35 Burst results for "Klan"

Interview With Ilhan Omar

Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

06:55 min | Last week

Interview With Ilhan Omar

"Good morning. I'm jonathan kaye. Part opinion writer for the washington post and welcome to washington post live. It is also a live recording of my post opinions. Podcast cape up. My guess today was just re elected to her second term in the us house of representatives she is congresswoman ilhan omar of minnesota's fifth congressional district congresswoman. Thanks for coming on the podcast. So great to be here with jonathan so less we talked which was yesterday on msnbc. I ask you for your reaction to being able to say the words president elect biden and your response to me was really interesting you said and correctly and i would love for you to to expand on this. You said that it would be it. It'll be great for you to not have to explain to your daughter. Y the president. The president of the united states was saying mean things about you. I mean so. I don't know if you remember this. Jonathan but The president when he was running for president king to minnesota two days before the two thousand sixteen elections and basically when on attack against somali immigrants somali refugees and for me and the community that i represent for my children. It's been a four year assault on everything that we believe in everything that we stand for down to our basic identity as american refugees in this country. And so you know. I've had many long days many nights having to explain to my youngest child who is now eight My two older ones You know sort of absorbed and can conceptualize what what is taking place in the political discourse in this country but for her it's been really challenging or this actually happened. You know. I think for a lot of our kids. They hear about a president in the here about Someone they're supposed to look up to see as a leader and there there's a lot of respect for the presidency that we try to instill in them and to have someone who has denigrated that as president in herve daily formative years has been really challenging. I mean it's one thing to be To have someone attack your community writ large. It's another thing when that someone is the president of the united states and he is directly attacking you by name personally. How has how has that felt on a personal level you know. I have gotten accustomed to standing up to bullies in in my life and so on a personal level. It hasn't really impacted me. Besides having you know my my children be exposed to add and And you know for for the last two months of this election cycle waking up every single warning to text messages from my siblings. Asking if i was safe because he chose to speak about me at every single rally. Didn't really matter where he was sometimes multiple times in a day as he had held his klan rallies throughout the country. And and you know. And i and i thought a lot about in the last two years that attack on me has met for the people who see themselves in me Whether it is you know. Muslims whether it is a black woman whether it is immigrants refugees People who are aspiring to be leaderless in in our country many. I want to live in an inclusive society and wants to be part of creating progress for our country And it's it's really something to to analyze and to understand and to to reckon with. Because as i as i said you know when i first came to the united states in middle school i remember getting a letter of recognition from then president clinton and i remember you know reading this this ladder and i wrote about it in my book. My father sort of was really proud of this letter at the time. I didn't really care much about you. Know who was president or politics That to my father. It was an acceptance of our existence in this country. It was sort of another welcoming letter welcoming ladder when you arrive here as a refugee and you know that that is what a president is supposed to be representative of. They are a leader of the nation. They are supposed to make everybody feel as if they are their president and to have now had four years of a president who has occupied. The white house was not seen himself as the leader of all of the people in this country who is not extended a welcoming hand every single person Is you know. Really sad. And sing. And disheartening And the day that it was announced that he lost his reelection. I tweet it to my now. Deceased father who passed away because of covert complications are that the president did not relieve in. Acknowledge that you know that we did it and he will no longer be president of the united states and the country that he loved Will hopefully come back to being a pekan. Oh hope An inclusive country that understands that There is strength in our diversity and And then there are better days ahead of us

Jonathan Kaye Congresswoman Ilhan Omar Washington Post United States Minnesota House Of Representatives Msnbc Biden Jonathan Clinton White House
Flyers recruiting for far-right group Proud Boys placed on cars in Ravenswood, NW of Chicago

WGN Showcase

00:34 sec | 3 weeks ago

Flyers recruiting for far-right group Proud Boys placed on cars in Ravenswood, NW of Chicago

"Flyer's attempting to recruit the For the far right group. The proud boys replaced on cars in a North Side neighborhood Friday. Here's still be Jim Bob Cussler with more. About three dozen flyers remain wedged under windshield wipers on cars parked near Montrose and Lincoln near Lincoln Square, including at least one displaying racist imagery, evoking the Ku Klux Klan. The proud boys is designated as a hate group by the Southern poverty Law Center. 47th Ward Alderman Matt Martin said residents have informed his office of at least six blocks in the district where flyers were placed on the cars. Police are now investigating Bob Kessler, WG and news

Ku Klux Klan Jim Bob Cussler Ward Alderman Matt Martin Bob Kessler Lincoln Square Southern Poverty Law Center. North Side Flyer Lincoln Montrose
Daryl Davis On Healing Hate with Friendship

Untangle

05:47 min | Last month

Daryl Davis On Healing Hate with Friendship

"Today I have the most amazing guest for you. He is a man that really shows us the possibility of how to disparate sides can come together. His name is Daryl Davis and he's a black man who is convinced over two hundred Klu Klux Klan members to give up their robes by boldly and bravely walking in deep into their lives deep into the heart of the Ku Klux Klan, becoming friends with them and showing them his sheer humanity. Today. We're GONNA hear Darrell Story and learn how it is that he threw his empathy compassion insight in bravery has been able to really embrace a methodology that allows people from opposite sides to come together learn from another become friends heal and grow welcome Daryl. Pleasure. To be here with you. Thank you for having me. It is such a pleasure. You're such an extraordinary human being sorry to embarrass you. I am so excited to be able to share your story and your insights today. My pleasure and I hope you'll listeners will enjoy it. Thank you. Why don't you begin by telling us the back story to how and why you are able to penetrate the clan? Okay. I'm aged fifty, two currently and as a child, my parents were in the US foreign service. So I spent a lot of my formative years starting at the age of three. And on through elementary school traveling abroad living in various foreign countries, you go to a country for two years and you come back home here to the states, and then you're reassigned to another country. So back and forth back and forth during my formative years while overseas my classes in elementary school and things like that were filled with kids from all over the world. Anybody who had an embassy in those countries all of their children went to the same school. So my classmates were Nigeria Italian Russian Japanese French you name it they had an embassy there I was in school with their kids and to me that was the norm that was my first exposure to school. and. So when I would come back home at the end of the two year assignment, I would either be in all black schools. Black and white schools meaning the still segregated schools or the newly integrated ones like. Well I left. CHICAGO. Shortly after I was born but we will come back and we would be like in Washington DC or be in Massachusetts different places for a short time before being reassigned every other two years. So I was back I know I was for part of Second Grade I was back for a fourth grade. I was back in sixth grade and I was back here in eighth grade when I would come back the schools were either all black or black and white meeting still segregated. Or newly integrated, and there was not the amount of diversity in my classroom that I had overseas. So in one case, I was in fourth grade nine, hundred, sixty, eight, I was ten years old and I was one of two black children in the entire school myself in fourth grade and a little black girl in second grade. So consequently, all of my friends were white and many of my male friends were members of the local, Cub Scout Group and they invited me to join which I did. And during a March we had from Lexington Concord to commemorate the ride of a Paul Revere. Suddenly I was being pelted with soda pop bottles and cans and Rawson just debris from the street by just a small group of the white spectators on the sidewalk not everybody most people were cheering us in waving and all that kind of thing. But there were about maybe five people off to my right I remember there being a couple of kids or half a year or two older than myself and a couple of adults who are throwing ends, and when I first began getting hit and looked over and saw this my first thought was oh, those people over there don't like the scouts. That's how naive I was because I had never been to. Before and it wasn't until my scout leaders came rushing over and these were white people, my den mother, my cub leader, my troop master, and they huddled over me with their bodies and escorted me out of the danger. And I realized I was the only person being targeted because nobody else was getting this special protection and I, asked him, I, said, why am I being hit why they're doing this? I didn't do anything and all they would do this kind of shush me and rushing along telling me everything would be okay. Just keep moving. and. So they never answered the question. At the end of the day when I returned home my mother and father who would not at the parade. were, fixing, cleaning the UP, putting bandaids on me and ask me how do I fall down and get scraped up I told him I didn't fall down into the mud happened. And this was the first time in my life that I heard the word racism they explained what racism was to me. And my opinion old brain could not process this definition. It made no sense to me whatsoever I'd been around white people from all over the world at this point and none of them whether they were my fellow Americans my French friends, my Swedish friends, my Australian friends, none of them treated me like this. So my parents were making this up because people don't do things like that. And they assured me that not all white people do this but there is an element of some they do and I just cannot wrap my head around it. So I didn't believe them well about almost two months later. That same year nineteen, Sixty, eight. On April the fourth Martin Luther King was assassinated. And every major city in this country burned to the ground. All in the name of this new word I had learned call racism.

Ku Klux Klan Daryl Davis Darrell Story Cub Scout Group Martin Luther King United States Chicago Massachusetts Paul Revere Washington Nigeria Rawson Lexington Concord
Racism Common at Virginia Military Institute

WBZ Overnight News

00:24 sec | Last month

Racism Common at Virginia Military Institute

"At a London air, alleging what they described as relentless racism at the Virginia military Institute. Virginia Governor Ralph Northam, who graduated from V M I in 1981 has ordered an outside investigation into the culture at the school in Lexington. His action comes after a washing And post a story detailing a lynching threat and campus. Talk about the Ku Klux Klan and Confederacy.

Ku Klux Klan Governor Ralph Northam Virginia Military Institute Virginia Lexington London
MSU dropping name of Ku Klux Klan member from building

Mitch Albom

00:36 sec | 2 months ago

MSU dropping name of Ku Klux Klan member from building

"Of the Michigan State University will be removed from the school's human resource building after he was discovered to be a member of the Ku Klux Klan. The board of trustees voted to remove Stephen Nesbitt's name. Their meeting on September 11th. The announcement made on their website. The building was named after Nesbitt in 1970, for he was a school principal, a superintendent. President of the Michigan Education Association, a member of the State Board of Education, a member of the board of trustees, a member of the Alma College Board of trustees and an executive with Gerber Products company. Paul High School

Stephen Nesbitt Ku Klux Klan State Board Of Education Alma College Board Michigan State University Michigan Education Association Paul High School Gerber Products Company President Trump Superintendent Executive
MSU dropping name of Ku Klux Klan member from building

Newsradio 950 WWJ 24 Hour News

00:34 sec | 2 months ago

MSU dropping name of Ku Klux Klan member from building

"State University now moving to change the name of a campus building after learning that it's named for a man who belonged to the Ku Klux Klan. Stephen Nesbitt's membership card from the 19 twenties, was discovered at a library at Central Michigan University. MSU's human resource is building is named for him. He was a member of the school's governing board from 1962 to 1970. Nisbet worked in education and private business and was chairman of the 1961 convention that produced Michigan's Constitution. He died in 1986.

Stephen Nesbitt Ku Klux Klan Central Michigan University Nisbet State University Michigan MSU Chairman
The Black Lives Matter generation remembers John Lewis.

THE NEWS with Anthony Davis

02:13 min | 4 months ago

The Black Lives Matter generation remembers John Lewis.

"By the results of those very tests. US, Congressman John, Lewis died on Friday night months after being diagnosed with pancreatic cancer at a pivotal moment for race relations in the United States, protesters in cities from coast to coast, a demanding widespread reforms in the wake of the May twenty fifth police killing of Floyd of all the ways that John Lewis influenced American. Life and politics. He's indelible impact on young people may be among the most enduring from student activists to elder statesman Louis continually encourage. Encourage the nation's youth to start good trouble and modeled just how to do that. He was arrested alongside millennial activists pushing for comprehensive reform of US immigration laws in two thousand, thirteen for the black lives massive generation, the connection to Lewis is deeper than many may realize as a young man through clouds of tear gas into hail of billy clubs. Lewis nearly lost his life marching against segregation and for Voting Rights Democratic lawmakers said on Sunday they don't. Don't want tweet so condolences to on a civil rights icon. John Lewis they want policymakers to get to work to honor the Georgia Congressman's Legacy Representative James Clyburn the House majority whip urged. Donald, trump and Senate majority leader Mitch McConnell to pass legislation that would expand voting rights in Lewis's name Clyburn also called for the Edmund. pettus bridge in Selma Alabama to be renamed in honor of Lewis a lifelong friend. The bridge currently named after reform confederate general. General and Klu Klux Klan leader became a critical site during the civil rights movement on Bloody Sunday. In Nineteen Sixty Five Alabama state troopers beats peaceful demonstrators there, including Lewis, who suffered a fractured skull? Recent protests have prompted cities nationwide to reconsider monuments and honours granted to people with ties to the confederacy or other racists legacies an online petition to rename the bridge

John Lewis Klu Klux Klan Edmund. Pettus Bridge James Clyburn United States Congressman John Louis Selma Alabama Alabama Mitch Mcconnell Floyd Congressman Senate Billy Clubs Donald Trump Georgia
Calls to rename Edmund Pettus Bridge after Lewis grow following death

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:41 sec | 4 months ago

Calls to rename Edmund Pettus Bridge after Lewis grow following death

"The death of Georgia Congressman John Lewis has renewed interest in a campaign to rename the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Alabama. In his honor. Lewis and other civil rights leaders were among the protesters were beaten by state troopers during a voting rights march across that bridge in 1965 an incident that later became known as Bloody Sunday. Michael Star. Hopkins is the founder of the John Lewis Bridge Project. It's time to take down the name of Edmund Pettus. Edmund Pettus was a Confederate general. And was a senior member of the Ku Klux Klan. And if we ever truly wanna wipe away the scene of bigotry in this country, we have to start by wiping away the names of men like Edmund Pettus. Lewis died Friday, several months after diagnosis of pancreatic cancer. He was

Edmund Pettus Edmund Pettus Bridge Congressman John Lewis John Lewis Bridge Project Ku Klux Klan Pancreatic Cancer Selma Michael Star Alabama Georgia Hopkins Founder
Death of John Lewis Fuels Movement to Rename Selma, Alabama's Edmund Pettus Bridge

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

01:18 min | 4 months ago

Death of John Lewis Fuels Movement to Rename Selma, Alabama's Edmund Pettus Bridge

"Says there is a call now from activist and politicians from both sides of the aisle to change the name of the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Alabama, the site of the civil rights turning point where the late John Lewis and other civil rights leaders were beaten by state troopers on what became known as Bloody Sunday. Michael Star Hopkins is founder of the John Lewis Bridge Project. Bridge had been named after a former Confederate general and Ku Klux Klan leader honor. Edmund Pettus, by keeping his name on a bridge is antithetical to everything that this country should represent. So if we want to live up to our obligations live up, Tio who we say we are. Then we can start by removing his name and putting up the name of someone who has been a hero. Someone who has stood for What's best in this country, not what's worst and online petition had been created last month has already gathered for 100,000 signatures representative and civil rights leader John Lewis died Friday of pancreatic cancer. Reaction. Tributes still taking place among them. Democratic Senator from New Jersey Cory Booker remember the last real public appearance he did was standing with the mayor of Washington, D. C, his body being attacked by cancer and that iconic vision of him in front of the black lives matter Letters. John was an activist until his body gave out. That is from an interview with ABC

Edmund Pettus Bridge John Lewis Bridge Project John Lewis Edmund Pettus Pancreatic Cancer Ku Klux Klan Cory Booker Michael Star Hopkins John Selma TIO Alabama Founder ABC Senator New Jersey Washington Representative
"klan" Discussed on Five four two and the Blue

Five four two and the Blue

03:27 min | 4 months ago

"klan" Discussed on Five four two and the Blue

"Out there. The clan in the southern mountains. The LUSK shot well controversy. This is published in the Appalachian Journal in Nineteen eighty-one. You can also go back to national newspapers. The newspaper! The asheville Pioneer August thirteenth nineteen sixty eight talks about the situation. The North Carolina daily Standard from that same year talks about. The involvement! Virgil Lusk in nineteen, twenty-three wrote his own account of Klan activity in the Twelfth Judicial District of North Carolina. In how he recalled it. which was completely different from shot wells as I said, you can find more information and North Carolina State is the actual citizens tons website wick India. The! North, Carolina. History Birchenough Look Pedia all these information sources are out there, and it's available to look at into read in. It's very interesting. There's a lot of history out there that. We are not aware of and we probably should be. so that's our shade of blue stories for this week. I hope you founded interesting. For more information on some of my books. You can go to Scott.

North Carolina Virgil Lusk Appalachian Journal Klan Scott
Mississippi gov. signs bill removing Confederate emblem from flag

News and Perspective with Tom Hutyler

00:50 sec | 5 months ago

Mississippi gov. signs bill removing Confederate emblem from flag

"A bill into law that retires the last state flag to display the Confederate battle symbol Tim McGuire has more. The Mississippi state flag with the rebel battle standard in the upper left corner is the final state banner bearing the Confederate symbol to be removed in this country. Governor Tate Reeves signing a bill that retires the old 18 94 flag in favour of a new one. There will be designed by a commission with the only stipulation that it has to include the words in God, we trust the people of Mississippi. Black and white. Young and old can be proud of a banner that puts our faith front and center. Critics in the state where nearly 40% of the people are black, have said it was wrong to have a flag marked by the Confederacy, particularly since the Ku Klux Klan and other hate groups have used it as a symbol. I'm Tim Maguire.

Ku Klux Klan Mississippi Tim Mcguire Governor Tate Reeves Tim Maguire
Twitch suspends President Trump’s channel, citing ‘hateful conduct’ in video streams

Democracy Now! Audio

00:39 sec | 5 months ago

Twitch suspends President Trump’s channel, citing ‘hateful conduct’ in video streams

"More online platforms are clamping down on trump related. Another content they say violates hate. Speech policies twitch a video streaming service owned by Amazon suspended trump's channel for hateful conduct Monday the videos that triggered the suspensions were the two thousand sixteen rally, in which trump referred to Mexicans as rapists, as well as video of his June Twentieth Tulsa Rally, in which he evoked the same racist image using the term tough hombre you. You to ban several popular white supremacy channels, including ones belonging to Ku Klux Klan leader, David Duke and all right leader Richard

Donald Trump Ku Klux Klan David Duke Tulsa Amazon Richard
Princeton to remove Wilson name from public policy school

AP News Radio

00:47 sec | 5 months ago

Princeton to remove Wilson name from public policy school

"Princeton University is removing the name of former president Woodrow Wilson from its public policy school because of his segregationist views university president Christopher Eisgruber says Princeton's board of trustees has concluded Wilson's racist views and policies make him an inappropriate namesake for Princeton school of public and international affairs and the residential college as Gruber notes Wilson's racism was significant and consequential even by the standards of his own time Wilson supported segregation and as U. S. president impose that on several federal agencies that had not been racially divided up to that point he also served as Princeton's president during which time he barred black students from the university and spoke approvingly of the Ku Klux Klan I'm Ben Thomas

Princeton University President Trump Christopher Eisgruber Princeton Gruber Ku Klux Klan Ben Thomas Woodrow Wilson Princeton School Of Public U. S.
"klan" Discussed on Behind the Bastards

Behind the Bastards

03:53 min | 5 months ago

"klan" Discussed on Behind the Bastards

"Do you know what I'm saying like? You're just the refrigerator like shut up. You know what man here we need to figure out some to make. The, damn, cows and pigs understand that they just cows and pigs. Don't saying so to me. It's like if that's where your brain goes. I went on a rant. That's where your brain goes. That's why it's so mind boggling to this to these clans, people was just like I. Don't understand why. These black people keep asking to sit at our tables. Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah, and that's yeah. I mean like like the that is sort of that's. This is a really important thing to understand because Jim. We usually talk about Jim. Crow like white people usually talk about Jim. Chrome thinking back like how has talked about it like it was this terrible thing that happened. That was done to black people, which is was a crime, but also Jim Crow was is the foundation of law enforcement law enforcement in this country was still very much in flux and being formalized when Jim Crow started. It was really fucking new like the the first police department had only started in eighteen thirty eight Jim. Crow starts in eighteen, seventy seven, so US law enforcement in much, if not most of this country is is is founded. At this more or less than the same time as crew, which means that US law enforcement is founded in large part to keep the appliances in the eyes of the white. Elite separated from the white elite like that yeah. So. The important point. Yes so the second clan was also real popular in Oregon, maybe more popular in Oregon than it was anywhere else in the country and patient zero for the Oregon clan was the southern town of Medford which is. which is you go once Shakespeare in the park. Yeah, no, that's Ashland, which is. Right in Ashland is a very different city of it is but. Yet there's great teahouse. I Love I, actually like. Like Medford and Ashland are both like right next to each other in both in one of the prettiest parts of Oregon and this one of the prettiest places in the entire planet like all over the damn world. I haven't found anywhere. I found some places that are like up there with that part, Oregon, but I haven't found anything that I find pretty fucking gorgeous place, but also Medford has a real long history of straight up fascism. Right into the present day. The mayor of the town of Phoenix I think it was Phoenix, which is like right outside of Medford, basically suburb of Medford the mayor, two or three days ago, drove his car into a crowd of black lives. Matter protesters air the mayor. So The issues go continue yeah I. Miss I wish I could see my face, right? Mayor. So I'm Medford is where Luther Powell clinical sent by the national clan to establish the clan in Oregon set up the state's first KKK outpost. He gained initial recruits like pointing to the massive blading problem in nearby Jackson, county and making the case that the clan could help with law and order an a quote now from a paper by been Bruce Chapman University. Powell sold the clan potential followers, not as a brotherhood of bigotry, but as a beacon patriotism, cultural conservatism and social order, according to Powell clan was there to uphold traditional American society against the threat of the roaring twenties, specifically, Pal emphasized the Klan Support for the enforcement of prohibition. In a matter of weeks pal had sworn over a hundred men into the invisible empire, most of who were policemen, clan, expert and author. Author David Chalmers describes the clan under palace, being in the law and Order Business Luther, pals. Recruiting success in Medford cannot be quantified by lists of names and paper on membership dues.

Medford Jim Crow Oregon Luther Powell Ashland US David Chalmers Klan Bruce Chapman University Jackson Pal
"klan" Discussed on Behind the Bastards

Behind the Bastards

03:55 min | 5 months ago

"klan" Discussed on Behind the Bastards

"Know our show sent you. You know what I love is being back from ads because it means that we can talk more about. The horrific history of racism and law, enforcement, terror and trauma. That's. Of My DNA and passed on generation Alie. Yes? Should they had an air horn there so starting in eighteen seventy. President. Grant began to lobby Congress to give him power to do something about the clan because again local law enforcement was actively aiding and abetting the cake. In Eighteen, seventy and eighteen, seventy one congress passed the enforcement acts. These protected the rights of black men to vote hold office and serve on juries and generally enjoy equal protection under the law. The Ku Klux Klan acts as they came to be known allowed President Grant to call up the army to order in order to. Break up the bands of disguised night marauders, and we're going to be like ninety nine percent critical of law enforcement on this podcast, but we gotta be fair when it's fair and federal law enforcement did a pretty decent job on breaking up the clan. This is this is where things get really complicated pro, because a lot of the credit for this goes to Amos Ackerman the attorney general of the United States at joined the Republican, Party after the civil war, and became one of the nation's most strenuous advocates black suffrage. He was like black. People have the right to vote and hold office and we will I. I will make sure we enforce this with fucking riflemen if we have to. Historian William S mcfeely said of Ackerman that quote no attorney general before, or since has been more vigorous in the prosecution of cases designed to protect the lives and rights of black Americans, and here's where things get complicated because before he was a republican before he was the attorney general. Amos Ackerman volunteered and fought in the confederate army. Equal.

Amos Ackerman Congress Ku Klux Klan President attorney confederate army Grant abetting army United States William S
Protesters tear down Albert Pike statue in Washington, DC

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:56 sec | 5 months ago

Protesters tear down Albert Pike statue in Washington, DC

"We went through all of Friday and most of last evening Friday evening with peaceful Juneteenth celebrations in protest and then you need to do to rid statue in the district was brought down last night protesters pulling down the statue of Confederate general Albert pike a little after eleven last night it was then apparently spray painted and doused with lighter fluid set on fire the statue was put up way back in nineteen oh one standing on Indiana Avenue northwest near DC police headquarters police were standing by watching this protesters last night use ropes to pull down the statue Mike was a brigadier general in the Confederate army and a grand commander of the supreme council for the Freemasons critics say Mike was instrumental in forming the Ku Klux Klan but the Freemasons insists there is no evidence to support that a

Albert Pike Mike Confederate Army Commander Ku Klux Klan
Taylor Swift Asks Tennessee to Take Down Its Racist Statues

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:35 sec | 5 months ago

Taylor Swift Asks Tennessee to Take Down Its Racist Statues

"Activists calling for the removal of statues celebrating Confederate figures have an ally in Taylor swift course one Christopher Watson has more on the Taylor swift has added her voice to those calling for statues that she says quote celebrate racist historical figures to be taken down one such monuments the Tennessee residents singles out in her social media post is a natural area statue of Confederate general Nathan Bedford Forrest the first grand wizard of the Ku Klux Klan swift calls on state officials to remove that statue and others saying in part you can't change history but you can't change this

Christopher Watson Taylor Tennessee Nathan Bedford Ku Klux Klan
Dayton's Road to Pandemic Recovery

WSJ What's News

05:40 min | 6 months ago

Dayton's Road to Pandemic Recovery

"We've been taking a look around the country at how different cities or dealing with the fallout from the pandemic. Today we head to Dayton Ohio unlike other places Dayton hasn't been a hot spot for the coronavirus and the death toll has been low but the pandemic is just the latest in a series of struggles. The city has faced in the past year our reporter Doug Belkin visited the city recently and joins me now Doug Dayton Ohio has been through a lot in recent years even before the pandemic from natural disasters to rising numbers of deaths the OPIOID crisis. Can you tell us a little? Bit more about the position Dayton was in before the pandemic it. It's a fascinating town. It really punched above. Its weight for a long time. Many years ago it was a home of a lot of innovation. The Wright brothers came from there there are a lot of major manufacturing companies and engineering companies that really employed thousands of people and built a Beautiful City in the early twentieth century. The housing stock is really lovely. But it fell on hard times. A lot of those companies moved south to chase cheaper labor and the revenue into the city declined significantly and then they had really hard shock. The financial crisis in two thousand and seven and eight pulled a lot of jobs out that didn't return and then the opiate crisis that was really ground zero. It's a lot of highways going in and out of Dayton and it made it a kind of a pitstop for these drugs and they were just hundreds and over the years. Thousands of people who overdosed from opioids. So they were very hard and then last summer they had a string of horrible tragedies. They had a tornado that wiped out part of the town and killed people they had A mass shooting in downtown shopping district that killed nine people and injured another twenty people and they had a Klu Klux Klan rally Which really hard for the people there so last year was very difficult moment for them and all of that brings us up now to the pandemic and Ohio responded to the coronavirus pandemic with one of the nation's strictest lockdowns how has the corona virus now impacted Dayton and our elected officials grappling with it so the virus itself has not taken deep root there the shutdown or have been very effective or at least the pandemic did not make huge inroads. There's been about fifteen people who've died in Dayton of a city of one hundred forty thousand six hundred confirmed cases so the sickness has been. You know it's the specter has there but the fear was a major problem in the shutdown and the economic implications of the shutdown have been dramatic. And what we wrote about in the story was a lot of of what that's done to the economy to the people in the town to the churches in the town and even to the revenue of the city. And how they're gonNA deal with it and how they're sort of handcuffed because they will have less revenue to keep their social safety net strong so we spoke to the mayor of the City Nan. Whaley WHO's trying to lead the community through this and this is what she had to say. And when since we all become mayors because you can see directly the impact you make you get to make decisions and you have this control but the more you do it the more you realize the less control you really have. So what she's talking about here is the fact that these these tragedies that happened last summer in the pandemic it's going on now are all national and international issues. The handgun issue is a national problem. The racism issue that the KKK was part of is obviously a national issue tornadoes. That came through As part of the change in climate and this pandemic as part of a global problem and one thing that they all have in common that the mayor belief is that the federal response has not been robust enough to help cities and towns and they are ending up dealing with these problems by themselves with much smaller resources than the federal government. Has IT Doug? You also spoke to members of the Dayton community. What did you hear from them about how they're coping right now? So a lot of folks were really knocked back on their heels by the shutdown A lot of business owners you know. Obviously they shut down their businesses and they were concerned that they wouldn't be able to restart them and a lot of folks were laid off from their jobs. I spoke to one woman named bridget. Hadn't who has had to dig into her children's college savings account to get by these last few months. And here's bridget. I think this is going to Their their futures. They're gonNA come out of this with a lot of debt Things that they shouldn't have to endure at their ages. I planned for this. I planned in plan for this so that they wouldn't have to do this and now I'm giving into their college funds just to be able to survive day to day and we know that the people around the country are digging into their children's college savings account to get through these periods of unemployment. This is a national issue. And it's it's playing out in Dayton along with everyone else and a big question that all of us are grappling with now is what happens next when the pandemic is over and and what does our new normal look like. Here's mayor naturally again in what she had to say about that. I do think during the tragedies of Dayton last year I did feel the region really come together to support the city. The city center which was very special. I worry that that could go away. Because of the WACO vid puts people in their corner really fast both politically and like literally in the corner. You know in their home. Dave chapelle lives in that area. The wonderful comedian and he gave a show after the the mass shooting to help bring the community together and to heal the community and one thing that the mayor said was that that's not possible now. People can't gather here show so she asked. How do you heal a community? That's gone

Dayton Doug Dayton Dayton Community Bridget Ohio City Nan Klu Klux Klan Doug Belkin Reporter Dave Chapelle Doug Wright Specter Whaley
Sit, Listen and Dismantle

Enterprise NOW! Podcast

09:06 min | 7 months ago

Sit, Listen and Dismantle

"First of all can like. I do every single time that I chat with fantastic folks like you. Thank you for your time. That is the one thing that you cannot get back and it is extremely valuable so thank you so much for taking some time out with us today. Thank you for taking the time and inviting me. The second thing I'd like to do is to ask you to tell us about yourself now when I say that what I mean is feel free to go all the way back to win it all started or you can start more current day. Tell us about sure. Well I guess going back to. When it all started I grew up in the nineteen sixties and was very much a part of all of the various political movements of that time and student movement in the Civil Rights Movement. I worked in the south as a civil rights worker in Selma and Montgomery in southern Alabama and south Georgia and then became very involved in social conflict and was actually at what you can think of as a professional conflict creator. And what then happened is I realized that if you wanted to achieve something like the right to sit in the lunch counter and be served demonstrations. Were a very good way of doing that. But if you wanted to change people's hearts and minds you had to dig deeper. And you had to have a different set of techniques you would adopt and so I had become a lawyer and was practicing constitutional law civil rights civil liberties law and then became a law professor. And after that I became a judge for the state of California in a couple of different administrative agencies and realize that what I was doing wasn't really very effective or very satisfying and discovered in nineteen eighty mediation conflict resolution and have been practicing full-time ever since now so I have now for the last. Forty Years Bene- fulltime mediator working with everything from divorcing couples families community disputes cross cultural disputes. Through litigated cases organizational disputes workplace disputes. I read several books on those and mediated hundreds and hundreds even thousands of those disputes. I also work internationally. I created an organization called mediators beyond borders. And we're working in a number of different countries right now so this has been an amazing journey. And what I've realized is that things that I believed in when I began are very much. A part of the process treating everybody with respect and dignity creating kind of equality in terms of who has the right to say what issues need to be addressed creating dialogues between people doing problem solving working together creating collaborative approaches to difficulties that people phase. That's the basic idea of conflict resolution. And what I basically do every day now came. We're GONNA take a step back a little bit and learn a little bit more about you. What's your favorite thing to do? My favorite thing to do is to work with people who are completely at odds with each other and find ways for them to discover something that is really quite wonderful about the other person something interesting something that they hadn't been able to realize before him some ability to appreciate the other person actually is to create conversations between people who haven't been able to talk to each other now going back to your background. You mentioned that you were involved in student rights and then civil rights does not normal. What made you want to be involved in that type of work? Well it isn't really normal. It wasn't normal at the time. It's a little difficult to describe today but we kind of can have a bit of a sense of it. Came from a rural place from a place that said that we are all human beings and nobody deserves to be treated this way. It came from a kind of fundamental belief in democracy that everybody should have the right to vote. Everybody should have the right to participate in deciding what is going to happen regarding the issues that impact their lives. Once I got started and became quite clear. The more that you read the more that you heard about what was happening in the world it became obvious that if you didn't act you were really retreating from a fundamental moral issue of our times and that even though it was scary to work in these environments we were attacked and had to face dogs and police officers in Ku Klux Klan and a lot of violence. The alternative of running away to me was scarier than the one facing up to a major challenge that everybody as We knew that if we didn't stand up to it something really important would be lost. I'm not sure exactly whether that answers your question. But that's kind of close to what I think. Most of us were feeling. That's really good. One thing that I wrote down was the alternative was scarier than the danger a lot of times when people even in business right you think about what if it doesn't work or what if it fails in? I know in my own journey. It was just that it was the thought the idea or the chance that I don't give this. A try is scarier to me than doing it in failing so I definitely get that obviously is not on her level of the work that you guys did but definitely get that principle. Do you see any parallels in today's culture to in the sixties or has. The conversation of the narrative been changed such that. We just don't talk about it as much because the issues are different. But it's not a lot different. Yeah the same meaning what these specific form of it was. You have the right to ride on a bus in an integrated group. Do you have the right to sit at a lunch counter? In order a meal you have the right to use a water fountain that says whites only on it. Those are the specific ways in which this would show. But the general the underlying issue was the issue of recognizing the value and importance of diversity recognizing value of importance of coming to terms with people and cultures and even personalities and political views. That are different from those that you have for yourself. And so that continues to this day and is a very fundamental. Almost I would say again a moral like question about how we treat each other and this is one of the reasons why we are divided really as a nation because we haven't yet gotten to the point that we are all in this together but that point is being made right now very powerful a by the corona virus. We are in fact all in this together. Everybody can get this disease. Everybody can die from it. Everybody is being impacted by all of the various measures that are taking place. And so there's a kind of a way in which we are being brought to realize that the little divisions that we create between them and US between if you're mailed with people who are female pure white people who are black Anglo Latino whatever. It might happen to be whoever you are. The entire world is basing this issue and we are stronger if we face it together and I think what we have to then realize is that this is only one of a number of global issues that no longer respect national boundaries. You can't deal with corona virus in one nation. Only art modern system of transportation means that it can go around the world in a matter of hours and if some group of people come down with it in one place other people are gonNA come down with it somewhere else. So we're being forced to look at this and I think there are other issues like that that we're being forced to look at by circumstance but the reality owes goes a deeper understanding that we can come to and my way of saying that in in all the conflicts that take place between them and us we have to realize there is no them. There's just us and the creation of the idea of a dam is something that has taken place inside of our heads out of fear out of frustration out of our own inner needs. It haven't been mad out of Hanker over some way that we've been treated but it's just a construct that we've created and it's one that isn't particularly useful and it's one that is incredibly damaging both to others and to ourselves

Civil Rights Movement Ku Klux Klan United States California Selma Professor Alabama South Georgia Montgomery
Los Angeles Area - Santee Vons Shopper in KKK Hood Identified by Sheriff’s Department

KOGO's Evening News

00:17 sec | 7 months ago

Los Angeles Area - Santee Vons Shopper in KKK Hood Identified by Sheriff’s Department

"The San Diego county sheriff's department says that they have identified the man who seem more a klu Klux Klan style covering in a grocery store in San T. over the weekend the shares part was not called in at the time of the incident but they have now identified the man involved and they are

San T. San Diego Klu Klux Klan
Beastie Boys Made a Movie. We Made a Beastie Boys Podcast.

The Big Picture

09:03 min | 7 months ago

Beastie Boys Made a Movie. We Made a Beastie Boys Podcast.

"I'm Shawn Fantasy and this. Is the big picture a conversation? Show about Beastie Boys. That's right beastie. Boys made a movie beastie boys story which is directed by Spike Jones and available to watch right now on apple. Tv plus. If you're like me and worship Beastie boys you need to watch this movie later in the show. I'll be talking to add rock. And like diaw Beastie boys about their movie history their favorite fruits. How they're doing in quarantine. The New York Knicks documentaries that they want to see a bunch of other stuff as I tried to keep them focused on our conversation. A really love these guys beastie. Boys are my favorite band ever and it isn't even really close so to talk about them before we get to them. I asked the VIC Ferrari to my Alessandro Allegra. Join me it's Chris Ryan. Hi Chris. I've always seen myself more as a Nathan Wind Guy. I've been waiting my whole life to do this. Podcast so let's go. I'm very glad you're here with me. I can't think of anybody else. I'd WanNa have here other than you. Except maybe Mike the Inadequacy and they're coming later. So when I say beastie boys what's the first thing that pops in your head Chris? Probably the invention of cool so I think one thing that we've talked about a lot over the last twelve to eighteen months. We've had a lot of Quentin Tarantino podcasts. We've we celebrated a lot of his movies on the watchable. We talked about them on. Big Picture Podcast with him and something that comes up. Ally is kind of how he gave us a vocabulary or language to through which to understand culture and understand the world and I think the Beastie boys are equally responsible for that in both of our lives in terms of introducing us to so much music and so much other culture that wound up becoming just part of our like way in which we relate to the rest of the world through these like Kung Fu and exploitation movies through rap Reggae punk rock weird funk like all like it just basically made collectors and fans out of out of us at the risk of stepping on music exists. I wanted to ask you why you think you. And I to some extent to are so interested in figures who are all about basically like recombinant culture. You know who take all the disparate parts of stuff that they love and smash it all together because that is the thing that the movie and then returning to all of this music that I listened to over and over and over and over again in my life that I have thought about is like wow they really just jammed all the stuff they liked together to make something new like. What is it about that? The second part of what you said is the most important thing. Do you think about the people that we really respond to. Wu Tang clan quitting Tarantino. Beastie boys it means we're very basic very and B. It's the most important part is finding the second thing the thing that you're GonNa make out of all this shit. And that's what makes me so excited is when someone uses all these postmodern tools in these reconstructs. All these things out of this of Cultural Ephemera to say something else. Wootten Klan took all those Kung Fu movies and took all those samples but made something that could only have been made in Staten Island. You know back could only have made the music. He made with the experience that he had. And the Beastie boys could only have been the beastie boys by combining bad brains with run DMC. Yeah and I feel like it's not a mistake that so much of what we do at the ringer and so much of what you and I have been trying to do in. Our lives is basically celebrate and be enthusiastic about the things that we care about and I feel like these artists are the same way if you if you think about Beastie boys and you even look at the way they tell their story in the movie. It's just we really liked was the clash and grandmaster flash and Cheech and Chong and we were trying to find a way to make all those things make sense together and I feel the same way about what we do every day I feel about you and I love the NBA and we love Top Gun and we love. I love deb's I don't know how you feel Dad's but You know just trying to find a way to make all those things fit together so I feel like I have aped and tried to copy a lot of what those guys do. And I feel like a kinship to their their mission their creative project. Absolutely I mean like you and I don't mean to make it sound like you. And I are the Beastie boys here but you know. I think that we use the Internet the way other people would use a sampler right and we draw in all these different media. We'd take youtube videos. We take a picture and I think it was probably more the case before we started working professionally together in an editorial capacity but we would have like tumblers and blog spots and you were just kind of like throw a picture Steve McQueen up in an article you were writing about those face and it would have some sort of relationship and I think that that was our way of continuing along this tradition of mixing and matching different pieces of culture to say something about yourself. The thing that you said that I think is probably one of the most important parts of the movie that will nocco very remarked upon because a lot of it is going to be spent talking about. Yok and it should be because this is very much I think an image to him in a real moving tribute to their friend but when Mike D says in the beginning of the movie that he was just this weird kid who found the clash. Not only is that like. That's the origin story for a lot of people. Who like they find that one band? Whether it's the dead or the clash or you know run DMC. Whoever it is that makes them think that they are now. All of not alone in the world the clashes like a really really important. Template for the Beastie boys because they are basically A Crossroads Group A marketplace. At Crossroads Group. It's where all these different cultures are coming. And they're setting up their wares and you can pick and choose off these tables and then you go home and you make something out of it. And that's what the clash did too. I mean you can make a lot of arguments about appropriation. And whether or not the people who the clash were taken from or or paying homage to properly compensated for the work that they did And the same thing could go. For the Beastie boys but I think a lot more people know about Lee Perry. Because of the Beastie boys did not you know and and that's like a really really important act in culture. Everything is about timing too I think about when they hit the scene and who they were working with and on the one hand I guess there's an appropriation question. I think they've moved past that so effectively because they were just literally there with Russell. Simmons and Rick Rubin and run DMC making music together and they were a part of something that was essentially punk at the end of its first true like lightning rod phase at the end of the day and and rapid the Dawn. You know I mean. They weren't there necessarily in in the parks in the south. Bronx but you know one thousand nine hundred. Eighty three played on the radio. Yeah Yes yes. And there's that great moment in the movie where Africa is asked about cookie. Post by one of the members of the Beastie boys and you can see like they're they're they're they're in the moment and they're going to dense area and you know performing for white people introducing them to wrap it away and that couldn't have happened if they if it was just five years earlier five years later. The same is true for the class. You know it's like they arrived at a time when the world was ready to hear rock and try to play reggae. And what that means for the future reggae. There's something also about this specific approach to the world though that jumps out to me. Which is it's not. Just this is what we like. It's this is what we like and I don't care if you don't like it and I don't I actually don't care if you don't get it because when I think about the things that I knew when I first heard the band it was you could fit it inside of a very small box. I just did my cultural reference points. The music that I knew about the the records the comedy everything that they were throwing in. I wouldn't say that I discovered them because they were sampled for three seconds on a on a record on policy boutique but they were a window. You know I had never heard of Sadaharu. Oh until I heard the beastie boys rap about him you know like there's so much in their music the sampling the lyric writing even if it is in their songs are very rarely like high minded. They're not necessarily pursuits of big ideas. But they put big ideas in front of you. Just by dint of what they were interested in and I I liked that kind of take it or leave it quality they bring to it and I feel like that really comes out in the movie too. Don't you think yeah? It's only a couple of people are lucky enough to have other people care about the thing that they care about. You know you can. You can play the game and you can try. Ride the wave of what's popular at any given moment. But it's so weird because what the beastie boys did especially once they move to La. I think wound up having such an incredibly profound formative effect on all the culture that comes after it but it so it winds up being underrated as as to what a zag that was how crazy it was for those guys to be like. Yeah we'RE GONNA LEAVE NEW YORK. We're GONNA leave behind rapper. We're going to go to capitol from Def Jam. And we're GONNA work with these two producers that basically no one's ever heard of an assemble these like really out there incongruous samples to build together a new sound that we're gonNA use to define us for the next couple of decades. The only thing I wanted to talk about because I think is probably also a reason why you and I like them. Much is that and this comes across very much in the movie much

Beastie Boys Chris Ryan Mike D New York Knicks Spike Jones Quentin Tarantino Shawn Fantasy Diaw Apple Steve Mcqueen Ferrari LA Africa Wanna Wootten Klan Wu Tang Bronx Crossroads Group
"klan" Discussed on FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

03:43 min | 2 years ago

"klan" Discussed on FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

"So it was a very bizarre disconnect between the all all the super hateful gross in porn imagery and certainly things they were talking about. But also, you know how. As you grandma house work? I haven't seen you. It's nice as your family. Let me see pictures. So it was a very it was for someone who'd never seen anything like it before. It was a pretty bizarre experience. Sue. That's your first rally. You're still in school. You continue to follow them. What happens next? Well, then I then I decided to start going further into this and looking further into what constituted the movement of white supremacy in America and it got it got easier having spent. There's a little bit over that with these groups, not much, but everyone kind of knows the other. So I decided to reach out to KKK group after that and. It was easier because I'd been able to say, look, I spent time with the national socialist movement. You know, I think they found that I was fair. Will you guys let me come and just sort of spend some time with you guys? So I did that and I went to this clan rally in North Carolina, which was just sort of an innocuous Klan rally. If there's such a thing, they had a cross lighting. We ate awful barbecue. I think they serve possum or something. But there I met some skinheads from the so-called blood and honour movement, and I started talking to them and I got invited to another thing. So. It just sort of snowballed a little bit. I guess, until I was sort of I, I had a a wide network of contacts in in the in the larger movement. Can you explain cross lighting with means in and if you can explain that for us? Yeah, one of the mistakes that it's easy to make when you first start covering the clan and it is a mistake that they find wholly offensive is when you ask them. So what are you going to burn this cross or something to that effect? And they get very angry and they take very personally because to them, they're not burning the cross, their lighting, the cross, it's a, it's a symbol of the light of Christ in in the in the darkness. But you know, it's, it's it's almost weird to have to have gotten used these things I've been to. I don't know how many cross lightings of I've been to, but they are. You know, the the con is a bumbling bunch of fools who have very little relevance today in America. But once you see them put on those robes and you see that cross start burning in the darkness, it is terrifying because you know they are the symbol of of of of hatred. They're the, they're the preeminent symbol of racism and white supremacy and hatred in this country. So no matter how many times you see it, it's scary and it's it's really disturbing. When you say they thought you were fair, what does that mean? Exactly what's balance in this context? I think it's a little bit of both. And obviously a lot of these people aren't gonna think you're fair regardless, but I told them straight up that, you know, I'm going to write what I hear and what I see. I'm not going to..

America Klan North Carolina
"klan" Discussed on The Dollop with Dave Anthony and Gareth Reynolds

The Dollop with Dave Anthony and Gareth Reynolds

02:28 min | 2 years ago

"klan" Discussed on The Dollop with Dave Anthony and Gareth Reynolds

"Was risk for spraying a cop in college what did you say to the cap i said what are you a fucking idiot turns out i've always been like this and he arrested yeah he was a fucking idiot too uh and then another one was arrested pulling on a streetcar a poll to stop the streetcar okay it's fun uh but the claim gone calm returned to south bend the students returned to campus many with their trophy robes had taken the kkk banner and they ran it up the notre dame flagpole uh you got to be careful with your irony expression at some point fine line really from now is that screw right yeah a many even though notredame at very strict priests none of them did a thing on that day in town not people are not as happy with wound down okay uh deputy sheriff coley was embarrassed that the kids have taken over south bend so he deputised thirty local clansmen jesus traced a kind of was feeling good for a minute uh the next day most of the papers uh the catholic students were portrayed as crazy p uh potato throwing mob uh walsh was just happy that noone had been seriously hurt or killed monday came students went back to class still pretty pleased with themselves they beat up the clan chief larry not having a good time he uh he thought the catholic locals would be happy with him leading the students have a go at the klan turns out they weren't because a lot of property was damaged everyone thought chief larry blunted by letting the students get into a mob and around the city so larry's embarrassing these angry at the notre dame students for letting him down uh because he thought they would be a good mob right you are not so in riot i thought you would be larry's not the sharpest batting about evening a deputy sheriff coley called larry and told him to bring his men to clan headquarters at nine p m he said the read more would be more trouble from the students chief larry called in some offduty guys and he showed up at nine pm but it was very quiet streets were empty.

sheriff coley walsh klan larry and
"klan" Discussed on The Dollop with Dave Anthony and Gareth Reynolds

The Dollop with Dave Anthony and Gareth Reynolds

02:26 min | 2 years ago

"klan" Discussed on The Dollop with Dave Anthony and Gareth Reynolds

"All righty like but it just waiting for someone is they know whether inspecting for klinsmann one car was vote clansman so they smashed the windshield you i clansman okay get the bats boys offender on another car was kicked in one clansman got mao the emma's dragged out of his card beaten until the cops came in saved them mouth the a car full of clansman musicians came through oh my god hi where the klan tones we gotta gave united zevon two the students grabbed their instruments and destroyed them fool he said the trombone flattened alike paper under his foot another klansman who was guarded by an indian a state trooper approached and walked through the pack and told the students they would get there's but the students didn't give to shit series fucking celebrating having a good time and that is streetcar full of cheering students passed by their words having a fucking great time although you know most of the clansman of of left now uh although one clansman did attack a student with a baseball bat and a student deputy chased him and another guy and and they chased him onto a street car and the clansman pulled out a gun and the deputy disarmed him and arrested him and then he looked at the other clansman those with them and that guy started crying he told the police he didn't have in a weapon and they just wanted to go home to get away from the student weight so we literally talked about that guy like four minutes ago it's like they're duda ended up with that in the tiki torch march the guy who was like on all the newspapers are now at bay fate chaired like buddy who do you want an apology from you i get that let's when the klan with their hoods amateur uh only eight students were arrested three for assault to for swearing it's a lotta swearing i would i would like to live with that but i.

klan assault klinsmann mao zevon baseball four minutes
"klan" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

02:10 min | 3 years ago

"klan" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"Want to go back for women tunisia any new homes and how do you explain to people when they say was the democrats had the ku klux klan it was the democrats are got rid of the ku klux klan i mean they they purge their pernia exactly and the republican party needs to do the same edwin excellent plants are your phone is is is is sounds kind of muffled i'm i'm concerned that people can understand what you're saying um i think i i think i got it all the good at tried to turn to speak but it it high god okay thanks a lot edwards is and thank you for your kind words i got a little ronald in lakes florida a ronald what's in your mind a tom i was calling pertaining to of the constitution uh you know we all of our that the constitution was written by the aristocrats and the wealthy and when they say we the people in order to form a more perfect union well let's look at who was considered the people it certainly wasn't the blacks hispanics uh with no all women knaw uh females for for that point and uh i you know native americans weren't part of we the people are either um yeah you're right but to to say that it was all about plutocrats um limoges share with you the out a little bit here the the this is for my book go what would jefferson do page 73 uh to to to to to to hand just a second one i find it uh at it where legal here we area in the state of delaware which voted for ratification of the convention almost seventy seven percent of the delegates were farmers more than twothirds of them small farmers with incomes.

ku klux klan republican party edwards delaware tunisia tom i jefferson seventy seven percent
"klan" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

The New Yorker Radio Hour

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"klan" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

"Now the president of the united states is by no means a clansman but when the former clan head david do came out in support of his campaign trump it first pointedly declined to disavow him as president he equivocated about the white supremacists who marched in charlottesville with torches and he recently referred to countries in africa and haiti majority black nations as shithole countries the white house later denied the remark but racist like richard spencer we're thrilled that the president thought this way and that he came out and set it in a meeting in the oval office it's impossible to deny that white supremacy is closer to the seat of power than it has been for generations andrew marantz has been reporting for the new yorker on the movement known as the old right which includes white supremacists holocaustdeniers misogynist the whole works some factions in that movement even model themselves directly on the clan and andrew was studying how these groups hope to change political of course not just on the fringe but for everyone in the united states inter linda gordon described the what seemed to be this sudden reappearance of the ku klux klan and the 20s and the way it i wouldn't say infiltrated just assumed its place in american government you had presidents who supported it governors who were members many members of congress were members millions of people who were members of the ku klux klan now we live in an age where the press in the united states um has made it very clear what has views on race as at least i think so many others do.

president united states david charlottesville white house richard spencer new yorker linda gordon ku klux klan congress africa haiti andrew marantz
"klan" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

The New Yorker Radio Hour

01:57 min | 3 years ago

"klan" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

"Preparing a coup to take over the government of the united states is prejudices their persisted right up until the presidential run of john f kennedy 1960 absolutely the notion of autism if you were catholic and therefore honoured the pope you could not be a loyal american you know one of the things that makes your book so riveting and it really is is how absurd and selfimportant the klan rituals and they're and they're terms where you assemble a a glossary of clan titles you know the various officers in the klan at the end of the book and it includes terms like king clear goal and i'm going to get the pronunciation wrong clara go and cloud vernon click talkin and clung club a and you know everything but cove fa and what's with these terms i mean you look at these guys in their absurd hats and you you think they're laughable in there anything but laughable well first of all let me say that when i wrote fish book i realize writer i didn't want to waste my time just telling people how horrible clan washing condemning it i wanted people to understand it and you also you don't describe them just doing horrible things there it picnics and barbecues and kind of family friendly social events and so and there's a certain certain kind of uh since sunday in the backyard quality to some of this against i wanted people to understand what could be attractive about the klan but as to these arcane names and rituals i think through how many people at first sydney way enjoy being part of the klan because it was like being a part of a theatrical group you were enacting certain kind of rituals and i might point out many fraternal orders at the time the elks the mations the nights of columbus all had their ritual so they were not that far out of the mainstream but i do think uh.

united states john f kennedy writer klan columbus sydney
"klan" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

The New Yorker Radio Hour

02:24 min | 3 years ago

"klan" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

"Obviously this week of the interesting to look at the emergence at a single economy and also 26th there aren't more profiles that's her avenue really subversive strange stay in raft especially in and see what the alleged alike humbert such as from one world trade center in manhattan this is the new yorker radio hour a coproduction of wnyc studios and the new yorker welcome to the new yorker radio hour i'm david ramnik i just read a terrific book about the history of the ku klux klan called the second coming of the kkk and the author linda gordon shows how the clan which was originally focused on violently suppressing blacks in the south was reborn in the 1920s as a nationwide movement and in this second integration the klan targeted not only african americans would jews catholics muslims mexicanamericans and asian immigrants discrimination was the new patriotism linda gordon rights how millions of people joined the clan in the 1920s in the span of just a few years and among them were mayors congressman senators and governors it's a period with very sobering lessons for our current moment one of the things your book makes so startlingly clear is that the klan was not something that was to the side of american political life how can you illustrate how deeply the land penetrated into political office in political life howard hide it rise didn't go to the presidency of the united states well almost because several presidents were in fact members such as harry truman but most of them uh i think there were three presidents who were probably darren berry truman was a member of this yes he glass but as soon as he decided to move into the national political arena he resigned how is that not disqualifying to his entire political career there's no reason at all why should have disqualified in this was an entirely reputable supposedly legitimate organisation it was not the least bit secret they advertised in newspapers they identified themselves when they ran for office as clansman but lacking polls we can also point to the legislative and electoral achievements of the klan it then the northern 1920s clan elected eleven governors 45 kong.

manhattan wnyc studios new yorker david ramnik ku klux klan linda gordon african americans united states harry truman darren berry truman congressman howard
"klan" Discussed on Politics and More Podcast

Politics and More Podcast

02:20 min | 3 years ago

"klan" Discussed on Politics and More Podcast

"This new yorker podcast is supported by rocket mortgage by quicken loans home plays a big role in your life that's why quicken loans created rocket mortgage it lets you apply simply and understand the entire mortgage process fully so you can be confident that you're getting the right mortgage for you to get started go to rocket mortgage dot com slash political scene this is the politics and more podcast i'm david ramnik i just read a terrific book about the history of the ku klux klan called the second coming of the kkk and the author linda gordon shows how the clan which was originally focused on violently suppressing blacks in the south was reborn in the 1920s as a nationwide movement and in this second integration the klan targeted not only african americans but jews catholics muslims mexicanamericans and asian immigrants discrimination was the new patriotism linda gordon rights how millions of people joined the clan in the 1920s in the span of just a few years and among them were mayors congressman senators and governors it's a period with very sobering lessons for our current moment one of the things your book mix so startlingly clear is that the klan was not something that was to the side of american political life how can you illustrate how deeply the klan penetrated into political office and political life howard hide did rise didn't go to the presidency of the united states well almost because several presidents were in fact members such as harry truman but most of them i think there were three presidents who were probably darren berry truman was a member of this yes he glass but as soon as he decided to move into the national political arena he resigned how is that not disqualifying to his entire political career there's no reason at all why should have disqualified in this was an entirely reputable supposedly legitimate organisation it was not the least bit secret they advertised in newspapers they identified themselves when they ran for office as clansman but lacking polls we can also point to the legislative and electoral achievements of the klan it then the northern 1920s clan elected.

david ramnik ku klux klan linda gordon african americans united states harry truman darren berry truman new yorker congressman howard
"klan" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:35 min | 3 years ago

"klan" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Lot of what you believe derives from who tells it to you were you heard from we know that thousands of ministers were lauding the klan in their sermons and some of them were reproducing at these outrageous claims you know another aspect of the klan that is off of this plan that is often forgotten in one that extremely relevant today is that while many people have labeled it a populist movement and that label has become very popular today being historian i think that's very misleading because the klan not only had zero proposals or policies that would have helped what we might call the ninety nine percent the sort of ordinary working class lower middle class people who joined the klan actually lauded and honored the very very rich how so you find statements like in in some of their directions to local groups that be sure that you elect a quote big man to be the head of your local chapter by which they clearly man a man of economic and social success when you think right now about the the base the socalled base of of trump's support how much of that in your mind is related to anything that can be tied to what were describing and the 20s or is a completely others are completely divorced from it's certainly not completely other and i do have to point out that we don't have perfect knowledge about who joined but we do have some good estimates one of the things i'd like to point out as a way of getting that is that on the opponents of the klan light to label them just a bunch of uneducated hicks claude harbours people who were just dumb and unfortunately i see that repeated today in the way some people talk about it trump supporters there two things wrong with at one is it's not true the clan had many educated people people are standing in their communities teachers lawyers engineers and presumably people who did not think of themselves as haters or hateful exactly exactly at but the other thing wrong with that kind of thing is that it backfires politically the there's is disdainful putdowns of the klan just made the klan.

klan trump ninety nine percent
"klan" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:51 min | 3 years ago

"klan" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And it really is has helped cerdan selfimportant the klan rituals and their and their terms where you assemble a a glossary of clan titles you know the various officers in the klan at the end of the book and it includes terms like king clean goal and i'm going to get the pronunciation wrong clara go and cloud vernon click talk and and clung club a and you know everything but cove fa and what's with these terms i mean you look at these guys in there absurd hats and you you think you're laughable in there anything but laughable well first of all let me say that when i wrote ish book i realize right away i didn't want to waste my time just telling people how horrible clan washing condemning it i wanted people to understand it and you also describe and just doing horrible things there it picnics and barbecues and kind of family friendly social events and so and there's a certain certain kind of uh s sunday in the backyard quality to some of this people to understand what could be attractive about the klan but as to these arcane names and rituals i think many people at first anyway enjoy being part of the klan because it was like being a part of a theatrical group you're enacting certain kind of rituals and i my point out many fraternal orders at the time the elks the mations the nights of columbus all had their ritual so they were not that far out of the mainstream but i do think uh you know when the clinton declined to climb largely from internal cautious and one of them was i think that members of the clan got a little bored with this but more chilling you say that the clan declined precisely because it had succeeded it.

klan columbus clinton
"klan" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:32 min | 3 years ago

"klan" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Rats i'll have to say i mean i hadn't wrap sleep out of the lou as you sitting on the luhn they come up with renewal thighs that is not to be recommended on that's later this hour we're going to start on another unsavory topic but this one is hardly any joke at all it concerns racism in government in the past and in the present i just read a terrific book about the history of the ku klux klan called the second coming of the kkk and the author linda gordon shows how the clan which was originally focused on violently suppressing blacks in the south was reborn in the 1920s as a nationwide movement and in this secondgeneration the klan targeted not only africanamericans but jews catholics muslims mexicanamericans and asian immigrants discrimination was the new patriotism linda gordon rights how millions of people joined the clan in the 1920s in the span of just a few years and among them were mayors congressman senators and governor's it's of period with very sobering lessons for our current moment one of the things your book makes so startlingly clear is that the klan was not something that was to the side of american political life how can you illustrate how deeply the klan penetrated into political office in political life were hide it rise didn't go to the presidency of the united states well almost because several presidents were in fact members such as harry truman but most of them i think there were three presidents who were probably aaron burr harry truman was a member of this yes in glass but as soon as he decided to move into the national political arena he resigned how is that not disqualifying to his entire political career there's no reason at all why should have disqualified in this was an entirely reputable supposedly lee legitimate organisation it was not the least bit secret they advertise do newspapers they identified themselves when they ran for office as clansman but lacking polls we can also point to the legislative and electoral achievements of the klan it then the northern 1920s clan elected eleven governors 45 congress congressman and i'm not counting what were almost certainly hundreds of state local municipal officials who their big issues what was the legislation of clint push for.

lou ku klux klan linda gordon united states harry truman congressman aaron burr clint
"klan" Discussed on 790 KABC

790 KABC

02:29 min | 3 years ago

"klan" Discussed on 790 KABC

"It that way failure on the air what's up all right quest i'll do it yet by a bee he the political ari what started the civil war were democrat this that you wrote segregationists or all democrat the klu klux klan was all democrats owing right up in the thought of my question you hear therapy awareness i don't hear anybody worrying that up well let's do it let's talk about it because because the the again hopes people the door i've trying to look at history to understand things today and if you don't those that do not dr doomed to repeat it and you're four entirely correct the southern democrats in the late nineteenth centuries were the ones that really created the circumstances that resulted in the things we are seeing today the republicans came in and they actually put in african american of governors and legislators and the the democrats became violent and responds to it now i understand they were all traumatized by war but their response was disproportionate and frankly sort of insane and that's what screwed up the rebuilt atia the phone south and then what happened in the federal government was just a mass thing just unwound accordingly at abraham lincoln survive i don't think the democrats would have been able to do that but it is what happened now you can it's i think the reason you don't hear about it today is that the disavowed that heritage and consider themselves the different or changer rehabilitated party in some way the that's why people don't talk about that i i i don't mean india or up going right up to two hundred fifty arts i was totally a democratic organisation that wasn't republika the he was called the mic it was called the solid south that member solid south solid democrat and but all this but i don't you know let's grain of of history we need to talk a bit about that because i think a lot of the blame getting are on the right olry other countries observe yet somehow boy all the way back and i don't think that you're you're you're correct i wouldn't argue with that but what i would say is again because i'm in the middle i don't care i don't.

civil war klu klux klan federal government abraham lincoln
"klan" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

KTLK 1130 AM

03:32 min | 3 years ago

"klan" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

"Don't want to whitewash our history i want to recognize the past and i want to recognize both the good and the bad you cannot raise your children to believe that america is just this sunshine and lollipops country because it's not we have some really bad things with that being said we also have some really glorious things about this nation but if you don't teach your children the bad things if they don't hear it from you and then here but this is why america is so great any way name the countries that have been done this kind of stuff we have to teach history and keep it in context and look for the advancement of man are there racists he l yeah boy are they're not cease yeah in growing numbers these seen these have been seen exactly what's going on in the world has been seen before and what's happening right now was played out in the uh the late night teams and the early 1920s this progressive movement that glorified racism from woodrow wilson two margaret sanger they glorified racism they beefed up the klan the klan was almost dead and they brought it back to life because they were they added deep hatred for black people and that is the truth look it up if you want to tear down a a memorial because people had a real true hatred for people of color then you need to take the one living memorial and this guard it and that's planned parenthood if you want to have a real discussion i will stand with you uh bedford forest horrible human being horrible human being the general in the south founder of the klan he skinned people alive if you stood up for the slaves and you were white and then he would hang your skin on the sides of barnes along with black ski ends to let everybody know you come into this area and you stand for the north this what's going to happen to you there's no way you can stand with those from the early 20th century progressive movement and there's no way you can stand with the klan the nazis or aunt afa can't and i want to warn you.

woodrow wilson margaret sanger klan founder ski america
"klan" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

02:05 min | 3 years ago

"klan" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"Other states as well and have been rendered irrelevant and and so what we solve down in in charlotte israel virginia was a manufactured crisis joe thanks for the call really appreciated so i want to pick up on this for second he said you infiltrated the klan were you working undercover under sheets no i was at a sheet but i i say i look there was a state trooper that was actually undercover under the the sheets nerve as those say trooper india he infiltrated i was that the planned meeting in the klan rally working for as a journalist store wars what do you think i was doing the actual mature woods clarified serbrun exiled aranxa you'll arrive when you go you just trying to put me on the spot i'm not trying to put you on the show this is the first i'm hearing that you infiltrated the klan i thought i knew which were where you were going with what i wanted to make sure it's a have you ever been to a klan rally no have you ever been to a clan initiation no on the boat yeah i'll tell you from wanted i look at the initiation i'm looking for the state trooper because he he had a rate of a you know a sheet mount and odd at home or something that joe i feel it how would you go i said how would i know that you are present let your there he said alters blink mileit will everybody i looked at lake their eyes i had no idea who the hollywood were you listeners truck was the first have you ever heard and i got it all in alka i'm just wondering what happened when the wind came up with a three sheet stood win on cheese veritas load folks vernon from bed ponds 101 listen all i'm going to do is make fund old damn thing because it's so ridiculous i'm going finds of the laugh about our funds numerous uppercut apart what's happening out there is a humorous from travelling tell no the southwest side as the new problem now was reported as a vehicle fire and i looked at it i don't see smoke but there's a vehicle in the left center lane interloop printed wilkins avenue so some traffic was getting by to the left some getting by to the right and looking at the.

klan woods hollywood charlotte israel virginia joe