35 Burst results for "Klein"

13 House Republicans Gave Pelosi the Votes to Pass the So-Called 'Bipartisan Infrastructure Bill'

Mike Gallagher Podcast

02:25 min | 2 weeks ago

13 House Republicans Gave Pelosi the Votes to Pass the So-Called 'Bipartisan Infrastructure Bill'

"And so on Friday, the Democrats get to celebrate the passage of the $1.2 trillion infrastructure Bill. Ending weeks of deadlock and infighting between the Democrat parties moderates and progressives. Now, if the Republicans in the House had, I don't know, acted like the loyal opposition to the Democrat agenda. If every Republican would have voted no, the Democrats wouldn't be celebrating this legislative achievement. And this giant win for their agenda. Here's the way Philip Klein over at national review characterizes it all. Just before midnight on Friday, we witnessed an utterly disgraceful act by a group of 13 House Republicans. Given the chance to deal a severe blow to President Biden's flailing agenda, they instead rescued him by providing speaker Nancy Pelosi with the votes she needed to overcome resistance from the far left of her party. For months, Biden's multi $1 trillion domestic agenda has been mired in problems. And the goal of the Democrats has been to pass trillions of dollars of new spending at a time when debt as a share of the economy is at historic levels rivaled only by the fight against World War II. The strategy all along was for Democrats to win over some Republicans to their cause by creating a charade that their agenda was actually divided into two parts. A physical infrastructure Bill and a sweeping social welfare Bill. Now, for months, as we know, we've witnessed Democrats have been battling among themselves. With some members, more attached to the infrastructure Bill and others more attached to the social welfare Bill. But ultimately, ultimately, it became clear that the two bills are inextricably linked, and they would rise and fall together.

Philip Klein House Republicans President Biden National Review Nancy Pelosi Bill Biden House
Boxing Superstar Manny Pacquiao Announces Run for Philippines President

NPR News Now

00:18 sec | 2 months ago

Boxing Superstar Manny Pacquiao Announces Run for Philippines President

"Star manny paki out. Says he'll run for the president of the philippines next year he was nominated today by faction within the ruling party. The forty two year old pack house serves in the philippines senate. I'm barbara klein npr news.

Manny Paki Philippines Barbara Klein Senate Npr News
"klein" Discussed on WBEZ Chicago

WBEZ Chicago

04:07 min | 2 months ago

"klein" Discussed on WBEZ Chicago

"Klein. President Biden has approved major disaster declarations for counties in New Jersey and New York, affected by devastating floods from the remnants of Hurricane Ida last week. New Jersey Governor Phil Murphy toured some flood damaged areas of Lambertville today passed waterlogged belongings piled outside homes and residents clearing flood debris and the spirit of of teamwork and community activism is overwhelming. The governor says he plans to push for more counties to get federal recovery aid. When President Biden surveys flood damage in New Jersey and New York tomorrow. California is facing a shortage of more than 40,000. Nurses in the shortfall is expected to last for another five years. That's according to a new study by the University of California, San Francisco. As NPR's Rito Chatterjee reports. It's part of a nationwide shortage and nursing staff that's been exacerbated by the pandemic. There are about 350,000 registered nurses employed in California's hospitals and clinics. But last year more than a quarter of nurses aged 55 64 said that they plan to leave The researchers of the new studies. A pandemic related burnout has accelerated a problem that's been going on for years and the estimate a 13% shortage of registered nurses in the state of the next five years. The findings come just days after the American Nursing Association wrote a letter to the Department of Health and Human Services, calling attention to the nationwide shortage and nursing stuff and urging the agency to take steps to address the shortage. Read the strategy. NPR news. At a court in the Netherlands. Relatives of the victims who died when Malaysia Airlines flight MH 17 was shot down over eastern Ukraine seven years ago. Beginning several days of testimony, Teri Schultz reports about 90 people intend to address the criminal trial of three Russian and one Ukrainian suspect, all of them being tried in absentia. Family members will have 15 minutes to talk about their loved ones. Almost 300 people, most of them Dutch, died in July 2014 when a book missile fired from rebel controlled eastern Ukraine brought down MH 17, The first speaker was really understand who lost her father and stepmother in the disaster and is a leader of the survivors Group. She speaks here through an interpreter about Russia's refusal to extradite the suspects. I'm absolutely full of feelings of hate of revenge of anger and fear. Watched what needs to fear that we do not obtain justice. The four men are accused of organizing the launch of a missile investigators say was transported from Russia. Moscow denies involvement. For NPR news. I'm Teri Schultz. This is NPR. Ireland's Ryanair says it's ending talks with Boeing on a major purchase of 7 37 Max 10 aircraft because Boeing is demanding too high a price. Just last week, Ryanair CEO said the airline was considering buying 100 to 200 planes, possibly more if prices were favorable. The new president and first woman to lead the AFL CEO Liz Shuler is promising major changes are coming to the country's largest federation, the unions. NPR's Andrea Hsu reports this Labor day Liz Shuler is telling workers were building a modern labor movement with women and people of color at its center. In a recent speech, he noted that the AFL CIA itself a federation of 56 unions is the largest organization of working women in the country. With 6.5 million women. You know, we will be half the labor movement officially In a couple of years. And so I think it's incredibly important to signal that the labor movement is a movement for women. Union membership has been in decline in recent decades, the Labor Department says just over 10% of.

Teri Schultz Boeing July 2014 Andrea Hsu New Jersey 15 minutes Ryanair Rito Chatterjee 100 Netherlands American Nursing Association Department of Health and Human 13% last week New York Lambertville last year one University of California Liz Shuler
Officers, medics indicted in 2019 death of  Elijah McClain

AP News Radio

00:51 sec | 3 months ago

Officers, medics indicted in 2019 death of Elijah McClain

"Three police officers near Denver into paramedics have been indicted on manslaughter and other charges in the death of a black man Allisha McLean two years ago a nine one one call was received in Aurora Colorado that McLean looks suspicious all I'm going to change Klein told officers he was just different and didn't have a gun McLean was put in a chokehold injected with powerful sedative Attorney General Phil Weiser says macleans memory will live on as a blessing after his death Colorado continues to lead on law enforcement accountability claims mother Shaneen says her son believed humanity matters that are still working are going to lose their job there's a possibility of all this and the Aurora police association says there was no evidence the officers caused McLain's death I'm a Donahue

Allisha Mclean Mclean Attorney General Phil Weiser Colorado Denver Aurora Shaneen Klein Aurora Police Association Mclain Donahue
"klein" Discussed on Midlife Mixtape

Midlife Mixtape

04:39 min | 3 months ago

"klein" Discussed on Midlife Mixtape

"Co the creator and host of the show. And i've missed you over the past month while i was out on vacation but don't you feel like absence. Probably made our hurts grow fonder for one another. I think it did that. Topic of mutual affection is actually a specialty for today's guests. Do you see what i did there. Did i segue like a boss. Yes i still got it. My guest today is jody klein. The author of first date stories women's romantic and ridiculous midlife adventures which comes out on september fourteenth. Twenty twenty one a demanding career desire to find the right. Mr yes for her lead to jody becoming an alumna of nearly four hundred dates over the course of twenty six years. She founded first date stories. Both podcast and blog as a platform for gen-x women to share their tails and wisdom. So that others can overcome the trials of dating and midlife and find the long-term love they seek. Jody's a graduate of uc davis and has an mba from the ross school of business at the university of michigan. And she lives their husband san francisco. Yes spoiler alert. She found her husband. She found mr. Yes now after i had spoken with jodi. I was so intrigued by the book. I really enjoyed reading first stories and love talking with her about it. And then i thought you know who i bet has some good i eight stories. The people listen to this podcast. So i sent out a call on facebook and said real quick. Everybody semi great first date story and as usual yet delivered so stay tuned all the way to the end of the episode. Because i'm going to share some of your stories about memorable magical and some pretty bad first dates but for now fix your hair. Check your teeth for broccoli. We're sitting down with jodie klein to discuss i eight stories. Welcome to the midlife mix tape. Podcast jody klein. Thank you for combat. Today god every on the show is terrific to be here. I'm such a fan. Well that's nice of you to say. I have to tell you. I have been so intrigued by the book or state stories. We're gonna talk a lot about it but the first question for you. Jodi klein is what was your first concert. And what were the circumstances. My first concert is one that i will never forget. It was sticks paradise theatre tour at the oakland coliseum in oakland california. Oh my god but tell me all about. It was the last show on their world tour. I went with two girlfriends. We were dropped off. We waited in line for six hours and as the line grew. So did our anticipation we rushed in to the coliseum. We grabbed our seats. We have pretty good seats but we did not spend much time in those seats because the show was so amazing that we ended up heading down to the floor and the light. Show the the singing the whole fang. It just blew my mind. And how old were you. I had just finished my freshman year of high school See i think fourteen is the formative year. That's that's the age. Everybody should get to see their first. Show 'cause it really means something it did. I feel so fortunate to have had that as my first show. I really couldn't have asked for a better debut concert experience while now. I'm gonna ask you a question about gen-x and music and i want your a dating specialist so i will ask you this..

jody klein ross school of business jodie klein jody uc davis Jodi klein Jody university of michigan jodi oakland coliseum Mr san francisco facebook oakland california
22 dead, many missing after 17 inches of rain in Tennessee

AP News Radio

00:52 sec | 3 months ago

22 dead, many missing after 17 inches of rain in Tennessee

"At least twenty two people are dead as rescue crews desperately search for dozens of missing people after a one day record rainfall and Humphreys county Tennessee the flooding took out road cell phone towers and telephone lines leaving families uncertain about whether their loved ones survived the National Weather Service says up to seventeen inches of rain fell in Humphreys county in less than twenty four hours setting a Tennessee record for one day rainfall in Waverly restaurant owner cancers Klein says the rain has caused a lot of damage we don't donations just totally gone I'm Forrest county sheriff Chris Davis says many of the missing live in neighborhoods where the water rose the fastest the dead included twin babies who were swept from their father's arms according to family members I'm Mike Hampton

Humphreys County Tennessee National Weather Service Sheriff Chris Davis Waverly Forrest County Klein Mike Hampton
National Review Online's Philip Klein Critiques Lindsey Graham, Mitt Romney for Inconsistencies

Mark Levin

01:44 min | 3 months ago

National Review Online's Philip Klein Critiques Lindsey Graham, Mitt Romney for Inconsistencies

"Is in every respect at every level a disaster this first bill And for 19 Republicans to go along with it. The problem is Phil, seven of them. Just won re election. Three of them are not running for re election. So that's 10 out of the 19. You have people like Lindsey Graham always poses as a conservative and so forth, But I must say from my perspective always lets us down. And the Yeah, Go ahead. Yeah, No, I was going to say I'm Lindsey Graham. I mean, the thing about it was that if you remember weeks ago, they all met in front of the White House and touted this great bipartisan agreement. And then Biden says, Well, if this kind it comes to my desk without, you know, the the 3.5 Trillion bill. I'm not going to sign it. And so then Lindsey Graham says, Oh, he's acting like we're a bunch of idiots. What I'm done with this. And then he turned and then bide and just issues. Um, you know, mild statement, and then all of a sudden, Lindsey Graham's back on board a few days later. Do you remember when Romney said he was severely conservative? Yes, I do. I was standing in the room. I think he's severely unhinged now, and I don't get this at all. We have We have a senator from Mississippi Wicker for criminal in Mississippi. If we can't hold the senator from Mississippi if we can't hold the senator from South Carolina, a senator from Louisiana Cassidy We have Kapito from West Virginia, whose father was the governor of West Virginia. She's got a solid hold on that seat. We can't hold her. I mean, I'm looking down the list here. It's just absolutely stunning. It's shocking, Is it not? Yeah. I mean, they must all be getting something.

Lindsey Graham Phil Mississippi Biden White House Kapito Romney West Virginia Cassidy South Carolina Louisiana
National Review Online's Philip Klein Says Passing Infrastructure Bill Is Disgraceful

Mark Levin

01:54 min | 3 months ago

National Review Online's Philip Klein Says Passing Infrastructure Bill Is Disgraceful

"Republicans, everything that they've told us about this for months. Has been a lie, Uh, they claimed it would be fully paid for the CBO says it's going to add a quarter trillion to the deficit. They claimed it would only narrowly focused On things like roads and bridges. That's only 20% of the bill, And they claimed it would scare away moderates from supporting the larger $3.5 trillion bill that Krems in The entire radical liberal agenda. And, um, the Democrats are moving full speed ahead with that larger bill. They didn't waste a moment. Um and you know, this isn't at a time when we're running out. Massive surplus. Um where early coming around the pandemic coming out of the pandemic where If all these built paths we will spent $10 trillion in just The past year and a half above our existing spending and Biden's own budget says that we're on pace to break the World War two record for debt as a share of the economy. Inflation is out of control. Um, so it's it's infuriating, the Republicans would essentially grease the wheels. Biden to pass his big bipartisan accomplishment at this time. And what especially, um enraging is that it's coming at a time right after Biden, Um said, defied the Supreme Court and an issued an illegal eviction moratorium. Um, and that Congress was supposed to act on and it did it. Um, so he thumbed his nose at both other branches of government, and Republicans responded by delivering him this huge victory. Um, and it's disgraceful.

CBO Biden UM Supreme Court Congress
Delta Variant Is Sending More Children to the Hospital

Fresh Air

00:38 sec | 3 months ago

Delta Variant Is Sending More Children to the Hospital

"Washington health officials across the country are sounding the alarm about the growing number of Children getting sick with Covid 19. Dr. Mark Klein, physician in chief at Children's Hospital in New Orleans, says his facilities admitting a record number of miners. I'm worried at this point that this virus is so contagious that these mitigation measures may not be sufficient. And it's really incumbent on adults and older adolescents who are eligible for vaccination to get the vaccine client says doctors need adults to get vaccinated, if not for their own health and for their Children. Who may be in the age group not yet cleared to receive Makovich shot while research

Covid Dr. Mark Klein Children's Hospital Washington New Orleans Makovich
Lowe Hits Grand Slam, Cruz Homers as Rays Beat Orioles 12-3

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | 3 months ago

Lowe Hits Grand Slam, Cruz Homers as Rays Beat Orioles 12-3

"The razor ten and one versus the Orioles this year after Brandon Lau hit a grand slam and Nelson Cruz homered for the second straight game to lead to twelve three romp in Baltimore Cruz has four home runs and ten RBIs in twelve games since being acquired from Minnesota on July twenty second his two run shot put Tampa Bay ahead to stay yeah I do D. as a wonderful uncle also went deep for Tampa Bay chamber Klein had allowed three runs and five hits with eight strikeouts over a career high seven innings I try to compete my my **** off and you know everybody made plays around me yeah offense was timely Nelson I mean Graham with a with a grand slam off the foul pole it's that's pretty that's pretty awesome to see the resilient the A. L. east three games over Boston and five and a half games over the Yankees I'm Dave very

Brandon Lau Baltimore Cruz Nelson Cruz Tampa Bay Orioles Minnesota Klein Nelson Graham Boston Yankees Dave
Using Email As A Sandbox Marketing Strategy With SalesNexus President, CEO Craig Klein

MarTech Podcast

02:27 min | 4 months ago

Using Email As A Sandbox Marketing Strategy With SalesNexus President, CEO Craig Klein

"There's another useful way to take advantage of email which is using emails. You're sandbox for marketing strategies. A most people would think that email is part of the marketing strategy. Tell me how email can influence the stuff. You're doing outside of the inbox. So we work with a lot of to sales teams so that can be sometimes startups. It sometimes can be longtime established businesses. That have been really sales driven for a long time but now they're trying to move into the digital marketing world sort of finding their footing there in i see them really spin their wheels a lot for a while because just like anything. There's a lot to learn before you really get to be an expert. And so what we've found is that you know if you compare for instance you could go and your digital marketing guy might say well you know we can start a pay per click campaign and we can spend five thousand dollars a month for a few months and gather quite a lot of data and we'll start to get things tuned in and figure out what works and you know maybe in six months will really start to see some roi on that investment which okay. That's a reasonable strategy. Six months is a long time to return on a ppc campaign. But i hear you but for a b. two b. company. There's so much variability in what's going to happen. After that lead converts from google point of view now they've got convert as a sale for the sales team as customer for the business and trying to get those two things working right. That's the hard part. So that's where. I see email marketing being so valuable. Because it's such an easy and affordable sandbox for you to play around if you're longtime established business then you've got a list of past customers pass leads and existing customers and so you can take all those lists and start testing some campaigns and it might take you a few days to put together the campaigns in the emails and orchestrate all that. But you're going to get data immediately. And i you're gonna look it opens and clicks and all that and see if the email performed but then you're going to watch what happens with the sales people who they close any of those deals once you start to get that feedback you can go back and make some changes to the campaign and do it again. And there's almost zero incremental costs other than a little bit of time right whereas in edwards campaign a really any digital platform. You're going to have to rerun those ads and spend the same amount of money spent i

Google Edwards
Thousands Protest Coronavirus Lockdowns in Australia

Weekend Edition Saturday

00:12 sec | 4 months ago

Thousands Protest Coronavirus Lockdowns in Australia

"Demonstrators poured into the streets of Sydney and other cities to protest lockdown restrictions. Coronavirus cases in Australia are climbing. I'm Barbara Klein.

Sydney Australia Barbara Klein
Olympics Latest: China leads in men's gymnastics qualifying

AP News Radio

00:31 sec | 4 months ago

Olympics Latest: China leads in men's gymnastics qualifying

"With the opening ceremonies in the rear view mirror the first gold medal has been awarded and it goes to a Chinese woman who won the ten meter air rifle Calvin Klein the first match of the beach volleyball tournament due to a Czech player testing positive the team from the host country Japan was awarded the win by default the United States estimates around one hundred of its over six hundred athletes that sent to the games are unvaccinated and Australian swimmer Kaylee McEwan is pulled out of the two hundred meter woman's individual medley where she's ranked number one in the world was favored to win gold citing a busy schedule in Tokyo is a reasoning I'm Danny cap

Calvin Klein Volleyball Kaylee Mcewan Japan United States Tokyo Danny Cap
The Importance of Storytelling in real estate

Toronto Real Estate Unfiltered

02:41 min | 5 months ago

The Importance of Storytelling in real estate

"Should be mandatory that in your listing that you have some sort of degree of storytelling involved. And if you're not part of it. If the realtor you hire is an asking you for the story behind again. What made you choose the house. What you've done to the house What what you've learned about the past of the house like anything like the previous owner's anything that you know if you haven't been asked about that then there's a good chance that that person doesn't care what your story is. They're looking at your situation as a transaction. Not as a relationship if you're in a position whether you're whether it's a relationship a romantic one or friendship or acquaintance Hopefully you guys all know what the differences with those are. But if you're in any sort of relationship where the person that you're with doesn't want to hear your stories isn't more interested in you than trying to be interesting then what you've got is you've got someone again who is in a transaction based business and i understand that all of us and you to have to make a living at what you do whatever that may be but when it comes to this especially the fact that some of you have been living these homes for ten years. Twenty years have raised families there. Some of you have had you know multiple generations of people living there. You've got a lot of great stories that should be shared. Which is again what this podcast is. All based on and the reason why it's growing at such a rapid rate and it's you know on some of the top podcasts search results on the planet. The reason is because it's it's all about the stories so i've always felt this way even before the podcast was here. I've always had a really strong relationship. A really strong focus on relationship with clients. and yes. you've heard me say before that loyalty deserves and demands royalty so you should be being treated like royalty if you again are our our someone that's gonna klein of mind and you've been klein the mind And i've helped you move several times and I'm the one that you come back to again. You are in that position where you deserve to have your story told on the on the highest possible mountains to again as many people as possible And again you deserve that because of the fact that your again someone who is loyal to the people in your

Klein
The Oscar Dress Mystery

Ghost Town

02:03 min | 5 months ago

The Oscar Dress Mystery

"So everyone is in awe of this dress. The academy awards happen. It's fun she looks amazing. Press press press whatever two days after yondo opens the door to her hotel room. She's on her way somewhere. she's late. is she staying at the london west. Hollywood hotel sometime between eight am and nine pm. She leaves and the dress is stolen and everybody freaks out again for very different reasons. Representatives for the london hotel said this is a terribly unfortunate situation and we are working with law enforcement on their investigation. Great thank you hotel in a separate statement to women's wear daily. Miss yongle call begun a timeless priceless piece of art. And mr costa's said he was looking forward to. Its return. So that calvin klein could have it restored and archived as it now represents an important moment for the brand so again still totally up their own asked about this dress. Wanting it to be returned an outcry from the house of calvin klein so suddenly Mere days after that some of the pearls were discovered being sold in the la jewelry district as fakes. It seemed when the thief removed a few of the pearls and tried to sell them in the district. They were told the truth and turned away. Kind of laughed out. They were told that the paroles were fake and completely worthless. After all the hype. This whole dress worth one hundred fifty thousand dollars. All of this lavish description was a complete lie two days after that. Tmz got an anonymous tip explaining everything. The person confessed to having stolen address that he had blocked off to pearls and take them to the a. garment district where they were told that they were not real. The caller was telling. Tmz all of this. He said because he wanted the world know that hollywood was fake back at the hotel. Authorities found crumpled fake pearl dress young goes dress in a black plastic garbage bag under a sink.

Yondo London Hotel Miss Yongle Mr Costa Calvin Klein Academy Awards Hollywood London TMZ LA
"klein" Discussed on thebuzzr pod

thebuzzr pod

02:42 min | 5 months ago

"klein" Discussed on thebuzzr pod

"Trying to attend to you know Which you know. And i get tagged in and Haven't quite got to tiktok yet. But i'm not sure our jeter. But i hear i hear that people get some success on their for publicity. But i didn't quite. I was asked you talk person which i won't name Name But he is a branding marketing expert and he spoke to industry insiders and ash some secondary about tiktok and they said if a badges on tiktok mrs now something but they're missing out on something big joining new fish her. Yeah it's been great having you on. I love your music. And i look forward to seeing what you put out with the final album in a When the release date is that sorry. Angela like out. Suddenly get emails is coming out next week. As a lotta bands do that. It takes a bit about a month. Delay there how. I know the name of it yet to name of the album song. I know i know what it was originally was. Don't think i'm going to stick with it. But now i i look forward to hearing the name and when is released and the house concert. They're developing yes schaefer. I've gone and best of luck with everything that you do. Your career thinking. Gosh you never have to talk. Well thank y'all for tuning in. If you enjoy listening to this podcast cleese share this episode with others and post about it on social media to catch all the latest from the buzzer and upcoming shows. You can follow us on instagram. At the buzzer all media and on twitter at the buzzer indie. Catch the pod. Next episode on air in d. from ipad tr's over the airways subscribe fees at the buzzer dot com cheers..

Angela next week twitter instagram ipad buzzer tiktok dot
"klein" Discussed on thebuzzr pod

thebuzzr pod

07:53 min | 5 months ago

"klein" Discussed on thebuzzr pod

"Fourteen. Ray stevens was number. One in nineteen seventy four on uk singles chart streak. The song was about the current british craze of streaking. Streaking was the act of running naked in a public place. Saskatoon folk rock artist. Scott klein joins us today. Scott some bird and sexy deliveries substance music art and is an artist to watch today. We chat about sunshine. And what's my name. These are two incredible releases heart of his upcoming album to release this year. Enjoy the show. Hi scott thank you for coming on the show. Today's really great that you could spend some time with. Thanks for having me. No that's great. thank you. so you're getting. You're making a lot of noise with the music. You'd sunshine. I was looking on the web site. You've had quite a number reviews. Radio play Need chop. That's this a single. That kinda came about there wasn't supposed to be on the ep. It was a song. That i kinda wrote really quickly and Just kind Threw into the there and But the press said. I've been getting it's been like quite a bit you know. And he's you never really know like what that leads to but But it's been it's been Exciting my end to to see how many logs skipped pick it up and like different countries that cover it in who likes. It doesn't like it. You know it's really. It's not very much genre like it's not just country music so it's a very subjective type style music so they so like it's interesting to see that some people like it and they liked the vibe and and others are like i like it but it doesn't set ni- would covering type of ricky that beginning firm inside box the that's one reason. I like it. But i was doll as music but actually all my notes here. I have genre question question question. I it wasn't it wasn't american. Could be a bit. Folk-rock bit breezy. Amen i was thinking who. Who does this remind me up. I hope your complimentary but it reminded me of america. The band america a name particular justice the best one i felt but i was into it But to me there's floated is conflicted because it's a downbeat but in the back you year sunshine so shy night. Was that intentional. Yeah yeah. I mean like i had this idea ahead of like what i'm hearing you know and It's a small percentage of it like comes out in the studio as you trying to strive for hundred percent. You don't get fully good You kinda roll is like what what is happening in the studio. You know that it starts with the drums right so so we make differently each write the song with it acoustic guitar and i think in in my music on it. There's a. there's a bit of a undecided tension between the dark and the light you know And it it's very you know whether that's you know country music and rock and roll or You know folk music and Yeah by just yeah anyway. I feel like there's there's some type of tension always you know the tween the between the two and That definitely is coming out his song white. This because it's like some dark undertones in a light light hearted like Sixties rock and roll. Kind of five. You know like like the bees or on other band. Slake the animals you know. At that time they were saying you know even the beatles. They're singing a boat dark stuff but they're making pot you know and and i think that's kind of what i was for on this on this track just to I tried to read a positive song. you know. this is my attacks by said it was complected. Surprises spin is always consecutive. I think you know. I'm i'm conflicted. Leah hanson Was the guitarist. One june our winner. How'd you meet up with him. I mean it's a i mean. There's there's good stories here shea kit stores. I met up with him He's he plays in a band called league roles right now currently. And he's currently doing this solo project senate hand on which is about to come off But he's you know he's. He's signed with warner music. canada You know with this other bambi roles and The producer american with aspen beverage. He also plays in the band. You know so so. When i recorded music with the with aspen i had went out to this small town in saskatchewan called pyo pods cash. Right which is like in the middle of nowhere a rails town israel. Town it is. It's accurate there's probably fifty people that live there recorded. It's like old school house so incompetent nineteen hundreds and as decrepit schools so we recorded the album there and You know they were doing legal. Wolves is doing some sessions there too as well and he heard my music you know it came across him and he played on it. You know which was amazing and very grateful for you know And he continues to to play on the whistle with sunshine in particular in the middle Like the the bridge or whatever you call it a keep she lays down some some good leads there and Yeah.

Leah hanson Scott Ray stevens Scott klein scott fifty people saskatchewan Today Fourteen One this year nineteen hundreds hundred percent today each israel two british five uk
Duke and Duchess of Sussex Welcome Baby Girl

Weekend Edition Sunday

00:15 sec | 6 months ago

Duke and Duchess of Sussex Welcome Baby Girl

"Duke and Duchess of Sussex, Megan and Prince Harry have a second child Little bet Diana Mountbatten Windsor, named after Queen Elizabeth and Princess Diana. Was born Friday. I'm Barbara Klein. NPR

Diana Mountbatten Windsor Duchess Prince Harry Duke Sussex Megan Queen Elizabeth Princess Diana Barbara Klein NPR
The Story of Audioburst

The Voicebot Podcast

02:31 min | 7 months ago

The Story of Audioburst

"Today. We're gonna talk about the rise of audio and ai in the combination of the tune. What that's gonna mean for not only our industry. But for i think more broadly for for tech in society because there's significant cultural elements here so my guest today or go klein and amir hershey were the co founders of audio burst. And what i thought i would do is maybe you could give a quick overview of what audio burst is how things got started and what you do in the market so i wanted to say hi to the team the join listen to us some of the faces familiar to me and others. That don't know me. I'm a mirrors founder. Other birds the like a the means to me I think the story of body verse should be maybe five years ago when we founded the company being huge. All your fans me personally. More on the radio sides in the us weren't as popular as they are today. Gossiping was faster than me to adopt to pretty much any of the medium available out there. We felt that everything we wanted to know and eager is available in exists in the audio world. But he was extremely hard to find. It was extremely to enjoy and from that challenge for the offers which is a big company. Were in a i. Face the engine that we've developed valuable product. Describe it into but later But we used. Our capabilities are know how allen jr to build an engine to make all your acceptable to understand what is being spoken with the spoken word audio which cheap acknowledgee up to that point warlords. The blind spot nause understanding of this thing would exist within the company and using our capabilities. Fine fine Become too we were looking for on one hand and help the concentrate us find the listeners and the us they wanted so in essence we built an ai engine with the mission the past to connect users and listeners to the company that they're looking for that will inform them entice them meant obtain them In the easiest fastest rich endless way possible.

Amir Hershey Klein Allen Jr United States
Interview With Audioburst Co-Founders Amir Hirsh and Gal Klein

The Voicebot Podcast

02:11 min | 7 months ago

Interview With Audioburst Co-Founders Amir Hirsh and Gal Klein

"Today. We're gonna talk about the rise of audio and ai in the combination of the tune. What that's gonna mean for not only our industry. But for i think more broadly for for tech in society because there's significant cultural elements here so my guest today or go klein and amir hershey were the co founders of audio burst. And what i thought i would do is maybe you could give a quick overview of what audio burst is how things got started and what you do in the market so i wanted to say hi to the team the join listen to us some of the faces familiar to me and others. That don't know me. I'm a mirrors founder. Other birds the like a the means to me I think the story of body verse should be maybe five years ago when we founded the company being huge. All your fans me personally. More on the radio sides in the us weren't as popular as they are today. Gossiping was faster than me to adopt to pretty much any of the medium available out there. We felt that everything we wanted to know and eager is available in exists in the audio world. But he was extremely hard to find. It was extremely to enjoy and from that challenge for the offers which is a big company. Were in a i. Face the engine that we've developed valuable product. Describe it into but later But we used. Our capabilities are know how allen jr to build an engine to make all your acceptable to understand what is being spoken with the spoken word audio which cheap acknowledgee up to that point warlords. The blind spot nause understanding of this thing would exist within the company and using our capabilities. Fine fine Become too we were looking for on one hand and help the concentrate us find the listeners and the us they wanted

Amir Hershey Klein Allen Jr United States
Edwina Dunn: Big Data Pioneer, Founder of Dunnhumby

Made By Women

02:02 min | 7 months ago

Edwina Dunn: Big Data Pioneer, Founder of Dunnhumby

"Big data is one of the biggest game changers in modern life. It's transformed business. Politics science and just about every facet of society and duino done is a pioneer in the field in nineteen eighty nine. She co founded a data. Science company called done humby the revolutionized the realm of retail and consumer packaged goods the groundbreaking loyalty program. That done humby created helped. It's klein tesco. Become one of the world's largest retailer's for her groundbreaking work at was awarded in. Ob one of the british empire's highest honors. After selling humby edina went on to become the chair of star-count a data science consultancy between his journey is a fascinating one. I hope you enjoy my conversation with the dna co founder of done humby and chair of star-count between thanks so much for joining us in two lighted to be here with you. Well we are very excited about this conversation in particular for lots of reasons much about your career to date has been about big data which we love to talk about it. Then of course getting into what you're doing with the female lead but to start big data has had a huge impact and continues to have a huge impact on contemporary life. And you've really been a pioneer in this field in one thousand nine hundred nine. You founded a global data science company which created the first mass loyalty program and changed the way people shop and now you're the chair of data marketing company stark out. What drew you to this field. And why is data science so important to our everyday lives will thank you. I mean yes. It's a great question. I i have to say i. I was lucky and my job. I i study joker fe and no one who studies geography ever face. They got a have an amazing career. Following that i've enjoyed it. I didn't think i was going to step into a role where spatial analysis was important. And actually i did

Humby Humby Edina Tesco
Israel Marks Memorial Day

People of the Pod

01:48 min | 8 months ago

Israel Marks Memorial Day

"It's almost trite at this point to talk. About how little. American memorial day an american independence day mean to. I don't want to say to every american. That's certainly not true. But too many maybe most americans so for our listeners who fall into that camp and you haven't had a chance to experience yamoussoukro and johann smooth in israel. Can you paint a picture for us of what those two days are like. So one of the things that i learned when i moved to israel in the early nineteen eighties was that the sadness day on the israeli calendar was actually not your show on holocaust memorial day. It was almost koran. And y'all mush law has great solemnity but y'all must be car on it's an open an ongoing wounds and think of it this way. I'm show we mourn the consequences of powerlessness and on yellow show. We mourn the consequences of our re empowerment and the price that we've paid for national software and y'all mostly clear on is a collective day of mourning. Everyone knows someone. Everyone knows a family. Everyone knows a kid who didn't come back and everyone has stories that were all cowry. This is a nation of soldiers. It's a nation of parents of soldiers and the ultimate israeli. Might nightmare is for a parent to bury a child and so even if you personally a fortunately not experienced that that's the deep fear that you've lived with

Israel Johann
"klein" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

01:54 min | 1 year ago

"klein" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"Life of Dr David Klein begins in just a couple of minutes former president Obama I nearly all the major TV channels last night criticizing the trump administration's response to the corona virus pandemic more than anything this pandemic is fully finally torn back the curtain on the idea that so many of the folks in charge know what they're doing a lot of them aren't even pretending to be in charge now the president is talking about Obama president that's all I can say thank you Obama earlier this month called the government's response to the virus and absolute chaotic disaster New York governor Andrew Cuomo urging people get tested for the virus and took on himself during a Lou live news conference today that's it that's it nothing else also new this hour more than two thousand US postal workers have tested positive for the virus a union spokesman says sixty one workers have died more businesses will be able to re open in Florida and loosen some restrictions it's all part of the governor's full first phase of reopening one of the biggest part of the plan involves real opening gyms for the first time in weeks several companies come up with a creative way to offer driving test and a social justice at the same time that the examiner won't even be in the car for you now they'll be watching from the sidelines the examiners will talk to the driver and give commands it through a phone amounted to the inside of the vehicle and they'll be watching the driver on an iPad so they'll be able to see and hear everything going on inside the car new drivers will have to bring along a licensed driver who's over twenty one it to sit in the passenger seat during the test the new virtual driving test in Seminole county it will start tomorrow and officials say the slots for the test are filling up fast so if you're wanting to take the test soon you should go ahead and schedule it now brandy Hastings and news ninety six point five W. DPO developing of the news ninety six point five W..

Dr David Klein president Obama Andrew Cuomo Florida Seminole county brandy Hastings New York Lou US
"klein" Discussed on The Carlat Psychiatry Podcast

The Carlat Psychiatry Podcast

07:27 min | 2 years ago

"klein" Discussed on The Carlat Psychiatry Podcast

"He was called the father psychopharmacology. He passed last August at the age of ninety. In this episode we remember Donald Klein Welcome to the car. Let's Qadri podcast brought to you by the Carlyle. Psychiatry Report Keeping Psychiatry honest since two thousand and three. I'm Chris they can the editor in chief of the Carlisle. Psychiatry and I'm Kelly newsom a student psych. MP and a dedicated reader of every issue. Donald Klein died last August of Cardio Pulmonary Arrest. He was there at the beginning and laid the bedrock for the modern practice of psychopharmacology. Here's a few areas where Dr Klein lefties Mark Antidepressant withdrawal. He was the first to describe this phenomena in nineteen sixty one paper on emit Birmingham panic disorder. Dr Klein discovered panic disorder after observing that patients. Who suffered these anxiety? Attacks didn't have they more generalized kind of anxiety and were different from others in that way. They had a phobia of panic attacks and they responded to medications differently that led to one of his greatest contributions which was the concept of pharmacologic dissection. Basically he developed the idea one way to separate different mental illnesses from each other is how they respond to different medications. Sounds like a simple thing. We'd take it for granted granite but Donald plein started it and he. I applied it to panic disorder. This was in the early sixties when chlorpromazine the first antipsychotic Hotak was released and people were using it for everything not sure the limits of what it might do but Dr Klein notice that people with the panic attacks six got worse on chlorpromazine and actually improved with the mid Permian. Dr Klein also used this pharmacologic dissection into to help separate depression into its melancholic. Atypical Forms. He was among the first psychiatrist to discover the Atypical Depression Russian which is characterized by overeating fatigue rejection sensitivity and leaden paralysis. This type of atypical. Depression Russian responded uniquely better to 'em Ao is while the Melancholic type responded. Better to try site clicks sometimes time. Those atypical symptoms were called reverse vegetative symptoms. Meaning they're the opposite of what we normally see in Melancholic Look Depression in melancholic depression. We tend to see low appetite psychomotor agitation instead of tiredness and patients waking king up early in the morning instead of oversleeping and a mood that solid like a rock unchanging instead of a mood that's reactive to every sort out of slight and rejection throughout the day Klein trained as a psychoanalyst and as a physiologist and hope to combine the the two and a research career lift psychoanalysis after realizing that was not possible in a world. Biological Psychiatry was under appreciated. The the mental illness was thought due to poor parenting. He was a bold advocate of the Newfield psychopharmacology in fact he wrote the first ever textbook of sacrifice of college in nineteen sixty nine. Dr Klein had a complex relationship with psychotherapy he certainly valued it as a useful treatment. And but he also testified famously in Congress that psychotherapy was renting a friend but he was deeply compassionate physician. Who got to know his patients well and genuinely cared about them? For example he made an effort to actually try every medication that he gave a patient on on himself to better understand how it was really affecting them. Dr Klein helped draft the DSM. Three with Robert Spitzer in nineteen eighty and famously. He was responsible for getting panic. Disorder in that book but there is another diagnosis that Donald Klein came up with which never made it into the book but might have some utility for the patients. We see even today. It's called his steroid display. His steroid destroyer happens in patients with histrionic personality features. He he said it was often seen in women who were very rejection sensitive and they respond to rejection with these unusual episodes that last about three three days where they'll lay on the sofa tired with heavy feelings of leaden paralysis. Eat Sweets all day and feel intense dis- FAURIA and sadness and anxiety. The episodes resolved he thought either with a few days time or with attention and praise and he saw them as is more of a personality. Trait and fact. Some have speculated that this personality trait he was witnessing is really a variant of borderline personality disorder or or Histrionic personality disorder itself. But as you might have guessed from those physical symptoms. His steroid fauria resembles atypical. Call Depression a lot both have rejection sensitivity eating a lot of carbs and heavy feelings in the arms and legs and that's it's automatically why it was left out of the DSM. Dr Klein argued with Bob Spitzer over this he wanted in the DSM. But Dr Spitzer interns sent want a survey to four thousand psychiatrists asking if they saw any of these features in their patients and in his analysis the features just I didn't cluster together so it got left out the steroid this for you. You will see it to this day in your patience and if you do remember Donald Lines observation that this syndrome responded uniquely well to 'EM AOI antidepressants. They took prescribing. Manny's in July August edition of two thousand and nineteen. And it's there that you'll find few surprises about these drugs it's like did you know that the MA. Oh I diet has gone through a big change in the last twenty years although there is a new. Ma Oi- the skin patch. 'em Sam it's only the older ones that have proven to work in treatment resistant depression. One of those has a side effect profile. That usually makes it the best one to start with channel SIP. Remain find out. WHY THE KARLA REPORT DOT COM? It's there you'll find the full articles that we discussed and especially for all of our listeners. We are offering special discount account where you get thirty dollars off your first year subscription with the Promo Code podcast this subscription includes the print edition delivered to your mouth box and full access to all the articles on the website monthly. Sammy credits to maintain licensure as well as an option for self assessment credits towards board certification..

Donald Klein Dr Klein Disorder Histrionic personality disorde DSM Dr Spitzer Biological Psychiatry Donald plein Robert Spitzer Kelly newsom chlorpromazine Newfield psychopharmacology Chris Donald Lines Carlisle Birmingham Sammy Congress Permian
"klein" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

05:13 min | 2 years ago

"klein" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"We are back with dr david klein of the stages of life nutraceutical and all and you know what when you go there think about this when you go and have your blood drawn and many any of these so-called blood drawing places that are on most corners out there well you've heard recently on the news they've had their privacy problems they've had their internet problems but how about this you go to the stages of life and you get your blood drawn it's done on the premises it is analyzed on the premises and on your same visit the doctor sits down with you and they go over your blood now that's pretty important is getting in a hot box on the outside of a building with this unbelievable heat is not getting an truck and you know bounced all over town it goes toward the quote blood control center right there's just too many things that can happen as football coaches say the more you hand off the ball The higher your increases of affordable. All right. We do things right there on the campus at the stages of life. Now, we had a call her, and they've since hung up. Okay. Well, you we're gonna follow up pick it up. Just call had to do with nipple sensitivity in an individual sixty eight year old that had a bone marrow transplant. So concerned that, that was a side effect of it. And my, my sense about it is that it is not okay. More than likely. It's the same thing that we see in so many other adults in that age group. Okay. The nipple sensitivity enlargement of the, the, the breasts themselves, and it comes from elevations of estrogen, what we want to do with that as one determine what the blood levels are. Now, why do you want to do that? Because when you know what the levels are, you know, where to take it how to deal with it? You're working with. Ignorance is really rarely thing. You wanna have more data the more data that you have the greater the likelihood of picking up and heading in the right direction. Now, one of the other things that can happen. Okay. Is that with? Transplant. He underwent essentially a came chemotherapy regimen prior to the marrow and he's still on immunosuppressants right now. And they can actually cause supression of the testicles, which in turn will cause imbalance of testosterone estrogen ratios. So it's not just a simple matter. Oh well we're going to go in and fix it by lowering estrogen. You really need to know a good bit more. Is it as a real? Big problem. There's no it's something that can be dealt with. But okay, illustrative of this. Okay. If you're, if you're operating out of evacuate in terms of, of your intelligence, not, not your brightness. Okay. But what, you know, around you Intel. Okay, the data the gathering of data. You know, it's like military Intel, they use as an oxymoron, actually. It's just it's just the, the dents operating in less dense vacuum. So what, what do we do? We looking at one third of women. Okay. In the ages of sixty two. Whatever. However, long they're gonna live. One third of women walking around. Okay, are gonna end up with urinary tract infections, either recurrent or present at this particular time. And if you take that population and move it into a nursing home facility, or sister living facility. It's more than thirty to fifty percent of women that are sitting in, there are having urinary tract infection as you look at them. And you're gonna think, well, what are you UT with different to make? It's a pretty benign condition. A urinary tract infection in folks that have age on them not have to be careful about this because I'm going to take off a bunch of people. But I'm one of those people, I guess, but after hit them at the age of sixty you'll see cognitive issues occur as a result of urinary tract infections. Okay. Which is not something you really remember too much with the happen to you. While you're in Sarkic is no, we had to deal with that, as well with you, and anytime you have a catheter in place. You're going to get an infection. It just doesn't take that very long. It doesn't take a week. And everybody has a catheter has an infection. Quadriplegics paraplegics. That, that makes a lot of sense. Yeah. Okay. But it causes changes and cut mission changes the mental clarity. You know, you can have some people that are. Maybe septic, they don't realize it because of their age organs at the age at crowd, not in pain. Okay. That's that goes back to Hippocrates. So what we do at stages, which is actually something kinda cool. Is that folks come in, and they have urine issues? Okay. We do your analysis on everybody. That comes through the door. Okay. Do it rotate across three whole dollars. Big deal. We run a three run it through a screener. And if it's normal, great, if it isn't, we have talk, and if it turns out that looks like it's pyro, or that it looks like infection we check the thing with DNA are looking at for what in what bug it is. We check for thirty two different bacteria, parasites and viruses to see what the infection is, why is this important because thirty to forty percent of samples sent off by a doctor's office with known urinary tract infections are thrown out by the laboratory is having mixed floor. That means more than one bacterium. We can't tell you what's wrong now. Okay. So you're sick you know they're sick. The doctor knows you're sick. They can't tell you what it is. And we can do it.

urinary tract infection Intel dr david klein football testosterone Sarkic sixty eight year fifty percent forty percent
"klein" Discussed on BiggerPockets

BiggerPockets

03:57 min | 3 years ago

"klein" Discussed on BiggerPockets

"Just come to the online class and see exactly how to get started. The smart way to go to bigger pockets of that com. Such smart webinar, again, bigger pockets dot com slash smart, webinar Elsie there. So let's say that somebody is at a meeting with other investors, and they're trying to get people's attention. So that when someone has a deal, they bring it to them first, and they. Don't really know. Exactly. How to go about making these connections there talking to somebody? And they're getting all these negative signs are recognizing his shoes or pointing the other way. I'm getting a fake smile. Their eyes darting away from me like what's an escape route. I could get away from here. Can you give us some ideas of what that person can do to turn that interaction around and make themselves more interesting or more valuable the person that they're speaking to will usually is something where you don't wanna get in that position in the first place. So you want to stand that the energy that you present people is how they're going to see you. So if you're feeling defensive in insecure, remember, we were talking about how susceptible we are to the emotions of people around us the approach that Klein initially in your kind of feeling insecure and defensive they're gonna feel that they may not consciously registered, but they're going to react in a way that makes them slightly defensive and slightly negative in slightly worried about you. We've all had an experience of being around insecure people they make us feel insecure nerves. As when you around somebody who's confident open intends to communicate itself to us in owe ourselves up. So you wanna be able to understand that your attitude in your energy is going to infect the people that you approach and you want to approach them differently. You don't wanna be thinking of yourself and thinking do they like me do I look good in my going to say the right things you wanna be focusing your energy on them? Think of yourself. How many times during the day? Do you ever feel that someone has come up to you? And actually made you feel better about yourself validated. Some aspect of your character the needed that kind of allegation not just flattery. But that made you feel that you are actually an intelligent person that you're actually a good person that you actually have decent ideas. It's extremely rare. Most people are so self absorbed. They're not paying any attention to you. If you can give that client just a millisecond of the field. Thing that they're act-. You're actually tuned to them that you're actually seeking noticing the good parts of their character and bringing it out. They will open up like a flower in front of you sorry to be so new age year. You know, it's because you're giving them defensive insecure negative neurotic worried energy that they're going to react this way. So I have a chapter about people self opinion, which is probably the most important chapter for your real estate agent people out there. It's really the chapter about how to have influence over people. And it means the people who are dealing with having opinion about themselves. They think that they are good decent immoral. They think that they're intelligent about something. Whatever that is. They feel that they have good ideas that they're independent person. You wanna validate that you wanna make them feel stronger about these ideas about themselves? You don't wanna challenge their self opinion? You don't want to make them feel defensive or insecure you wanna confirm them validate them and give them the kind of attention that they're not getting from their spouse with their children or their boss. If you just put those three prince. People's in practice that whole game alters. When I mean is your attitude in your energy, a how you approach people getting into their mindset in attending to them and confirming invalidating their self opinion, I think that's kind of a game changer. That is gold. I mean if you can do that. Well, what happens is people that you're interacting with that way..

Klein
"klein" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

The Ezra Klein Show

05:01 min | 3 years ago

"klein" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

"For thirty years instead or stressed day after day, and traffic, whatever you're sitting there, and traffic and absolutely nothing useful as coming from the fact that you're doing the exact same thing with your body. Ooh, you're sitting in traffic, and you. You increase your heart rate. You divert glucose to your muscles. So you could run for your life, you shutdown ovulation, you stop repairing tissue you get into an inflammatory state all of which makes perfect sense when you're running from ally. And all of which is a disaster when you do it chronically for nonsense, psychological reasons me, no matter how bad traffic is. Or no matter how poorly your boss is treating your whatever you're probably not going to get disemboweled in the savannah and left is just like a pile of bleached bones. You know, I just moved to the bay area. And the traffic though, is really bad y'all actually hear it. It doesn't fall vacation sort of killing of that sort. But still it's a rare, it's rare by mammalian standards. So I want to lay my cards on the table here bet. So I'm a political journalist, and I did not pick up your book on this on under those terms. I struggle a lot with anxiety, particularly the past five ish years, and I read. The book I picked up the book because I wanted to understand what was happening in my body better. And what I took from the book actually read it on a plane ride. And it was in this in the back half that I felt like you were offering a theory of social spreads. That was actually incredible value to my work as a political journalist in some way of more value than just knowing that all my worrying was being bad for me on a day-to-day basis. So I wanted to move up to this idea of stress as an unequally, but importantly applied force across our society. And I thought the place to begin was you've an interesting insight late in the book where you've done a lot of work with primates, and you say than some ways primate society is a lot simpler than human society that what we've invented in human society is poverty, which is a way of applying social stress it's much more diabolical than anything you've seen in your primate. Studies. Can you talk a little bit about those differences? Okay. The large subject that you're alluding to is lots of social organisms out there. Most primates and us have hierarchies status hierarchies dominance hierarchies things of that sort. And a general theme is if being the bottom of your hierarchy involves taking a lot of grief individuals dumping on you if they're in a bad mood. You not having much social support things that are relevant every primate out there the profile you see is your body's in a chronic state of mildly activating stress response, and you're being set up for all the classic stress related diseases atherosclerosis, hypertension, no adult onset, diabetes is worsened by stress gastrointestinal problems at cetera et cetera. You look closely at other primates though. And you see all these interesting qualifiers like being a low ranking Bob moon. Is not as a societas with the bad health coutcome. If you a friend's what's a friend for a babboons, somebody, you sit and groom with somebody you sit in contact with somebody who's got your back in a fight, and that sort of thing modulated by that it's modulated by if it's a true who's hierarchy is not quite as vicious as an other troops. In other words, it's not just your rank. It's the social system in which the rank is occurring. Okay. So hurry, all this non-human primates subtlety. And then you look at the human quivalent, which we're not a classically hierarchical species in the sense of like, chickens having pecking orders, but we have one hell of a dominating hierarchical thing that we invented ten twelve thousand years ago, or so which is socioeconomic status and differences in it. And what you see is poverty is associated with virtually all. Of the bad health outcomes associated with chronic stress, and we can go into the nuts and bolts of that and more detail, but the most striking thing about it is you see that SAS socio economic status SAS health relationship in sweaty capitalist United States in socialized medicine, Scandinavian, Canada and gala -tarian societies. And in society after society, poverty, no matter how severe or how benign might be poverty is associated with with worse health. In other words, and mid all those subtleties non-human primates of it depends on your personal buffers in your personal experience of your rank with nature is the culture of your.

United States Bob moon Canada ten twelve thousand years thirty years
"klein" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

The Ezra Klein Show

04:06 min | 3 years ago

"klein" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

"It created that that act created its own fundings train for the for that new division of the EPA. And yet that was not it didn't make front page news is very quiet negotiation. In fact, it was about a ten year long negotiation is a new short book out with Cambridge University press by Larry Rothenberg, does describing how that negotiation took place and how it was brought to the successful relation. And yet that it's on environmental policy where hard think of an issue. That's more a more difficult for Republicans and Democrats to agree on and yet it did happen. But you didn't see the president going on on the campaign trail on that issue. That may be I think that may be our most optimistic point, or at least a constructive point that we can close on some ask you the our final question always on this podcast, which is what are three bucks on this topic or other is it influenced you over the years, you would recommend to the audience. Address focused on three recent books that I would I would recommend on understanding these kinds of these kind of dynamics I I'd I recommend David Mayhew's twenty seventeen. Book the imprint of congress. This is about Congress's role in responding to major political challenges throughout US history. It is despite the subject matter, a slim volume, something that you could sit down and read in a couple of hours it deals with you know, what was the role of congress in d major challenges that the United States government face whether launching a new nation or continental expansion or taming corporations are creating a welfare state, and then he points to differ. A distinctive imprint of what you know, what does congress at. What does what does what is congress contributed? I'll just black a couple just for your for your interest of your listeners that one is that congress repeatedly throughout US history tends to restrain executive ambition international affairs. Congress more skeptical of invasions expansions annexation 's regardless of party, the president tends to be more ambitious in foreign affairs in congress tends to drag its feet congress likes incremental ISM. That it prefers incremental policy to the kind of big bang new policies that the executive branch pray vers. And finally, congress excels in fourteen compromise. The congress prefers win win outcomes. That a lot of time. It can't do anything. It's good locked. But when it acts it's usually on a win-win basis is very very interesting and thought provoking think about what distinctive about how our institutions function. Second book. I'd recommend is I-. Recaps Nelson's twenty thirteen book fear itself, which is it's a history of Roosevelt's presidency in the new deal. But it begins by setting out. The broader context of the great depression that it there is a crisis of confidence in liberal democracy. This boot listen, what went on ways makes the book seem more relevant now than it did in twenty thirteen when it came out the protracted severity of the great depression led to a turning away from liberal Representative democracy to more autocratic forms of government. Like, fascism, communism is more than a few echoes to our present American democracy with the legislature and the represent and and representation at its heart was eventually preserved through this economic crisis in through the war. But that outcome wasn't by. No means a shoe word. And so we one can ask today whether liberal democracy can survive our current challenges, and certainly there's there are no assurances, but the that book, I think is helpful for thinking about those kinds of crises of institutional confidence. And last I'd recommend Josh chafe. Its's book Congress's constitution. This is also another book from twenty seventeen who's a landmark vote book on the separation of powers and the role of the.

congress US David Mayhew president Cambridge University executive Larry Rothenberg EPA Josh chafe legislature Nelson Roosevelt Representative ten year
"klein" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

The Ezra Klein Show

03:57 min | 3 years ago

"klein" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

"Most of the news articles are about the prospects of change party control one is to to Sioner another. That's not how congressional elections were historically covered in the in the news that they used to be about individual races or about what was going on in different regions of the country. Because of course, because of the already control was not in play that the fact that it's in play means that the salience of which party wins is is raised. And so there's so much more attention to that which I think, you know, does play into rivalries and helps to cement people's commitments to their partisan identities at least for those for those Americans who have a partisan identity. So another piece of this. I think is interesting. So I recently had a conversation. Although I think it may come out after this one with the neuroscientist Robertson Polski who studies stress and the weighing Zayed affects the primate and human brains, and he talks about. How when studying primates if you're in a period where the hierarchies are unstable it changes by who feel stress all of a sudden people in power and dominant people feel out of stress and anxiety and stress and anxiety. It reduces short term planning, and it can make you angrier, and it has all these sort of bad downstream mental effects, and it really made me think a lot about your book, which is that for a long time and other ways almost saying what you're saying to get it out of the competition language is that America had very stable political hierarchies people knew what the party's knew what their places were more or less, and so they could kind of relax into it and plan on longer time horizons and active more calmly and had a little bit more space in which to interact with the other party and figure out what they wanted to do. But now, they don't the like the political hierarchy is constantly unstable and constantly changing. And so everybody feels that like that stress. Volatility all of the time. With all the things that stress in threat due to do to the human mind. I'm curious if you think that's true, your your book because a lot of institutional behavior, but obviously to some degree institutional behavior is built out of the behavior of individuals, and you spoke to a lot of individuals for the project. Do you think that this changes sort of how individuals see themselves and each other and just like the daily like level of cortisol in their bloodstream to constantly be in this war for control? That's a super interesting idea. I wrote that book it's published on an academic press. And I stuck with in my area of expertise as a political scientist. So I wrote about institutions and incentives, but the psychology that you're pointing to makes a great deal of since to be in suggest that I need to spend a little time taking to account, this broader context in which struggle for power on shapes emotions in psychology and identity, and and thinks that, you know, go. Oh, a little bit outside of what we normally deal with this is to Shanley focused political scientists, though the one that I think about a lot is planning. It seems to me that the cut a time horizon on which you can plan is really important and one we know that stress like acts on the human brain, such you've less working memory, and you know, deferring gratification now to get something later becomes much harder. But just if you have no idea what politics is going to look like in four six years. It creates it seems to me this inability to defer something now for later. This inability to say, yeah, maybe we're not gonna win this one without doing something really awful like Carlin situation. But you know, it's worth it like, whoa. Like the system is important, right? Like the ability to treat something as you're playing for twenty or fifty or posterity versus the ability to treat it like what you do. Now is the only thing that matters. You hear this business a lot with like, the the focus quarterly earnings reports. But it seems to me to be true in..

Shanley scientist Zayed Sioner Robertson Polski cortisol America Carlin four six years
"klein" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

The Ezra Klein Show

02:16 min | 3 years ago

"klein" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

"I love the book lab girl hope yarns, it's a memoir by a can of paleo biologist geologist of that deals on everything from the think just a really great description of how the scientific process works on the ground interesting views on climate change in evidence for climate change in how one thinks about that. And then also just a memoir of of what it's like to be a woman scientist kind of moving through a world that is that is still heavily male dominated in oriented in some ways. Mr. really, really funny. Sean ticket. Thank you very much. Thank you. Thank you to president cater for being here. Thank you all for being here. Thank you to toper Ruth at UC Berkeley to Jeff gal at box media. The as recon show is a box media podcast production. For decades. Whenever people talked about technology. They would talk about things like graphics chips and memory salts. It was like technology gadgets. It was things. People produced hardware-software not anymore. Now, everything is downstream from technology society. Politics media told downstream from technology technologies. A layer that everything sits on top of an understanding that layer and the way it is changing us and everything around us. It's what care Swisher does best on her podcast Rico decode kera down with the world's most influential people on her podcast Rico, decode care sits down with the most important people in technology, and she gets to the bottom of what motivates them how cheap there breakthroughs where they may have failed. And whether they even understand what they are doing CARA is unique as an interviewer, she is fearless. And she is funny. And she knows almost everything she's talking about better than her guests do so it makes for a a rare conversation a conversation where there's very little bullshit. And you actually get to. The bottom of what people are thinking. And why they think it cares. Guests included tech titans like Elon Musk and Mark Zuckerberg. But she talks to politicians journal celebrities people like Hillary Clinton, Michael barrow, Estra Parral, even the mooch. So we waited for name the show is Rico decode with care Swisher, new episodes publish every Monday and Wednesday. And there are often bonus episodes on Saturday, can listen it and subscribe for free on apple podcasts or wherever you're listening right now.

Swisher Rico Elon Musk biologist geologist scientist Berkeley Hillary Clinton Jeff gal Sean president Mark Zuckerberg CARA Estra Parral apple Michael barrow
"klein" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

The Ezra Klein Show

03:28 min | 3 years ago

"klein" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

"I'm not sure that we as as a nation did enough and push back against you know, the the special interests who were. Who would see these reform efforts as being inconsistent with you know, what was in their best interests? Will they might have been in the best interest of of the country? Those special interests were a successful in. I think circumventing, you know, asking for asking appropriate questions and coming up with them putting in place more mechanisms so that we don't have a repeat of what happened, you know, in two thousand seven two thousand eight so the one of the reasons I ask this is because I think it loops back to the broader conversation. We are having at the beginning over redistricting and good government. There's this feeling that partisans. And in this case, particularly Republicans are rigging the political system, and that that's a big prompt. This also, I think a belief that the rich rigging the system both by writing too, many of the laws directly through political contributions and influence and lobbying and then in having too much voice in their enforcement in the guidance given to agencies in in. The ways sort of laws are shaped in context and society. Do you do you think? That's right. Do you think that the rigging of the rich is as big or somewhere kind of problem to the rigging of the GOP question that the system is rigged in a whole variety of ways, politically as we have talked about the way in which the Republican party as a his tried to rig the system when it comes to gerrymandering in voter suppression in those special interests in those people who are extremely well off have disproportionate amounts of control of the bar. Our system disproportionate amounts of power that is tied to to economic economic wealth. And I think we need to we need to to realize that, you know, I I think in some ways we are in another gilded age. And I think that you know. I think we're on the verge of seeing a reform period of reform that would be consistent with what we saw in response to the end of the that yielded age at the beginning of the twentieth century. I really do think that we are people are her with starting to to to focus on, you know, economic disparities. You know, when you start talking about Medicare for all star people start getting concerned about the way you see income in inequality. This is starting to seep into the concerns of the general population. And I think that you will see policies that ultimately will reflect those those more general does more general concerns, and as I said, I think if you wanna get a sense of what this new reform era will look like, I think you look at the early part of the twentieth century and you'll you'll see a similar kind of reform reform movement is this part of the unfinished business of the Obama administration. I think sometimes about the way in which President Obama's two thousand eight campaign was very much about special interests and lobbyists in the ways in which the political system itself felt on fair, and then you get into office, and there's a recession, and there's always his tradeoff between are you going to use your political capital on policy..

President Obama Obama administration Medicare GOP Republican party
"klein" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

The Ezra Klein Show

02:55 min | 3 years ago

"klein" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

"You'll know that one of my obsessions of late has been whether America still is democracy. Whether it ever has been whether it is one whether it should be one. But in particular, how some of the distortions in the system ranging from the electoral college to the way geography becomes representation to gerrymandering to the filibuster. How they're ending up stacking the political deck, they're making outcomes legitimate. And how increasingly there is a divide between Democratic Party wants a more small d democratic America and a Republican party that sees more democracy as a threat to its interests. And that to me is a pretty dangerous space someone who's work. I've been interested in space is Eric holder's or cold. Or course was the attorney general under President Barack Obama the first African American attorney general since leaving the White House. He has founded and chairs the national democratic redistricting committee, and that's become not just the focus of his political work. But also the focus of much of President Obama's post-presidential political work. He actually recently merged organizing for America into this project. And I think the the reason for it is is a growing sense that if you don't get some the fundamental questions of elections, right and representation right than all the other policy you care about climate change healthcare economy. Whatever it is it doesn't work out. I it's not going to be there. So I wanted to hold on the show to talk about that work to talk about what motivates it what it's chances are what the strategies he's trying to employ are what he thinks if some of the counter arguments to it and also to think a little bit more broadly about other parts of his legacy and his role some of the speeches. He gave on race in the Obama era. Some the work he did or did not do in terms of prosecuting financial crimes during the financial crisis or prosecuting bankers. I should say during. The financial crisis is a pretty interesting conversation. Appreciate him taking the time to do it. So as you can Email me at Klein show at vox dot com. Here is Eric Holder, Eric Holder, welcome to the podcast going to be here. Thanks for having me comment recently about what you're trying to do that struck me as really telling you you call your work apart effort at good government kit. Can you talk a bit about what you mean by that? Yeah. I think the reality is that the two parties stand on different sides of this electoral fairness issue, and for us to get as a nation back to the place where I think we need to be Ted just affair Aleppo system one that is you know, gives the people the opportunity to truly express their views. The Democratic Party has to take on the Republican party and fight for that fairness, but I always say as I talked to people, but we're trying to do with the national democratic redistricting committee is not to come up with a system gerrymanders four dead. Kratz?.

President Obama Eric holder Democratic Party Republican party America Ted financial crimes Aleppo attorney White House Klein President
"klein" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

The Ezra Klein Show

04:21 min | 3 years ago

"klein" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

"For radicalization and extreme emotional engagement, and you have more bad eggs exploiting that system because now when you're at the two billion user scale like Facebook as the number of bad actors is millions. It's still small percentage. But millions of people saying I want to spend my time to game the system that is designed to get you increasingly engaged emotionally, agitated radicalized. Nobody's encountered that before. Here's a thought that I'm genuinely not correct? But I think may be which is that what keeps tipping these platforms into being real dangers. Are the overlay the algorithm. I think Twitter got a lot worse and a lot worse for politics. When it began getting more algorithm when the incentives became to write a tweet that the absolute most people would re tweet or heart because then you would hit this kind of like algorithm MC wave and now fifty thousand people would have done it or one hundred thousand people like the the incentives to do this kind of performance high-intensity, high emotion communication there because way up because rewards got so much bigger. Obviously Facebook newsfeed was one of the first you're talking about the YouTube algorithm. A lot of what these companies do at their core strikes me as not just benign, but but relatively positive. I mean, I I kinda love you to. I think is amazing work with it. Like we have. I mean, I'm I'm still like astonished by the quality of the audience air, and how much they want to gauge with things that are long and interesting, but it seems to me that the way at least so far we've built engagement algorithms keeps going wrong when you get enough scale and. I assume it keeps going wrong because he incentives on all sides or bad, the incentives on all sides, or to you know, if you're if you're a bad actor, you can just go straight to try to gain the algorithm. And if you're the companies, it's like people are spending more time there. So what's really the problem? And if you're good actor now, you're competing with people who are working too much to try to gain the algorithm in that can distort your own work. And there's something about how we have tried to make action out of engagement that seems to be repeatedly not working or Peterle failing and pretty similar ways. Yeah. I I would reshape that into I think that's an accurate diagnosis broadly. But I I think that the the flaw in the algorithms is there amplify -cation doesn't actually have enough inputs. Right. So they're saying, okay. The likes in Hartson shares. That's our meter right views in page counts. And this actually even predates the sort of social media era when when Google become Dom. Early two thousands an entire industry arose called search engine optimization. And this was I sell flowers, and I'm the mom and pop flower shop, and I wanna rank for pokipsy flower shop, and so I'm gonna make my site design try to appease, the Google Botts. Right. And there was no documentation. It wasn't like you do x y and z and therefore yourself goes up. It was just this magical like there would be a windfall for some folks. We're like we just happen to get the right? Search engine ranking where we were the first result. When you look for that. And then there were the people the other extreme they were like, wow, I I had that. And it went away because Google changed something. I don't know what it is. It's totally fake. And I wish I could. No. And it was almost cargo cult right there. Like if we sacrifice a goat. Maybe our ranking will go up, and literally they would be these entire forms of discussion. Like, I think they like blue pages better than they like green pages. And you're like that clearly that can't be the rationale and then every once in a while Google sorry. It was we made a mistake. Our bug is the we we made this. Error in. So there's this learning process, but the was meddling process, which the entire industry had which was oh there are opaque unknowable algorithms, and if we share folklore with each other about how to appease them, we can win monetary value, right? That has economic guy so enormous multibillion dollar incentives towards reverse engineering the algorithms, but only for the most die-hard only the most obsessive in those cases because people were building businesses. But then when you get sort of more pure information academy it's like who are the people who are most motivated to.

Google Facebook Botts Twitter YouTube Hartson
"klein" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

The Ezra Klein Show

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"klein" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

"And so I if I look, at example of self driving trucks are coming. There's whatever it is three or four million truck drivers in America, and they're at risk losing their jobs. So everybody sort of understands this framework. And that is actually that tends to be the media framing, the the sort of public conversations that and then the critics say, but we should protect the truck drivers. They're not wrong in saying that, and then they say, so we should and they can only look in the conventional methods and what they know. And they're fluent is we should regulate the deployment of self driving truck technology. And it's like you're not gonna win that. There's no way you're gonna win that. 'cause you don't have the dollars to pay enough policymakers to make the regulation. Go your way. Now, I don't want that to be technologists can outspend you in therefore that his policies, but that's where we're at. So then how would you be effective and one of the things I look at is the coders the people doing the work, not not the executive checkers they were going to actually write that code. They are not personally invested in displacing truckdrivers. That's that's a non goal to them there. That's incidental to them. Now. Should they care more? Yes. So they'd be more fluent these things. Yes. Do they have power kind of in an interesting way? And that's when the other things we haven't recogni. Is like coders are theoretically among the most empowered laborers who've ever existed, but collectively they're just finding that power. And so they haven't had this conversation when we say what if we redefine the problem, we're solving which is how do we use automation technology to make trucking more efficient? But the goals could be safer for drivers more profitable for everyone architect.

America executive
"klein" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

The Ezra Klein Show

03:54 min | 3 years ago

"klein" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

"But when my parents got divorced when I was young when back out softened for may was at my by my new house, my other house. I got to have a Bondi blue the first I MAC, right? Okay. And like, you know, it's like on the way your parents are getting divorced on the other hand, you get you get the new I max certain. You're not the only person that can that has that story. That's a weird thought that they probably not. Yeah. No feels like a specific about like first ipod looks made this big chunky out like this is dad's new house, and it comes with an I. Sorry. But that digression side, they're all these things that I mean, we talk about products at flop, but I think this is true about technical initiatives and actually win the funniest things that I'm again, super guilty of this is tech people say, oh, well, you know, there's all this confusion and problems in the market or users how this problem, and so we're going to come up with a new technical standard and that'll solve it. Right. And this always happens is the big companies get together. And they're you know, you end up with HD versus Blu Ray thing for ten years in that Rouge like all right fine. All suckered garage net flicks. And so there's this like well intentioned techno determine ISM like if we get the right features. They're just going to do whatever we say. And it's not true. Like, you have to have, you know, the right impulse to match what people want and culture, they have to have that sort of degree of trust. I mean, I look at like Snapchat, which seems to be sort of flailing a little bit. And it you know, it was like a whim is like the right card ashes as the right thing about your app. And then says the wrong thing. And you know, the winds ways, and there there are I'm sure very talented engineers there who are like like busting my ass on this new filter. And isn't it technically impressive in? It's like it doesn't matter. But this goes back to values. I think I've come to believe that the way we talk about Luddites is really damaging because we've created this derogatory word for anyone who sees a new technology coming. Maybe we shouldn't. We should hold off. Right. You know, I I don't wanna get into a deep thing about like whether the Luddites were right to try to save looming at the time. But it is not we have a cultural conversation around technology that if a new technology is coming you'd better to get on board. Maybe can think about making some changes on the edges. Maybe you can think about talking about it in a different way. But whatever we've invented we should be deploying it as fast as humanly possible. And like, that's how things go and the credits are always wrong. I've been on a kick of reading technology criticism from the eighties recently agreeing on you'll postman. Great. And what shocking to me is in my head. I had figured while. They were all wrong about all the stuff. And actually they were right about all of it. Yeah. Critics right now other things were true to nothing's I'll good nothing's all back. They may not have foreseen. The good parts criticisms weren't wrong. And that's been really shocking to me to just realize how strongly the cultural conversation dismisses anybody who says stop or slowdown or maybe this. I was reading postmen and he's so cranky. But then I think what what is the world we're living in and if you've explained Twitter to him. Acuity for killed you correct? Yeah. Yeah. It's such an interesting thing too. Because the problem, and I think there is a weakness in a lot of the criticism. And this is true. The eighties is true now where they're not fluent enough in technology to have a nuance criticism because they are they do tend to be people who are resistant to the new tech must be a danger. They're not wrong about identifying the threat, but they're not fluent enough to articulated in a way that the -ffective. And I think that's a really tough thing about the criticism is used by nature are going to want to be a person's like well. Yeah, I don't need to know all that stuff because there's this risk. And then what happens is because of that sort of lack of fluency the technologists still define the framing of the entire conversation. Right..

Bondi Blu Twitter Snapchat ten years