29 Burst results for "Klamath"

"klamath" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

03:09 min | 9 months ago

"klamath" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Magnetic <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Music> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Telephony_Male> <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> regarding <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> the klamath river <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> flows some <Speech_Female> two hundred fifty miles <Speech_Female> from southern <Speech_Female> oregon to northern <Speech_Female> california <Speech_Female> from its headwaters <Speech_Female> at upper <Speech_Female> klamath lake east <Speech_Female> of medford oregon <Speech_Female> the river rushes <Speech_Female> through trout <Speech_Female> habitat forested <Speech_Female> mountains <Speech_Female> farmland <Speech_Female> and salmon nurseries <Speech_Female> as it makes <Speech_Female> its way to the pacific <Speech_Music_Male> ocean <Speech_Music_Male> rather <Speech_Music_Male> the river <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> usually <Speech_Female> russia's <Speech_Female> but now <Speech_Female> drought is <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> desiccated almost <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> the entire klamath <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> river basin. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> Some twelve to <Speech_Female> fifteen thousand <Speech_Female> square miles. <Speech_Female> That's an area <Speech_Female> approaching the size of <Speech_Female> the entirety <Speech_Female> of massachusetts <Speech_Female> and connecticut combined <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> across those more <Speech_Female> than nine million <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> acres. Everyone <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> and everything <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> is <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> suffering <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> including <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> the birds <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> species <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> such as th- <Speech_Music_Female> rushes hummingbirds <Speech_Music_Female> and fly <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> catchers <Speech_Female> the diversion of <Speech_Female> water from refugees <Speech_Female> in the klamath river. <Speech_Female> Basin and climate <Speech_Female> change is <Speech_Female> altering migratory <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> patterns of <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> bird species in <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> the pacific flyway <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> from alaska <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> to patagonia. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> John alexander <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> is executive <Speech_Female> director of the klamath <Speech_Female> bird observatory <Speech_Female> the <Speech_Female> observatory's monitoring <Speech_Female> station is at <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> the klamath river headwaters <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> on <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> the shore <SpeakerChange> of <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> upper klamath lake. <Music> <Speech_Male> Normally <Speech_Male> when you would <Speech_Male> come out of our field <Speech_Male> station walked down <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> through the woods and onto <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> the <SpeakerChange> marsh. You'd <Speech_Male> be doing <Speech_Music_Male> it in chess waiters <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Telephony_Male> <Speech_Male> but this <Speech_Male> year even in the string <Speech_Male> when <Speech_Male> we would normally <Speech_Male> be over <Speech_Male> waist deep in <Speech_Male> water where <Speech_Male> walking on <Speech_Male> dry <Speech_Music_Male> marshall bottom <Speech_Music_Male> and there's <Speech_Male> no water <Speech_Male> at the station where <Speech_Male> usually <Speech_Music_Male> water persists <Music> <Speech_Telephony_Male> mclamb <Speech_Male> refuge system. <Speech_Male> It's lynch <Speech_Male> pin. Perform auditory <Speech_Male> birds western <Speech_Male> populations <Speech_Male> of waterfowl <Speech_Male> and other species <Speech_Male> of migratory. Birds <Speech_Male> depend on this <Speech_Male> very small area <Speech_Male> in this <Speech_Male> critical art <Speech_Music_Male> of their <SpeakerChange> journey. <Music> The all immigration <Music> <Speech_Telephony_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Telephony_Male> <Speech_Male> decisions that <Speech_Male> were making now <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> are putting at risk <Speech_Male> the birds that make <Speech_Male> their remarkable <Speech_Male> annual migration <Speech_Male> through this area <Speech_Male> and. This is a clear <Speech_Male> signal <Speech_Male> that the arteries <Speech_Male> of the wests <Speech_Male> are. Wetland <SpeakerChange> ecosystems <Speech_Male> are <Music> <Advertisement> failing. <Music> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> What can we <Speech_Male> maintain <Speech_Male> with. Regards <Speech_Male> to an agra <Speech_Male> farming industry <Speech_Male> in the upper klamath basin <Speech_Male> while also <Speech_Male> maintaining <Speech_Male> the headwaters <Speech_Male> of <Speech_Male> one of our continent's <Speech_Male> most important <Speech_Male> watersheds <Speech_Male> a watershed <Speech_Male> fueled <Speech_Male> cultures <Speech_Male> and fed <Speech_Male> cultures. <Speech_Male> And <SpeakerChange> how do <Speech_Male> we balance those <Music> needs. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> What's the economic <Speech_Male> impacts of <Speech_Male> giving. The refuges <Speech_Male> were water. You know <Speech_Male> there's always families <Speech_Male> in likelihood <Speech_Male> that are important <Speech_Male> and that we need to <Speech_Male> be concerned about <Speech_Male> and we need <Speech_Male> to balance them <Speech_Male> with what <Speech_Male> we need as a <Speech_Male> broader society <Speech_Male> if we <Speech_Male> lose some of those <Speech_Male> crops in <Speech_Male> the upper klamath basin <Speech_Male> is it gonna <Speech_Male> to impact on our <Speech_Male> food resources in the <Speech_Male> west or <Speech_Male> the impact of the economic <Speech_Male> in nature <Speech_Male> to stanley's <Speech_Male> didn't make that persists <Speech_Male> in their porton <Speech_Male> they're part of our community <Speech_Male> in. Is there any <Speech_Male> way we can compensate <Speech_Music_Male> for

oregon river basin klamath river John alexander upper klamath lake patagonia russia massachusetts california alaska chess stanley
"klamath" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

09:19 min | 9 months ago

"klamath" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Real the concern is not necessarily like people locally protesting the concern was outside actors coming in and trying to make the klamath. Their soapbox yeah. I'm i understand that. A farmer named ben duval. Who's the president of the klamath. Water users association was writing to members And condemning people from be that were being recruited from other parts of the country right to come in and participate in these demonstration. So fortunately nothing. Nothing terrible happened. But but Scott if i can turn back to you have one more question for you. It's the same question to ask everyone this hour Do you think that there is a solution here. A way to balance the needs of of of all the farmers the fish the native tribes. Everybody who relies on the lakes and rivers in the basin. And what is that solution. Y i do think that it was the kp. Are i think it is the cape your a. I think it's a matter of you. Know the reason why things weren't enacted in in two thousand fifteen and died was largely the the support for npr a because of dam removal. It was such a hot topic locally politically from here all the way to dc. It was it was just kind of nails. On the chalkboard for some people it was a spear in the side for others and and and the idea of dam removal is utopia for the tribes. That believed that a free flowing. River is is ultimately. what's needed. And as a as an era gator. I didn't have a dog in that. Fight the the dams that are below us. Don't control my irrigation. water A bullet. I believe that the property owners along the river that the the four dams that are in question that have a lake. That's that has property value attached to that for people that built houses are they need to be dealt with an and they were trying to do that but it was such a radical idea. Dam removal is going forward That the anticipation is damn. Start coming out in twenty twenty three. The part of that agreement didn't go through was was the the the component that took care of the national wildlife refuges which would have had one hundred thousand acre feet of water guaranteed to them Which this year will are only receiving the ten thousand acre feet. That's being brought down through to like your education district delivered into someone be to to support one hundred and twenty seven suckers that are entrapped there in one hundred thousand birds that we're going through Molting that could have had botulism kill. That's the only surface-water coming into the the this side of the project. And and so. It's pretty critical that we get back to that because it dealt with agriculture it dealt with tribal interest and what was good. Dan is is still the same approach now in my mind. Well scott choice. Their generation farmer and owner of soy's family farms in to lake california. Thank you so much for joining us. Thank you for having me all right last. Stop on our virtual re- Trip downriver on the klamath is at the mouth of the klamath river near the pacific ocean. An area shared by the euro people and redwood national park. Barry mccovey junior Joins us from klamath california where he senior fisheries biologist with the uruk tribal fisheries program and a europe tribal member as well. Barry mccovey junior. Welcome to on point eric. Thanks for having me. Tell me a little bit about the salmon there. How healthy or not healthy is the population there. Yeah so salmon. Runs here on. The klamath have been in steady decline for many many decades And it's gotten extremely bad over the last few years since around two thousand fourteen in two thousand fifteen we experienced drought. We've kind of been in this perpetual state of drought since then and we've seen population declines that we've never seen before and it's to a point where there's snow longer enough fish harvest for the tribe to feed its people so things are getting pretty bad. No not enough to feed feed the people. So how much of this is due to the what you heard prior to you in this hour in the water management decisions being made up river and even all the way up at Upper klamath lake. It's it's really a huge part of of the declines in fish species in the klamath river there many many aspects of of decline From you know habitat loss to water management issues to disease to sedimentation Dams blocking four hundred miles of of historic spawning habitat. There there are. There are a lot of reasons. Why sam numbers have declined over the decades This year in particular we were hit extremely hard by the drought like everyone was in the basin. And do you do you. do you worry that. The the drought Since it seems like it may go on for some time. is just going to continue to make everything worse. Sure there's there's not enough water to go around in the space and And like dr gonyea said there's not enough water for fish and we can't we can't dictate how much water fish need. They need a certain amount of water. And there's not enough to go around and so something needs to change and we do foresee drought continuing but we're working really hard to build climate resiliency into the basin. He talked to me a little bit more about that. Sure so like Scott mentioned dam. Removal is a is a huge part of that dam. Removal will be the largest river restoration project. Maybe in the history of america. And so what we're doing as we removing for dams on the klamath were opening up. Four hundred miles of historic spawning habitat. That will build helped to build in climate resiliency. That will give the river access to springs and many other habitats that haven't been accessible for for over one hundred years now That in itself is huge. And it's a it's a major move in the direction as far as restoring salmon here on the klamath river and other species look. It's not just salmon that were concerned about. There's pray there's green sturgeon there's steelhead. There's many many species that are connected to this ecosystem and dammar mola's going to help all of them and it's going to help all the people in the basin also In and you know our job here at the europe tribe is to try and restore balance to this basin and we feel like dam removal landscape scale restoration projects like that are the path forward. Well barium mccovey junior senior fisheries biologist with the uruk tribal fisheries program. Thank you so much for joining us. Thank you appreciate it. Alex schwartz have got about thirty seconds. Left with you in your reporting heavy found that people along the entire the tired of the base are genuinely concerned about their ways of life vanishing forever unless some kind of workable solution is found. I would definitely say yes. there's i mean especially with the trauma cop two species it's literally hurtling toward extinction There is a lot of concern that these traditional lifeways for indigenous peoples are in jeopardy and also the the farmers who definitely have a shorter history here but you know have been here for some generations and are seeing their their life ways decline. Seems like there can be a set of solutions though. If they don't keep dying in congress. But alex schwartz reporter for herald and news as part of report for america. Thank you so very much for joining us today. Thanks for having me as you've heard for many in the klamath river basin. There are more questions about the future than answers and so we want to wrap up today with another group. That can't seem to win in this complicated situation. That's birds such as brushes hummingbirds and fly catchers the diversion of water from refugees in the klamath river. Basin and climate change is altering migratory patterns of bird species on the pacific flyway from alaska to patagonia. John alexander is executive director of the klamath bird observatory and the observatory's monitoring station is at the klamath river headwaters where we began today's episode on the shore of upper klamath lake. Normally when you would come out of our field station walked down through the woods and onto the march you'd be doing it in chess waiters but this year even in the spring when we would normally be over waist deep in water. We're walking on dry marsh bottom and there's no water at the station. Wear usually.

Barry mccovey klamath ben duval Water users association klamath river uruk tribal fisheries program lake california Scott redwood national park dr gonyea npr upper klamath lake salmon pacific ocean dammar mola europe
"klamath" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

09:37 min | 9 months ago

"klamath" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"There's a groundwater resources being used here. This gear that's keeping some Acres green but not in full production. Were were deficit. Irrigating crops to the extent that We aren't getting yields. Were trying to maintain stands of alfalfa and other perennial crops. That we don't wanna lose the investment of and people are getting some return out of that but this is a this will be a deficit year for the economy of the klamath basin. Do you worry that there could be some really negative long term impacts here and i ask because we've done a lot of shows about How this current drought cycle. That the what. The entire of the west of western united states is in may go on for a long long time and You know these water. Shut off that you're experiencing this summer could become more regular perhaps in the future. I mean let's just game this out. If it does continue on this way. How much longer do you think You could keep farming there. Well i i think the question becomes. How long did the fish survive. Period were were releasing water out of upper klamath lake. That is is is extremely warm water. That is deluding the natural. Chretien's that come into the klamath river and and keep cool water for the for the fish the salmon in the river in so climate change. If if that's the argument is Will change a lot of things were were not the only ones that will suffer in that and i don't miss it doesn't just because you have a a fish doesn't mean more water is always the answer for that water. It's it's about the right conditions in the right place and We we certainly subscribe to. That is as alex talked about the. Kb are a That was a big part of that was fixed. The fish fix the farms. It can have salmon and potatoes on the same plate but it. it's about balance it's about the ecosystem it's about what's right for it and and not necessarily an absolute disaster that the national wildlife refuge is that we have here in to lake and lower klamath national wildlife refuge receives zero water until recent where we tried to avoid a botulism kill on the the two national wildlife refuge by bringing ten thousand acre feet of water into that refuge that should have been celebrated by people everywhere as as a successful thing In an unfortunately. It's this is such a political hotbed here In in there so many misunderstood and not under not misunderstood and not understood at all issues that that go along with all of this. We're we're not just changing. We're not just dealing with a changing climate per se. Were also urged dealing with a changing climate of the people that are that are in at the table and the people don't understand the true needs of the of the system. Okay i wanna talk to you about that but we have to take a break here in just about thirty seconds or so. So i'm gonna ask you to hang on here for a second mister soyuz and and alex schwartz as well because we are trying to get an understanding about how water and really the lack of it and how it's being managed as well along the entirety of the klamath river basin is changing ways of life. There and what lessons we can all draw from it so we'll have a lot more when we come back. This is on point. This is point meghna chakrabarti and today we're taking a virtual trip down the klamath river along the border of oregon and california to understand how drought and An ongoing concern over how water is apportioned along. Ten to fifteen thousand square. Miles is impacting and perhaps permanently changing ways of life. And i'm joined today by alex schwartz. He's reporter for herald news as part of report for america. He's with us from klamath falls oregon and right now. We're focusing on to a lake in california where scott swiss joins us. He's a third generation farmer and or owner of choice family farms And just before the break. Scott you were telling us how not only is the physical climate changing but believed to paraphrase. What you were saying that the climate of the people is also changing is. Were you referring to the fact that Over the course of the summer there was concerned that there might even be something like a like a violent water rebellion. there When when the water got shut off for the farmers no you know. I don't think there was ever going to be a violent water rebellion You know the the thing about farmers is that were americans Always in our heart in and we wear that on her sleeve in a great example of that is in two thousand one in two thousand one there was a standoff at the head gates where farmers rallied in setup. Encampment there in an protested peacefully in granite. There you know. There's things that they do to try to bring attention in. Sometimes that means that you have to to wave your hands a little harder or or or have people convinced that something's going to happen just to try to get the attention of people that might not care that you're there And and make it interesting for him. And i think that's a lot of what you saw but just as in two thousand and one when nine eleven happened you know there were federal marshalls at the head gates that year most of the summer and as soon as nine eleven happened the farmers took everything down went home and and i. I don't believe that there would ever be a violent standoff. I i believe that what we had at the klamath head gates. That was probably riskiest of of all. The situation was people from outside of the area that came in and tried to be supportive of farmers but more than that they were there on the principle of private property rights and and the dismantling of rural america which you know we. We've become a poster child for that Here in the west and especially here where the tip of the spear here in the klamath basin and so. I think that that's more what you're referring to. And that that all you know sadly that a lot of that went away early this summer people people were gathered there and trying to make a point and and the real farmers that were there just they they kinda loss harden and i mean when you're watching fields dry up and having a hard time telling your story people go away in with her head hung in. That's that's not healthy for. That's not a healthy discussion either. We'll alex schwartz. Let me turn back to you here. Because i'd love just a minute or two more detail about why there was some concern about what might happen. around the irrigation canal right. Because i believe that there was there was worry for some time that ammon bundy Was gonna come to town. And perhaps he's a quite of infamous right wing extremist now and Was maybe gonna lead some kind of standoff. Yeah so after the projects i guess. Non-allocation was announced in this spring To irrigators who do own some acreage in the klamath project but very small compared to i guess i would say the average farmer in the project They purchased land directly next to the canal had gates. Which that's the main canal that diverts water from a proclaiming lake They set up a big red and white tent. There they called it. The water crisis info center in the began hosting meetings there That were staffed by the local chapter of people's rights oregon which is a far right group. That was started by ammon bundy last summer. So they you know. These two irrigators told reporters that they were planning to force. Open the head gates Similarly to what happened during two thousand one and they mentioned some points that Bundy himself was prepared to provide any assistance. So there was concern That you know bundy himself was headed to klamath falls and you definitely saw a some worry among all communities in the basin Because as scott said you know the real the concern is not necessarily like people locally protesting the concern was outside actors coming in and trying to make the klamath..

alex schwartz klamath river klamath lake klamath basin klamath national wildlife refu klamath river basin meghna chakrabarti scott swiss Chretien america oregon national wildlife refuge herald news california klamath falls alex ammon bundy Scott harden
"klamath" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

06:55 min | 9 months ago

"klamath" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"And so the farmers were sort of last in line and get a drop of water so just to again to reiterate farmers at one time we're able to rely on millions of gallons of water and this summer that got reduced to zero correct. But what about the klamath river. The klamath basin restoration agreement. Right that's from about a little over a decade ago. there was they're supposed to is my rudimentary understanding. Is you're supposed to be there supposed to be sharing of the all along. Yeah you're right. well. I mean that's what sort of everybody's just kind of kicking themselves wishing that this agreement had actually taken effect So this was started negotiations. Pretty much right after two thousand one people were like okay. This can never happen again So they tribes environmental groups. Agricultural groups came to the table and spent years and years countless hours designing this massive Restoration agreement that. Not only you know came up with a system to give the farmers slightly more reliable supply of waters that they would always expect to get something even during the years. But that would just have to fluctuate the klamath tribes were willing to give up Some of the water in upper class lake in certain year types and then the same a with the downriver tribes but it also included Hundreds of millions of dollars for really large scale ecosystem restoration So like restoring. Wetland habitat reducing phosphorus loading into upper. Clean it's lake removing dams throughout the basin That would have all made species a lot more. Resilient and able to handle these droughts like a would have in prior to colonization. The problem was The caviar a never went through congress. our local political representatives. Just weren't able to introduce it or get it passed In that in it's sort of failed at the end of two thousand fifteen so a plan that might of helped everyone died in congress. Correct okay alex. Hang on here. Because i want to travel about fifty miles south from where we began this show at the upper klamath. Lake in oregon. And let's go down river to tuli lake in california. Where scott soy's farms horseradish onion garlic peppermint spearmint alfalfa and cereal grains. Scott is owner of soy's family farms and he joins us now. Welcome to on point. Thank you for having me. Can you describe to us. What the soils like on your farm right now. Yeah that's that's that's probably the easiest thing to answer out of out of everything we could talk about here. The soil on my farm is some of the richest soil that you could you could find. It's a it's a dream for an agriculturist i'm living on what was an ancient lake bed Six million years abduc manure and to lease in the in the that fills a crater that is part of a volcanic system here part of the cascade range and Because of that this is a bureau reclamation. Took the water off created homesteads here. They moved that water in above us into upper klamath lake and held it in clear lake to the east of us. And those are the reservoirs. Now that feed the klamath river So it that's a simple question. This is phenomenal spoil and it produces some of the best crops a potatoes and mint spearmint. It's it's much desired area for agriculture is. But you need the water you need. The water The project was designed to have water the the deed that my grandfather who was a world war two home stutter He put his name in a pickle jar. Nineteen forty six was drawn. Came out put. A pin picked a pin out and put it on the map and came and found his stubbornly two acres of paradise and and developed a a farm here of which i'm the third generation but that that included a a right to water in. That's been much contention in the last thirty five forty years well. Alex was describing to us a little earlier about how the water got. Shut off this summer can you. Can you tell first of all. What's your impression of what happened. Scott and how did that have an impact on your farm. I think this all starts years before us starts in nineteen seventy-three with endangered species. Act a well intended. Act that Has become the law of the land. If you're if you're in the west and we're we're living that we're the poster child for it in two thousand one we we've faced to biological opinions one for the for the sucker fish and upper klamath lake and one for the salmon in the klamath river and they were conflicting biological opinions. That demanded more water than could ever be in the system That fortunately that year we got a small amount of surface water. That came down through the project and Didn't do a lot of good. It was early enough call in the season to to not irrigate a lot of crops. And so a lot of people didn't try that you're This is our second year in a row of being curtailed severely We came out of two thousand the winter two thousand eighteen and nineteen with a lot of water in the system fled stage situations up and down the river. We add fields. We couldn't plan because it was so wet here. So we we live through cyclical droughts difference of what is happening to us. Now is Regulation for single species management Is dictating what happens. Without water. To the point where it's it's not making room for the federal wildlife refuges that are here in the basin with this or or the farmers and We're we're living that firsthand in and see the flaws in in what should be ecosystem management. So can you tell me then. Let's focus on this year for a second. I hear you about the broader context. But i also want understand sort of inasmuch details possible. How is the water. Shutoff having an impact on you this year scott. Well it's a it's a severe impact or basin we are. We are utilizing our groundwater resources. Since nineteen ninety two people have been having to drill wells. That was the last severe drought that we went through. Two thousand one was not anywhere near the drought that we had in nineteen ninety. Two not naturally created droughts.

klamath river klamath lake upper klamath tuli lake scott soy klamath basin congress Scott alex oregon california Alex scott
"klamath" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

06:30 min | 9 months ago

"klamath" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"We're taking a virtual trip down the klamath river to try to understand how drought and human impact are changing ways of life perhaps making ways of life vanish along the entirety of the twelve to fifteen thousand square miles of the klamath river basin. It's a cautionary tale for all of us. And i'm joined today by alex. Schwartz reporter for herald news. As part of report for america is with us from klamath falls. Oregon. dr alex ganja is with us as well from Oregon he's a senior fish biologist for the klamath tribes. We'll be hearing from farmers and other tribal members a little later this hour as we continue our journey downriver but dr ganja tell described to us a little bit how you think decisions on how to manage the fish have downstream impacts on the klamath. Sure so we're in a very difficult position. We have an environment that no longer produces the amount of water that it did in the early nineteen hundreds. The project was developed in the early nineteen hundreds yet. We have more demands on the system so when the project was first developed there was nothing such as the the usa and there was very little concern for the the rights and the values of indigenous peoples. So we have a system where the agricultural community is demanding water. That isn't there. And that has been allocated to different social values meaning protecting endangered species and also fulfilling the in inherent sovereignty of absolve of indigenous peoples. We also blamed on that climate change and now drought conditions so everybody is stuck in a very difficult position. We really have no control over. How much water nature produces however we do have control over how it is distributed in amongst all the various users. That's really the crux of the problem. Here right so that's that was my going to be my final question for you. There's an thing something that we must underscore can't make it rain anymore or make it snow anymore at the moment. Only mother nature's in control of that even if we put like a hard stop to how much carbon reporting in the atmosphere today but given the tools that we do have that that the region does have it. Its disposal can you can you. Is there a way to balance all the needs of Of the people are and the species that that live in the basin believe there is The one thing the one other thing we can't control is the needs of these species. The fish need whatever water they require to complete their life cycle and to continue existing. We have no control over that. So the the first primary concern should be the needs of the species that we are affecting. We've also had agriculture on this planet for around fourteen thousand years and we've been able to adapt technologically behaviorally and through crop science methods to use less water that means efficient irrigation systems alternative crops. They're more adapted to arid conditions and air aired environments. And so we feel that it's the obligation of of people to adapt to the changing conditions of the environment and not require that three species of fish face extinction to grow crops. Well dr alex ganja senior fish biologist for the klamath tribes joining today. From chillan oregon. Thank you so much. Thank you we're gonna hear from a farmer in just a moment but alex schwartz. Let me turn back to you. Because i'd love a little bit more context here There this isn't the first time there was a there's been a severe drought in the region. Right in the early two thousands. There was one as well that led to some some first of all some key incidents and decisions thereafter. can you. can you talk about that. Sure so for the first i guess. Roughly a century of the projects existence. They were basically able to take as much water as they needed from a proclaiming lake To water their crops. So they would. Actually you know. More water would leave the lake during drought years And so after sort of almost one hundred years of that The you really saw these declines in the fish species you know which are also related to those land-use changes as dr ganja mentioned And then during a really severe drought in two thousand one These biological opinions from these federal agencies sort of kicked in for the first time and required reclamation to maintain the water level of upper klamath lake for the cop two along with higher flows in the klamath river for salmon And that meant that barely. Any water was leftover for the farmers in the klamath project and they protested in response to the irrigation. Water being cut off okay so it was cut off then basically into in in the early two thousands. Yeah it was not a severe as this year. Nothing they've never really experienced. Anything like has happened this summer but they think the irrigation was cut off sometime in the summer and then you saw some protests at the canal head gates And there are some. There were a couple of times where they were actually able to open. The canal had gates release a little bit of water. And and what happened. This summer is complete. Shut off of those canal gates. Yeah so in the spring reclamation announced that the canal just wouldn't open at all this year And that's never happened before And you know the that was a huge blow to farmers in the project And it was driven by the lowest some of the lowest inflows ever to upper klamath lake from some of those tributaries There just wasn't enough water for the bureau to meet. Usa requirements not only for lake levels in the spring let alone The flows for salmon..

dr alex ganja dr ganja klamath river basin klamath river Oregon herald news klamath falls Usa Schwartz alex schwartz alex klamath lake oregon
"klamath" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

04:56 min | 9 months ago

"klamath" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"The drought and the low water levels are perhaps permanently changing Not just ecosystems but ways of life and so our first stop on the klamath river is going to be right at the headwaters. The river's source the upper klamath lake. Which as you mentioned is home to the klamath tribes and several types of fish that live only there and nowhere else on planet earth. So dr alex ganja joins us. He's a senior fish biologist for the klamath tribes. Dr daniel. welcome to on point all right. So can you first describe to us. What upper klamath lake was like. I don't know a century or so ago sure so upper cliff flake was well. The upper climate basin Had three large water bodies on it upper clinically lower climate flake. And tuli like these are the residual lakes from historic lake. Mohawk that existed about ten thousand years ago and these were a series of berry interconnected shallow lakes with Abundant fringe wetlands around the margins. That served as juvenile fish habitat for the trauma and copper to okay. The tom and cop to so these are toes. What they are so Trauma cop to our member of the catastophe fish group were suckers and the trauma and the clinton applying which is The lost river sucker and the cop to the short no sucker and they exist only in the upper klamath basin. Nowhere else on earth. Nowhere else on earth and they're they're a fairly unique Fish the traum. It's about thirty inches long at adulthood so a very large bodied fish. The cop is about twenty two inches and they would have existed in the millions if not tens of millions of of individuals and they acted as sort of the cleaners of ecosystem and keeping the ecosystem and balance. Okay so you said they would have existed in the millions meaning now. how are they doing. Now we're looking at maybe twenty five thousand total about twenty thousand twenty to twenty four thousand Chuan and somewhere around three thousand cop two so three thousand thirty thirty four hundred or so They're they're on their way out Due to water quality conditions and water quantity conditions. Does that mean that they are critically endangered. I would say so. They haven't been designated as that officially out. But we've seen Seventy five percent plus decline in just the last five years of individuals and so we're approaching the end of the species in in the wild upper klamath lake but they have not received federal designation as as being endangered no they are endangered. They've been endangered since. Nineteen eighty eight but not critically endangered critically endangered The last time they had young survive was about nineteen ninety. Three which means these are all very old adult individuals and ever since nineteen ninety-three the water quality conditions in the lake during the fall. This time of year have effectively killed all of the young fish and just as a quick aside. How long do these fish live for the trauma. The oldest one we found has been about fifty three years old and the Oldest cup to somewhere around. Twenty five okay. So there. long live fish then. So so Alex schwartz a little earlier was describing a couple of the major challenges with the water in in upper klamath lake can you. We've just got about thirty seconds to go before. I break dr gone. Yeah i'll give you a. I swing at this What do you. What is the biggest challenge right now. That's threatening us fish. The the biggest challenge is of the phosphorus loading into upper climates lake which fuels the algae blooms that has caused largely by unrestricted cattle-grazing. About the like okay. So there's phosphorus loading into the into the lake and then is that being exacerbated by just the the reduced volume of the lake itself the reduce volume of the lake And also the destruction of the fringe wetlands that are around the lake that acted as filters for the boss. Frus okay so we're going to just take a quick break here and hear more about that when we come back. So dr alex. Ganja and alex schwartz as well standby were doing virtual trip down that two hundred and fifty miles of the klamath river on the border of oregon and california to understand better. How drought in particular is changing ways of life. There perhaps.

klamath lake dr alex ganja Dr daniel cliff flake upper climate basin historic lake upper klamath basin klamath river tuli Chuan Oldest cup Alex schwartz clinton dr alex alex schwartz Ganja
"klamath" Discussed on Go West, Young Podcast

Go West, Young Podcast

02:00 min | 11 months ago

"klamath" Discussed on Go West, Young Podcast

"It isn't that i'm <Speech_Female> thinking about it in the abstract <Speech_Female> i'm thinking <Speech_Female> about it <SpeakerChange> on a concrete <Speech_Female> level <Speech_Female> like the other <Silence> day i had to decide <Speech_Female> whether <Speech_Female> to leave my windows <Speech_Female> open overnight to <Speech_Female> cool the house during <Speech_Female> the heat dome <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Female> risk the fact that the <Speech_Female> smoke from the lava <Speech_Female> fire in weed california <Speech_Female> was going to <Speech_Female> come in through those open <Speech_Female> windows and believe <Speech_Female> ash all over the inside <Speech_Female> of my house <Speech_Female> so <Speech_Female> these these are the kinds <Speech_Female> of daily decisions. <Speech_Female> That people in <Speech_Female> the west are making now <Speech_Female> You <Speech_Female> know more. And more <Speech_Female> when i hear people talking about where <Speech_Female> to live buying a house. <Speech_Female> They're talking <Speech_Female> explicitly about the <Speech_Female> future climate. <Speech_Female> Where in these places. <Speech_Female> I think people <Speech_Female> are thinking realizing <Speech_Female> the penny is dropping <Speech_Female> that we're <Speech_Female> going to live. We're <Speech_Female> gonna spend <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> the rest of <Speech_Female> our lives in a different <Silence> west <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Female> that's a serious <Speech_Female> thing to <Speech_Female> can't come to terms <Speech_Female> with especially <Speech_Female> when it's <Speech_Female> one hundred and seven degrees <Silence> and you're sweating <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> so <Speech_Male> yeah. It's been a rough week. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Emily harris <Speech_Male> is an author <Speech_Male> and journalist based <Speech_Male> in klamath falls <Speech_Male> oregon. We've got links <Speech_Male> to her books <Speech_Male> and that piece in the <Speech_Male> atlantic in the show <Speech_Male> notes. 'em <Speech_Male> thank you so <SpeakerChange> much for this <Speech_Male> wonderful conversation <Speech_Music_Female> terry. It's been great. <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> That is <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> it for this episode of <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> the landscape. If <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> you enjoyed this conversation <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> please leave <Speech_Male> us a review on <Speech_Male> apple podcasts. <Speech_Male> Or wherever you are <Speech_Male> listening to this right <Speech_Male> now also <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> dropped me aligned with feedback. <Speech_Male> Podcast <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> western priorities. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Dot org <Speech_Male> or. I am a weiss <Speech_Male> on twitter. <Speech_Male> Thanks again <Speech_Male> to america's for <Speech_Male> joining us. I'm <Speech_Male> aaron weiss and <Speech_Male> on behalf of the whole team <Speech_Male> of the center for western <Speech_Male> priorities. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Go get outside <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> early in the morning. Please <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> do <SpeakerChange> your best <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> to stay cool out there <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> from.

Emily harris klamath falls california aaron weiss oregon apple twitter america
"klamath" Discussed on Go West, Young Podcast

Go West, Young Podcast

04:37 min | 11 months ago

"klamath" Discussed on Go West, Young Podcast

"In a tent along the head gates to the main irrigation canal. That would in a normal year be sending water to farmers in the klamath basin but this year of course is not normal and whatever normal was in the west it is almost certainly not coming back because of climate change. She's also the author of several books. Her new one is titled wild souls freedom and flourishing in the non human world emiratis. Welcome to the landscape. Great to be here. I wanna make sure we've got time to talk about your book but let's start on the klamath river a because your article doesn't just cover. What is going on with a handful of ammon bundy or wannabes. Perhaps the pieces titled the west can end the water wars now and that is a very big promise to make considering what we're staring down across the region right now. Yes yeah. I agree that that is a big claim. But you know i'm a. I'm an optimistic person. And i wanted to create a space for that conversation of of actually reaching agreement and solutions. So what's going on first of all these farmers along the climate. So there's an irrigation project here in klamath basin called the climate project. That in a normal year takes water from upper klamath lake and delivers it to quite a few producers across the southern oregon and northern california And this year because of precipitation lack of precipitation and water levels in the lake It was determined that this allocations to farmers weren't gonna just be reduced. They were going to be zero. They're not even going to open the canal that that brings usually brings water so that was a real shock to too many producers also the wildlife refuges that are downstream that also rely on water from this era. Gatien project are also not getting any water. So they're also dry this year. Which is going to be a really difficult for them. As well and the klamath tribes of course also rely on on water from the river in the dams..

klamath basin ammon bundy klamath river klamath lake northern california oregon Gatien
"klamath" Discussed on SharkFarmer Podcast

SharkFarmer Podcast

04:31 min | 1 year ago

"klamath" Discussed on SharkFarmer Podcast

"National wildlife refuge in the lower klamath national wildlife refuge or two of the crown jewels that are here in our project their home to millions of ducks and this was a dot cutting mecca. Anybody that's duck. Hunter recognize those two names and they're synonymous with fantastic hunting especially back in the day when they would ship railcars of ammunition and guns up here for the hundreds. That would come from all over the west. Hollywood come here to hunt. Honestly it just sounds like you earned very good shots out there well or too good shots i gotta say you can have a true railcar ammunition right now. You can't even get a box at the store right. So i mean we're missing some. We've got to get that kind of mentality back to where we get that many outdoorsman party supporting the refuge system and we're part of that right so we have a working wildlife refuge where we have farming on it and the way that that works two thirds of the acres that we bid there is supportive of cereal crops or alfalfa. One third of it would be a row crop. You never have more than one third row crop allocation there so we raising potatoes and onions out there. But then we read a lot of green and a lot of that spent gets left for the birds the original antenna. That was to try to hold birds here that otherwise would end up in the central valley of california in the fall that would decimate rice crops that were being grown in the sacramento valley. That was the point of having the refuge and they didn't homestead all the land that was here and they develop that refuge to support those birds. We're the caretakers that we've raised the crops out there we provide for that waterfowl and last year we watched between sixty and seventy thousand birds parish the botulism botulism disease. It's in the soil. It's always there and eighty five years. The project operated where water would come down through this system and keep those sumps at full pool or a high pool and we have a plant called d. plant which is thirty six hundred horsepower that pushes water through a tunnel to the lower klamath national wildlife refuge and eventually back to the klamath river. That thirty six hundred horsepower kept my house from going back underwater but they found another way to keep my house dry and that was just not deliver water at all but that also is drying up burntness and.

klamath national wildlife refu Hunter Hollywood botulism botulism disease sacramento valley california klamath river
"klamath" Discussed on SharkFarmer Podcast

SharkFarmer Podcast

05:55 min | 1 year ago

"klamath" Discussed on SharkFarmer Podcast

"It's a pretty phenomenal thing to see. The other thing we're raising here is a lot of ducks. Four hundred and thirty species of animals. Here we're known for the ducks and geese and the ball eagles right but there's a lot more out here that's part of this landscape. I really think that when things started to change arrest it was the narrative that happened. During the clinton administration. It was actually an act. By mr babbitt that left us with two biological opinions one for the salmon and one for the sucker fish that took more water than what was ever available in the project out of here and designated it for the fish and that was the two thousand and one water cut off. We made national news with bucket brigade in the fact that we had a head gates crew. That was trying to move water around the head gates. That were armed with us marshals. It was the first of many dark years for us this year. Is we're going to cross that threshold that that you're set for us and with an absolute disaster here across the board. The only water here right now is being pumped from wells. There is no surface water being delivered to agriculture. The wells that are being pumped. They're tapping into an aquifer that wasn't intended. This wasn't intended to be ground. Water project water. There was here the water where my house is used to be. Twenty five feet and that water that was on. This land is no longer here. Because they're pushing it down the river in storing it in upper klamath lake and not giving us access to it so people like to say well. You drained marshland. You took water out of a lake and you altered assist system number one number two the positives that came out of that benefit our entire nation from the refuges to the to the consumer at the store and number three when they di water ditches and take the water out of those. They're the ones that are hurting the four hundred thirty species of wildlife that live here in concert with us. And they're all doing it in the name of the essay to try to protect three species and that doesn't make sense disrupting communities disrupting wildlife there making clear losers here. And they're not benefiting the very species that they're trying to protect who do you complain to everything you've said here makes perfect common sense. Mike if seems like you should just go to whatever agency said. Hey this is this. And they're at least should be a conversation about it but it does not seem like in the past bit of history that that has been able to occur well it it occurs every day at many levels but it doesn't go very far you know i will say especially in terms of bureau reclamation who ultimately has control of this. They have some really good folks here at the local area office. They do at the regional office when it gets on the regional office. I don't know them. i'm sure they have good folks everywhere but at some point as you.

mr babbitt clinton administration ducks eagles upper klamath lake us Mike
"klamath" Discussed on SharkFarmer Podcast

SharkFarmer Podcast

03:41 min | 1 year ago

"klamath" Discussed on SharkFarmer Podcast

"The constant solution. According to our federal biological experts is more water. More watering the lake. for the suckers. More water down the river for the salmon and every year. that has absolutely no good zero. So you know essentially what they're doing this doing the opposite of what mother nature did for all of history taking this water. That's in a project that was built to store water for irrigation for irrigated agriculture. And they're they're manipulating waterfall downriver. They're putting down huge flows of hot horrible quality water at times of the year when that river historically may have had absolutely no waters going into it upper klamath lake there were natural reefs and history tells us we have pictures documentation. That's it. I won't say it with common but it wasn't unheard of this one. The lakewood almost dry up. There's pictures and their local museums of folks out. There hain the grass that grew on the lake bottom after it dried up. There's also pictures of the climate's rivers near the discharge point from being so low that you could walk across and get anything wet above your ankle you know. Essentially we have federal agencies that are trying to play. God is they've done it for more than twenty years and they're not doing a very good job they're not doing as done for anyone and in the process of having the national marine fisheries service managed water for downstream salmon and the us fish and wildlife managed water or the upstream sucker fish. I you know just that in itself having to federal bureaucracies compete with each other is not good. That's not good but then you know we're caught in the middle and it's our work. I mean it was built to store water for irrigation period. And it's a mess in unfortunately we can't seem to take a look at what's really happened here and say boy you know in twenty years of more water more water more waters. We haven't saved a single salmon nor have we saved single sucker so okay you can help manage the government. We're all here's all that's all we need to do well. He should've said so scott. I'm here out in illinois Former swamp land is what we are farming. We drained it. And you know. now we have The corn belt. Basically this lake out there. I mean it was a lake and you drained it and they drained to farm like you said because the country needed food. At what point do you think in history did that mindset. Shift to where you know. This is for the production of feeding our country to Man this is bad for the environment. you know i. I guess when people started to food for granted you know. I mean when you go back to it. The functionality of the product is still an amazing thing and it still is doing the job that it was intended to do and we're taking care of their six wildlife. Refuges that are here that are part of this reclamation project. And they're still here. They're just void of water at this point right because they are in in line the adjudication they are behind us in water rights but farmers have always done a good job of making sure that water gets to those refugees. we're the largest concentration of bald eagles in the lower forty eight states in the month of february. Because they come here to make..

klamath lake lakewood national marine fisheries serv illinois scott us
"klamath" Discussed on Resonant Restoration Podcast

Resonant Restoration Podcast

06:35 min | 1 year ago

"klamath" Discussed on Resonant Restoration Podcast

"Occurs well worthwhile. I recently listened to mike bell. Chick from the euro tribe talk about the dam removal process and one of the concerns that he touched on that people bring up is the renewable energy that is potentially being lost by the projects for as you have those hydroelectric dams being taken out but it sounds like pacific for the energy. Generated from those facilities is pretty negligible especially when compared to other potential projects. The power companies can do with wind and solar. Is there anything that you can mentioned on that. I think mike covered that pretty well. The pacific core has been investing in renewable power facilities for quite some time now and is committed to additional transition to renewable olds and they won. They clearly have mitigated the loss of power production from the four dams. They also point out that they're involved in a sixty eight power grid and there is some misconception that the power that's generated on the klamath is us right locally in that area and really not true. It's all part of a very large western power grid right. So i do have one other question for you and if you were to give advice to someone that has a diverse group of stakeholders and getting them all to the table. What what's the best thing you can say. I think what i would say is that we're living in a changing world and relooking at assets that are fifty to a hundred years old and we just have more modern ways to generate sustainable power and at the same time we can open up the river through a significant economic development benefit and i would just call for people who are skeptical about this to continue to attend the meetings that we hold and review materials that were producing those who remain skeptical. I would encourage to make their feelings. Heard and the real decision makers will be a federal energy regulatory commission and the commission holds open meetings from what we've seen seriously takes the input from all parties. And that's really your best way to try to accomplish. Any change that you think would be beneficial to the project. Perfect you guys at the krc have a newsletter that you can subscribe to on the website which gives good updates as there. Any other place can go to collect information. If are interested. We'll wrap certainly our best attempt to keep the public informed. And as i mentioned earlier when there are public hearings. That's a very formal way both to attend and be informed or to contribute to to the discussion right. A is there anything else you'd like to mention. Why still have you here. I think i've covered what i wanted to contribute. And i really appreciate to the questions you've asked and i hope between the two of us. We provided good information for your audience. I appreciate you reaching out to To achieve on this project trump. yes. I've been wanting to talk about the klamath dams for a while now and you guys were very responsive and i really appreciate it awesome. Well thank you. Oh i've enjoyed my time with you all the best and certainly tried to be present when this project starts it is going to happen. When did you say that you're hoping to start. The process the formal there'll be preconstruction activity but deconstruction start said january. One twenty twenty three. And you might find this interesting. We spend three months drawing the reservoirs down then we start the actual deconstruction which all four dams will come down at the same time and the deconstruction will occur over only a six month period. Oh wow it's gonna look like an ant hill that'd be impressive it will. How long do you guys anticipate other restoration activities happening and association. The restoration is a much lengthier. Time period were already started on yet. Were propagating Huge supply of native vegetation that will be used in the restoration but the the restoration activity will play out over about six years. I s that's gonna be interesting to see that as well. It sure will. Yep i. Well thank you again. It was great talking to you most. Welcome thanks you on the day. The music on this podcast was quiet. Fury by the music teller you can find him at the music teller dot com the best way to support. Our podcast is intel like-minded friend or colleague. Human interaction is important. You can also visit our web page at resonant restoration dot com and sign up for our newsletter and find links to our patriots page. You can also find us on social media such as instagram facebook and twitter so stay tuned for resonant restoration and thank you for listening..

january two mike bell twitter facebook fifty instagram three months four dams one trump dot com both six month mike a hundred years about six years Chick klamath sixty eight power
"klamath" Discussed on Resonant Restoration Podcast

Resonant Restoration Podcast

06:35 min | 1 year ago

"klamath" Discussed on Resonant Restoration Podcast

"And the geology makes them unique. Also we've had engineering firms. Environmental engineering firm studying dam removal for the four years that i've been involved and the bureau of reclamation was initially charged with this project in two thousand ten i believe and we've relied on the the studies that they and their sister federal agencies have also been involved. Yeah i think you guys have done a great job of alleviating one of the main concerns. I see from a lot of dam removal projects and that is involving the stakeholders and especially tribes. So i wanna say good job for the work you guys are doing good will thank you. And i want to emphasize. The skill sets that the tribes have and have developed their restoration. Were key redid as good as it gets from what we've seen so were were very pleased to have them in fall in that aspect of the project and the tribes have built up considerable civil construction skill. And we're also pleased to be having them participate in the deconstruction ice. I also wanted to ask. What is the current stakeholder climate. More up river around the klamath area or up in oregon have people. Are people working together. Well there's still a lot of conversations happening. We enjoy considerable support in the oregon area. There's one damn the john. C boyle dam in oregon and we have worked closely primarily with klamath falls in klamath county. The board of commissioners have been supportive of the city is very supportive. We faced concerned by the irrigation community but have worked diligently with them and there's a more cautious support but they are supportive also. Let's get to hear. Can you remind me how many dams are on the klamath. I'll have to do some counting but one seven seven dams on the main stem of the klamath. So this project is aiming to take out as it two or three of them. Four four of the seven okay. Yeah that's that's better than two or three. the dams that remain are all in oregon. One is an irrigation dam. That is in the hands of the bureau of reclamation and they're charged with improving the fish ladder on the keno dam. The other two are right up at upper klamath lake and are the top. One is a water regulating dam and also has hydro capacity and then below at a small hitro. Damn those all have fish ladders or modernize scan nod invoked in our project. Okay that makes sense. Those two are called the link river dams. You got a name for them. I would like to talk about additional concerns that your audience may be interested in. Yeah go for it. You touched on flooding. And we've done extensive leave work on flood analysis and fled mitigation and what's at risk for flood. Damage are just a handful of residential properties. Just below the iron gate dam and we have a number of different plans depending upon what the residences want will move their houses and reestablish them on high ground will flood proof the houses quarter they sit or will purchase the residences for those who want to sell and remove a. And we're we're in very good contact and believe that our plan is is acceptable for the residences. There you touched on silt and management of sylvia's built up behind the dams. We've done extensive study of those deposits and the silts primarily vegetative matter. It's dead. Algae that has accumulated data material is highly mobile. And we're expecting during the draw down of the reservoirs that that so all will mobilize and will end up in the ocean done of steady of ocean currents and feel that it will disperse nice. Yeah i'm sure there's been a lot of studies and he had to look at a lot of potential outcomes. We sure have let me mention one more. And that is the the work we're doing on same in recovery removal of these dams will open about four hundred twenty miles of salmon and steelhead spawning and rearing habitat with this of the largest river restoration project. Both in the country and in the world and were very excited to look forward to the recovery of the species right. Yeah that's an. It's an impressive projects. And i can only imagine how much money that has gone into it. Well significant that's for sure but we believe.

two klamath three four years two thousand Both about four hundred twenty mile oregon One four Four keno dam one john. C boyle dam seven dams upper klamath lake link river seven ten
"klamath" Discussed on Resonant Restoration Podcast

Resonant Restoration Podcast

08:27 min | 1 year ago

"klamath" Discussed on Resonant Restoration Podcast

"Spring is bringing. and it's almost done sprung. Get your based on documentation and order. Do these things well in delineations critter reports If you're in the appropriate window whatever look for plants for critters. Don't skirt by without knowing what is out there. The flowers will appreciate it and so will i. I had a great conversation. jim root. Who is the president of the klamath river renewal corporation and but first. Let's look at some history behind the klamath so these dams have created substantial impact to the hookah karuk klamath and europe communities the dams are planned for removal and those include top co one cop co two iron gate and jc boil. Jc boy is in oregon and other ones are in california. These are all hydroelectric facilities. There are under the ownership pacific core. The dam removal would be the largest dam removal project in the world. But let's back up a bit or a lot or a little and a lot as rewind the setting in a trajectory reference restoration. Time machine thing. So what led to where we are by eighteen. Fifty five settlers inundated the area due to the gold rush logging mining. You know all those types of activities by eighteen seventy it is said that the populations of indigenous people on the klamath had declined by seventy five percent in one thousand nine hundred six. The first canal relates the klamath irrigation. Project you start supplying farmers with irrigation water and farmland in the klamath basin. This led to about two hundred and twenty five thousand acres of rains. Land being transformed into active farmland copco one and copco two or constructed starting in nineteen eighteen. Jc boyle was constructed in nineteen fifty eight and iron gate in one thousand nine hundred sixty four by the thirties. Euro tribal members were banned from fishing and nineteen seventy eight. The supreme court of california upheld the ban on fishing one year later the supreme court upheld eight thousand nine hundred seventy four decision that the tribes were entitled to fifty percent of harvestable salmon. I imagine tensions were still high as there. Were no possible way that the same number of salmon would be seen anymore compared to those historical numbers considering the major losses the habitat and other impacts from nearby logging roadways development. And all the other things that go along with our ill-suited conception of progress over the last hundred years in two thousand two things get heated including the water temperature. We saw the largest salmon die off in the western united states and september. about thirty. Four thousand fish died and some counts. Estimated at over seventy thousand adult chinook salmon the cause according to a report by us fish and wildlife service and then it was due to water diversions to the climate basin during drought years. The high temperatures in the water created conditions leading to gill rot disease and these fish perish before they're able to reproduce so now that you have a little bit of background i encourage you to look the klamath up more now. Let's hear from jim to get started. Can you introduce yourself and tell us a little bit about the k. R. c. a. Yes sean on jammed route. I'm serving as the app. President of the klamath river renewal corporation were five. Oh one c. Three nonprofit corporation formed by a large group of stakeholders the stakeholders negotiated a settlement regarding the klamath river. Hydro electric projects and that settlement will result in the demolition of the dams and the restoration of that reach of the river. Our corporation was formed to accomplish that project. And so how did you get. Started with the krc or the klamath. In general. i began quite early on. I have a cattle ranch in the wood river valley. The river is one of the upper tributaries of the klamath river. We in the year. Two thousand two we encountered a curtailment in irrigation for the whole basin of the clam and i felt like sites were so polarized regarding the the water shutdown that i wanted to become involved and see if i could use some of my rotary. Med skills to help negotiate a settlement in a fair result for all the stakeholders in those water issues shaun. I've been at this a long tac. Yeah i bet. That's great though to see develop this far. I'm sure there was a lot of interesting back and forth in conversations through the early stages anyway and probably continuing to this day. That is correct. The upper basin water issues. Although the work that i did help result in a subtle hint for water allocation settlement required. An act of congress to enact and congress failed to act on the settlement twitch. Everybody regrets now but with that we still advani issues in that upper basin area the Hydro settlement agreement remained alive though Number of us were appointed by principles stakeholders to sit on the board of that corporation. Back to your original question. I was appointed by governor kate brown to serve on the board. Oh great so okay. I'm kind of interested how. How does the political climate kind of factor into the process of the dam. Removal is their dc a lot of changes with presidential turnover. Or does that even matter. It's somewhat tangentially related. The federal government is one of the stakeholders in the subtle on through the app department of interior and commerce and so we have to pay attention to the politics at the national level. The actual activity in the federal government is principally centered with the federal energy regulatory commission which is an independent body and other than their commissioners being appointed by the president. We we really respond to the regulations of this independent commission. Right that makes sense recently. I've heard quite a few news stories about hurdles. You guys have gotten past including the question of liability. For as i understand it wanted pacificorp hold onto that liability and now it is going to be assumed by the k r c and a combination of the oregon and california. Is that correct. Yes yes that's correct. This came up via the transfer of the licenses for the dams which are currently held by pacific core. The corporation filed an application to have the license transferred to the k r c after lengthy consideration by for for fell that the single purpose nature of our corporation left some.

fifty percent two thousand california seventy five percent one thousand klamath river federal energy regulatory comm jim september Fifty five settlers Four thousand fish Two thousand oregon congress one year later thirties kate brown western united states two things klamath basin
Record Female Leaders, Salmon Restoration and Rapid City Boarding School

Native America Calling

03:52 min | 1 year ago

Record Female Leaders, Salmon Restoration and Rapid City Boarding School

"This is national native news. I'm antonio gonzales. The northern cheyenne tribe in southeast montana inaugurated its newly elected officials tuesday which includes a record number of female leaders. Yellowstone public. radio's caitlyn nicholas reports from laimbeer. The northern cheyenne tribe made history. This month when tribal members elected all women to the positions of tribal president vice president and into each of the five on the tribal council after prayers and speeches. Each woman was sworn into office. While hundreds watched from socially distanced chairs cars in the parking lot and online promote i will promote in On protect the interests donna fisher. The new president of northern. cheyenne says. She's anxious to get to work. We have women. We will work together to get things will always be on the same page but we will work together to get things done. And this is what the people have voted us and therefore there are now seven. Women says ten seat council. I'm caitlyn nicholas. Leaders of the euro can creek tribes the states of california and oregon and a damn owner announced an agreement tuesday to provide additional resources and support to advance salmon restoration project addresses declines in fish populations and improves river health. The agreement with the tribes states pacific core and the klamath river renewal corporation describes how the parties will implement a two thousand sixteen agreement which sets terms for the removal of four dams on the klamath river. Karuk chairman buster out of berry. I'm looking forward very much to having the best day as chairman of the tribe. When i can say that we have restored those fish in that we can Enjoy those bonding times with our children when we go to the river and and we can put food on the table together. Plans include navigating the final regulatory approvals to allow the project to begin in twenty twenty two with dam removal in twenty twenty. Three federal approval is still needed. The rapid city council has approved a resolution to resolve a land dispute over more than one thousand acres on the west side of the city and old indian boarding school. South dakota public broadcasting's richard two bulls reports the council approved the historic resolution with the nine to one vote it's a step to rectify history and acknowledged the shameful legacy of the rapid city indian boarding school. There was very little public comment on mondays. Council meeting one person did not support the resolution saying it wasn't clear who represents the native community in this effort troy fairbanks on the other hand agreed that the city council should approve the resolution on principle alone. I want to commend you. Each and every one of you for actually taking a look at what is right through city council. The only ones i've ever stood up for us even even thought about talking about the native indian community that has tremendous an initial vote on the resolution was tabled two weeks ago council members had doubts and questions about it before their vote on monday. City attorney joe land dean said the resolution creates a pat to resolve the underlying issues. This is not legally binding. It is an intent to come up with hopefully in agreement that when we enter into it will be legally binding. It outlines the parameters broadly but yeah we will need to come back with a specific plan. The bureau of indian affairs which operates under the department of interior has the final decision on these parcels of land. The ba wants the rapid city native american community to work with the city to move forward. I'm richard tools and antonio gonzales

Northern Cheyenne Caitlyn Nicholas Antonio Gonzales Laimbeer Donna Fisher The Klamath River Karuk Rapid City Council Yellowstone Cheyenne Montana Troy Fairbanks Salmon Oregon Berry City Council California South Dakota Joe Land Dean
"klamath" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

01:55 min | 2 years ago

"klamath" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"Of the Klamath project which is a U. S. government operated water works that steers runoff water from the tearing cascades to more than two hundred thousand acres of farmland is running low on supplies in the local Robert water agencies say that they may not have water to send to farmers beyond and next month you know a lot of reservoirs are doing just fine yeah I know it's interesting I wonder what is going on with that particular we're gonna have to dig deeper into that minimizing right as at U. S. project so I'm not just here in California where there are remains many many questions about the billion dollar mask deal with the Chinese car company right that was a complete disaster we still don't know all the details on that I'm not just here turns out Associated Press I did some research states give few details on billions spent on virus supplies soci to press survey fifty states phone a Hodge podge of public information about the purchase of masks gloves gowns other hard to get equipment for medical emergency workers I think you know and and we've had so many media companies laying off so many journalists this is when you need it journalism defined or all those public dollars are going well that's public information it's taxpayer money to be able to find out where the stuff is going in without people digging into this stuff I will assure you of this government officials are not going to just hand over the information now they are not in your mind you have to fight them tooth and nail yeah you do I mean they're just not going to tell you how they're spending their money exactly so that I mean the freedom of information act or not they they tried a whole lot of that information or anything they can to hold on to them California churches allowed to hold services again on a very limited basis so what will that look like on Sunday Amanda Carroll joins us live with what a local church leader told her that's coming up in just three minutes stay connected to some businesses are allowed to open in California stay in touch in fact it may somehow rage on the efforts to reopen California anytime you need an update will.

California Amanda Carroll Klamath Robert water
Tribe Gives Personhood To Klamath River

Environment: NPR

03:29 min | 2 years ago

Tribe Gives Personhood To Klamath River

"A native American tribe has granted person hood to a river in northern California making it the first known river in North America to have the same legal legal rights as a human at least under tribal law the your tribe based near the southern border of Oregon conferred the new status on the Klamath River for years water management Richmond Systems and climate change have led to lower water flows in the Klamath and fewer salmon one of the main food sources. We're joined now by your tribe general counsel Cordola's who is also a tribal member. Welcome to the program. I agree. Thank you for having me. What does the status of person hood mean for river what it means is it gives the right to the river to exist to flourish and to naturally evolve and a right to a stable climate free free from human caused climate change impacts. What that means is that anytime the rivers hurt for example. There's a toxic pollutant pollutant that is gets into the water of the river we could then bring cause of action against that polluter to protect the river so would New York tribunal to take legal action against polluters of the river further upstream beyond their territory well that gets into some jurisdictional issues but we certainly would make the argument what prompted this. Why did they decide to take this action. One the euro people have always lived along the banks. Thanks of the Klamath River and in our creation story the Creator told us that as long as we lived in a balance with the natural world world we would never want for anything and we live that way for a very long time of course after the invasion in the eighteen hundreds in in development occurred outside of our control. That balance has been thrown off. I understand that the situation when the salmon though has really prompted a lot out of concern. Can you explain a little bit about what's going on and how it's been going this year. The salmon runs are the lowest they've ever been even this year. It was anticipated that the returning salmon runs. We're going to be strong but they never showed up. We don't know where they are. We have been doing all all we can to protect the river and you know working within existing legal frameworks and it's not enough we should note that this is not the first body of water to be granted. Person Hood Toledo Ohio voters approved a referendum to grab person hood for Lake Erie in February although that is being challenged lynched. Is this an idea. That's gaining traction. Ah Beyond Native Americans absolutely the New Zealand government granted rights of a river in really what I think this is a reflection of a change of societal values so we're in a climate crisis and we need new tools tools to respond to that crisis and in this country right now corporations have rates as a person and that's because historically our country valued commerce and so I think it's a logical next step in this era of climate change to give the same kind of of legal recognition to the natural environment and to nature. That's Amy Cordola's. She's the general counsel for the Europe tribe in Northern California. Thank you so

Klamath River General Counsel Klamath Cordola California North America Oregon Richmond Systems New Zealand Government Toledo Northern California Lake Erie Europe New York Ohio
This is Oregon's Best Kept Secret

Killer Innovations

01:24 min | 3 years ago

This is Oregon's Best Kept Secret

"If you're looking for an amazing vacation or just a weekend getaway, you won't do better than this gorgeous Pacific northwest location. Klamath county is really one of those unique vacation spot is really as yet undiscovered here. In southern Oregon were nestled up in the cascade mountain range, we've got over three hundred days of sunshine here. It's a beautiful area of just trees and lakes and rivers, and we have a cute little town Klamath falls, Oregon, what you really should see when you're out here in Klamath county is crater lake national park. It's it's the deepest lake in North America and the clearest lake in the world. It's nine thousand nine hundred forty three feet deep one hundred and forty three feet of clarity. It's conic. It's one of those you have to see it to appreciate it. The photos. Don't do it Justice. Now lava beds is the other icon thing to see national monument over seven hundred seven hundred and fifty caves. That were formed when lava came to the surface, and then retraced its staff itself effectively leaving caves, these some of these caves are miles long, and they're not all of even been discovered or lords. It's really a lot of fun.

Klamath County Crater Lake National Park Oregon Klamath Pacific North America Nine Thousand Nine Hundred For Three Hundred Days Forty Three Feet
"klamath" Discussed on Herald & News Basin Views

Herald & News Basin Views

02:21 min | 3 years ago

"klamath" Discussed on Herald & News Basin Views

"On the iphone, and you just everything is available to people now for maybe not free, but really really close to it. If you've got a cell phone, you can make a movie you can download editing software for free. You can put something together. And you can really start thinking about what your voice is. And to me Klamath falls was a huge part of that voice. And and experiencing everything the basin has to offer. We grew up Klamath lake. We were on lake shore drive. So every. Summer. I was swimming in the lake every day. I was water skiing. We were camping we were travelling out to places and really experiencing what the community was about and walking to our neighbor to the neighbor kids to to play and everybody on lakeshore. You know, we would walk a quarter of a mile or half a mile to get an spend time with people and it wasn't. It was different. You know, it wasn't electronic devices in our hands all the time. It wasn't. I mean, we love watching TV. Of course, we loved watching TV, but there weren't five million programs onto watch. And and so it was just spending a lot of time with people and outside that really of shaped. I think who I am. And even now, I think it's funny that I live in Los Angeles because I'm not. I don't feel like I'm suited to Los Angeles. All that. Well, I still like being outside. I feel like I'm a pretty down to earth person. And and so when I come back when we can go camping or when I can go out with a dog. It's a really it's a really great feeling to be able to to be outside. But Los Angeles has great weather. So it's easy to be outside all the time in Los Angeles. So I know you haven't necessarily done very much filming around the Klamath basin. But how is the Klamath basin? Perhaps influenced your filmmaking process. Interesting. I think I think it has been I think growing up especially in the Klamath basin. It was very much about. A lot of different kind of people coming together. And whether we were in high school in theater, I think about my time in high school and in every high school there these different clicks. And I I was talking to my husband the other Dan that you know, when I was in high school, there weren't any mean girls like like that whole movie about the mean girls, and everything you hear about these mean girls, they didn't exist. The everybody just kind of was pretty welcoming to everybody else..

Los Angeles Klamath lake Klamath Klamath falls Dan
"klamath" Discussed on Herald & News Basin Views

Herald & News Basin Views

02:21 min | 3 years ago

"klamath" Discussed on Herald & News Basin Views

"On the iphone, and you just everything is available to people now for maybe not free, but really really close to it. If you've got a cell phone, you can make a movie you can download editing software for free. You can put something together. And you can really start thinking about what your voice is. And to me Klamath falls was a huge part of that voice. And and experiencing everything the basin has to offer. We grew up Klamath lake. We were on lake shore drive. So every. Summer. I was swimming in the lake every day. I was water skiing. We were camping we were travelling out to places and really experiencing what the community was about and walking to our neighbor to the neighbor kids to to play and everybody on lakeshore. You know, we would walk a quarter of a mile or half a mile to get an spend time with people and it wasn't. It was different. You know, it wasn't electronic devices in our hands all the time. It wasn't. I mean, we love watching TV. Of course, we loved watching TV, but there weren't five million programs onto watch. And and so it was just spending a lot of time with people and outside that really of shaped. I think who I am. And even now, I think it's funny that I live in Los Angeles because I'm not. I don't feel like I'm suited to Los Angeles. All that. Well, I still like being outside. I feel like I'm a pretty down to earth person. And and so when I come back when we can go camping or when I can go out with a dog. It's a really it's a really great feeling to be able to to be outside. But Los Angeles has great weather. So it's easy to be outside all the time in Los Angeles. So I know you haven't necessarily done very much filming around the Klamath basin. But how is the Klamath basin? Perhaps influenced your filmmaking process. Interesting. I think I think it has been I think growing up especially in the Klamath basin. It was very much about. A lot of different kind of people coming together. And whether we were in high school in theater, I think about my time in high school and in every high school there these different clicks. And I I was talking to my husband the other Dan that you know, when I was in high school, there weren't any mean girls like like that whole movie about the mean girls, and everything you hear about these mean girls, they didn't exist. The everybody just kind of was pretty welcoming to everybody else..

Los Angeles Klamath lake Klamath Klamath falls Dan
Linda Tepper of Crater Lake Klamath Regional Airport

Herald

11:29 min | 4 years ago

Linda Tepper of Crater Lake Klamath Regional Airport

"The heralded news news learn is now. Empowering the community. So the news, your news now with falls, Oregon. Podcast, empowering the community and serving mclamb basin. This is the URL the news facing these top. Readings in welcome to base and views a herald news podcast featuring interviews with local experts discussing issues important to the climate basin. I'm Cridland key with the herald news this week. We are joined by Linda tapper business manager for the crater lake claim at the regional airport here to discuss a wide range of issues related to aviation and the climate basin. Linda, thank you for taking time out of your day. Does to join us in glad to be here. We will get into all kinds of aviation related topics, but I, I have to ask about the airport name itself because how often each day do you have to correct people? Because I people just called the claim with airport, right? But it's the crater lake regional airport. It is. And when I first started with the airport, it was the Klamath falls international airport. So then we dropped in became the Klamath falls airport just for concise purposes. And then a number of years ago, we actually went to the crater lake Klamath regional airports which is quite the mouthful, but it was done too tight of tie in with a major attraction. We have. Hearing Klamath county, which is the crater lake national park and to gain some additional tie ins and traffic. Hopefully, as people looked at planning to come visit that park, how they would get here and be able to use the airport to do so. Well, before we delve into issues related to the airport ongoing right now, I always like to get a little bit of background on our guests. So could you tell us a little bit more about who Linda Tupper is? Sure. So I grew up for the most part in Oregon. Moved here when I was not yet to. So I'm almost an native Oregonian. I grew up in the Willamette Valley went to Oregon state university and then on to Portland state university where I got my MBA degree and then moved down to Klamath falls in ninety five. Oddly enough. My background is in animal science as an undergraduate degree. And then I have the my business administration degree from Portland state. So I was looking for a job in agriculture and unfortunately, I didn't find one, but the airport department had a department. Pretorial position coming open and my background. My father was a commercial airlines pilot for United Airlines for thirty five plus years. So aviation is kind of second nature to our family. So seemed to good fit and I applied for it and received the position. And I've been there ever since enjoying it immensely. It's very exciting field always something new going on, and I enjoy interacting with the public in all aspects of aviation that we encounter at our airport from generally VA, Asian to usually commercial aviation and military as well. We'll some of that roundabout stuff. I, my major in college was earn article science and so I- studied aviation now, Emma journalist, you started animal science and now you're in aviation, so however it works out, right. So how did you go from animal science into being involved with the Asian industry? So like as when I moved down here to Klamath falls, the airport department position came open. And it was seemed a good fit for me with the background. My family has an aviation and I recognize that probably for myself, it's a certain skill set that I enjoy using. So it didn't matter the industry, whether it's agricultural animal science or aviation or even medical. It was a certain skill set that I enjoyed using, which is organizational. Business skills, communication, writing, and things like that. So I sort of happily took to the aviation field, and as I got more involved in it really expanded that different types of duties that I was doing at the airport in became the business manager at that time. So what does your role as a business manager entail for a public airport for our airports since way are as small department. There is a staff of six. There's the airport director, the operations manager myself, the business manager, and then we have three operations maintenance positions that oversee the airfield upkeep. So for myself, I tell people that I pretty much manage all the paper that comes through the office. So everything from answering the phones to doing accounts payable, counts receivable to managing grants to public relations marketing. Those are all items that I take on on a daily basis. I'm also. Charge of some of the regulatory items that we are in sponsor for doing at the airport when it comes to the FAA for annual reports to meet our regulatory or grant assurances that we have through the FAA's. So a lot of paperwork sounds

Portland FAA Cossiga Klamath Falls Traffic Manager Oregon Doug Cunningham Konami United States Fedex Clemson L. A. N. C. Business Manager BOB Ness Penn Crater Lake Klamath Phil Batt
Jesse Widener of Klamath Film

Herald

05:40 min | 4 years ago

Jesse Widener of Klamath Film

"Heralded news news learn is now. Empowering the community base, slow the news, your news with falls, Oregon. Empowering the community and serving mclamb basin. This is the the news facing us pop. Greetings and welcome to base views heralded news podcast featuring interviews with local experts discussing issues important to the climate basin. I'm kirtland key with the herald news this week. We're joined by Jesse Widener Klamath film here to discuss one of my favorite topics, movies, upcoming events, such as the annual climate independent film festival and a special screening with a very special guest coming soon. Jesse, thank you so much for taking the time out of your schedule to join us here. Well, we will get into everything that Clem film entails and just a little bit. But I always like to start these things off a little bit of background on our guests themselves. Can you educate us a little bit more about who Jesse Widener? Sure. So I've actually got a fairly wide arts back there used to work as a draftsman architect California for about seven years before I moved up here, I've studied music composition, do some drawing some writing. I practiced photography for several years before I started getting into the film thing. So the film thing actually really comes from being the sort of great medium. It's an amalgamation of all these other disciplines that you. You can do kind of throw all these different dispirit interests into one thing. So what was the first video project that you worked on? The first project was probably the first project I did with Klamath film, and it was on one of those old. I don't say hold the nineties hand held nineties early two, thousands of Devi Cam with the digital video tape. And one of the first things I learned was that the screen on it is not as it shows brighter than what the actual film was. So I was exposing to the screen and when I actually took the footage home to work on, it was so dark. I had to crank everything is still looked nasty and black, and it was horrible. I'm from Hollywood is well, I grew up in Eugene, but I spent a long time in Hollywood and those Devi cameras there fuzzy because when I was working on a lot of projects, some of those cameras were fifty thousand eight hundred thousand dollars now that everything's gone digital. They're selling those things on EBay for one hundred bucks. People can't get rid of them. Yeah, yeah, ours, ours is more of a consumer grade one though that we were. We're using it was, you know, like something you'd pick up Fred Meyer or whatnot, and it just wasn't that hot and me not knowing what I was doing with it was even worse. So well, one thing that I have found fascinating being involved in film is the number of people like yourselves that got involved in simply by doing, didn't have formal Bagger. There are film schools that people can go to, but lots of times people just get involved when it for the sake of having an idea grabbing a camera and giving a try and kind of learning as you go. Right. That's a funny thing because I think you know, obviously the film industry is still young, maybe one hundred years, old hundred twenty years old. Just you know, it's not like painting or something like that, and it's been a master apprentice industry for a long, long time. You know, you start working on a film as gopher basically, and work your way up. And then at some point you did start getting into the film school stuff with that sort of seemed to be the advice path go to films go, go to USC, go to southern California, whatever the case maybe and then it not in the last probably twenty years with the advance. In technology with the internet, having all of these YouTube videos, and there's several channels that teach you how to do all these filmmaking techniques or whatnot. I think it's really democratized and commodities that industry where you can just from your house, you'll get a five hundred dollar camera. It's amazing compared to anything from, you know, ten twenty years ago and then sit on YouTube for your to do stuff. You know, the technology's advanced, but what's really fascinating to me as just a fan of film in general. I love going back to the old silent film era, the little black Charlie Chaplin Buster Keaton and stuff like that. And you look at the things that they were doing. They were inventing how films are made then. And while the technology may have changed the method for creating film really hasn't and over the course of a century, right? Yeah. The structure is generally isn't actually, I have a slight complaint about structure of fill. You know, when when film for start out, you're talking late, eighteen hundreds early nineteen hundreds and nobody really knew what to do with it. You know there was this massive creativity of, you know. What? What wild things can I do? You know what weird effects can I do? How can I freak people out that never seen something on screen like this and somewhere in the teens, the nineteen teens. It's sort of took on this the purpose of films to tell a story. And I think it's really been pigeonholed in that one hundred years. You know, it's it's like saying the purpose of painting before there was photography. The purpose of painting was to be as realistic as possible and the medium geared towards that realism until in the eighteen hundreds of the camera came out and they realize somebody could just snap a picture. So you know what was the point of painting now that's when you saw painting expand into, you know, pression ISM and surrealism and Dada. ISM cubism and Jackson Pollock jap- technique and all this kind of wild stuff. And

Klamath Klamath Falls Oregon Portland Ralph Dr Ralph L Las Vegas Writer Eccles New York Siskiyou County Tula Lake James Ivory San Francisco Steve Buscemi Jesse Widener Reisen
Electric cattle fence blamed for massive California wildfire

KCBS Radio Morning News

01:37 min | 4 years ago

Electric cattle fence blamed for massive California wildfire

"Up sixty four points the sp five hundred is up seventeen you're listening to npr from k q e d news i'm brian watt state fire officials say the cause of the county fire in napa and yolo counties was an improperly installed electric livestock fence the massive wildfire burned more than ninety thousand acres in a mostly rural area it's now eighty nine percent contained meanwhile the klamath on fire that killed one person in crossed over the oregon border is now seventy percent contained here's cal fire's gabriel lauderdale on the recent progress calmer winds temperatures although they've been hot haven't been as hot better humidity recovery's a night so that's enabled firefighters are out there on the line to control the fire lauderdale says cal fire expects to fully contain the klamath bonfire by july i fifteen bart is making final plans for a major change in its early morning service dan brekke explains the impact on thousands of predawn commuters the transit agency will begin work early next year on a major seismic upgrade to the transbay tube to give crews extra hours to work the start of early morning service will be pushed back from four am to five am about three thousand people ride bart during that first hour of service and edits median oakland today the bart board of directors will hear plans for an express bus network to get those early commuters from the east bay to downtown san francisco daly city in san francisco international airport the transit agency.

County fire caused by improperly installed electric fencing

Morning Edition

02:09 min | 4 years ago

County fire caused by improperly installed electric fencing

"Public safety issues won't be easy this will require a lot of patience it will require a lot of work and it will require a lot of prayer would breed doesn't have is a lot of time after she fills out the remainder of the late mayor ed lease term freed we'll be back on the ballot in november two thousand nineteen that leaves just sixteen months fulfil or at least make serious headway on promises of clearing the streets of ten encampments and building thousands of units of housing i think she has hit the ground running that's university of san francisco political science professor james taylor she's given plenty of opportunity to demonstrate her capacities as a governing executive and if she does that i think voters would reward her with potentially a decade of leadership in the city of san francisco which would definitely her legacy in the city of san francisco a victory next year and again in twenty twenty three would make breed the city's longest serving mayor since the nineteen forties for the california report i'm guy marzorati after several weeks of rapidly spreading wildfires throughout california the fire seemed to be slowing dramatically the county fire in your low in napa counties which scorched more than ninety thousand acres is now about ninety percent contains we learned yesterday that an electric fence likely caused that fire further north the klamath and fire is sixty five percent contained as of this morning cal fire spokesman gabriel lauderdale says the fire has been burning in some really remote and hilly areas in many cases if we're going to use those irs they have to actually build their own roads just to get out to the fire to build those containment life now of course hot weather makes it more difficult to fight fires and the fire scenes you can often see whole firefighting teams head to their engines to take water breaks where they fill up on fluids before heading back out to the fire scenes now the heat is not just something for firefighters or old people or young people to worry about as cary five will tells us us healthy adults can get.

Professor Executive San Francisco Klamath Gabriel Lauderdale James Taylor California Napa Cary Ninety Thousand Acres Sixty Five Percent Ninety Percent Sixteen Months
US soon to leapfrog Saudis, Russia as top oil producer

Ron St. Pierre

02:14 min | 4 years ago

US soon to leapfrog Saudis, Russia as top oil producer

"News the united states will soon be the world's biggest oil producer believe it or not the us energy information administration forecasting that the us will soon pass both saudi arabia and russia to become the world's biggest oil producer for the first time since the nineteen seventies the forecast says that the us oil output will grow next year to eleven point eight million barrels a day which would put the us in a global top spot that could change however if saudi arabia or russia or both increased their production of course the increase in us oil output has been driven over the last decade by revolutionary changes in production including hydraulic fracturing also known as fracking and horizontal drilling imagine that us is set to become the world's biggest oil producer told you yesterday that crews and northern nevada were battling the largest wildfire in the country it's only taken the martin fire a few days to explode to nearly four hundred and four forty thousand acres it's fueled by hot dry conditions they're the fire in fact is so huge that the smoke plume can be seen from space the good news fire officials are reporting progress and it's nearly fifty percent contained now but the bad news officials say the fire is the fault of human beings investigators say the suspect they suspect the fourth of july campers started a massive blaze there imagine that while there's progress in nevada cruz in california they're still fighting more than a dozen wildfires there the massive county fire and napa and you'll lo counties is the state's biggest at scorched over ninety thousand acres but is now eighty three percent contained it's really ruined wine country to in the meantime a fire near klamath on the border with oregon has burned over thirty six thousand acres there in one person actually died from the fire last week and three firefighters were injured but who gets the booby prize it's colorado the centennial state is home to the highest number of wildfires currently burning across the country forty seven wildfires currently burning in colorado it's twenty minutes after six newsradio nine twenty four seven fm traffic and weather on the tents from the courtesy hyundai drive courtesy.

United States Saudi Arabia Russia Nevada Cruz California Klamath Oregon Colorado Nevada Napa Hyundai Four Forty Thousand Acres Thirty Six Thousand Acres Eight Million Barrels Ninety Thousand Acres Eighty Three Percent Twenty Minutes Fifty Percent
Why California fire season is off to worst start in 10 years

Larry O'Connor

01:34 min | 4 years ago

Why California fire season is off to worst start in 10 years

"You were education says it's looking into the request but it may be difficult to work in the next school year schedule more acreage has already burned from wildfires in the western us this year than the ten year everage the ten year annual average of acres scorched by wildfires is just under two and a half million already this year nearly three million acres have burned friday saw the first fatality of this fire year in northern california the klamath on fire which is now stretched into oregon killed one person injured three firefighters crews of able to contain about a third of that fire elsewhere the holiday fire in santa barbara county destroyed twenty homes no injuries or deaths that was held to a one hundred acres colorado's largest fire the one hundred seven thousand plus acre spring creek fire nearly three quarters contained but heat and winds could change that jim roope los angeles sarah box says it will pull all plastic straws out of all stores worldwide and less than two years signing primarily the environmental threat the plastic straws create an oceans the iconic coffee shop chain becomes the largest food and beverage company operating globally to do so starbucks says it's making available astrologers live at eight thousand stores in the us and canada for certain drinks they estimate the switch will eliminate more than one billion plastic straws from the waste stream every year starbucks says cold beverages in which has straws typically included make up about half of the drinks it sells i'm scott carr money ahead of the close the dow's up three hundred twenty points the sp five hundred.

California Klamath Oregon Santa Barbara County Sarah Box United States Canada Colorado Jim Roope Starbucks Scott Carr Ten Year Three Million Acres One Hundred Acres Three Quarters Two Years
Washington, Thailand and Npr discussed on Morning Edition

Morning Edition

04:29 min | 4 years ago

Washington, Thailand and Npr discussed on Morning Edition

"Live from npr news in washington i'm nora raum divers in northern thailand have begun the process of rescuing twelve schoolboys and their coach from the cave where they've been trapped since june twenty third michael sullivan reports from shanghai that are thirties were worrying their window of opportunity was closing with heavy rains coming they could flood the cave even more the local governor says the operation began at ten a m local time that the divers taking the boys out or a mixed group of foreign specialists and tie navy seals and that the first boy probably wouldn't be brought to the entrance to the cave for at least eleven hours which means it's going to take a while to get them all out and the rain is starting already michael sullivan reporting from thailand workers are preparing to lift a sunken boat off the coast of thailand today it went down a storm thursday near the island of pook cat killing at least forty one people mostly tourists from china at least fourteen people are still missing secretary of state mike palm peyot says he believes that north korea will stay true to its commitment to dismantle its nuclear program even after north korea suggested it's will could falter npr's elise hugh reports the divisions opened up after two days of highlevel talks npr young pompeo and his north korean counterpart discussed how to implement the broad outlines of an agreement made between president trump and kim jong un last month but differences emerged soon after pompeo left pyongyang north korea said the united states betrayed the spirit of last month's agreement by demanding complete verifiable and irreversible denuclearization north korea favors a phased drawdown speaking to reporters sunday pompeo emphasized kim jong un did commit to denuclearize in june steel i'm hopeful that we will find a path forward to achieve that commitment that chairman kim himself made personally to president trump and then to the world the secretary of state will head next to vietnam elise hugh npr news soul in california wildfires are burning from the northern border with oregon to the southern border with mexico q e d john's sepulveda's reports record hot weather is hampering firefighting efforts throughout many areas of california the son cannot be seen because of the thick haze from smoke that fills the sky over the heat from the sun can definitely be felt as temperatures in many places are reaching triple digit record highs near the oregon border high temperatures have mixed with dry forest to fuel a fire that covers more than thirty square miles the klamath and fire as it's called has killed at least one person on the central coast near santa barbara evacuations were ordered in at least twenty homes have been destroyed by wildfire and here in san diego county a wildfire jumped a fire line and burned down eighteen structures in mobile home park in all three areas of the state whether is expected to call during the coming week for npr news i'm john sepulveda's in san diego this is npr news authorities in japan say several million people are out of their homes after torrential rains caused floods and landslides at least fifty four people died and dozens are still missing some roads have been closed and rail service was suspended for a time and more rain is expected today and tomorrow the government of guatemala has given the survivors of the communities hardest hit by the june third volcanic eruption just a few more days to search for the remains of their loved ones and as maria martin reports the official death count has risen officials statistics in what the malas say fatalities from the volcanic eruption are up to one hundred thirteen with three more victims identified the official search for victims of the eruption of the volcano call forego had been called off several weeks ago the what the modern disaster area since the area is too risky and still vulnerable to all chemic activity but in the hardest hit communities have los look this rodeo townspeople continue to search for remains of their loved ones they say we'll keep looking even if the government doesn't help as they work mostly on their own or with other volunteers to fight whatever remains of their families the government has given them only until wednesday of next week to do the sad job of digging through the ash and destruction for npr news marie martin and i'm thinking what the mullahs the leaders of ethiopia eritrea met today for the first time in nearly twenty years in the capital of eritrea the visit from the.

Washington Thailand NPR Thirty Square Miles Eleven Hours Twenty Years Two Days
Derek Van Dam, Puerto Rico and California Oregon Border discussed on Bloomberg Businessweek

Bloomberg Businessweek

01:56 min | 4 years ago

Derek Van Dam, Puerto Rico and California Oregon Border discussed on Bloomberg Businessweek

"For the caribbean california wildfire claims a life i'm christopher cruise barrel is headed toward the caribbean now a category one hurricane in its path the islands of dominika guadeloupe martinique meteorologist derek van dam is closely tracking the storm but we do expect it to maintain its strength as it approaches the windward islands but then it starts to interact with some upper level shear and that means it'll will help disorganized storm even further once it enters the eastern caribbean waters all of our computer models keep itself of puerto rico but could they experienced tropical storm force winds watts definitely a possibility eight thousand acre klamath on fire on the california oregon border is claimed the life of person was found dead inside a burn building the fire said to be just five percent contained and threatening three hundred homes near hornbook california letters from the teenage soccer team trapped in a cave in thailand are being sent to families through rest divers ferrying food and supplies to the trump team and their coach correspondent david mckenzie is outside the cave where some of the letters to parents are being shared i'm fine the weather is quite cold don't forget from pugh and that's his nickname it says don't worry dad mom have you as just disappeared for only two weeks with a number of deadline set by federal judge to reunite immigrant families with their children the trump administration is asking for more time in brownsville texas correspondent miguel marquez a tuesday deadline for reuniting immigrant families with their detained children under age five is an issue by a federal judges order the administration has to put detain parents in regular contact with their kids parents and lawyers representing them say most have had at least one phone call some speak regularly others not at all and this late word the north korean foreign ministry has just said talks the past few days with us secretary of state mike pompeo were regrettable i'm christopher cruise.

Derek Van Dam Puerto Rico California Oregon Border Thailand David Mckenzie Pugh Miguel Marquez North Korean Foreign Ministry Christopher Cruise California Caribbean Soccer Brownsville Texas Mike Pompeo Eight Thousand Acre Five Percent Two Weeks
Judge largely rules for California in 'sanctuary state' fight

Sonoma County's Morning News with Pat Kerrigan

01:53 min | 4 years ago

Judge largely rules for California in 'sanctuary state' fight

"In the eighties for most of the weekend today topping out of eighty four sixty nine on the coast mostly cloudy above us few clouds tonight low fifty two mid eighties for both saturday and sunday with mostly sunny skies round seventy though if you're on the coast and this morning temperatures mid to upper fifties for most of us fifty nine in windsor it's fifty eight degrees in petaluma and fifty eight in santa rosa to six oh seven at k sro in the news a federal judge is rejecting the trump administration's request to block california immigration laws the federal government sued the state in march claiming the california cannot obstruct immigration enforcement efforts bypassing socalled sanctuary laws yesterday's ruling onto laws by us judge in sacramento said the court was not convinced the state laws were intended to interfere with federal immigration enforcement meanwhile the judge put third sanctuary law on hold anna the county fires burning in yellow and napa counties it's now at pardon me eighty eight thousand acres and containment is up to thirty three percent the number of firefighters battling the blaze as of yesterday is increased to more than four thousand and the number of engines fighting the flames now to three hundred forty up from two hundred eighty no injuries have been reported the party fire scheduled to be fully contained by tomorrow now cal fire says we're pushing that back until tuesday and there's another one a fast moving fire in siskiyou county forcing evacuations and the governor has declared a state of emergency they're cal fire says the five thousand acre klamath on fire has destroyed several several structures is threatening more in horn brook a tiny town of about two hundred fifty people blaze broke out thursday around noon and exploded two.

Windsor Petaluma Santa Rosa California Sacramento Horn Brook Napa Siskiyou County Eighty Eight Thousand Acres Thirty Three Percent Fifty Eight Degrees Five Thousand Acre