently what was originally valuable in it? What was originally something that we should have been discussing just become just more of the Trump carnival of chaos? I think trade has had that quality where he's come in. He's running a trade policy that doesn't make a ton of sense. Even if you agree with his ideas on trade or what you maybe thought his ideas on trade war. But that doesn't mean that we don't need to have a bigger conversation about trade. I think if you watched the lustful action or Hillary Clinton had to come out against the Trans-Pacific Partnership trade deal, which I am among the people who believe that she was not actually that offensively a critical that deal the that that was just where the politics were, but the fact that the politics were such that the democrat got pushed to be against the TPP that the Republican ended up being a an unusual publican against the TPP. It shows that something has happened here has been a real change. I think in the way the economics discipline treats at the very least labor market affects of trade. The work of David author and others, I think, has been very, very influential in forcing people to recognize that while trade may have aggregate gains that the losers really lose and they never get paid back. All this of me thinking a lot about the work of Danny Rodrick. He is an economist and a professor of international political Konami at the Kennedy School of government at Harvard, and he's been for years. I think the most interesting and persuasive critic of the trade consensus in economics and not just a critic, you know, in the sense of he thinks of the studies are wrong, and certainly not a a nuanced critic. You have people who just don't like trade for intuitive or emotional or self interested reasons. He's been someone who I think both understand its benefits, but for a long time has been making not based on political economy that should have been listened to more widely on his work is influenced me for many years. And I think he's just perhaps the most interesting thinker in this space, and a lot of what he said was going to come true has at least in one way or another come true. So it's a, it's a real pleasure to have him on the show. This is a discussion that is not really about Trump's trade war that we get into. It it is really about how to think about trade, not just as an economic fact of life, an an economic pursuit, but as a political one. Right. What what is trade due to countries to sovereignty to borders, to people to questions of distribution and is the way we talk about it in our, you know, using our economic models is that in any way actually relevant. So before we get into that a couple of quick things, there are a couple of days left. If you have a question for me on the upcoming, ask me anything episode. I'll be closing that in just a just a few days early next week. So Email me as recline showed vox dot com. If you want to write down your question and ideally also send it in a voice memo. Although if you can't do that, you can just write it down. That'd be great. You can ask me anything. So again, write it down, send me a voice memo at as recline show at vox dot com. The other ask is if you're not checking out net Netflix explained yet, I really think you should be most recent episode was about the exclamation point and it's about how grammar changes over time and in different mediums about it. Why..

Donald Trump Ezra Klein vox media Trump Danny Rodrick Hillary Clinton Netflix TPP Konami David Kennedy School of government professor Harvard
"klein" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

The Ezra Klein Show

03:51 min | 2 years ago

"klein" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

"Hello and welcome. Be Ezra Klein. So on the vox media podcasting network. I've been thinking a lot about trade recently. Obviously, it's been in the news. Donald Trump has has launched trade war, which is not a term I love it makes it sound more vivid and crazy than I think what is going on actually is, but it's a good time to talk about trade. There has been this tendency with Trump to to both recognize it. He reflects some some very real idiological currents and even substantive important critiques in American life in policy, and also that he himself is unusual human and the the ladder can often overwhelm the former. And then because he will often implement the things he's doing, not that well or not that consistently what was originally valuable in it? What was originally something that we should have been discussing just become just more of the Trump carnival of chaos? I think trade has had that quality where he's come in. He's running a trade policy that doesn't make a ton of sense. Even if you agree with his ideas on trade or what you maybe thought his ideas on trade war. But that doesn't mean that we don't need to have a bigger conversation about trade. I think if you watched the lustful action or Hillary Clinton had to come out against the Trans-Pacific Partnership trade deal, which I am among the people who believe that she was not actually that offensively a critical that deal the that that was just where the politics were, but the fact that the politics were such that the democrat got pushed to be against the TPP that the Republican ended up being a an unusual publican against the TPP. It shows that something has happened here has been a real change. I think in the way the economics discipline treats at the very least labor market affects of trade. The work of David author and others, I think, has been very, very influential in forcing people to recognize that while trade may have aggregate gains that the losers really lose and they never get paid back. All this of me thinking a lot about the work of Danny Rodrick. He is an economist and a professor of international political Konami at the Kennedy School of government at Harvard, and he's been for years. I think the most interesting and persuasive critic of the trade consensus in economics and not just a critic, you know, in the sense of he thinks of the studies are wrong, and certainly not a a nuanced critic. You have people who just don't like trade for intuitive or emotional or self interested reasons. He's been someone who I think both understand its benefits, but for a long time has been making not based on political economy that should have been listened to more widely on his work is influenced me for many years. And I think he's just perhaps the most interesting thinker in this space, and a lot of what he said was going to come true has at least in one way or another come true. So it's a, it's a real pleasure to have him on the show. This is a discussion that is not really about Trump's trade war that we get into. It it is really about how to think about trade, not just as an economic fact of life, an an economic pursuit, but as a political one. Right. What what is trade due to countries to sovereignty to borders, to people to questions of distribution and is the way we talk about it in our, you know, using our economic models is that in any way actually relevant. So before we get into that a couple of quick things, there are a couple of days left. If you have a question for me on the upcoming, ask me anything episode. I'll be closing that in just a just a few days early next week. So Email me as recline showed vox dot com. If you want to write down your question and ideally also send it in a voice memo. Although if you can't do that, you can just write it down. That'd be great. You can ask me anything. So again, write it down, send me a voice memo at as recline show at vox dot com. The other ask is if you're not checking out net Netflix explained yet, I really think you should be most recent episode was about the exclamation point and it's about how grammar changes over time and in different mediums about it. Why..

Donald Trump Ezra Klein vox media Trump Danny Rodrick Hillary Clinton Netflix TPP Konami David Kennedy School of government professor Harvard
"klein" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

The Ezra Klein Show

03:51 min | 2 years ago

"klein" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

"Hello and welcome. Be Ezra Klein. So on the vox media podcasting network. I've been thinking a lot about trade recently. Obviously, it's been in the news. Donald Trump has has launched trade war, which is not a term I love it makes it sound more vivid and crazy than I think what is going on actually is, but it's a good time to talk about trade. There has been this tendency with Trump to to both recognize it. He reflects some some very real idiological currents and even substantive important critiques in American life in policy, and also that he himself is unusual human and the the ladder can often overwhelm the former. And then because he will often implement the things he's doing, not that well or not that consistently what was originally valuable in it? What was originally something that we should have been discussing just become just more of the Trump carnival of chaos? I think trade has had that quality where he's come in. He's running a trade policy that doesn't make a ton of sense. Even if you agree with his ideas on trade or what you maybe thought his ideas on trade war. But that doesn't mean that we don't need to have a bigger conversation about trade. I think if you watched the lustful action or Hillary Clinton had to come out against the Trans-Pacific Partnership trade deal, which I am among the people who believe that she was not actually that offensively a critical that deal the that that was just where the politics were, but the fact that the politics were such that the democrat got pushed to be against the TPP that the Republican ended up being a an unusual publican against the TPP. It shows that something has happened here has been a real change. I think in the way the economics discipline treats at the very least labor market affects of trade. The work of David author and others, I think, has been very, very influential in forcing people to recognize that while trade may have aggregate gains that the losers really lose and they never get paid back. All this of me thinking a lot about the work of Danny Rodrick. He is an economist and a professor of international political Konami at the Kennedy School of government at Harvard, and he's been for years. I think the most interesting and persuasive critic of the trade consensus in economics and not just a critic, you know, in the sense of he thinks of the studies are wrong, and certainly not a a nuanced critic. You have people who just don't like trade for intuitive or emotional or self interested reasons. He's been someone who I think both understand its benefits, but for a long time has been making not based on political economy that should have been listened to more widely on his work is influenced me for many years. And I think he's just perhaps the most interesting thinker in this space, and a lot of what he said was going to come true has at least in one way or another come true. So it's a, it's a real pleasure to have him on the show. This is a discussion that is not really about Trump's trade war that we get into. It it is really about how to think about trade, not just as an economic fact of life, an an economic pursuit, but as a political one. Right. What what is trade due to countries to sovereignty to borders, to people to questions of distribution and is the way we talk about it in our, you know, using our economic models is that in any way actually relevant. So before we get into that a couple of quick things, there are a couple of days left. If you have a question for me on the upcoming, ask me anything episode. I'll be closing that in just a just a few days early next week. So Email me as recline showed vox dot com. If you want to write down your question and ideally also send it in a voice memo. Although if you can't do that, you can just write it down. That'd be great. You can ask me anything. So again, write it down, send me a voice memo at as recline show at vox dot com. The other ask is if you're not checking out net Netflix explained yet, I really think you should be most recent episode was about the exclamation point and it's about how grammar changes over time and in different mediums about it. Why..

Donald Trump Ezra Klein vox media Trump Danny Rodrick Hillary Clinton Netflix TPP Konami David Kennedy School of government professor Harvard
"klein" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

The Ezra Klein Show

03:51 min | 2 years ago

"klein" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

"Hello and welcome. Be Ezra Klein. So on the vox media podcasting network. I've been thinking a lot about trade recently. Obviously, it's been in the news. Donald Trump has has launched trade war, which is not a term I love it makes it sound more vivid and crazy than I think what is going on actually is, but it's a good time to talk about trade. There has been this tendency with Trump to to both recognize it. He reflects some some very real idiological currents and even substantive important critiques in American life in policy, and also that he himself is unusual human and the the ladder can often overwhelm the former. And then because he will often implement the things he's doing, not that well or not that consistently what was originally valuable in it? What was originally something that we should have been discussing just become just more of the Trump carnival of chaos? I think trade has had that quality where he's come in. He's running a trade policy that doesn't make a ton of sense. Even if you agree with his ideas on trade or what you maybe thought his ideas on trade war. But that doesn't mean that we don't need to have a bigger conversation about trade. I think if you watched the lustful action or Hillary Clinton had to come out against the Trans-Pacific Partnership trade deal, which I am among the people who believe that she was not actually that offensively a critical that deal the that that was just where the politics were, but the fact that the politics were such that the democrat got pushed to be against the TPP that the Republican ended up being a an unusual publican against the TPP. It shows that something has happened here has been a real change. I think in the way the economics discipline treats at the very least labor market affects of trade. The work of David author and others, I think, has been very, very influential in forcing people to recognize that while trade may have aggregate gains that the losers really lose and they never get paid back. All this of me thinking a lot about the work of Danny Rodrick. He is an economist and a professor of international political Konami at the Kennedy School of government at Harvard, and he's been for years. I think the most interesting and persuasive critic of the trade consensus in economics and not just a critic, you know, in the sense of he thinks of the studies are wrong, and certainly not a a nuanced critic. You have people who just don't like trade for intuitive or emotional or self interested reasons. He's been someone who I think both understand its benefits, but for a long time has been making not based on political economy that should have been listened to more widely on his work is influenced me for many years. And I think he's just perhaps the most interesting thinker in this space, and a lot of what he said was going to come true has at least in one way or another come true. So it's a, it's a real pleasure to have him on the show. This is a discussion that is not really about Trump's trade war that we get into. It it is really about how to think about trade, not just as an economic fact of life, an an economic pursuit, but as a political one. Right. What what is trade due to countries to sovereignty to borders, to people to questions of distribution and is the way we talk about it in our, you know, using our economic models is that in any way actually relevant. So before we get into that a couple of quick things, there are a couple of days left. If you have a question for me on the upcoming, ask me anything episode. I'll be closing that in just a just a few days early next week. So Email me as recline showed vox dot com. If you want to write down your question and ideally also send it in a voice memo. Although if you can't do that, you can just write it down. That'd be great. You can ask me anything. So again, write it down, send me a voice memo at as recline show at vox dot com. The other ask is if you're not checking out net Netflix explained yet, I really think you should be most recent episode was about the exclamation point and it's about how grammar changes over time and in different mediums about it. Why..

Donald Trump Ezra Klein vox media Trump Danny Rodrick Hillary Clinton Netflix TPP Konami David Kennedy School of government professor Harvard
"klein" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

The Ezra Klein Show

03:51 min | 2 years ago

"klein" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

"Hello and welcome. Be Ezra Klein. So on the vox media podcasting network. I've been thinking a lot about trade recently. Obviously, it's been in the news. Donald Trump has has launched trade war, which is not a term I love it makes it sound more vivid and crazy than I think what is going on actually is, but it's a good time to talk about trade. There has been this tendency with Trump to to both recognize it. He reflects some some very real idiological currents and even substantive important critiques in American life in policy, and also that he himself is unusual human and the the ladder can often overwhelm the former. And then because he will often implement the things he's doing, not that well or not that consistently what was originally valuable in it? What was originally something that we should have been discussing just become just more of the Trump carnival of chaos? I think trade has had that quality where he's come in. He's running a trade policy that doesn't make a ton of sense. Even if you agree with his ideas on trade or what you maybe thought his ideas on trade war. But that doesn't mean that we don't need to have a bigger conversation about trade. I think if you watched the lustful action or Hillary Clinton had to come out against the Trans-Pacific Partnership trade deal, which I am among the people who believe that she was not actually that offensively a critical that deal the that that was just where the politics were, but the fact that the politics were such that the democrat got pushed to be against the TPP that the Republican ended up being a an unusual publican against the TPP. It shows that something has happened here has been a real change. I think in the way the economics discipline treats at the very least labor market affects of trade. The work of David author and others, I think, has been very, very influential in forcing people to recognize that while trade may have aggregate gains that the losers really lose and they never get paid back. All this of me thinking a lot about the work of Danny Rodrick. He is an economist and a professor of international political Konami at the Kennedy School of government at Harvard, and he's been for years. I think the most interesting and persuasive critic of the trade consensus in economics and not just a critic, you know, in the sense of he thinks of the studies are wrong, and certainly not a a nuanced critic. You have people who just don't like trade for intuitive or emotional or self interested reasons. He's been someone who I think both understand its benefits, but for a long time has been making not based on political economy that should have been listened to more widely on his work is influenced me for many years. And I think he's just perhaps the most interesting thinker in this space, and a lot of what he said was going to come true has at least in one way or another come true. So it's a, it's a real pleasure to have him on the show. This is a discussion that is not really about Trump's trade war that we get into. It it is really about how to think about trade, not just as an economic fact of life, an an economic pursuit, but as a political one. Right. What what is trade due to countries to sovereignty to borders, to people to questions of distribution and is the way we talk about it in our, you know, using our economic models is that in any way actually relevant. So before we get into that a couple of quick things, there are a couple of days left. If you have a question for me on the upcoming, ask me anything episode. I'll be closing that in just a just a few days early next week. So Email me as recline showed vox dot com. If you want to write down your question and ideally also send it in a voice memo. Although if you can't do that, you can just write it down. That'd be great. You can ask me anything. So again, write it down, send me a voice memo at as recline show at vox dot com. The other ask is if you're not checking out net Netflix explained yet, I really think you should be most recent episode was about the exclamation point and it's about how grammar changes over time and in different mediums about it. Why..

Donald Trump Ezra Klein vox media Trump Danny Rodrick Hillary Clinton Netflix TPP Konami David Kennedy School of government professor Harvard
"klein" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

The Ezra Klein Show

03:51 min | 2 years ago

"klein" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

"Hello and welcome. Be Ezra Klein. So on the vox media podcasting network. I've been thinking a lot about trade recently. Obviously, it's been in the news. Donald Trump has has launched trade war, which is not a term I love it makes it sound more vivid and crazy than I think what is going on actually is, but it's a good time to talk about trade. There has been this tendency with Trump to to both recognize it. He reflects some some very real idiological currents and even substantive important critiques in American life in policy, and also that he himself is unusual human and the the ladder can often overwhelm the former. And then because he will often implement the things he's doing, not that well or not that consistently what was originally valuable in it? What was originally something that we should have been discussing just become just more of the Trump carnival of chaos? I think trade has had that quality where he's come in. He's running a trade policy that doesn't make a ton of sense. Even if you agree with his ideas on trade or what you maybe thought his ideas on trade war. But that doesn't mean that we don't need to have a bigger conversation about trade. I think if you watched the lustful action or Hillary Clinton had to come out against the Trans-Pacific Partnership trade deal, which I am among the people who believe that she was not actually that offensively a critical that deal the that that was just where the politics were, but the fact that the politics were such that the democrat got pushed to be against the TPP that the Republican ended up being a an unusual publican against the TPP. It shows that something has happened here has been a real change. I think in the way the economics discipline treats at the very least labor market affects of trade. The work of David author and others, I think, has been very, very influential in forcing people to recognize that while trade may have aggregate gains that the losers really lose and they never get paid back. All this of me thinking a lot about the work of Danny Rodrick. He is an economist and a professor of international political Konami at the Kennedy School of government at Harvard, and he's been for years. I think the most interesting and persuasive critic of the trade consensus in economics and not just a critic, you know, in the sense of he thinks of the studies are wrong, and certainly not a a nuanced critic. You have people who just don't like trade for intuitive or emotional or self interested reasons. He's been someone who I think both understand its benefits, but for a long time has been making not based on political economy that should have been listened to more widely on his work is influenced me for many years. And I think he's just perhaps the most interesting thinker in this space, and a lot of what he said was going to come true has at least in one way or another come true. So it's a, it's a real pleasure to have him on the show. This is a discussion that is not really about Trump's trade war that we get into. It it is really about how to think about trade, not just as an economic fact of life, an an economic pursuit, but as a political one. Right. What what is trade due to countries to sovereignty to borders, to people to questions of distribution and is the way we talk about it in our, you know, using our economic models is that in any way actually relevant. So before we get into that a couple of quick things, there are a couple of days left. If you have a question for me on the upcoming, ask me anything episode. I'll be closing that in just a just a few days early next week. So Email me as recline showed vox dot com. If you want to write down your question and ideally also send it in a voice memo. Although if you can't do that, you can just write it down. That'd be great. You can ask me anything. So again, write it down, send me a voice memo at as recline show at vox dot com. The other ask is if you're not checking out net Netflix explained yet, I really think you should be most recent episode was about the exclamation point and it's about how grammar changes over time and in different mediums about it. Why..

Donald Trump Ezra Klein vox media Trump Danny Rodrick Hillary Clinton Netflix TPP Konami David Kennedy School of government professor Harvard
"klein" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

The Ezra Klein Show

03:51 min | 2 years ago

"klein" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

"Hello and welcome. Be Ezra Klein. So on the vox media podcasting network. I've been thinking a lot about trade recently. Obviously, it's been in the news. Donald Trump has has launched trade war, which is not a term I love it makes it sound more vivid and crazy than I think what is going on actually is, but it's a good time to talk about trade. There has been this tendency with Trump to to both recognize it. He reflects some some very real idiological currents and even substantive important critiques in American life in policy, and also that he himself is unusual human and the the ladder can often overwhelm the former. And then because he will often implement the things he's doing, not that well or not that consistently what was originally valuable in it? What was originally something that we should have been discussing just become just more of the Trump carnival of chaos? I think trade has had that quality where he's come in. He's running a trade policy that doesn't make a ton of sense. Even if you agree with his ideas on trade or what you maybe thought his ideas on trade war. But that doesn't mean that we don't need to have a bigger conversation about trade. I think if you watched the lustful action or Hillary Clinton had to come out against the Trans-Pacific Partnership trade deal, which I am among the people who believe that she was not actually that offensively a critical that deal the that that was just where the politics were, but the fact that the politics were such that the democrat got pushed to be against the TPP that the Republican ended up being a an unusual publican against the TPP. It shows that something has happened here has been a real change. I think in the way the economics discipline treats at the very least labor market affects of trade. The work of David author and others, I think, has been very, very influential in forcing people to recognize that while trade may have aggregate gains that the losers really lose and they never get paid back. All this of me thinking a lot about the work of Danny Rodrick. He is an economist and a professor of international political Konami at the Kennedy School of government at Harvard, and he's been for years. I think the most interesting and persuasive critic of the trade consensus in economics and not just a critic, you know, in the sense of he thinks of the studies are wrong, and certainly not a a nuanced critic. You have people who just don't like trade for intuitive or emotional or self interested reasons. He's been someone who I think both understand its benefits, but for a long time has been making not based on political economy that should have been listened to more widely on his work is influenced me for many years. And I think he's just perhaps the most interesting thinker in this space, and a lot of what he said was going to come true has at least in one way or another come true. So it's a, it's a real pleasure to have him on the show. This is a discussion that is not really about Trump's trade war that we get into. It it is really about how to think about trade, not just as an economic fact of life, an an economic pursuit, but as a political one. Right. What what is trade due to countries to sovereignty to borders, to people to questions of distribution and is the way we talk about it in our, you know, using our economic models is that in any way actually relevant. So before we get into that a couple of quick things, there are a couple of days left. If you have a question for me on the upcoming, ask me anything episode. I'll be closing that in just a just a few days early next week. So Email me as recline showed vox dot com. If you want to write down your question and ideally also send it in a voice memo. Although if you can't do that, you can just write it down. That'd be great. You can ask me anything. So again, write it down, send me a voice memo at as recline show at vox dot com. The other ask is if you're not checking out net Netflix explained yet, I really think you should be most recent episode was about the exclamation point and it's about how grammar changes over time and in different mediums about it. Why..

Donald Trump Ezra Klein vox media Trump Danny Rodrick Hillary Clinton Netflix TPP Konami David Kennedy School of government professor Harvard
"klein" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

The Ezra Klein Show

03:51 min | 2 years ago

"klein" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

"Hello and welcome. Be Ezra Klein. So on the vox media podcasting network. I've been thinking a lot about trade recently. Obviously, it's been in the news. Donald Trump has has launched trade war, which is not a term I love it makes it sound more vivid and crazy than I think what is going on actually is, but it's a good time to talk about trade. There has been this tendency with Trump to to both recognize it. He reflects some some very real idiological currents and even substantive important critiques in American life in policy, and also that he himself is unusual human and the the ladder can often overwhelm the former. And then because he will often implement the things he's doing, not that well or not that consistently what was originally valuable in it? What was originally something that we should have been discussing just become just more of the Trump carnival of chaos? I think trade has had that quality where he's come in. He's running a trade policy that doesn't make a ton of sense. Even if you agree with his ideas on trade or what you maybe thought his ideas on trade war. But that doesn't mean that we don't need to have a bigger conversation about trade. I think if you watched the lustful action or Hillary Clinton had to come out against the Trans-Pacific Partnership trade deal, which I am among the people who believe that she was not actually that offensively a critical that deal the that that was just where the politics were, but the fact that the politics were such that the democrat got pushed to be against the TPP that the Republican ended up being a an unusual publican against the TPP. It shows that something has happened here has been a real change. I think in the way the economics discipline treats at the very least labor market affects of trade. The work of David author and others, I think, has been very, very influential in forcing people to recognize that while trade may have aggregate gains that the losers really lose and they never get paid back. All this of me thinking a lot about the work of Danny Rodrick. He is an economist and a professor of international political Konami at the Kennedy School of government at Harvard, and he's been for years. I think the most interesting and persuasive critic of the trade consensus in economics and not just a critic, you know, in the sense of he thinks of the studies are wrong, and certainly not a a nuanced critic. You have people who just don't like trade for intuitive or emotional or self interested reasons. He's been someone who I think both understand its benefits, but for a long time has been making not based on political economy that should have been listened to more widely on his work is influenced me for many years. And I think he's just perhaps the most interesting thinker in this space, and a lot of what he said was going to come true has at least in one way or another come true. So it's a, it's a real pleasure to have him on the show. This is a discussion that is not really about Trump's trade war that we get into. It it is really about how to think about trade, not just as an economic fact of life, an an economic pursuit, but as a political one. Right. What what is trade due to countries to sovereignty to borders, to people to questions of distribution and is the way we talk about it in our, you know, using our economic models is that in any way actually relevant. So before we get into that a couple of quick things, there are a couple of days left. If you have a question for me on the upcoming, ask me anything episode. I'll be closing that in just a just a few days early next week. So Email me as recline showed vox dot com. If you want to write down your question and ideally also send it in a voice memo. Although if you can't do that, you can just write it down. That'd be great. You can ask me anything. So again, write it down, send me a voice memo at as recline show at vox dot com. The other ask is if you're not checking out net Netflix explained yet, I really think you should be most recent episode was about the exclamation point and it's about how grammar changes over time and in different mediums about it. Why..

Donald Trump Ezra Klein vox media Trump Danny Rodrick Hillary Clinton Netflix TPP Konami David Kennedy School of government professor Harvard
"klein" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

The Ezra Klein Show

03:51 min | 2 years ago

"klein" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

"Hello and welcome. Be Ezra Klein. So on the vox media podcasting network. I've been thinking a lot about trade recently. Obviously, it's been in the news. Donald Trump has has launched trade war, which is not a term I love it makes it sound more vivid and crazy than I think what is going on actually is, but it's a good time to talk about trade. There has been this tendency with Trump to to both recognize it. He reflects some some very real idiological currents and even substantive important critiques in American life in policy, and also that he himself is unusual human and the the ladder can often overwhelm the former. And then because he will often implement the things he's doing, not that well or not that consistently what was originally valuable in it? What was originally something that we should have been discussing just become just more of the Trump carnival of chaos? I think trade has had that quality where he's come in. He's running a trade policy that doesn't make a ton of sense. Even if you agree with his ideas on trade or what you maybe thought his ideas on trade war. But that doesn't mean that we don't need to have a bigger conversation about trade. I think if you watched the lustful action or Hillary Clinton had to come out against the Trans-Pacific Partnership trade deal, which I am among the people who believe that she was not actually that offensively a critical that deal the that that was just where the politics were, but the fact that the politics were such that the democrat got pushed to be against the TPP that the Republican ended up being a an unusual publican against the TPP. It shows that something has happened here has been a real change. I think in the way the economics discipline treats at the very least labor market affects of trade. The work of David author and others, I think, has been very, very influential in forcing people to recognize that while trade may have aggregate gains that the losers really lose and they never get paid back. All this of me thinking a lot about the work of Danny Rodrick. He is an economist and a professor of international political Konami at the Kennedy School of government at Harvard, and he's been for years. I think the most interesting and persuasive critic of the trade consensus in economics and not just a critic, you know, in the sense of he thinks of the studies are wrong, and certainly not a a nuanced critic. You have people who just don't like trade for intuitive or emotional or self interested reasons. He's been someone who I think both understand its benefits, but for a long time has been making not based on political economy that should have been listened to more widely on his work is influenced me for many years. And I think he's just perhaps the most interesting thinker in this space, and a lot of what he said was going to come true has at least in one way or another come true. So it's a, it's a real pleasure to have him on the show. This is a discussion that is not really about Trump's trade war that we get into. It it is really about how to think about trade, not just as an economic fact of life, an an economic pursuit, but as a political one. Right. What what is trade due to countries to sovereignty to borders, to people to questions of distribution and is the way we talk about it in our, you know, using our economic models is that in any way actually relevant. So before we get into that a couple of quick things, there are a couple of days left. If you have a question for me on the upcoming, ask me anything episode. I'll be closing that in just a just a few days early next week. So Email me as recline showed vox dot com. If you want to write down your question and ideally also send it in a voice memo. Although if you can't do that, you can just write it down. That'd be great. You can ask me anything. So again, write it down, send me a voice memo at as recline show at vox dot com. The other ask is if you're not checking out net Netflix explained yet, I really think you should be most recent episode was about the exclamation point and it's about how grammar changes over time and in different mediums about it. Why..

Donald Trump Ezra Klein vox media Trump Danny Rodrick Hillary Clinton Netflix TPP Konami David Kennedy School of government professor Harvard