35 Burst results for "Klein"

Who Mark Levin Can and Cannot Support

Mark Levin

01:58 min | 3 weeks ago

Who Mark Levin Can and Cannot Support

"We have used this platform to endorse a number of candidates because we want to take on the establishment and change what's taking place in Washington We're not just blowhards with columns or organizations or go to meetings In fact I don't do any of that Three of the 6 Klein Rosen down bobart they were on this program or in other programs that we've endorsed We've endorsed Biggs I told you before I could never support him For dog catcher given his role in the Arizona state Senate blocking convention of states gates to me is not a conservative He is a fly by night And good to me is a massive hypocrite He took more money from the McCarthy pack I think than anybody $2 million won by the skin of his teeth Why did he take it And why doesn't he return it Then I would see some consistent principles in the guy I mean I don't understand it Quite frankly So that to me is a character issue That's a character issue So those are the remaining 6 As best as I can see I've also been troubled by the brutal attacks on Newt Gingrich The king which is an iconic figure Root gingrich succeeded in taking back the House of Representatives during Bill Clinton's presidency For the first time in almost half a century he is a brilliant brilliant man He's a great patriot He's helped conservatives his entire life This is precisely what I mean

Klein Rosen Biggs Washington Gates Arizona Senate Root Gingrich Newt Gingrich House Of Representatives Bill Clinton
Bitcoin IRA

DC Forecasts

00:32 sec | Last month

Bitcoin IRA

"12 p.m. Thursday, December 15th, 2022. Bitcoin IRA Bitcoin IRE review our newest Bitcoin IRA review discusses launching a retirement account with crypto. The Bitcoin IRE reviews show that since it was founded, the platform processed up to 1.5 billion in transactions with more than 100,000 users. Bitcoin IRA was founded in 2015 by Chris Klein, Johannes Hayes, and camillo kocha. They founded

Johannes Hayes Chris Klein Camillo Kocha
Phill Kline Talks All Things Voter Integrity

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:28 min | 2 months ago

Phill Kline Talks All Things Voter Integrity

"Klein, welcome to America first. Thank you, Sebastian. Great to be with you. So I asked you in the break, there are two ways to answer the question about yesterday. What is the take home politically for the good guys? And then what is the situation when it comes to voter integrity? That's take, let's take, let's reverse them. You're the expert on voter integrity, talk to us about what is fixed, what isn't fixed, how bad is it? Well, we had a little bit better transparency this time around, but we haven't fixed the problems. American elections are not understood by the electorate. And in fact, the way elections are run are not fully understood by those who run the elections. And so American faith in the electoral process continues to diminish. Machines are not transparent. They have glitches every time, procedures and processes are not open to both political parties. They've started to create interim counting centers. With the management of absentee ballots and what that does Sebastian is its sidestep. Common common sense provisions in law that members of both party need to be present in the room as ballots are being handled. So millions of ballots are being handled away from poll watchers and poll watchers are a legitimate part of the process.

Sebastian Klein America
"klein" Discussed on Monday Morning Critic Podcast

Monday Morning Critic Podcast

05:36 min | 2 months ago

"klein" Discussed on Monday Morning Critic Podcast

"My name is Philip Klein and you're listening to the Monday morning critic. So I have to say going through your filmography is pretty amazing because first before I go into any further could you explain explain to me I know what it is but what's an orchestrator? Is that somebody that conducts the orchestra? Is that somebody that assembles the orchestra? I mean, I'm coming from a point of like, I mean, I know what it is. I have a feel for what it is, but what are the exact duties of an orchestrator? Yeah, I mean, it's a question I get asked a lot. I guess so what an orchestrator does this works in conjunction with a composer to basically take what they've written? Because everything nowadays is digital. We work on computers for everything. So it's the process of taking it from digital form and making it analog, so to speak. So we take all these blips and blops on your screen and turn them into notes on a page. And what we do is assign all the individual parts or the instruments, make creative some creative decisions about voicings and we're there to basically take what a composer has done formalize it in the most elegant way possible. Some composers write very bare bones, cues, that goes to an orchestrator, so you're doing a lot more creative thinking and filling in. Other composers are very complete and it usually comes down if there's time and all honesty. If they have the time to invest into that process, they usually can get through it. But you know, I've done things with composers where they're writing a whole score in three weeks, so they really rely on their orchestrators to help them fill out all the parts and get things ready and whatnot. But yeah, we're kind of the next step after the composer writes it.

Philip Klein
ABC News: The Path to Republican Victory Is Through Arizona

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:58 min | 3 months ago

ABC News: The Path to Republican Victory Is Through Arizona

"According to ABC's Rick Klein and Jonathan Carl yesterday, the path to Republican victory might just come right through here in Arizona with a Blake masters victory. Yeah, John, this poll with ipsos shows that both parties have their areas of strength, but Republicans are starting to open up pretty open up a pretty significant gap on some of the biggest issues that motivate voters, inflation, crime, issues around the economy, double digit plus gap. That's what the campaign has been about. That's what the ads have been focused on. Now, Democrats have their issues as well. They have yawning advantages on things like gun violence, abortion, climate change, but the problem for them, John, is that those aren't the issues that are motivating voters first and foremost. Either in polls or talking to voters, it's those issues around the economy. And if this campaign is about inflation, high prices about crime, Republicans have a big, big advantage. Okay, and here in Arizona, a senator Mark Kelly, the Democrat, obviously running against Blake masters, tight race, you have been saying that this could come down to something you're calling McCain Democrats. Yeah, and John, this is kind of a microcosm of what we've seen around the country. Keep in mind that right here, this used to be red territory. Maricopa County fastest growing county in the country. John McCain won right here in 2016 last time he's on the ballot by 15 points. Fast forward just four years though, Mark Kelly and Joe Biden both win this state. Biden winning by barely 10,000 votes. One of the biggest upsets of the election cycle. So the battle right now, it's over suburban voters. It's over new voters in this fast growing county is over Latino voters. These are the trends you're seeing everywhere, and this drop voters, people that for decades voted Republican now have been voting Democrat where they land almost certainly determines where Arizona lands. And if you want to see why that matters, John, take a look at this. If just this one Senate seat flips, if Blake masters is able to beat Mark Kelly in a few weeks, Republicans go from a four in ten chance to an 8 in ten chance to take the Senate.

Rick Klein Jonathan Carl Blake Mark Kelly John Arizona ABC Maricopa County Mccain John Mccain Joe Biden Biden Senate
Doug Welcomes Virginia Rep. Ben Cline to the Show

The Doug Collins Podcast

01:24 min | 4 months ago

Doug Welcomes Virginia Rep. Ben Cline to the Show

"I'm gonna introduce you to someone on the podcast who I have got a lot of respect for. He is Ben Klein, he is from the great state of Virginia. Congressman from up in the wonderful valley area up in there, just a great place. And part of Virginia that you don't expect because most people now expect Virginia to look like the suburbs of Washington D.C.. This district does not look like this watching D.C. and Ben came into Congress with some experience. He'd worked for a former member, but he came in and he was one of the ones that I went after to get own judiciary committee when I was the ranking member and I am so glad that I did with everything that we went on that term and he has just continued to just excel at that. Ben, welcome to the podcast. Well Doug, it's great to be with you and appreciate your leadership there on judiciary. It was an amazing time there as a freshman to be confronted with the Mueller investigation and all the different efforts by this corrupt intelligence community that we or that the corruption in the intelligence community that was not rooted out by the Trump administration and certainly has not been rooted out by the Biden administration. But it's great to be great to be with you today.

Ben Klein Virginia Washington D.C. BEN D.C. Congress Doug Mueller Trump Administration Biden Administration
Kash Patel: The Endemic at the Top Level of the FBI

The Dan Bongino Show

01:51 min | 5 months ago

Kash Patel: The Endemic at the Top Level of the FBI

"But it's clear now that this is not a case of just isolated incidents it's a systemic problem I mean cash you're just some of the names Jim Comey Andrew mccabe Bill price step Jim Bakker Lisa page Peter strokes the even soma Joe pianka Kevin Klein Smith Brian autumn Tim Tebow I mean the list goes on By the way those are just I'm sure of me and you sat here with Devin for an hour we could name 30 more I mean you know it's true You and I know I can just go to my book and the index right now But that's just off the top of my head This is not a rotten apple This is an Orchard problem Now this is an endemic at the top levels of the FBI because they thought that Donald Trump should never be president So they did everything they could to gin up false prosecutions from Russia gate and to the mishandling of the Hunter Biden laptop issue which you've covered extensively And now then Jan 6 and nobody's even talking about Jan 6th anymore And now we're on Mar-a-Lago and now we're on the verge of defeating this whole fake notion that Donald Trump's been on mishandle classified information And they're going to go come up with something else And I still think I'm right They're going to try to attack Trump's allies that were around during the situation and try to prosecute them to get the narrative out there somehow dirty enough Trump enough So he doesn't run again And I don't think it's going to work But you're right The list goes on and on And I just highlight the people's the former agents that are now commentating on TV Mccabe struck page precept all these guys who were fired as a direct result of my investigation that I led with Devin Nunez their bias is on blast in the hypocrisy of the fake news is on blast for allowing these people to do what come in and say Donald Trump's going down Capital is getting arrested I'm what charges These people used to work with facts in law and now they just work in dirty politics It's disgusting

Jim Comey Andrew Mccabe Bill Price Jim Bakker Lisa Joe Pianka Kevin Klein Smith Brian Donald Trump Hunter Biden Tim Tebow Devin Peter FBI Lago Apple Russia JAN Devin Nunez Mccabe
Biden says he's mulling health emergency for abortion access

AP News Radio

00:48 sec | 7 months ago

Biden says he's mulling health emergency for abortion access

"President Biden says he's considering declaring a public health emergency in the push to protect abortion rights The move would free federal resources to promote abortion access something advocates are urging The president said yesterday he's asked administration officials to look into it Whether I have the authority to do that and what impact that would have On Friday White House gender policy council chief Jen Klein said they did look and declaring a health emergency would not free a lot of resources or legal authorities That didn't seem like a great option As the administration weighs other steps the president's encouraging people enraged by the Supreme Court's abortion decision to keep speaking up Keep protesting because keep making your point It's critically important Sagar Meghani Washington

President Biden White House Gender Policy Coun Jen Klein Supreme Court Sagar Meghani Washington
Rick Klein's Analysis of the House Midterm Elections

Mike Gallagher Podcast

00:55 sec | 9 months ago

Rick Klein's Analysis of the House Midterm Elections

"So that's the breakdown of the Senate. They went on then to break down the house and the likelihood that Republicans are going to take control of the House. You focus a lot on the Senate control of the house almost certain to go to the GOP. They only need to pick up four seats. Yeah, and that map right there, you're looking at the narrowest House majority by Democrats in the modern history of the House of Representatives. We know how first midterms go for presidents. None of that has really changed. But what has changed is redistricting. And this is fascinating. Our friends over at 5 38, they looked at every state that's finished redistricting so far. They're not all done. So far they found a net total of 7 fewer competitive seats than just two years ago. Down to just about 33. That means in the whole House of Representatives, you're just looking at this kind of narrow window of truly competitive races. Places where the Democrats and the Republicans are relatively evenly split. So, you know, they know what's coming.

Senate House Of Representatives House GOP
Rick Klein's Analysis of the Senate Midterm Elections

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:25 min | 9 months ago

Rick Klein's Analysis of the Senate Midterm Elections

"And they know that the midterm election is coming. Here was ABC's Rick Klein talking to George Stephanopoulos yesterday on ABC's this week. Yeah, George, you know that they were in a tough spot when it comes to holding the House and Senate. But when you look at the Senate, it's a 50 50 Senate. It means Republicans only need to take one seat. But what's interesting is that not all the seats are up. Of course, only 35 Senate seats on the ballot and in that group that's 21 that are now held by Republicans 14 by Democrats. That means that Republicans have to play a lot more defense than they do the opportunities for offense. And when you zoom in a bit on the states that are likely to determine control of the Senate, these are the 9 states that are probably going to tell us who's going to be the majority and who's going to be in the minority. And 5 of them are controlled by Republicans only four by Democrats. That means if you're the Republicans, you've got to not only hold your seats, but then go on offense somewhere. That means picking up maybe an Arizona or a Georgia. Both states, of course, that went to the Democrats in 2020. Or you have to move into deeper blue territory and Nevada or a New Hampshire. That all assumes that the Democrats don't find any places of their own to pick up. And there's a couple of states that were carried by President Biden or were very close last time. They were targeting, including Pennsylvania, the primary on Tuesday, a spirited democratic fight, and an opportunity that Democrats see to win even in a very tough election cycle.

Senate Rick Klein ABC George Stephanopoulos George Republicans House President Biden Arizona Georgia New Hampshire Nevada Pennsylvania
Phill Kline of the Amistad Project Gives an Update on the Fight for Election Integrity

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:59 min | 1 year ago

Phill Kline of the Amistad Project Gives an Update on the Fight for Election Integrity

"Law with us as Phil Klein from the amistad project Phil. Welcome back to our program Phil. I want to compliment you. You have been on the case since the day after the election. In 2020, you have been covering this. You have been unafraid to tell the truth about every single one of the dynamics surrounding this. I just want to compliment you and congratulate you because you talked about for quite some time. There is some action that was going to happen in Wisconsin. Tell us the latest from Wisconsin. Thank you, Charlie, and thank you for all that you do. Wisconsin and the decision of the court confirms what we've been saying for some time now. And that is that private monies of lifted who left this interest hijacked government campaign offices to get government involved in partisan effort to benefit mister Biden and they did that by violating the laws. Unilateral decisions and here in Wisconsin, it was at the behalf of the left leaning Wisconsin election commission who worked with Zuckerberg and all these private interests and all these nonprofits to inject efforts for the government office to target by voters in the democratic urban core and turn out those voters. And it didn't just happen in Wisconsin it happened in Michigan in Georgia in Pennsylvania and all the swing states. And the drop boxes, the judge says, we're illegal in Wisconsin. But guess what? Zuckerberg money and let this money put drop boxes illegally in the urban core. So in these Democrats, strongholds, you can hardly walk down the street without voting. Meanwhile, through leftist governors and others in the swing states, they were making it harder to vote in person and harder to vote in Republican strongholds or rural areas by shutting down in person polling places claiming COVID. So the government got involved in the Biden campaign in 2020. And the planning to do

Wisconsin Phil Klein Phil Mister Biden Wisconsin Election Commission Charlie Zuckerberg Government Office Pennsylvania Michigan Georgia Biden Government
Officials: Nearly 1K homes destroyed in Colorado wildfire

AP News Radio

00:53 sec | 1 year ago

Officials: Nearly 1K homes destroyed in Colorado wildfire

"Some some Colorado Colorado residents residents are are starting starting off off the the new new year year trying trying to to salvage salvage what what remains remains of of their their homes homes after after a a wildfire wildfire tore tore through through the the Denver Denver suburbs suburbs president president Biden Biden issued issued a a major major disaster disaster declaration declaration for for Colorado Colorado after after devastating devastating wildfires wildfires tore tore through through homes homes and and businesses businesses between between Denver Denver and and boulder boulder officials officials say say three three people people are are reported reported missing missing burnt burnt out out subdivisions subdivisions blocked blocked off off by by National National Guard Guard troops troops at at Humvees Humvees were were still still smoldering smoldering under under a a blanket blanket of of snow snow that that fell fell to to late late to to curb curb the the fires fires billion billion Klein Klein lost lost his his home home in in superior superior they they had had to to go go see see it it for for himself himself just just unbelievably unbelievably fast fast boulder boulder county's county's office office of of emergency emergency management management said said its its call call center center was was overwhelmed overwhelmed with with people people looking looking for for help help after after losing losing everything everything including including their their computers computers in in fires fires that that destroyed destroyed nearly nearly one one thousand thousand homes homes according according to to the the latest latest estimate estimate official official shut shut off off water water in in the the burn burn areas areas to to restore restore pressure pressure and and prevent prevent pipes pipes from from freezing freezing and and utility utility companies companies were were working working to to restore restore electricity electricity and and natural natural gas gas I'm I'm Jennifer Jennifer king king

Colorado Denver Biden Biden Boulder National National Guard Guard Klein Klein Office Office Of Of Emergency Boulder County Jennifer Jennifer King King
Officials: 2 missing in devastating Colorado wildfire

AP News Radio

00:56 sec | 1 year ago

Officials: 2 missing in devastating Colorado wildfire

"Some some Colorado Colorado residents residents are are starting starting off off the the new new year year trying trying to to salvage salvage what what remains remains of of their their homes homes after after a a wildfire wildfire tore tore through through the the Denver Denver suburbs suburbs president president Biden Biden issued issued a a major major disaster disaster declaration declaration for for Colorado Colorado after after devastating devastating wildfires wildfires tore tore through through homes homes and and businesses businesses between between Denver Denver and and boulder boulder seven seven people people were were hurt hurt and and after after coming coming to to agency agency reports reports boulder boulder county county spokeswoman spokeswoman Jennifer Jennifer Churchill Churchill says says the the two two people people are are reported reported missing missing burnt burnt out out subdivisions subdivisions blocked blocked off off by by National National Guard Guard troops troops at at Humvees Humvees were were still still smoldering smoldering under under a a blanket blanket of of snow snow that that fell fell to to late late to to curb curb the the fires fires billion billion Klein Klein lost lost his his home home in in superior superior they they had had to to go go see see it it for for himself himself just just unbelievably unbelievably fast fast you you know know it it wouldn't wouldn't pull pull their their county's county's office office of of emergency emergency management management said said its its call call center center was was overwhelmed overwhelmed with with people people looking looking for for help help after after losing losing everything everything including including their their computers computers in in fires fires that that destroyed destroyed an an estimated estimated five five hundred hundred homes homes officials officials shut shut off off water water in in the the burn burn areas areas to to restore restore pressure pressure and and prevent prevent pipes pipes from from freezing freezing and and utility utility companies companies were were working working to to restore restore electricity electricity and and natural natural gas gas I'm I'm Jennifer Jennifer king king

Colorado Denver Boulder Biden Biden Boulder County County Jennifer Jennifer Churchill Ch National National Guard Guard Klein Klein Call Center Center Jennifer Jennifer King King
'So many memories': Over 500 homes feared destroyed by fire

AP News Radio

00:49 sec | 1 year ago

'So many memories': Over 500 homes feared destroyed by fire

"Hundreds hundreds of of homeowners homeowners into into Colorado Colorado towns towns hit hit by by wildfire wildfire Thursday Thursday are are stunned stunned shocked shocked and and dismayed dismayed by by the the damage damage cost cost billing billing Klein Klein says says he he never never imagined imagined the the speed speed and and destruction destruction of of a a wildfire wildfire just just unbelievably unbelievably fast fast I I know know the the home home in in the the older older part part of of superior superior gutted gutted by by the the blaze blaze David David marks marks had had yet yet to to make make it it to to his his superior superior neighborhood neighborhood but but did did see see homes homes near near his his a a flame flame fifty fifty sixty sixty feet feet high high probably probably it it was was really really I've I've never never seen seen anything anything like like it it anywhere anywhere from from five five hundred hundred to to a a thousand thousand homes homes are are thought thought to to have have burned burned in in the the fire fire which which broke broke out out unusually unusually late late in in the the year year following following an an extremely extremely dry dry fall fall and and the the mid mid winter winter nearly nearly devoid devoid of of snow snow until until Friday's Friday's snow snow a a day day too too late late hi hi Tim Tim McGuire McGuire

Klein Klein Colorado David David Tim Tim Mcguire Mcguire
Pennsylvania Court Allows Inspection of Dominion Voting Machines in One County

The Larry Elder Show

01:34 min | 1 year ago

Pennsylvania Court Allows Inspection of Dominion Voting Machines in One County

"This is from world net daily, there's something called the amistad project. And they've been focused on focused on election integrity. Before the 2020 ballots were counted, and they just announced that the Commonwealth court of Pennsylvania is allowing project almost our project and Fulton county descend, the county's dominion voting machines to the state Senate for inspection. The director of the amistad project is named Phil Klein, he said and I'm quoting him. The court recognized that it was improper to demand that the county which owns a machines, and is responsibility of running the election, along with the legislature can't determine whether the machines work properly. As a judge noted, there's no justification for preventing the county from looking at their own machines. And inspection had been scheduled for earlier this month, but the state AG and the Secretary of State sued to prevent any more to prevent such move to affirm the accuracy of the 2020 election results. Now it's set for January 10. And that will be after a judge determines that the review must be allowed to proceed. With a short delay to allow experts on both sides to come up with a formal protocol for the inspection. The am a star project attorney said this executive branch officials were trying to stop the inspection altogether, but the judge did not grant their emergency motion to stop the inspection. They did not go to court seeking a delay. They sought to stop it and they lost.

Commonwealth Court Of Pennsylv Amistad Project Phil Klein Fulton County State Ag Senate Legislature
Who's Allowing Covid-19 to Spread ? Phill Kline Shares His Opinion

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:20 min | 1 year ago

Who's Allowing Covid-19 to Spread ? Phill Kline Shares His Opinion

"One on one with me Sebastian gorka and professor Phil Klein. Phil, let me, you've given us all the examples that prove the Zucker box and everything else and what I call the privatization of our election. Let's stop for a second. And let me ask, you know, the thing that I need an answer to. Who's responsible for this happening on our side or for allowing it to happen? That footage we have of people in Philadelphia saying, let us in, let us in on the police officers saying to the GOP public as well, you're not allowed to come in because the mask said so and then trying to get a court order in the court refusing it. So an election has multiple actors in America we have two parties. Was the GOP just asleep for the whole year on the COVID? What happened to the RNC? Where does the responsibility for all of this lie in terms of not stopping it fell? Well, there are long term impacts. And long term failures in the Republican Party that have allowed this to develop. For example, the Republican Party, just like the Democratic Party, tends to nationalize all the issues. You have members in Congress who believe that their role is to get on Fox News and get on national networks to become relevant in debates. And so they make every issue a national issue. And that hurts republicanism and individual liberty. You know, we win when things are local. And when we focus on individual liberty and we fail to do that, we have a lot of elected officials and believe that we're always to solve any concern of any citizen. I do not know Sebastian. I can not recall and I don't believe it's ever happened. Where I have heard a congressman who was asked an issue by somebody, what are you going to do about this who said, you know, that's not my job. That's yours. That's your job in exercising freedom with responsibility. So we've got an underlying problem with our leadership nationally who really believes it's all about poll numbers and addressing what the media says or the dominant concerns, rather than making a substantive difference in policy. Now

Republican Party Sebastian Gorka Phil Klein Zucker Phil RNC Philadelphia Democratic Party Fox News America Congress Sebastian
Backlash After Madonna Reveals Her Team Have Been Working For Free

AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

01:52 min | 1 year ago

Backlash After Madonna Reveals Her Team Have Been Working For Free

"No one else is lunacy. Madonna's most recent case of butt burn. She got all pissed off because she posted a bunch of pictures on Instagram and she's not happy that people are not supporting her art. She need to support her rod. She says she's not just complaining about not having been supported by non artistic people who objected, did you see those pictures about her? She did something for the magazine as if we all know V magazine. But the post in V magazine included a behind the scenes photo of the photographer Steven Klein holding a knife to her throat. I don't know why they thought it was edgy and she thanked the people who worked long hours for free all to support madam X that's her new moniker as you probably know. So she's worked with people who weren't paid all night for this photo shoot all day and all night. And she's being criticized for sharing this violent image of the knife to her throat and the fact that she made people work for free. These things don't work well for Madonna. She's going through it. And of course, you know, she did this awful photo shoot the other day with I showed you pictures on the Facebook podcast obsessed page. I'll get to that in a second. But this recent photo shoot for V magazine very controversial in which she alluded to Marilyn Monroe's death. And she said, I'm proud of my collaboration with Stephen Klein for V magazine and knowing that against all odds. And with very little support from non artistic people. That's you. Who can't pushing back and the fact that we did it with almost zero budget, we were still able to make

V Magazine Madonna Steven Klein Stephen Klein Marilyn Monroe Facebook
13 House Republicans Gave Pelosi the Votes to Pass the So-Called 'Bipartisan Infrastructure Bill'

Mike Gallagher Podcast

02:25 min | 1 year ago

13 House Republicans Gave Pelosi the Votes to Pass the So-Called 'Bipartisan Infrastructure Bill'

"And so on Friday, the Democrats get to celebrate the passage of the $1.2 trillion infrastructure Bill. Ending weeks of deadlock and infighting between the Democrat parties moderates and progressives. Now, if the Republicans in the House had, I don't know, acted like the loyal opposition to the Democrat agenda. If every Republican would have voted no, the Democrats wouldn't be celebrating this legislative achievement. And this giant win for their agenda. Here's the way Philip Klein over at national review characterizes it all. Just before midnight on Friday, we witnessed an utterly disgraceful act by a group of 13 House Republicans. Given the chance to deal a severe blow to President Biden's flailing agenda, they instead rescued him by providing speaker Nancy Pelosi with the votes she needed to overcome resistance from the far left of her party. For months, Biden's multi $1 trillion domestic agenda has been mired in problems. And the goal of the Democrats has been to pass trillions of dollars of new spending at a time when debt as a share of the economy is at historic levels rivaled only by the fight against World War II. The strategy all along was for Democrats to win over some Republicans to their cause by creating a charade that their agenda was actually divided into two parts. A physical infrastructure Bill and a sweeping social welfare Bill. Now, for months, as we know, we've witnessed Democrats have been battling among themselves. With some members, more attached to the infrastructure Bill and others more attached to the social welfare Bill. But ultimately, ultimately, it became clear that the two bills are inextricably linked, and they would rise and fall together.

Philip Klein House Republicans President Biden National Review Nancy Pelosi Bill Biden House
"klein" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

The Ezra Klein Show

02:56 min | 1 year ago

"klein" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

"Me to.

Boxing Superstar Manny Pacquiao Announces Run for Philippines President

NPR News Now

00:18 sec | 1 year ago

Boxing Superstar Manny Pacquiao Announces Run for Philippines President

"Star manny paki out. Says he'll run for the president of the philippines next year he was nominated today by faction within the ruling party. The forty two year old pack house serves in the philippines senate. I'm barbara klein npr news.

Manny Paki Philippines Barbara Klein Senate Npr News
"klein" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

The Ezra Klein Show

05:01 min | 1 year ago

"klein" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

"The assassinations would have you is dealt with strictly from the standpoint of how did this affect this man and how did he process this even with malcolm you know where he was vitriolic and in rather hateful in his rhetoric. How did this shape the person that we're trying to learn about. And i think that's what documentary filmmaking should be. I think there is a conversation between the individual the biographical subject and the era. That not only is was the right word shaping them but they are shaping as well and i think with mohammed ali. You get a chance to see that the way in which an events like with malcolm x. Are sort of shaping him good and bad and also the ways in which he's has the opportunity to change who we are and you know largely for the better. Yes is indeed. I'm curious speaking of documentary. Filmmaking what do you both feel about how it's evolved and with those kinds of things that we're seeing especially in sports documentaries. I mean we're seeing this these ten episodes of the last dance. But they're produced by michael jordan especially and obviously. There's some key things that were left out. We see a documentary about woody allen produced by fron farrow and other members of the family. How do you feel like these pieces. Introduced into the space documentaries affects or doesn't affect what you do well. I think there's been a huge golden age of documentaries and been going on. For decades and decades people have trusted at the stories that we tell obey the same laws of storytelling has a feature film make curb. But we can't make stuff up and yet. There's a freshness to them. There's something new. And i'm excited by it but i think being in pbs. I'm concerned about the documentaries. That are being made you know in which the subject is a huge part of the production team. That's an important thing or we're leaving out one aspect of it but that's okay. We've adopted a certain style of making films. That liberates us a little bit from having to choose a particular side though. It's very very clear in many cases or subtly woodside were on. I think it's good. We should make stories. We should have the debates. Were also having a debate with roadrunner about the use of Manufactured voices for something that anthony bourdain wrote but never said and there's no warning of it and it's only after the fact that we've learned about it which raises the same kind of huge ethical questions that the use of making a ten part documentary about michael jordan produced by michael jordan raises. And i still thank god for being. Mbbs because neither of those things could happen in our place and we wouldn't be faced with that kind of ethical dilemma. At the same time you know. These are very interesting and fascinating films. And they've got to be part of our conversation but all of it has to be part of our conversation. It's the more films the better you know. I mean there's lots of dead wood out there. What's called so-called reality. Tv of course isn't nobody eats bugs on tv. Nobody runs around naked in the woods for days and nobody proposes to somebody else in front of millions of other people. That's hardly reality. So i think that when we're talking about documentary we were talking about a wonderful spectrum from things that are almost feature films they ecstatic trues of verner herzog. The stylistic trues of an errol morris are kind of emotional archaeology the political advocacy of a michael moore and then some of these great subjects whether it's nexium or bourdain or oj. Are michael jordan. You know we were given stuff that has got at. Its heart something that really happened..

malcolm michael jordan fron farrow mohammed ali woody allen pbs anthony bourdain verner herzog errol morris michael moore
"klein" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

The Ezra Klein Show

05:47 min | 1 year ago

"klein" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

"Was in such contrast to even the black boxers who had come before him and had great success. So you have. Of course jack johnson who did what he wanted to do and was run out of the country for it. You have joe louis. Who in reaction to jack. Johnson essentially has his handlers. Say you certainly can't date white women you can't even celebrate when you beat a white person. You can't even like show enthusiasm about winning. I mean he really had to be so polite. And deferential in order to achieve what he did. Joe louis did and then you have muhammad ali even as caches clave even as a younger fighter at the beginning of his career and he was not going to do that he was going to be himself and that meant being a brilliant promoter. He's a better promoter than really any boxing promoter right he just had a genius for self promotion he knew how to get people to come to the fights. You know the reporters loved covering him. He was great copy. He would talk to everybody anybody any time. And he drew people to him and he also turned people off because he was bragging he was proud. He was predicting what round but it also speaks to the fact that he was going to be himself and he did not care if that bothered people. That was fine. And there's another part of this. That's really really important. Which is as he says. Look at me. i'm i'm so beautiful. i'm pretty as a girl. He's also in that braggadocio. People are repulsed by who control the levers of power but he is speaking for other people who do not feel that black is beautiful and he is saying that black is beautiful. And it's all around the world anyone who felt the boot of the oppressor on it realized that he was going in the face of that and that perhaps you could draft in the wake of mohammed ali and there would be something better and if it wasn't better at least i would feel better about myself and there's something so joyous of watching particularly in the united states the black community but then all around the world in sub saharan africa and saharan africa and the middle east and elsewhere southeast asia. This identification with him because he knew their struggles and so all of that bragging was a way of saying i. Am somebody repeat after me. I am somebody. So we know that in a modern context of civil rights but mohammed ali is the head of the pack. And what's fascinating also about. That is how much of his own manhood. How much of his own perspective as an adult and as a black men in this country was shaped by allege muhammad and the nation of islam mean. That's a very complicated subject. How did you feel like that was best approach because you do. Essentially many biographies of malcolm of elijah. Muhammad a lot of other people within the film. How did you decide to approach it in that way. Yeah i mean elijah. Muhammad and malcolm x. are among the most important characters in this story mamadali himself and it was important to us to make sure that we really could understand that these story as journey and faith that this is something that is influencing him across his entire.

Joe louis jack johnson muhammad ali mohammed ali saharan Johnson boxing jack africa Muhammad middle east asia united states malcolm mamadali elijah
"klein" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

The Ezra Klein Show

03:33 min | 1 year ago

"klein" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

"Obviously we should just pause to say that like this is why is a giant lie but nevertheless this found purchase because it was so aggressively cultivated by people like donald trump who as every new yorker particularly of my age knows has played this casually violent native ism for his entire public career and make sure as well that he's present at these moments of eruption he's present for instance went in two thousand ten a new york city mom and his wife his business partners try and set up a community center near ground zero where one had already been an actual muslim place of worship right there. This is not foreign to new york city. This is these are new yorkers. They set up something that they see as a muslim equivalent of the ninety second street. Y which is like. It's a jewish space that plays an important role in the intellectual life of new york city. Generally and this gets converted with. Donald trump is as a leading carnival barker endangering people's lives into the so called ground zero mosque which viewed and portrayed actively by islamophobic bigots exploiting the pain of nine eleven as the equivalent of the second turning highest afia into a mosque after conquering constantinople. In fourteen fifty three and all throughout the obama presidency with things like the cultivated assaults in various state legislatures around the country against so called sharia law that was exactly the kind of eruption of native ism that we would later see on the streets of charlotte. Because what it saying is that they are replacing you. They're replacing your culture. Your values your tradition and ultimately your place in the american racial caste that while it doesn't guarantee you this is supposed to provide you with a level of material comfort that lets you and not others live in dignity over time. The pain of the war on terror the agony of being inconclusive and sitting in tremendous conflict with american exceptionalism because now suddenly the people that have been described. He was subhuman. Are winning these conflicts. This goes searching for an explanation. For why this atrocious circumstance should be happening and donald trump comes along and has an explanation ready to go..

donald trump new york city afia barker obama charlotte
"klein" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

The Ezra Klein Show

02:55 min | 1 year ago

"klein" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

"To pursue a position inside the government. I'll ask her. after one. Last short break it used to be their.

"klein" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

The Ezra Klein Show

07:24 min | 1 year ago

"klein" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

"A long journey. I thought maybe it was going to be an immediate response to what was happening around us. But within days. I ended up. Starting what became the largest immigrant advocacy organization that was a twelve year journey of leading that and growing it. And then of course it led me into politics and it led me to the tables where that kind of public policy is being discussed. I remember in the days after nine. Eleven and i had a whole presentation on the patriot act which was passed within. Just a couple of weeks of nine eleven happening. It was taken off the shelf. It was dusted off. Most members of congress didn't even read it famously. Not read bill famously. Not read patriot. Act and we've been living with the consequences of that for a long time. It took me a while to get there. But i think i just realized that we need more of us in public office who understand these perspectives and can bring them to bear in the moment when they need to be brought to bear congresswoman. Before we get into your quite winding journey into public office. Let's go a little bit about your back story. You are a very unique member of congress and that you are one of only fourteen naturalized citizens there. America used to have many more. We have gotten less diverse. In that respect you came to america at age. Sixteen by yourself. You boarded a plane alone. Do you recall what you were imagining back. Then as a teenager. I do because i found a treasure trove of letters that i wrote to my parents every week. On era grams that my mother happened to have kept and when i was riding my last book i just happened to be home and she said oh by the way i have all these letters. Do you wanna read them. And so it really brought home to me what that was like. I was very excited about the opportunity. I knew what an opportunity was. I knew at a sacrifice that was for my parents. I knew how much i had to deliver on their sacrifice. I mean i really had to bring it home. You know and make them proud. And i think i read a lot of the things i had forgotten about how hard it was to come to the united states. I think i kind of put those in a vault in the back of my brain and when people would ask me it must have been tough to come to the us by yourself at sixteen. I would just kind of shrug it away and say oh it was hard but you know it was such an opportunity and i think reading those letters. I realized it was really hard. It was really hard. And i was trying to keep myself together from my parents. And how so. What did she you know. I was sick all the time. I had a really hard time with the climate. I was working so hard to succeed. I mean i think this is the ultimate imigrants story. But i couldn't disappoint my parents so there were long explanations of any grade that was less than an a there was a lot of concern about money. I mean i was only sixteen years old. But i didn't buy long underwear because we just didn't have the money and i had a certain amount of money that i had to live within and even though i was freezing cold there were just all of these financial concerns that at the age of sixteen. I think it's hard to imagine. Somebody has to deal with that and then there was just the the thing of being away from home not wanting to burden your parents with how hard that was but there were no vacations where i would go home other than once a year during the summer just being away i think was tough being alone with tough. You went to georgetown university. As an undergrad at age. Sixteen is that right. That is yeah. That's right for coaches. It's interesting because you just explain. You felt the need to explain away anything. That was less than an a at the same time. You decided you wanted to major in english. Which drove your dad's philly. Yes that's exactly right. I was supposed to be a doctor a lawyer or an engineer. You will understand that. I think a lot of people do that. That's the only reason my parents sent me away. So for whatever reason i mean i think i had my rebellious side to right. I wanted to be the good daughter and deliver but at the same time. I was like wait a second. I'm away from home. I need to do what i want to do. And so my sophomore year. I called my dad to tell him that. I was going to be an english literature. Major instead of an economics major. And i had to hold the phone away from my ears. He yelled at me. And said i descend you to the united states to learn how to speak english. You already know out. Speak english and so that was a bit of a battle and it was frankly. It was a bit of a battle throughout my career. Even just going into social justice work and not using my masters in business that you mentioned. That was not what i was supposed to be. Doing is taking nonprofit jobs. That don't pay very well and have you living in villages along the borders of laos and cambodia or even in the united states and worrying about where your salary was gonna come from the antithesis of the sacrifice. They were like. We live in villages. So you don't have to exac- exactly exactly and of course that is the beauty of being a parent to you. Do all the stuff so your kids can can have a different life and make choices and then they make choices that you might not make. You did in some ways. As a dutiful. Asian american daughter go on to business school at northwestern you got your mba and after a stint selling heart defibrillators. I love this fact about you. I like i picture the tan suit and the flats going door to door and don't forget the blue ford aerostar van that i had to drive. That had the different players in a cart in the back. Wonderful so After doing that as you just mentioned in terms of laos and cambodia you went into international development work. Can you tell us a little bit about that. Part of your life because it happened just before your activism in the us. And i think shaped a lot of your your worldview your economic lines your political ends. Yes and it's a part that often gets left out because people know about my immigrant rights background but they don't know about the international development work and for me. It was the bridge between business school and the private sector and social justice work. You know it was a way for me to wake up every day and feel like i was doing something that mattered and i loved working around the world. I mean it was so much a part of my growing up. I worked with people from all over the world and was friends with people from all over the world and so that ability to go to other countries and to get to know other cultures i speak a number of languages i pick up languages. Easily was just a fabulous experience for me but it was also formative in terms of us policy towards developing countries us aid policy all the politics of that good and bad and also of course refugees migration poverty so much that i now end up working on in congress but also that was a big part of how i dealt with the issue of immigration over the last twenty years working on it domestically you are now a. Us citizen at one point shortly after your child was born. You nearly lost your legal status in america..

america congress georgetown university bill laos cambodia aerostar ford
"klein" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

The Ezra Klein Show

05:19 min | 1 year ago

"klein" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

"Her husband was a planned parenthood right. She was in favor of birth control where she was trying to reach out to democrats reach out to people active in the black civil rights movement and she and her followers are basically kind of kicked out of the antiabortion movement in the nineteen seventies right. So wow radicalization of politics happens as a direct consequence of roe versus way again. There are lots of other factors going on and there are lots of people who've told this very complicated story. Mary ziegler reba siegel and a bunch of other people and i encourage you to read their their work to understand. The politics of this but row was a big part of changing anti-abortion politics in the mid nineteen seventy s. That's really interesting writing. Whatever international comparisons one wants to make the very contingent and specific nature of the american political surrounding abortion led to a different kind of discourse when the right was absolutely entrenched in the way it was by roe versus wade. Throwing it into the situation. Where as you said earlier rate trying to get the law changed requires legislatures to play this game of chicken with the courts which i know for fact makes abortion. Rights defenders feel threatened and abortion opponents. Don't feel like there's any kind of middle ground anymore in the way that you're describing it a second ago in part because of these historical processes right the purging of people who had this different view. So you're not proposing like monaco's oil kind of model where it's if we had just done this one thing with the courts. Maybe things would have been different if there are a lot of complicated things at work and roe versus wade played an important role in pushing those undercurrents in one direction. Rather than getting to a point where we could have had something some kind of settlement that would have reduced pars intentions around abortion which arguably are a root cause of a lot of other different cascading partisan polarization like the increasing identification of religious conservative christians with the republican party. Yes i think. That's exactly right..

Mary ziegler reba siegel roe versus wade monaco wade republican party
"klein" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

The Ezra Klein Show

04:15 min | 1 year ago

"klein" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

"People often ask me. If prosecuting the mob is like the movies well. I can tell you this. The real thing is much more interesting. I'm ellie hoenig. Former bob prosecutor and host of the new podcast up against the mob up against the mob lifts the veil on the world's most secretive criminal organization. Lakos unknow stroke. New episodes dropped every wednesday. Starting september eighth. Listen and follow up against the mob on apple podcasts. Spotify or your favorite podcast app can visiting the sites of america's racist past help us create less racist future will smith and i'm your host provokes conversations. There's been an ideological war going on over the history in remembrance of slavery in this country since well there were slavery the outer villainy of the enterprise is unquestionable but it must have been particularly evident to everyone who was seeking to lie about it from the start holding kidnapped africans and their descendants in bondage was portrayed as something not only essential but not the falsehoods about slavery in the confederacy that propagated it had been spread. Not merely through violence and propaganda but in our textbooks by our monuments in within our modern american politics in his latest book. how word is passed. Atlantic magazine staff wider clint smith. The third writes quote for so many of them. History isn't the story of what actually happened. It is just the story. They want to believe confederate. History is family history in which loyalty takes precedence over truth. Clinton book is a journey through those wilfulness constructions. In present time starting in two thousand seventeen the start of the trump era. He visited eight places in the united states in one location abroad to as he put it understand how each reckons with its relationship to history of american slavery it's an uncompromising piece of work one that i hope everyone who listens to this conversation and those who don't pick up read dr clint smith the third.

ellie hoenig Former bob Lakos Atlantic magazine united states apple clint smith smith Clinton dr clint smith
"klein" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

The Ezra Klein Show

04:03 min | 1 year ago

"klein" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

"Presented by climate power education fund does big oil care about our streets flooding or our home burning not according to an exxon mobil top lobbyists. Did we aggressively bite against Some of the science. Yes you know. We were looking out for our shareholders. Take care about prophets not people learn more at polluters dot exposed. How does seashells shape our world. What can they tell us about our future. Benji jones and environmental reporter. At vox and today i'm your host for vox conversations. Think back to the last time you saw a seashell. Maybe it was by the ocean poking out of the sand or perhaps it was on a restaurant resting on a bed of ice in any case. You probably didn't.

climate power education fund exxon mobil Benji jones
"klein" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

The Ezra Klein Show

01:54 min | 1 year ago

"klein" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

"Do a lot <Speech_Male> of these interviews. <SpeakerChange> So <Speech_Male> i appreciate you being here. Thank <Silence> you take care. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> Real <Speech_Male> time with bill. Maher <Speech_Male> airs every friday <Speech_Male> at ten eastern <Speech_Male> on. Hbo <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> you can check bill. More dot <Speech_Male> com for info <Speech_Male> on upcoming stand <Speech_Music_Male> up shows. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> Vox conversations <Speech_Male> is produced <Speech_Male> by eric genius. <Speech_Male> Our editor is amy <Speech_Music_Male> dressed oscar. <Speech_Music_Male> Our theme <Speech_Male> music was dreamed up by <Speech_Male> the mysterious brake <Speech_Male> master cylinder. <Speech_Male> And liz kelly <Speech_Male> nelson is the vp of <Speech_Male> audio at. Vox <Speech_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> who do you think is the best <Speech_Music_Male> are the <Speech_Male> best. Maybe the wrong word <Speech_Music_Male> for the most <Speech_Music_Male> important stand <Speech_Music_Male> up working <Speech_Music_Male> right now <Speech_Male> may or else. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> I wouldn't do <SpeakerChange> it <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> if <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> you'd like to show <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> let us now room <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> for improvement. We want <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> to hear that too <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> curious <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> to know what you <Speech_Music_Male> think what you want. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> More of what <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> we could improve. <Speech_Music_Male> And if you have ideas <Speech_Music_Male> for future guests <Speech_Music_Male> topics send us your <Speech_Music_Male> thoughts at vox <Speech_Music_Male> conversations <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> at. Vox dot <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> com. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Hey <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> if you did like this episode <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> share it with <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> your friends rate <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and review <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and

"klein" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

The Ezra Klein Show

05:36 min | 1 year ago

"klein" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

"Okay. We're going to take one more short break but when we come back standups have always been some of our greatest social critics but is that kind of comedy still possible today. That's coming up after the break. This is appetizer content from linden tree. When it comes to finding a mate most of us will compare many possible matches before finding our person and we invest our time..

"klein" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

The Ezra Klein Show

04:00 min | 1 year ago

"klein" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

"Power to get everything you want in. That's the thing. I don't understand about going back to the democrats you have the power. You have the presidency back. You've rescued it from these. People incompetent. Malevolent people who were in charge. And you have a majority in congress. Why aren't you using it the way that we really need to be using it. Well first of all. I wanna say in fairness to the democrats with there in the capital right now. I'm impressed by the one point. Nine stimulus bill got through. I'm impressed that it looks like an almost trillion dollar infrastructure. Bill is going through. I would if i had to bet i would say that. Three point five. Trillion dollar have soft stimulus bill. That's likely to go through. I think the democrats actually accomplishing more than the obama. Democrats or the clinton democrats in the first two years Where the democrats have both houses of congress for both of those administrations. But i you know as a progressive i want more. I mean as a progressive. I want to see. The minimum wage raised as aggressive. I want people who are in poverty who are being kicked out of their homes or their rental units. They should not be. I don't want to be subjected to that. I don't want people at the border being put back into prisons or jails or cages a progressive as a liberal. I want much more than the democrats seem to be able to deliver. And i also want the for the people act. I one voting reform. I don't want right. These republican states to be able to take away the votes particularly votes. Who black and latino people. And i'm angry. Yeah and say man. I should probably couch my earlier comments by saying listen. I understand that. The by the administration and democrats in congress have actually gotten a substantial amount done and they've they've certainly turned this whole pandemic in a different direction. But that being said it's not wrong to ask for more considering the power that they have especially with garcia voting rights. As you bring up you see them in -sconsin this language of hope and optimism which is all well and good but you know voting turnout as they claim is not going to solve the problem of voter suppression. It's not going to end it and we. We can't just sit here thinking that like okay. We're going to stop the bleeding of the trump administration and think that they were doing okay or that we've done enough. Yeah well. I think there's a real danger. We're not back to jim. Crow were not back to pre nineteen sixty five of voting rights act. But we're pretty close and were pretty close because there is something that we haven't yet talked about but it is the elephant in the room and that is trump and the trump administration. What donald trump did the racism he exploited and provoked and the fact. He's still with us. He still justifying all of these republican state. Legislators trying to constrict the vote the fact that trump can still do that is frightening. It frightens me and the fact that we've got a few democrats like joe. Manchin and kristen cinema democratic senators who are so concerned about being considered centrist. That they won't commit themselves to the for the people are to preempting all of these Negative turns on the in state legislatures on voting rights That's be is incomprehensible. There is no centrism anymore. If feel fascism on one side. You can't be a centrist centrism. Meant something when you have legitimate republican party small government and actually had some principals behind it but centrism when you're talking about compromising with trump works.

congress clinton Bill obama garcia kristen cinema Crow donald trump jim Manchin joe republican party
"klein" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

The Ezra Klein Show

08:14 min | 1 year ago

"klein" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

"I went to school with like but like the thing that Also obsessed with terrariums in school and no one else was where i grew up and i felt like i had a sense that maybe she was cool in other places. But i had no access and part of this because like internet fan boards on that sort of thing. We're still pretty much in their infancy. Like i had no access to a community of people who authenticated her as cool so it was a taste that i knew was my own that guy gravitated towards that for sonic reasons right like i loved the piano. Wanna and and the word play and and everything about it. But those didn't seem cool to me. And i think this is where like cool popular have a really interesting relationship that also shifts as you grow older because like you talk a little bit. In your essay about how for gen-x like cool had so much to do with scarcity and obscurity. Ya but then that's held in contrast with when you're in high school cool things are things that are actually very popular right like things that people want or the popular kids lake. Well i really. I feel like i really fetish is jackson lake. I was obsessed with reality bites. And dave eggers obviously and like a lot of jan acsi music i i was really obsessed with like what gen-x taste was you know what i mean. And it's kind of weird to see like the way gen zia's now because i feel like they're really obsessed with each other. Yeah i think jazzy kids. Find all of us so embarrassing. Though i know especially millennials. Yeah especially us. i mean. They haven't registered genesis human but their parents. We're still human to them but like super embarrassing. Yes absolutely and i like the first time that i really realized that was. There's this great interview with jen's ears and like uk vice from a couple of years ago. Where they're like millennials. Are all obsessed with harry potter and i was assistant here literally like camp out waiting for these new damn books. Oh my god. Like harry potter and like talking about secure jobs like that is what millennials are obsessed which is so true and also the deeply on cool right but like this is what we get into this distinction between popular in cool because harry potter was incredibly popular and it was a way probably till they fit in with the status quo. No matter where you were. But that doesn't mean that harry potter was cool rate. I think that like. I said the word distinction this past sense which is a good segue to talking a little bit about the theories of sociologist pure bourgeois which you mentioned in your article. Most famous of his works is titled distinction and he talks a lot about how consumption is now the way that we distinguish ourselves right especially as middle class people. So i wanna know about how you think about consumption and how it affects the development of the south and just like how we fix the things that we consume to our identity to try to make those identities meaningful. It's interesting I've really only discovered his work through reading. Carl wilson's oh. Yeah book and i i love. Can i just give him a shout out yes called. Let's talk about love. Journey to the end of tastes. Book is so good. It's i just love his writing slate. He really piqued my interest in this topic. And i have to give him props. And like i think for me i really feel like it. All comes down to consumption. Like i literally just remember as a kid. I don't know if you ever had this experience. But i just remember coveting things so much like anything that was on television any new jump through so many commercials for different junk. I wanted it all every last thing. And i think that that feeling has really dulled over the years like i'm not that way anymore because i'm not a child i'm not like operating on pure ed but like i definitely think that i still have this relationship to consumerism. That is intertwined with. I guess like performance or signaling things you know One really big example in my life is like. I'm really obsessive. Vintage stuff right. And it like i know. It doesn't say anything about my character as a person. But like i feel like i need these things you know i mean i think when i think about people who are obsessed with ventured stuff. I'm always like oh that's a better person which is so full. I mean i think that's how a lot of those people can. I just say you know like a few months ago. Someone had made a tweet. That was like this style is avant basic your remember that. And then i think someone check them and was like You're literally wearing like a top in your abby. That's like very much thought. Exact look is it not of basically you do it because it's like vintage configure songs you know by. I mean i'm not immune to that either totally but at the same time i have self-awareness around that where i really struggled derived other people for those decisions you know like the other day i was telling someone about my bookshelf. Something about how. I painted the back of it and i took a picture and in the picture. You're there are some old-fashioned cameras and media studies implements hysteria scope which is like one of those viewers where you put a two photos in front of it and you and you look at it and becomes three d. and i felt the compulsion to say that is made great grandad's stairs scope. That's not something. I bought from west. And i think that's part of it radio like somehow there are these elements that if they are like part of your own lineage or their vintage. Like you've found something that was cool Like it accumulates a different form of capital like social and cultural capital then if you just went onto west elm and put a bunch of things into your basket and pressed by absolutely on. This reminds me of. I don't know if you've ever on my face. Oh yeah do you remember putting all year like most obscure musical tastes in your little thing. They had for music one hundred percent one hundred percent and this also happened been in early facebook which i joined when i was a grad student. And lying you really really worked hard on your profile. This is before the news thing became the dominant means of engaging with facebook profile. Used to be the way that you really engaged cultivated your personality and it became a sorting mechanism right because it would hyperlink to other people who also put down whatever obscure thing and is like a masters student. I remember thinking was very sophisticated of me. to say in my bio for facebook. The lake one of my hobbies was calling facebook a group of signifier fires. But that's what it is right like when you're listing these parts of yourself or when you know whether it's the way that you represent your life on instagram that too is a bunch of cigna fires but there were obviously pre-digital ways that we signified our cultural capital as well now. The kids have instagram literally. See really young. People kind of pose with all their stuff The like hold a book in like this really kind of forced way because they want you to know like i'm reading this important book and then they're wearing like a bucket hat or something like fuzzy bucket hat and like it's a whole thing and it's just more visual than the way we did it like i remember everything being taxed right. Well that's interesting right because it becomes more powerful to be depicted as someone who reads a book. Even if you're not actually reading it but you own it and that signifies something about you instead of actually having the knowledge that.

harry potter jan acsi gen zia jackson lake dave eggers Carl wilson jen uk facebook grandad cigna
"klein" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

The Ezra Klein Show

04:01 min | 1 year ago

"klein" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

"The reason political parties have been so central to the preservation of of liberal democracy. Is that what parties do is they channel public passion public emotion public anger public joy into programs and policies that are compatible with a liberal democratic framework. You know at least at their best. That's what parties to and parties act as gatekeepers. You know they rule out the most extreme fringes the most anti system more of radical fringes on both sides. Now that is one of the reasons why amid famous formulation of clinton rossiter in american political scientist. Who said no. America without democracy no democracy without political parties no parties without compromise and that formulation does express something very profound. I think what has happened in america ever. Since the onset of the primaries in the nineteen sixties is we have vacillated the political parties and empowered all kinds of non-party actors. You know from the candidates themselves. The politicians themselves to the rich people through the fundraising process. Whether it's political action committees or over all the other ways in which the funding takes place and the effect of that has been. The parties have gotten hollowed out. So i i don't really i mean i blame the republican party but i understand what is going on which is the political system has become one run almost entirely by of small fringes that occupied the the extreme wings of the party. This is particularly true in the republican party. And so what is going on when the party caves to. Donald trump is that. They're all worried about losing the next primary about losing the funding. That comes at those early stages which all tends to come from the most passionate the most committed so you know if you look in europe for example one of the reasons you have not had trump like takeover of a political party is because those parties are still strong for the most part..

clinton rossiter America republican party Donald trump europe
"klein" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

The Ezra Klein Show

07:21 min | 1 year ago

"klein" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

"Or even somebody who's been hasn't had to change because they just came out of the sort of bloomberg by ganj davis you know. I think seeing people change or seeing people be strong in the midst of five decades of storms. You know in a case of davis of being the public light just gives me hope that people can change or people can be forthright and then seeing what what we have done what we have changed what we have eliminated in history. The things we've done and especially as black folks the impossible we've achieved so many times it gives me hope so thinking about that kind of world i think sometimes i try to picture that anti-racist utopia and just like what would be in it so for you what would an anti-racist america actually looked like and i to narrow that down want you to apply it to like our corona virus response like what would an anti-racist have done instead of what we did last year if this were an anti-racist country so i think i if we were in anti-racist country then people of color would not be disproportionately in positions of what we're called essential workers so i think let's say if the this virus became a pandemic was the day we became an anti-racist country what we would have done first and foremost would have provided every single american like other countries wealthy countries did with replacement salaries so that they could stay home and that would have allowed even essential workers particularly people of color to stay home. Then we would have figured out. Okay who are the people that we really truly need to be essential. Not based on in other words. They decided on their home. They could not stay home but we decided as a nation. We needed them. In order to survive as people and we would have ensured that the burden of those essential workers would not have fallen on people of color particularly women of color we would have also not only worn mask universally and ensure that that was happening but we would have figured out a way to ensure that the people who still had to work and who had children that we worked out childcare because obviously so many people particularly women but even some men they struggled to even work from home when they could have because of childcare responsibilities again that burden you know really fell on women of color and then in addition to that we would have built trauma one centers in every community in the country so that they would not have been trauma. Desert's we would have universe aligns access to health care. In other words immediately instituted medicare for all we would have had a radical sort of response to polluted neighborhoods and we would have specifically recognized that people who live in polluted neighborhoods have higher levels of pre existing conditions which makes them extra vulnerable to corona virus deaths and we would have targeted are resources particularly public health resources to those people to prevent them from dying. I can go on. And on. But i also want to say i think something that hurt. The most at the beginning of the pandemic was just the lack of data and information so us leading a research center was the fact that we did not know further a wild just how deadly the corona virus was for communities of color. That to me was like one of the first areas that spoke to how behind we were in terms of recognizing our failure to be antiracist. I agree par bulan. It really speaks to how behind my answer was. Because i probably should've first thing that i've stated that indeed we would have been collecting in a standardized fashion data on people who are taking tests who were being infected who are being hospitalized. Who obviously were dying. You know not just in terms of their race and obviously class in in gender and sexual orientation ability but also their status whether the homeless or not whether they're incarcerated whether they're immigrant their home country. You know we would have had as much data as possible to understand where the hot spots are not just in terms of the cities or the neighborhoods but in terms of the groups of people. So we have a couple of minutes. Before i'm gonna turn to questions from the audience so what i want to ask you before i do that is just how are you doing. Like how has twenty twenty changed your thinking on anti-racism and also like how exhausted are you. So i mean it as men Exhausting but at the same time. I have just tried to remain focused on constructing creating and producing and building. And it's hard to do that especially the sort of vitriol that sort of coming my way and even watching people who i admire like nana jones being so viciously attacked and even her career threaten you know. Critical race scholars like criminally crenshaw are being attacked journalists who cover race being perceived as part of thin or or subjective. I mean it's hard to see that into not wanna spend all my time attacking back and defending. But then i remember that why this is happening. You know this is happening because this is what happens when we move forward and create more equity injustice great so my final question for you before we move onto audience question is like does america already basically know how to be antiracist. But we can't get there because of hate because of white supremacy. Yes okay so. I don't think this is. This is not rocket science. I mean what. I mean by. This is not rocket science if we were serious as a nation and if we were not so constrained by so many powerful people who as individuals benefit from racist policies and practices or benefit from convincing white people that they are not. The people were causing their own. Constituents pain that the people who are causing their own constituents pain those letting immigrants in and black criminals in muslim terrorists you know we were freed of those people then i think it would be pretty straightforward racial inequity. What are the policies behind it. How do we eliminate those policies would policies can be.

nana jones ganj davis last year davis five decades america first twenty twenty crenshaw one first thing first areas virus so many people muslim every single american many times
"klein" Discussed on thebuzzr pod

thebuzzr pod

07:53 min | 1 year ago

"klein" Discussed on thebuzzr pod

"Fourteen. Ray stevens was number. One in nineteen seventy four on uk singles chart streak. The song was about the current british craze of streaking. Streaking was the act of running naked in a public place. Saskatoon folk rock artist. Scott klein joins us today. Scott some bird and sexy deliveries substance music art and is an artist to watch today. We chat about sunshine. And what's my name. These are two incredible releases heart of his upcoming album to release this year. Enjoy the show. Hi scott thank you for coming on the show. Today's really great that you could spend some time with. Thanks for having me. No that's great. thank you. so you're getting. You're making a lot of noise with the music. You'd sunshine. I was looking on the web site. You've had quite a number reviews. Radio play Need chop. That's this a single. That kinda came about there wasn't supposed to be on the ep. It was a song. That i kinda wrote really quickly and Just kind Threw into the there and But the press said. I've been getting it's been like quite a bit you know. And he's you never really know like what that leads to but But it's been it's been Exciting my end to to see how many logs skipped pick it up and like different countries that cover it in who likes. It doesn't like it. You know it's really. It's not very much genre like it's not just country music so it's a very subjective type style music so they so like it's interesting to see that some people like it and they liked the vibe and and others are like i like it but it doesn't set ni- would covering type of ricky that beginning firm inside box the that's one reason. I like it. But i was doll as music but actually all my notes here. I have genre question question question. I it wasn't it wasn't american. Could be a bit. Folk-rock bit breezy. Amen i was thinking who. Who does this remind me up. I hope your complimentary but it reminded me of america. The band america a name particular justice the best one i felt but i was into it But to me there's floated is conflicted because it's a downbeat but in the back you year sunshine so shy night. Was that intentional. Yeah yeah. I mean like i had this idea ahead of like what i'm hearing you know and It's a small percentage of it like comes out in the studio as you trying to strive for hundred percent. You don't get fully good You kinda roll is like what what is happening in the studio. You know that it starts with the drums right so so we make differently each write the song with it acoustic guitar and i think in in my music on it. There's a. there's a bit of a undecided tension between the dark and the light you know And it it's very you know whether that's you know country music and rock and roll or You know folk music and Yeah by just yeah anyway. I feel like there's there's some type of tension always you know the tween the between the two and That definitely is coming out his song white. This because it's like some dark undertones in a light light hearted like Sixties rock and roll. Kind of five. You know like like the bees or on other band. Slake the animals you know. At that time they were saying you know even the beatles. They're singing a boat dark stuff but they're making pot you know and and i think that's kind of what i was for on this on this track just to I tried to read a positive song. you know. this is my attacks by said it was complected. Surprises spin is always consecutive. I think you know. I'm i'm conflicted. Leah hanson Was the guitarist. One june our winner. How'd you meet up with him. I mean it's a i mean. There's there's good stories here shea kit stores. I met up with him He's he plays in a band called league roles right now currently. And he's currently doing this solo project senate hand on which is about to come off But he's you know he's. He's signed with warner music. canada You know with this other bambi roles and The producer american with aspen beverage. He also plays in the band. You know so so. When i recorded music with the with aspen i had went out to this small town in saskatchewan called pyo pods cash. Right which is like in the middle of nowhere a rails town israel. Town it is. It's accurate there's probably fifty people that live there recorded. It's like old school house so incompetent nineteen hundreds and as decrepit schools so we recorded the album there and You know they were doing legal. Wolves is doing some sessions there too as well and he heard my music you know it came across him and he played on it. You know which was amazing and very grateful for you know And he continues to to play on the whistle with sunshine in particular in the middle Like the the bridge or whatever you call it a keep she lays down some some good leads there and Yeah.

Leah hanson Scott Ray stevens Scott klein scott fifty people saskatchewan Today Fourteen One this year nineteen hundreds hundred percent today each israel two british five uk