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Prof. John Flood, Professor of Law and Society at Griffith University, Brisbane, Australia. - burst 01

Scientific Sense

59:58 min | 8 months ago

Prof. John Flood, Professor of Law and Society at Griffith University, Brisbane, Australia. - burst 01

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Please send up to info at scientific sense. Dot Com. And I can be reached at Gil at eappen. Dot Info. My guests today's facade John. WHO's professor of Law and society at Griffith University in Brisbane Australia. He's also adjunct professor of law at Queensland University of Technology and Research Associated University College Under Center for Blockchain Technologies, he who suggests on the Bloomberg professional globalization of law and the technology in law. But come John. Hello. Thank you. Sure. Yeah. So I want to start with one of your recent people, professions and expertise hog machine learning, and blockchain redesigning the landscape of professional knowledge and organization. In invite you say machine learning has entered the world of the professions. The different impacts automation will have huge impacts on the nature of work and society. Engineering architecture and medicine or early and enthusiastic adopters. Other professions especially law at late you say at in some cases with leptons adopters. could you talk about you know sort of the landscape all? Of Law, profession and. They today in terms of opting these technologies. Certainly Louis interesting because it's a very old profession is. Often considered one of the. Original traditional professions along with medicine and the church. And in a sense law has used different kinds of technology might say I mean does it? Based around writing. And then the printing press and So on yet that. It's always being based on a craft. A skill which the individual person is that enables them to do, whatever is quote if you like and. said, there's never been a lot of room for any kind of automation. Certainly, the has been space for using. A people who are not fully qualified as low as about as paralegals, people like that, who will do a lot of repetitive work document checking and things like that and so on. But what will get into now is the situation where automation through machine learning. There's other kinds of artificial intelligence. is able to start constructing documents example contracts. Check dollop a documents for particular clauses and things like that mature they're up to date and this incense is. Replacing now, the kind of work that noise will do. So I think in some ways more more of of the profession of law is gonNA be subject to automation, but distinction I would many because I think it's quite important here is that A lot of what lawyers do. Is actually quite. Active that that that that the drafting contracts overtime or or they're reviewing documents to some sort or another or they're getting through particular. Negotiation. And so you know a lot of it is the same, but they build up the expertise through doing these same kinds of were over and over again and What we're now finding is that instead of having young lawyers coming in and doing what you might call the grunt work of checking documents and going through discovery applications where he goes through the size boxes of evidence to decide. which are the appropriate documents you want the emails, the invoices order, this sort of stuff that is the kind of work which is lending itself to automation. And, and so that his taking away a lot of the work which is used for trading purposes with young lawyers and is just doing it much quicker. will quickly I mean More efficiently in many ways and probably expensive much much expensive a Lotta. This work is being outsourced to you know legal process outsourcing India or Philippines South Africa places like that. So yeah, that's that's right and so in some ways, the group of lawyers who do the work which requires the skill, the judgment. Is Reducing in some ways. That pool is getting smaller. Yeah Yeah it's it's interesting. The the distinction that you make between automation. And in my job and let's call it decision making right which is you know a lot of work in the business side of this. So for example. in the nineties in large pharmaceutical company So you think about you know rnd. People might think it has really complex selection of programs that design of them, portfolio management, risk management, all those decisions. Genuine companies be say well, senior managers with lots of experience and intuition make those decisions really well right and so that's statement would automatically implied that machines can really do much there. But what we find in the mid nineties says that is systematic analysis of data make those decisions. Don't better. Actually, I've Tom to humans humans. Always seem to make decisions. These are typically bonding the decision. So if you go back and look at it, alternative experiment has not been wrong. So we have no date to say it was a good decision at typically. So human scaffold, fifty percents of making good decisions So do you know just throwing a coin or letting monkey make those decisions so? Yup We found that even complex decision making that humans hold. you know close to their you know kind of domain I'm not necessarily. So we have machines That could do that much better than I. Don't know there's an analog of that in in law I I. Think The may be actually I mean Two three years ago the royal. Society in England decided to arrange a working party on machine learning. One of the things that they put together a a roundtable on machine learning professions resolved to talk about that night and I talked about the history of professions in technology and. and. I think one of the peculiar things that came out to in relation to law is that law. Has always been a sort of on its own. If you think about medicine, for example, medicines always had the teacher hospital institution that sort of straddles the academic quilt and the practice walls and brings those people together and as a result. INCORPORATES loss of, scientific, work. Engineering work as well computing work and things like that. And that's been the first teaching hospital king into existence in in the French revolution in Seventeen eighty-nine. A long history of that. If you look at law, there was nothing equivalent to that whatsoever and there is in fact, actually a big gap between what academy does on what the practitioners in your do so that As a result as before law has come to this a quite late but what we are. Finding I think is that Certainly the management consultancy finding is that because of the nature of a lot of what goes on in legal office a remarkable amount of it can be automated. So what we are getting now is companies setting themselves up to do this automated work. So. We have companies which do nothing but contract our instruction formation sort of company. The typical lawyer would would say to a client Do you WANNA contract classes. Yes I want this for this. And loyal galway draft contract back with it, and then in the con- comes back against as I need another contract, you go through the same process. which is good for the lawyer but not necessarily good kind. What we're finding now is the company's not can think of a few of them that will, in fact, go into the company's show order contracts. Let's see the entire. Corpus of contracts you've got there and they will analyze them. And basically say, all right. We can create a new contract in automated way fairly easily it may need some modification according to special circumstances but on the whole, it's fairly standard and and they can do that INNOVA systematic world meaning the contracts are reviewed that checked. If they're going to expire marketing, you want an unable just the system will cope with that if you're. Yeah. So yeah. No No. No so I was just going to say yes. So that the distinction you make, you know in terms education sort of systematic graduate level education that because as you say, it is low in one sense of soft proficient. You say in called professions like made it to text reengineering this team has a strong concern ensuring that expertise applied in the public interest when as low little bit different from from bad and economics in some sense sort of in the same same vein we have now made economics at really odd. of mathematics you know north of analytics there. Whether they are actually useful from policy making perspective is left to debate but at least it has been an attempt to make this make economic video hard. So so I don't know A. Fascination has been in in law I very much that will happen in law. Oh there things are beginning to happen I mean let me just boob. At. One example I learned in that workshop that I mentioned the Royal Society held. With somebody from the engineering profession talking about. The difference in skills between people who above forty I'm below forty he said. If he he was about Forty Years Austin design an aeroplane, takeout pen and paper Pencil, and paper and. I don't know anyone under forty could do that would know how to do that go onto a computer program undecided there. So you can see that the incorporation of technology into the academy through to the actual. Occupation. Than phones and things is is already a standard and they're in law. It isn't law. As you said, it's still very much a soft skill although I will argue that there is a difference between the way nor is viewed in different parts of the world. So in the United States A law is I think more tilted towards the sciences. So low in economics is one of the big things in the. US. So you got a lot of people working in the of lower economics who might go onto antitrust work no competition work and things like that which across a lot of economics, mathematics and Statistics and so on. In, say a Europe Australia and so on. Law is more allied towards the humanities. And the classics. So it doesn't have that kind of scientific underpinning in that way. So anything that's going to change in these parts if you like is going to be something that's going to be imported from outside. And is going to have a very dramatic impact when whether it does An and I think that's yet to happen. I don't think there's been sort of Cambrian explosion. If you like in in law, the will be one I'm sure but but law has an advantage over engineering economics or the other areas you might. That's With the nature of the rule of law and absent justice is since law as a a way of ordering society is absolutely crucial to everything else. Then, Law and lawyers will say will look you know we have a special status here is different amid leave engineer. We certainly want to make sure bridges stay up. We don't want down but we can design different kinds of bridges. We can design different kinds of legal bills, but they're also the fundamental rules If you want to you know if you're an engineering company and you want to build a bridge in a different country, you're going to have to do it on the basis of the legal rules, which will be just vise by the lawyers according to the country's there in so on. So in in that was what? I might put in a special category if you live. Yea. Yea. Let me let me push NBA John. So. The. The conference that you mentioned you know the Internet is under forty and engineers at. So so one could argue you know from an engineering perspective could argue e- It sexually dangerous. To not use machines to build aircraft the goes you know all the technology that cap today actually help us make the trap lot safer. granted. If you sit down with a blank sheet of paper and Pencil, you might get the principal right. But, but the technology has advanced so much that you really have to use. Technology to do so in some sense, engineering is pushed back. that. I argue this myself then they were naive engineering school. I had a V exposed at my daughter bent to school. She used the same physics book. Twenty, five. meter. I argue that that is sort of backward because data speed no need for an engineer to really learn Newtonian physics anymore because it is prescriptive, it's deterministic can make machines, learn it very quickly and so why spend all? Right. So so then you know if you think about the the law field. I wonder if there is a senior argument that is to say Dan and tape really good lawyer casts lot of intuitions dot expedients to crap something Contract or a discourse, but then maybe the machine scan actually do it even better We haven't really tested that hypothesis yet. Right be almost have this idea that humans are always dominant. Or machines but that the not be true as technology lancers. So what do you think about that in the in the? It's a very important point actually because the. American bosses. being modifying its ethical rules recently to say that lawyers have a duty and obligation to keep up to date with technology. So we already know the technology is now a an important part and I have to say when when I say the word technology, I mean this at all kinds of levels from what you can do with Microsoft word for example, it strays plug ins all the way up to artificial intelligence IBM, Watson, or something like that So that if if lawyers become. A. Uses of technology whether this small firms or big firms or what have you a under the Aba now they they actually have an obligation to make sure that they are up to date. They can't just say we didn't know what we were doing. So I think in that respect, there is a there was a move. The other move that is taking place is actually the push from from the clients. Now, this you have to look into ways one is with corporate clients. The corporation seen US lawyers have to use noise if you'd like want their work done. PHILOS- money on Chiba they wanted to more efficiently They don't want the best piece of work every time they want something that works and they want officiant. UTA A and so on. So it was interesting I think a few years ago. The General Counsel Cisco. Actually made a speech. Saying that he expected his. Lawyers Law firms who worked for the company to be reducing their fees year on year. Now, that's the opposite of what lawyers normally do, which is to raise them year on year. So say that that's one push which is. Very profound push now, coming from the client himselves who are using the beginning to use their procurement departments in in the companies and things like that to help purchase legal services the other aspects which is just as important in this is if you look at the role of lawyers and individuals. So if you is what access to to legal services, it's expensive lawyers are not cheap they charge our money We don't know how to judge the quality of their work and so on. because. There was a credence which we just know that So. On this is where technology can begin to step in and provide services which are. Efficient and often quite. what very well for the individual saying that this. Technology can be seen to be improving access to justice a Lotta people. Yeah. Yeah yes. I want to come back to this. John. I think this is a very important point. So bent on put has a lot of uncertainty. Uncertainty maybe not not the right term, but it's called deterministic. It shows beatty ability and so the determination of quality it's not as easy as hard media India nearing or. Right business economics legal all sorts of well foreign that category and the application of technology sort of a different different meaning there but I want to touch on one of the things that you say in the paper, and that is you mentioned this before and that's about training training the next generation. So you savior regulating bodies professions are involved in the collection and reproduction of knowledge intended to be used by the entire body professionals, and so there was an expectation here that you know seeing it professionals. Is Providing the wisdom that knowledge mission to train the next generation now in a technology driven. regime. discuss vacations right. Our expert is going to be a computer engineer in the future. And so so how does that work from from cleaning and knowledge Asian will I think this is This is a crucial issue in it's one which the profession hasn't. Really. Got To grips with yet I think because you think of technology in terms of Predictive analytics a document review and things like this most law schools are not preparing students for this they may be a a a a causal to on some aspect of technology, but it's not something which lawyers themselves are learning. So I think what is going to happen is we're going to find a blending of skills occurring. So law firms will be sense having to bring in a range of technologists who perhaps have. A scales a straddle, both sides of the lines, the lawyers like this too I think I think we're going to find an avangard Who will begin to develop skills that allow them to talk to both sides of the line, the tech people and? Below people if you likes and there will be people who will acquire develop these skills as well but that's that's still some way down the line I didn't think we're anywhere near there yet, and part of the reason for that I think is that you know law is still a very highly regulated profession and and the regulators themselves are in the same situation they are unsure about what is going to happen and they also feel they have an obligation to. Not only ensure that. Customers clients and consumers are protected but in some ways, the profession is protected to if you like so. You know it's it's a it's a fine balancing. There I. Think. It's a fight balancing act and you'd say if the changing changing things. So going back, you know you care as an individual eighteen status of expert. Some form of encapsulation of knowledge and analysis occurs enabling professional experts, derived diagnoses, decisions, and conclusion wrapped late. and you make some distinctions. Type of learning that. Human? Beings. That the distinction between doing drive and become a gift and laster Yes yes. Yes I think that's important. So the the the the principle behind this is that Individuals can acquire a lot of knowledge in in various areas. So as I say learning how to drive a car, you learn how to change gear you though with the speeds. Braking different rates, conditions, and things like that. So. If you WANNA take that further and become a formula one drive or something like that. Then you have to undergo a very different kind of training and that kind of thing becomes a lot more collective rather than individual because you start to you're you're going to be in a group that is gonna be doing a particular kind of our driving. If you like everybody in the group has to understand what each other is doing that group, you can't have people going right a racetrack at two hundred miles an hour or thinking individually feel like they have to have a collective consciousness. About. How to drive in that situation? That's nothing like how? You and I might drive. I'm not saying we bad drivers just saying spreading very different. So I think professional work is not. That different from this in a way. So once you you can go through school and you can do your law degree and you can learn your low. We can learn you engineering's this applies to or professions really. But in order to become a professional in order to become somebody who can operate function within that. Group if you like you then have yourself have to develop collective consciousness and and one way of thinking about it is that we we can kind of tacit knowledge. This assorted knowledge you learn on the job from people, which is not always articulated in a precise formulate kind way but it's something you pick up from the way. Somebody does something you just recognize aw that that's how they've done that might not be. Written down anywhere or anything like that. But you know that's different from now exiting differently from the way that wise doing I think X.'s doing it better I and you and you just, and you can absorb that. That's what I mean by this kind of tacit knowledge and that comes about from the professional context. As how the professional context develops becomes absolutely crucial to how you introduce new ways of doing things new my daddy's new skills new outlooks if you like and I. Think this is where we're on the cost of of this beginning to develop I mean we we know it's got to be done quite how it's going to be done. is yet to be. So. So let me make a statement John and I want I want your reaction to it so eat in hard sciences eight years against again medicine. Expertise has about a consistent happy of remorse. Whereas enor- economics and business in general, let's say expertise is not about the ability to apply rules but to deal with. and at and if that is true, it has lot of implications rate. It has implications as to how we might divide work. Between. And machine in the future. And the skills that universities need to impart on on on new graduates are also quite different. So I always argued in the business. engineering contexts that universities having changed the dog they get mentioned before they're using the same. Using the same. Out Thirty four years without asking the question are those skills relevant, anymore or more importantly watch. Really relevant for a human being in the future rate. do you agree with that that expertise assert more about dealing exceptions apply? Putting it actually. I. I can see the logic behind what you. Saying I think what distinguishes? A good professional whether it's a good engineer good architect or good lawyer or doctor is is somebody who has a certain? This may sound strange but it's the. Imagination. Creativity. about. Kind of flare that allows them to function on the nausea they they've got and developed over the years and the experience. Gathered from Nova pitching what they'd be doing over the years and so on, and it allows them to see around things in ways which they perhaps would. I can give you an example if you like a law. So I'm in in Germany and some other countries. For example, there's a particular way of bundling together mortgage securities I I won't go to detail about this, but this statute that enables you do it. And then you can sell these securities and get money. In certain countries, the UK, the US, and so on. This, NICI. So in a sense to put this kind of a a deal together it. Couldn't be done if you live. So a bank came to one of the large English law firms and said, look we wanted we want to replicate this in in the UK, want to set a market this we're not the statues off there. What can you do and what was interesting was that the law firm then went back to first principles lawyers who were looking at this went back I suppose they looked at some vape basic areas of law matter your trust. And contract from what have you? I'm from that they constructed elite supplement that looked very much like the one in Germany, but without stat sheet and they tested it and it worked. Out To be credibly successful. So much so that the German government started German legal profession started to complain because they said. You can only do this by statute and these we find a way of doing it three. I suppose using law and there it is an they were vowed shops by but that was a particular example if you like of of what you were talking about, they took the exceptions they went back to first principles and said you know or How would we get? This is where we gotta get to, and this is a way right at the beginning what are the steps we need to take and and? And that's what a good loyal will do if you. Right right? Yeah. So that's very important point. So you in your paper dawn as the DREYFUSS and rice note that the proficient performer immersed in the world of skillful activities sees what needs to be done. But decides how to do it. So as we move into a and other technologies, I think it's important point it is. Right from Dad benefactor culture we have been using humans as you mentioned before in lots of with meted activities big not designed for humans I would I would contend enjoy doing things over and over again, and if you had thought of doing that, yeah, because they have to do it for living right and so so we should be moving to word It would where anything that is with pita on delegated to the machine at automation in the bottom of that and Appealed autonation you can have intelligent automation you can have you know reinforcement learning those types of things you have some aspects of intelligence into the into the two. And deploy humans Don't Miss. They're really good at in some case. I'm. So you know we've been studying the green for ages be our no close. It feels to understand mother. Heck it does You know it's not neat learning it. Oh, BBC of. thirty years ago as see that person again, you could see you could you could have a feeling. Then you've seen that before and and what the brain has done actually not only as he that pattern but also age that matter intuitively for thirty years and say, yes, that face I, guess before. and. So there are some superpowers the brain has reaped have been applying the all all. So for a technology might allow. Look I. Think Technology will allow us to incredibly complex things without having to think about too much I. Mean if you look at the way a port functions, for example, any major port these days they've got millions of containers and ships going through them all the time. So there's a lot of paper going through the you those charter parties, bills of lading guarantees. So the lot of legal work that's being done it, it's all quite standard stuff. I mean everybody. KNOWS, what needs to be done and so on. Now, some people are beginning to think while the best way to handle a port if you like I for everybody should know is to put everything that's going on in the poor into a blockchain so that you can see the whole supply chain. You see when something comes in, you can determine when the goods are being offloaded. When they're being shipped, you can stop making the payments as a result of the. Operation of the smart contracts if you like, and the whole thing would be just one quite seamless. In some ways without that much human intervention really just need oversight Some bits of coordination so on. But at the moment is still a a lot of humans are vote in that shipping people, law people, all sorts of things which is. I think insane. That's a waste of resources. We know that there are people who have all kinds of problems that require that creative flair she like as so why waste money on the routine stuff when you could develop skills to the the real need if you like in that way? Yeah Yeah. So I, want that some that bit that John Blockchain, for example, as you mentioned. So so one reason especially in the professions like law and business humans have an advantage justice dimension of trust. and you know at least our generation we don't really. At eighty level, right. So so having that. Human human touch is still extremely important for us. Now, technologies like Blockchain, for example, actually allows that trust to be tensely decoupled, right? Yeah, and I think I think you're right. Look I. Think I mean one of the reasons we make contracts is because We, don't trust each other. So we we devised these documents with all the conditions in them. Something goes wrong. This is what will happen things like that and so on. What are the interesting things? You know people really rely on contracts are met you. You draw up a contract. And the to business people stick him in the drawer I never look at again less something really really fundamental goes wrong but they know sumit doesn't that never look at that again. So you say value of the contract, what did it actually do if you look at some of the Asian countries say like Taiwan or parts of China, you have a assistant coach Guanxi, which is where people developed effective relationships by knowing each other over a period of time around business that allows them to develop trust it. So You know there are different ways of of handling trust, but we we seem to spend a lot of time on trying to minimize something You know which we don't really do a lot of if you like. So I think one of the advantages of of blockchain is that it just it removes a lot of this from from the equation if there's certain things you know that can happen. as a result off if this thing that systems. Lead happened And you know. As, long as you've got oversight and you can see what's going on than. You don't need to be too concerned about it. It will just do what it needs to do in that way and So. Again. That's still very much in the early stages, but we are seeing situations where supply chains A shipping goods from one country to another can actually be done under smart contracts through a blockchain. Technology if you live. That that is now happening I associate goodful dealing with things like gum counterfeiting if you're. Producing. Particular high-quality could site move our phones or particular pharmaceutical products and so on you know it's one way of guaranteeing the quality of the product is you couldn't I say look you can examine the whole supply chain or the data is there. And you know his Eq- code look at it and you get the whole thing going all the way back The. Again, issues around that if you're dealing with the digital. Is Much easier once you start dealing with physical products then you have. A question of how do you get that first initial digitization of the physical if you'd like to goes on so though some people I know here in Australia who? Run A company called Beef Ledger, which is trying to export beef straight beef to China using the blockchain supply chain, which will. Guarantee the security, and the quality of the goods to the Chinese consumer APP because having problems with this before. But I will tell you now do doing something like that does require that the people you are dealing with. You're going to set this up with You have to have a trusting relationship with you before you can set up a technology that will do away with the So we're still in that. That's really early days. I think another a lot of time way to go right Yeah, but the technology works it. Clean potential one could argue contracts exist because they probably known performance if you have a technology that drives that probably the of non-performance zero, then you can actually get rid of for contract. Yeah limit. It is. Not. Goes back to that earlier point I made that. Most most contracts are fairly standard. You know a routine things they're there to. Record a series of transactions payments that have gone on between people without the to do much. If you like you know once you you're you're doing the business, the contract just kind of records that in perpetuity. So the small contract just takes that into a different area and an an actually does the whole implementation and execution without people to be involved in that too much and there's something goes wrong. But if it if it all goes right then back it is done you need to you don't you think about it Right. Yeah. Hasn't been jumping to another are forthcoming people globalization law at. A time of crisis in the? Global Lawyer and so in the say Nikolai Condom Nieve a Russian economists in the nineteen thirties believed the worst economy operates long sixty year cycles Then he called K. Braves. And you safeguarding coronavirus analysis, the fifth psycho young's from nineteen eighty to twenty thirty. It's you save twenty, nineteen forthcoming John You might have. I think so I think say because I, tell you off the what's happening this year I thought my good I couldn't My God. I was just. Owners because you know a contract device these waves up into into what he calls four seasons spring summer or winter at, and we're in the winter off this fifth cycle if you like this is. All the bad stuff happens and he's news war. Famine Disease I think wait a minute that sounds Yes yes. That's exactly right. A. But one of the interesting things about contractors was that you know he he a because he's A. Solid economists are installing a dip executed. By the way you know he he got fed up ninety that was the end of Nikolai unfortunately but he. He said instead of know if you like the ownership of the means of production are being the determinate for changeover from system system, he said it's it's technology and and that the technology will drive you out of the downswing of the last cycle into the upswing of the new cycle, and and the way that works is the win. You're in this kind of winter period because of the kind of economic. Gloom pervades if you like people tend to hold back in subsurface vestment in terms of technological innovation of what have you and so a lot of energy resources, resources, money capital if you like builds up to a second point when people say we're GONNA go for this is this is it? And that's when if you like technology comes to the fall on, really drives it forward. So from that perspective, what he's saying is that you know come right about twenty thirty. If. Things are going slowly now regarding technology they're going to speed up. In. This period and that's when it will. You know really also take take off and people have looked back over our preceding cycles and they've you know it works if you like not just their. Fantasy theory there are also the people who do Cleo dynamics in history these the quantitative historians and they've done a similar kind of analysis of historical periods and said, yeah, you know there are all these citrical. Processes that take place even revolutions occur and big upset occurs and what have you and and. One of their Perspectives which I find quite interesting is that they say one of the reasons for revolutions come about is caused a lease beginning to compete with each other and and an an I look at say trump in in America and I look at the Democrats and I I I would say Modine, India I look she in China and different groups of elites who are engaged really profound struggle for the future of their countries if you live. Out which again is leading to this kind of potential eruption of activity and a new ways of doing things. Yeah. It makes a lot of intuitive sense gone. So one way to think about this also. There are a lot of excesses. So innovating go good their excesses in the system people to believe that invincible they changed assumptions about. because they don't see any. and. Financial markets to right. So these cycles and real real mass that uniquely talking about you can see the. Happening in the financial markets more clearly. But what he's saying is that he happens mortgage and you ask in this paper in two thousand, nineteen for in many ways go. Crystallization off the settling ketone economic forces lost throat ear Kublai doomed as populous. Separates nationalism and lead clients and I think they have that we have probably the answer to that. But you see I think. One of the points I was trying to make an in in this paper walls that Global Law. If you like is is, is the a kind of synthesis off chaos? How do we bring some kind of order to chaos now once you start seeing the undermining? Of his global institutions, you see trump was withdrawn from the W. H. O.. He's he's are criticized NATO he he won't have the do with the International, Criminal Court and so we've got this kind of real life tension now between a an international legal order that's being built up since the Second World War both Ekit economic and legal order is Global And so we can't just a radical globalization I mean even even with covert, we can't eradicate mobilize ation we've got to. Handle covert the Kobe pandemic on a global basis. Otherwise, we'll. We're lost it retreats to a national. Approach is not gonNA. Work? We'll be defeated in that race is going to be global. Might. Be One of my questions in in paper was will who are the people who are going to be doing this? Kind of bringing the the order to chaos if you like and that made argument that it's got to be the global lawyer. And this is a person who not only understand their national legal system but also able to communicate with lawyers and officials. From around the world if you like. To be able to develop a kind of common. Language common discourse that enables them to stop putting these things together are, and it's not just a simple massa of saying mathematically, it works this way or not. It requires the kind of pulling together of people, but it requires that sort of common understanding which. Comes out of what I was saying about this idea of testing knowledge you know as you got this kind of professional consciousness you know how people ought to behave and how they will interact with you, and then that enables you to be out of bizarre to predict how you can do things and so on and so on. That basis I think we can operate kind of global order. It had a a below the institutional level if you're not kind of private. As opposed to the public according and that will put three. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah you know I the limit John I don't know if you think this way I limit one could as. Want to stay need for. Countries what does the need for legal system differentials? We set this up with the premise that it's easier to manage small chunks. one could also argue with Edmund Affect. -nology that you don't need to segment this debate that we have done. which might make these types of issues you know. See where you're coming from and I'm going to say yes or no? Yes, I think the home range of of questions that can be handled by the technology the ones we got pay I don't chain, etc. I don't I didn't see any issues there but there are a lot of decisions that needs to be made a book in terms of putting things together and resolve disputes that can only function at a human level because it's not. These are not decisions that are simple binary decisions. If you'd like, it's yes or no it's it's often a lot more nuance than complex about I mean, one of the resources in the World Kiva Zero System, the world amendment which is being fought over if you like is water, a water is probably one of the most valuable resources anywhere and it's you often find that rivers and things like that sort of flow between countries, they form borders. And and you are you know people if you look at the Nile, ESL start stopping in Sudan throwaway down to the Mediterranean. So he goes to countries all three countries, east European and then into Egypt's and so unwell well, who has the right to put it dime at a particular place and things like that all of that has to be cooled in act. You see a not going to be done at a human level that that's what caused the skills in negotiation judgment interpretation understanding if you like of the other people, no machine can do that I got. Yes before we conclude, I want to touch on one other thing So in the paper, you say as technology and culture intersect more and more. Ethical conundrums will intensify these raising questions about the rights and obligations of robots. And go beyond as moves. Three laws of robotics in two issues of rights of all moon. Algorithm, stem serves. So this is this is an area that be Kevin babies even even really form some notions allowed rights of all modes at rights of a are. Sai, gets more sophisticated. Yes. Yes. I do. I, mean I think this is one of the issues we already know some of the problems with algorithms and and you know can we can be are they transplanted from you see what's going on the ethical issues around the construction and implementation of algorithms and things like that. But I I I think looking into the future we all going to rely on things like robots. And various kinds of machines so much more so that if you look at a country like Japan, which is a a an aging population such that it doesn't have sufficient younger people to look after the people who need looking often. So machines, I'll be part of that, and that means people will stop forming real relationships with machines and and so that's when I would say. Okay. So let's think about how we View a potential rights of machine that we give. We give rise to humans. Yes. We know that we give rights to animals. Now we've also given rights to viz in forest in some countries as well as so machines I think our. Next logical step you know do we do we treat them with respect Let me give you one. Very classic example yet the production of. Robots for sex if you like is a major industry at the moment, some manufacturers say they want to program them say that people can act out rape fantasies will do we want that I? Mean you know should we be at first of all? You know? We should be having people behave in this particular kind of way, but even an uncertain if you do it against another human being, you'll be punished for it and you say we'll a machine is a piece of property you should be you should be doing that but I'm getting to think that maybe a machines should be treated with dignity say that we are treat ourselves with. Dixie. This a kind of reflexive situation here what we? Do to machines we do to each other, and they may again due to US depending on how they evolve and and move forward in that way is a very contentious issue. A lot of people would reject that right out of hand I agree I think we've got to stop thinking about stop dining forward because I. think we're going to at some point again. I. Don't know when. But at some point we will be having to deal with that. It's a it's a very important point. Joan. So if I understand you correctly, you know that the rights to animals the rights to inanimate. INANIMATE things like Lubers The recent those exist is because of its effects on humans and can see video a clear link in the future we would see a very clear link between a algorithms and robots ended affects on human. So this is not me You know each not fantasy in the sense that yeah, robots should have rights, but rather it's a more conceptual question. Any fraud did not have rights each going to cabin negative I I think that's absolutely true. I mean just to highlight that if you like this firm called Boston Dynamics that produces. Robots and they produced these videos of these. Now, these robots are resistant being pushed over and things like that, and it was quite interesting because a lot of people say all you can't treat them in this way. This is awful and so what I mean that that's the answer for more fighting to to the extreme extent. But it I think you know on the basis what you're saying, you know how we Oakland. Hold human beings accountable to each other in an increasingly complex world machines have become part of that. We can't just have them all sitting on the edge as though they're not part of who we are, what we are and how we do things. Right. So. Incursion Johnny fuel sort of look forward five years. At. The intersection of law and technology. But you think people see sort of the biggest. I. Think you'll see it two wins. On the you know for the individual The individual, you're going to see a lot of them just interacting. With artificial Tennessee, say lost questions about what my rights for this how do I deal with a tendency agreement? How do I complain against a producer company or something like that or that's going to be automated? is fairly straightforward to do and and it will only need A. Minimal. Amount of human inside of. An intervention if you like. At the other end at the. In I think we're GONNA see more and more technology coming in because as those basic functions that are. Being, carried out by junior people or or paralegals or things like that are the ones which are going to be increasing, automating creasing. I'm. We will replace the humans and just let machines do that because there's no point in wasting human resources on that whether that means we need fuel or more lawyers That's an open question I think it will that we need different kinds of lawyers We will need Roy Moore to logically aware much more sophisticated. They don't it's be programmers or odors or anything like that, but they need to have a quite a a a a strong understanding and gross what's going on in technology in that way if you like so. Yeah. We can definitely see an. Yeah, so I, think you mentioned the so from a structure perspective in all forum DC law firm sprucing to word. It a group of equity partners. Around it by machine so to speak well, I. Think. I was in that paper or another one I. I'm S-. Forecast. Law. Firms. Being. Distributed decentralized we'll tournaments organizations running on a blockchain with with the various people. into setting when they will no I. Think the law firm is still a very strong and powerful is Shutian, that's not gonNA disappear straight away. But certainly the numbers of partners who control things will shrink. They'll that will get smarter as proportion and yes, they will be surrounded by machines and they surrounded by people who are servicing those machines. Your excellent. Yeah. Thanks for doing this weekend. John really enjoyed the conversation. Thank you very much. It's been great fun and very

Blockchain John Gill Eappen Eappen Queensland University Of Techn Blockchain Technologies Australia Griffith University India United States German Government Innova Bloomberg Inflammation Royal Society Brisbane John Blockchain Chiba
Shannon Sharpe reacts to Lakers GM 3 loss to Nuggets in Western Conference Finals

Skip and Shannon: Undisputed

03:40 min | 9 months ago

Shannon Sharpe reacts to Lakers GM 3 loss to Nuggets in Western Conference Finals

"III LOVES SIGHT THAT LOSS. From the Lakers and how about we break it down right now guys Lebron. What is third triple-double this postseason, but it wasn't enough against the nuggets. Last Night Denver led by twenty as late as the fourth quarter Lebron Ford in thirteen points in a last-ditch comeback at. Albury, finished with a team I twenty, eight, ten of which came in the fourth defend off Lebron the Lakers and hold on for the one fourteen to one. Oh, six Windsor Shannon. What is the biggest reason? The Lakers lost this one. They came out they came out and look like a team was to oh, and they just thought you know we don't come on here and do what we do and and not play hard and you could tell early on the nuggets were getting whatever they want. They drive laid up in the paint they you'll get to his dominant hand his right hand. Kiva phenomenal player. He's GonNa make shot skip that shot that he hit with the clock winding down on the right foot. I note most guys right handed shoot that shot Dirk Nowitzki made famous what he shot off his left leg I've never seen right hand guy shoot that shot up the up the wrong foot. I mean, 'cause we shoes tonight expected to go in everybody that's a bad shot clock winding up I expected to go in but I did not expect the Lakers to look this flat. We've haven't seen them even even against a Portland skip the first game even against the rockets the first game they didn't look this flat they I'm like broad do realize the western conference finals. you mentioned it a D. Two rebounds and they came in the last five minutes of the Game Hey deeply forty-three minutes. Avail one rebound white one rebuilt. If you tell me skill that the nuggets will out rebounded again by nineteen. If you tell me, they're going to turn the ball over the Lakers. I'm going to say the nuggets going to win the series, but I don't believe that I believe Lebron ad will play better I. Believe Lebron will be more aggressive because I thought the second the second in the third quarter. Eighty go it and it seemed like Lebron was designed to say you know what you gotta go hey, we're gonNA keep going. But skipped ahead, given up so much ground they had dug themselves. So much of a whole maybe if they don't allow get a eighteen twenty, maybe ten twelve now they can complete the comeback but I thought the Lakers played like a team that was looked. Like they didn't have they had a away game and if through this game away but what are the process what you've done if that you giving these guys confidence because now they think they can beat you they do they feel like Murray for sure thinks he can be yes and he's talking like He. SHOULD BE UP TWO GAMES TO ONE IS I've seen story before the thing is with this guy when he gets hot and. Those lash those last second shot because I saw him in game seven you remember the clock out of both have and he throwing up three's from twenty five from thirty feet and he switching. So he has confidence in their gaining companies but the problem that also has get, you can't have every guy that played for the nuggets with the exception of to a temp equal to or more free throws they Lebron James that tells. Me He's not getting he's not driving the ball. He's not aggressive enough or they're not calling it. So for me, that was the different. They just lacked intensity. They came out like a team that was too low and had the game to throw away I. Expect I know for certain and I'm going I, don't care I. don't care what the line he'll. I won't do on it right now you do I won't do right now.

Lakers Nuggets Lebron Lebron Ford Lebron James Denver Windsor Shannon Dirk Nowitzki Albury Portland Murray
Robotic Process Automation with Antti Karjalainen

Software Engineering Daily

09:23 min | 10 months ago

Robotic Process Automation with Antti Karjalainen

"How do I describe RPI, task in robot corporate. How do you define an opiate task? You set up a new project let's say you're using the lab you create new project. You'll import a few libraries depending on what kind of tasks you WANNA do a walk on technology she want to interact. And Right Staw Staw tasks, Star Star, and then start writing instructions. you might use a building keyboards. Some library keeps that you have available all you might define your own keyboards. So let's say you start with open. Browser. Browser then you start defining, you'll building Keyword Logan to knit. And then goes on from there that keyboard should then probably piping new RL heavy gate lot island do some logging tasks. That might lead you to use volt, which is in the cloud. Not Cloud Service that provides you secure storage, drove us a credentials and you'll use another library to access the walt and so forth. That's Kinda, the basic process can you give a few more examples of tasks? That so many different tasks usually say that kind of snowflakes each company. Each user has their own particular need. In one company actually was company that had done the box boxing in the question they. They used. To automate the process of doing on last talk purchases. In Japanese websites. That was a good use case I think and. So kind of the typical. Financial Institution, use cases that you could imagine. That let's say you need to update a lot of customer. Once an and people are calling in on the phone and you know updating, let's say their phone number for your records. you might use. To navigate through the internal applications that you useful customer Carson and go through multiple locations. Wayne opted the information. That's one of use schedule is saw and it was actually Danica. So great volume, the bank that it said that they saved. What it was like seven years of customer waiting time on the phone by automating the process. Very impressive. In when a task is processing in it fails in the middle. What happens Yeah. So typically you probably want to retry. So just get the input that you had. Andrey retried if that's how you configure it. You probably want to notify somebody so you'll send out an email. Alerts through some other service desk. Application. Depending on obviously kind of depends on why failure happened. So was it a business exception? So unit the application that you've automating did something wrong or and. Your data was incomplete that she used something like that. So that kind of guides you if it's just flat out failure, just exception on court. Then you probably want to. Get the developer to look at it. Does something happen like when the I of the website changes that can sometimes mess things up or do most of these sites tend to keep their you is static enough that your tasks don't go out of date. Yeah. So that's a bit of author that. So you WANNA try to use locate us that almost stable. So if you if you use like absolute expand references, those might get messed up pretty easily if you use like low element ID more stable. So typically. Yes, sure. I mean sites changing us an issue for you can do something such developer to make it more robust but ultimately, if site and some changing completely, there's nothing that you can do about it. Typically I tell people that you know if you have the option to use an API instead course that's more stable or west goal where you have the most stable route. Tell me more about the libraries that are built into Robo Corp.. Yes we are we actually developing fairly large library that we call the. Framework. And consists of. Of you'll basic tool kit essentially as you need us an opiate developing. So. You'll have things for the browser things folk desktop applications, immigration you'll have. integrations with all the major cloud platforms, aws azure. Google cloud. And probably forget like eighty percent of the stuff but we we keep adding to it. Multiple Times a week become a new release that adds new functionality to be a framework right now at the moment. But Yeah I some multitude of different kinds of Kiva statute categorized by different technology domains. there. Are Lots of API's out there for machine learning. Tell me about how machine learning API's can be used with Robocall Corp Yeah. So the industry term for that is intelligent automation and you to be his call up intelligent does as soon as you who into some machine learning API. But sure I mean the kind of the basic I think most frequent use cases to do something like send a document to aws extract or other similar Google Cloud Vision Api you have a pdf in moist than want extra someday to out of it. You can easily use cloud services to do that for you if you don't want to try to do it locally that's I, think the most common use guests that I see all the time. When an ARP task gets spun up, what is actually happening on Robot Corp? Yes. So when a not B task at Spun Up. If you look at the architecture that we have with the cloud platform. And we have what we call the work us the workers, essentially an application that's installed in the target system. So he can be on your laptop, it can be on a virtual machine on. or it can leave inside a container that we can hopefully. So depending on where the work is. Say That the workers is on my laptop. What happens is that the cloud will send a package of code and some instructions to the work. The work will get the package on Pakistan and then initiate a fresh condign women fall by the libraries that. You have inside your robust cold, and then it'll stop fresh every time to make sure that you don't have any side effects from previous executions and then when you environment done, he'll execute the task stream. The console tries to cloud account, and then when don is Kinda you're execution Audifax you might have produced some documents or you at least have a file stream those to the cloud and report the results of the execution. So a lot of the stuff that we provide is really the east convenience of. You know you WANNA run by Tom. based. For a frame of coordination. Good just install one APP in the Environment Logan and you're good to go. You're all set. You'll have a stable execution environment each time and is pretty fast to. And what are you using under the hood to orchestrate these tasks? So, the orchestration service on our cloud is we are working actually mostly several s so it's on aws is pretty. This know like we are not using any the ready project to set up the orchestration scheduling. Those we do it ourselves. And then it's a fast growing platform of different features so. So he's one of the call pieces that we develop. We'll tell you more about that the service orchestration stuff like how much can you offload? What kind of leverage do you get by going server less? What does that look like? So we started developing that early twenty nineteen and I doubt time we made the decision to kind of go s cutting edge that we could because we have dealt with unity. So might be be of engineering just made the decision out. If you don't have the host anything sales, we won't do it. Then I might have a few service here and there, but most is hundred percents less and the idea is that we should be able to scale up pretty nicely with that decision. Obviously you're. GonNa always have some some issues hand but for the most part, we think that that will allow us to. Maintain certain level of service as we. Continue to grow and scale and and really some of these processes are pretty business critical company. So we need to be careful with operations. Tell me more just want to know more by your infrastructure in like how are using lambda are there any other service services that you'd like to discuss? is typical host, but really I'm not too deep into architects are close to its basic like `scuse Dynamo DB, Lambda all around US plan for monitoring data dog as well I. Think. Yeah It's a complex and growing piece of software.

AWS Developer Google United States Robo Corp Danica Financial Institution Carson Andrey Robocall Corp Pakistan Wayne Robot Corp ARP DON Tom. Audifax
Behind the Curtain

Clues

01:27 min | 11 months ago

Behind the Curtain

"Studi Kiva. And these last roots on ever write down. In a couple of hours, I will be hanged for the murder of nightclub artist Ruby red breast. It's so cold and dark in here. After a month of imprisonment. I've lost all. Hope an all strength to deal. In light of this death is a welcome relief. I do it. Do it.

Murder
"kiva" Discussed on For Realness Sake

For Realness Sake

07:09 min | 11 months ago

"kiva" Discussed on For Realness Sake

"November December of eighteen twenty twenty this. Year you'll be Ryan. Wife News. Here Though? Couple so now that you know as a final changing socially, just you know, throw world I'm I. I still WanNa hire that. They want to pay attention to Mike neither my blacks meeting. We need to come together with the right now. A lot of people are hurting. You know it's just things that are going out. Is I recommend? I WANNA be a voice of you know of love of reason of no support so I'm going to focus on that. Somebody me a community. That love owning you know people in the community doing good so hallways. You're my friend based. I'm here illegally. Here. Produce the WHO was this whole everything so? One of my bracelet your. You know what? We can do better know that you know. Years ago are insincere. Only Hong are or mothers against the they come together. Aren't-aren't to get Louis like. The next the we have to use our even launching, we can be the chain. I love the NS true because I think about the stuff that you know. Are My grandparents even went through being born nineteen, thirty three in all the disparities I'm sure she had phased. In my grandfather's was like hen. You know you hear about it. You read about it. You learn about it, but to think that we're in a time just like that now and it is really time you. You know crab or get out the pat what you do. Party is is here. I love our everyone. Especially in our community has pivoted to start focusing more on our community. Because for so long it seemed like you know. We had to have the American dream. We want it to be like them accepted like them, but now it's like it actually start looking to our own magic in our in our beautiful news in our extraordinary personalities, talents and things we have going on in. How can we highlight that within? Our community is not so much. Much now that we need to be or feel the need to be accepted by other people, it's like okay, We accept ourselves in less highlight that must push that because that is also powerful, an amazing unnecessary so I love that you're doing it for the children because they're. They're our future. They're coming right after us in days. Seeing what we're seeing in real time in source court until a pack their lives now and I love the I. let kids Blinky. It. Exactly so. What are some tips? You can give to people who are also struggling with being their own queen of sabotage. What can what tips can you give them so that they can maybe not go through the same thing that you have for, so we can all come out of this thing because we're too great looking ourselves as if we're not enough like. We gotTA cancel that. What used it. To. Other. People in your circle that will hold you accountable and sometimes like we have to. Come out of. The public hearing. But. I think you should talk. Communicate you know what you're. Sharing. Next? Friday if you tell people about it, you gotta come through. He. Locally in the no one knew so. It's like the more you. Circle that are there. People were doing substitute. Empower themselves. You kind of want to be a part of the to someone else. Make League Man I. WanNa make. Could do. Not Copy does but you know that are working on goal. You have older, so you WANNA keep striving. To make sure that what you're working on that. Come into wish. So once again. That sisterhood is so important is something I've been talking about for awhile, so then your sisterhood. Do you feel like you have that support that you need that? You're able to when you're having. Those moments Assumpcao like me every day. He goes to them and say like girl. Listen like big MEA right Think I. Think is important. Meet soon, have diverse. Frankly have girlfriends. Roper is also you have people who are doing saying you're done with their. Maybe maybe having all my support podcast that you know they talk to. Your friends that you know. The all your friends, but sometimes they talk of like now they might. Relate to too much of the day. They can help you out on A. Unique S. Say Saving you're done that way. Yes, Kinda like personally locals. There's no. Absolute people people here I go this eight eight year on, so that way got might know. Bounce off each other. You this. You editor podcast early. Today. So that being said because you are food blogger extraordinaire. I have to ask you. If twenty twenty were as little girl. What sort of twenty twenty being. Okay. That's tough. One because you know twenty twenty has been. US Business Okay Kid. On us, so I will go. If you remember back your childhood. Sandwich in. Red Was gone and use that last piece girl. Friends one no me. Just a Mayo! Is As earl just. Just a broke upset was basically. Just a wholesome sandwich. The girl in. Low. Lloyd. I hope that twenty twenty one gives us way better food options. I'm just saying it has. When, we can only go up from here. Girl, only at least let's get a pack of noodles some tape. But I also have to have you. Thank you so much for being sharing your truth. Honesty your good energy. This is only the beginning for Kiva in Verona Sake. I'm so happy that you're here Kiva. Thank you so much..

Kiva Ryan Mike Verona Sake Hong Louis Lloyd Roper editor earl twenty twenty
iOS Interview Questions For Senior Developers in 2020 Part 2

Inside iOS Dev

09:01 min | 1 year ago

iOS Interview Questions For Senior Developers in 2020 Part 2

"And today's episode as part two to the previous episode about IOS interview questions for Senior Developers in two thousand twenty. The article that I wrote S- and this is the part two episode where I'm covering article so in this one. I'm going over questions next question. So we'll start with question number four. What is what is NBC? It's a very fundamental question again. Even though it's very basic question senior developers also need to know about and expected to give more detail on the show more depth of knowledge of such basic questions so NBC stands for Model View Controller. Software Design Pattern apple adopted. It came from small talk. Apple adopted its towards their own. Had has has its own reincarnation of it Model is responsible for data controller is responsible or views responsible rendering the dates and getting input from the user and control are supposed to glue views and models together right and be this coordinator control right at the end of the day. Apples flavor of it is More view skewed towards the view. That's why wouldn't really have controllers. Who Have you controllers what you should know? Besides there's this basics That that I just covered you also need to know and understand that model view controller. Nbc is not your application architecture. That's just a design pattern foot of you and if you want to architecture application especially architectures for scale you probably should go for something something else. Something with more flexibility. Something's more advanced at least. I'M VM MVP COORDINATOR. Design pattern or go for a heavy duty architectures such as viper and ribs but again as a as a senior developer. You should be aware of that so erratic flag that could raise here as well simply not knowing what an NBC is right. What what it stands for. And what that's fundamental Basic design pattern of APP Iowa's Apple Development in general I think they use it on all the platforms but nevertheless I again as I mentioned already as a senior. Dev rather the expectation is that you know. Other design patterns and architectures for further reading. Look at Apple. Apples article on their developer portal. It's called model dash view controller Then ABC's Dotto has a great article Cold lighter view controllers. It's from one of their previous issues of Went UP CIO. Had this Monthly I believe issue of their articles. Then there's another article on a con Lou con Lou. I think that's how I say it that come about massive you controller. Kennedy shoes with NBC. Another one is on a Napa soda actual this podcast inside. Iowa's Dev where and I covered the the issues with controller skull the problem with the problems with controllers another article you could read introduction to n. b. b. m. that's also obviously that article And then another episode of this podcast view models to the rescue As far as I recall Andrew in that episode. Goes over a great example of where? Mvp and could could save your bacon in the overblown view controller. Massive you controller code base and another article could read up on a model view presenter. It's MVP by Martin Fowler. It's on his website. March and following dot com. And as usual. You you'll find those links south. Put Him the Up put the link to the article in the show notes and they're in the further reading for that question. You can find links to those articles that I mentioned. The next question is number five. What do you know about? Singleton's where would you use one? And where would you not Singles Singleton Severi? It's very common design pattern. It'S CONSIDERED TO BE CO CORE. Competencies design pattern and it's used everywhere throughout all of the apple examples and They they actually utilizing soon bilton themselves in the API COCA API that they provide a four us. This jar short answer. Singleton Is a class that returns only one. And the same instance no matter how many times you requested what it really means at the end of the day that you have a type but say networking services and you implement a static or property rather. I think that's typically the implementation called shared or something like that instance and then in there you basically cash that instance the very first time. It's accessed you initials it and then you cash it and that's it. And then every other time when the in through that static property the instances rick. The SINGLETON has requested to return the same instance Singled and Sarah unfortunately anti pattern. They have a lot of issues with them and specifically they encourage global states. The they they really did. Sir and there are a lot of issues with dependency injection they. They really don't help at all with it. They make it more difficult. They you have to tie things to specific concrete types instead of relying and interfaces things like that so and in general even though apple promotes it. I do not recommend using singleton's and I know it's a it's a kind of a debatable topic if you will but there are a lot of prominent articles written about by prominence experienced developers Basically kind of debunking if you will the design pattern than explaining why. It's an anti pattern. So the Rad flak for this question as well you should actually know what a singleton the is and how to implement it and how to work with it even though it's a necessary and or unfortunate evil quite often and for further reading to to kind of get into the details of why. I'm saying it's an anti pattern. There are two resources you could go for. One is actually episode of this podcast. Called Y Singleton are evil and another one is actually similar styles. Single single are evil. It's by you can find this article on Viki Dot C two DOT com. They cover it more. They're in in more details in an an unwrap all the issues with singles. So the next questions number six. What's different between delegates and TV? Oh so this is a this is also quite common question on on. Irs INTERVIEWS THE DETAILED. Yar The cute. Let's let's start with What what is Ki? Ki Ki all right cave your sense. Four key valley observation so delicate design pattern and Kiva observation both are techniques for to establish relationships between objects and delegates establishes and declares using the delegates. You declare one to one relationship using protocols delegate protocols and Dan with Kiva labs operation you declare and establish a many to many relationship using other techniques but mostly. It's a kind of declarative key valor. While the that that's in the name Kiva Observation and your keys likely will be there strings or I believe you could use like selectors or something about for

NBC Apple MVP Singleton Developer Iowa Coordinator Kiva Observation Lou Con Lou Kiva Labs Napa IRS CIO ABC Kennedy DAN Rick Martin Fowler Sarah
"kiva" Discussed on Marketing Trends

Marketing Trends

08:09 min | 1 year ago

"kiva" Discussed on Marketing Trends

"You Google Nike Shoes. You're telling us on the specific. Yeah on facebook. Given who you're friends with or the groups they like tells you something specific most the Pixel Rate Datu in on twitter. It's IT'S A smaller audience. But that audience to your point can be such highly engaged audience inside is engaging with news and content In such an interesting way like I'm this is actually after. I left twitter but one thing I saw. That was really cool was Disney Disney plus when they launched a couple months ago. They did this thing and I don't I. It's a really cool feature haven't seen they're really available to everyone where you could say like this tweet. It was a twitter about demand. Lauren which is cool. Sarwar show. We've already talked about it. I was a big Fan. Oh it's so good Jon favreau and that shows wonderful into stores in general I can come back to a star wars. Absolutely call me but what was really what they said you know I think was before the show came out like this tweet men Lawrence coming out on a couple of weeks and for like this tweet we will. Dm You every time. A new episode drops. I love it and I was like. Whoa what an interesting engagement tactic. That's see that's like. That is a brilliant marketing tactic. But it's even better customer success tactic because the I did that I liked it because I was like I. I'm like I don't know when these are going to be coming out and I don't know and I just got Disney plus I don't know and I don't follow any traditional news channels so mike. How do I know when stuff comes out? Yeah I think about it all the time in fact if any listeners. Have some type of capability like that like absolutely send it our way will promote it but I like I totally agree. That is such a brilliant thing and if you think about the evolution of that tool in twitter as something that advertisers could leverage or like any. Tv show should be using that right. You get it do you. You get it right. You know when I'm building content for customers or prospects I'm always thinking about. How do we create something that is timely relevant engaging total rape and? I feel like that that piece of that feature or that tactic sort of knocks. All three of them out of the park. Ray because its relevance knows that I'm the Disney probably already knew it was a Disney plus subscriber knows that it's relevant to me any. They know that I follow bar camel and I follow Star Wars Somali. Okay this guy's GonNa you know it's relevant. It's really engaging because it gives me a really cool action to take can just press one button and I got. I understand the benefit right so it's engaging and then the timeliness of it is perfect because one the show is coming out so it's like really timely and when I get that. Dm It's to show. Is here click here to watch that episode and I have found over my career that once if you're able to put content in front of a custom that hits those three marks your engagement rates go through the roof. Your conversion goes the roof. Your customer satisfaction goes through the roof. And I think that's such a great example of of a of a business innovating to create advertising or in customer engagement tools that allows businesses to exactly that wonder how much that cost. We should look at that for marketing. Trends that will be great. The sodas that just great. Yeah I'll share from my twitter like hey when you want new episodes Just like this tweet. Yeah no I love it. I mean and and there's another segment of the twitter sphere that I think is super fascinating under appreciated Unless you have any sense about this but like super I don't know what they're called active passive users mine. People like who like. I'm trying to think of getting my brother. Something like this doesn't really liked any stuff doesn't really comment ever Just scroll through the feed every day like every morning every night scroll through follows new people but doesn't really engage with the content but is like I am a monthly active user generated media And I think that there's just so many people out there now that like every now that you can see whether it's instagram or twitter. Whatever who liked what you can look at all that you get more and more people that are like I'm just not gonna like anything anymore because they don't want people to know what I'm making but you are looking at Maybe you're looking at accounts that you shouldn't be or whatever it is or maybe have the burners Katie I think that those audiences are so like interesting to target and if you give them a reason to engage that super super valuable And they wouldn't normally be engaged. That's right when wet I've been an avid for a but even early might twitter usage. I didn't really tweet. I rarely liked and by even though I'm a homeowner you're at times subscriber. I actually rarely start reading my news on the New York Times APP. I survived because they don't have access to those stories but I often get the stories directly from the writers on twitter because I follow my favorite writers and once they posted news story. I just click from there and I go straight into reading so There's so much of that and then it's a lot of those users also only tweet when they have a customer service complainer. Make this if you call somebody to complain you on the phone for an hour and then you hang up if you send him an email to blackbox never going to hear back but if you tweet at a brand to complain about something thirty seconds or like how can we help you redeem redeeming you. So it's it. There's there's definitely a lot of people who are more passive users but will get a lot of value engagement from from twitter. I I used to be one of those myself okay. Any final thoughts on on the best tips for twitter. What should our our marketing trends listeners? Keep an eye out for yeah. That's a good question Look I think the coolest thing about twitter is that it allows you to participate in cultural events in a way that no other platform allows you to write. I think as marketing moves into the space. Where it's harder advertise if people because people are buying themselves out of advertising distribution then one way to really getting them is when there is a cultural conversation taking place if you can contractually interject your brand in it. You can get a lot of impressions and a lot of consideration from that. Here's a great example was gonNA been awhile remember there was a When there was a blackout in the middle of the Super Bowl and Orios. Yeah 'cause I mean really cool. I forget exactly what he did. This is sort of an old example but there are just so many conversations taking place or even when the Peleton ad they just came out a couple months ago and everyone went after it and then I think James Franco had a brand of Tequila and they did like they create. They did an ad right leg a fast follow had the same actress and use those routes and twitter was the place where that conversation was taking place in. Twitter was a place that he he interjected that story so again to go back one gray way for brands to get to get in front of users is to participate in the cultural conversation. Best taking place in Meek Brand. Relevant twitter is often where the conversations taking place. Because that's where that's where that that timeline is is is where those conversations are happening so my tip is if you can find opportunity for your brand to interject an a story now. You have to be careful. You can backfire but but I think if you do it well and any awful way it can be a real source of leads. Exposure and ultimately conversion speaking of interjecting Before we get. Outta here we're going to do our lightning round. These questions are fast in order the lightning round of..

twitter Disney Disney Disney facebook Google Jon favreau Meek Brand New York Times rape Lauren Lawrence instagram Ray James Franco Peleton
"kiva" Discussed on Marketing Trends

Marketing Trends

14:28 min | 1 year ago

"kiva" Discussed on Marketing Trends

"I'm like twenty dollars for this comes back to me at some point in my life but does executive rate so The challenge we have is a marketing organization. Is How do we get to? What's really beneficial to our customers rate? Nobody very few people I would say are are going on Google googling Howard participating microfinance no total. That's not the thing most people are looking for. I you know I want to give back. I've been lucky a few times And I WANNA do some good. I WANNA pay forward. What are the best ways for me to pay it forward? And and how do we insert Kiva in that in that decision? Set that consideration set. I'm sorry So that they can understand what's unique AKIVA versus all the other amazing options to do good and can be considered and then ultimately convert and get them to become a given customer because our retention rates are incredible. The you know once you gotTa Repaid. Eighty percent of our customers would go inland again. Yeah so it's really about. How do we feel the top of the funnel Which is you know. It's challenging for any brand because we live in an incredibly busy time. We live in a time in which customers are buying themselves out of advertising right. Think about the media. The Media. Space Today When you when you sign up Netflix. When you're buying Hulu without ads when you subscribing to Disney plus when you're doing is you're buying yourself out of advertising that's one of the main value props which means that wait. How do I reach that person now? How how can I get in front of them? And when we're now you put on top of that. That is a nonprofit which means that we are incredibly careful about how we use our funding because if any dollar that goes into marketing means that it's a dollar doesn't go out on the field so we have to be incredibly incredibly awful and and in rigorous about our marketing investment which makes complete sense so That's the challenge right. How do we get more and more people aware of what we do aware of? What makes Khiva unique enjoying the Kiva community? Yeah if this was attack product it would be like in the first thirty days like you position like if you had an algorithm that could position and this would would not be something that would be a good idea. But for Siegel argument. Go on you position that the first project that somebody does that somehow you know they get that back in the first thirty days or sixty days or ninety days or whatever a transparent time horizon so it's like they know that the system works and that they get the more immediate gratification and then it's like you know after that you were to go into like the less likely once again not not saying that that that's a good idea. But that's that's the sort of thing people want to to no end like this is like the classic. What is the person really buying? I would posit. I don't know if you know anything on this that it's not like customers are sitting there at the end of twenty nineteen like. I have a hundred bucks this year that I'm going to spend on charity. Which one am I GONNA do like? That's probably not what they're doing. They probably come across. Kiva somehow through one of your funnels and is saying like wow. I didn't know about this like I can. I can do this. Twenty five bucks today. This is fine. I'm just GONNA fire. Fire the bullet or you know. Maybe it's after the Thirteenth impression impression that that are like hey. I'm finally ready to do this. Or Hey you know I got my bonus this month or whatever it is And now top of mind in some way but I would imagine that. It's not like a traditional You know type of a thing because they're such a specific way to do it right and there's such a specific thing that they're supporting I don't know maybe I may be wrong but no I. I think I think you're onto something one. I WANNA address your earlier idea which is not a bad idea. I think you're onto something which is to make an analogy right. It's the urban legend or of facebook. Once you get that fourteenth friend yeah. You're not locked in every single successful product. Has that that loop of like once you close the loop? That user now has a much higher likelihood of becoming a retained customer keeping us no different and we believe a Lotta that is once you're able to get your repayment back in help some new. I think there's a there's there's there's a light bulb goes off. Say Oh I get it my number my my investment or my my contribution goes further on Kiva Org than other places that could investing in so we are actually working through a lot of ideas of how do we. How do we make that feedback loop shorter? I think that I think that's the right problem to try to solve whether it was exactly the same way that you described it. I don't think they'll be the case but I think that's exactly the question right. It's how do we make that feedback loop really really short? Or how many updates like is it right? You know if you are donating to you know jill to buy a cow or something like that. It's like an. She gets to do so. Do they get to go from just individual contributors or is it like a goal plus? Kiva or like you know if she needs two hundred box and like Ian does you. A hundred and then Dylan are headed girl. Sitting next to me does fifty and then it's like open that extra fifty bucks like open a month is how does that last part. Every loan has thirty days to be fully funded. Okay yeah so let's say Joe who needs a cow post on key without org in. She needs five hundred dollars to buy that cow. Then people can come in discover her story and they can give as little as twenty five dollars but someone might be become so enamored with with her story to say I will give you. I will not give or lend you the full for a five hundred dollars. However the the more typical experiences Dylan will give twenty five. I'll give fifty IAN will give one hundred dollars or until we get to five hundred we get when we got the five hundred. Got To say Jill your guy funded so it's really it's like we in the actually what's really cool. Is You can see when you when you make alone. You can see the other people in the community who helped in that alone and then you can actually build teams so in so for example. I every loan that I make on dot org is associated with the northwestern university team. And it's just a cool way to keep tabs on parts of a keeps communities. How different communities are giving? What are they passionate row giving to? This is really funny. But it is for example the most to active communities on Kiva The most active teams are Christians. The Christian team in the eighth east team like yeah. It's it's amazing. It's incredible how everyone can agree that when you get to help somebody to be empowered into their lives that everyone wants support that idea so you can join any number of teams when you're Kiva Org weather it's university whether it's your religious affiliation whether it is worth the city you live in an but they're all these cool teams and you get updates in some. You know if you're in a team you can say. Oh I just saw this amazing loan to Joe who needs a cow. Who else wants to help out there? Can you can actually communicate with one another and and drive up and drum up support from a specific borrower. Yeah I would imagine that those network effects are probably pretty massive. Especially 'cause you're giving people who are already have an affiliation with each other a platform to do do it on final piece on even that I wanna get into some of the stuff From from twitter Fan So When you came into the role was one of the things that surprised you about marketing Akiva. What surprised me really shouldn't have been a surprise. But it's just the level of passion for the brand you know Marketer spend their whole careers trying to get people to be really passionate about the service or the product that they offer and I came into. Kiva assuming no different the great. I want a big part of my job will be to convince people that was a great place for you to be engaged in and turns out people who are our user base are just so passionate about it already. They get it. In fact they feel ownership over over the Kiva brand they've been with us for years and years and make our jobs in a way a little bit easier because you're a great people really get in their fashion other brand in in other ways you feel you feel so much You really don't want to disappoint them. You know you really. It really makes you think twice about intake really seriously How to create the best brand of the best product experience The best way to do good you can't in the world so it's a Dow. That was something that now that I've been here for a while. It's obvious that people re Pasha could this is. This is a very personal decision to go. Help somebody but coming in. It's something I hadn't quite considered that was. That was a really fun in different challenge to come in two different set of circumstances. Let's get twitter so I'm a huge fan. I think twitter is is an incredible An incredible place. I know that there are issues with it. Of course there's issue with any platform where you're working with billion people or whatever. Three hundred million people whatever's on twitter. And I think you know from an advertising perspective. It's something that's not nearly talked about as much as facebook obviously So I'm curious what what did you. What did you do there? I was a part of the growth team that was growing the Self Service advertising platform on twitter at the time. Shout out to them by many of my friends. Still there In it's a wonderful team. And if they really felt a start up within a young company red at that point when I joined twitter had IPO year before so they weren't like they weren't a startup anymore but the self service advertising business was it was a very small very nimble team of people really wanted to crack the ability to convert regulatory users were small and medium businesses to to become advertisers on the platform whether they wanted to grow their following whether they wanted to drive traffic to a specific business or website or APP that they were developing And it was really fun because there was no playbook for it right. I mean you always pick things up from other businesses But we were really trying to do things for the first time Especially for twitter so it was just really fun to opposed to approach challenges in problems with a hundred with all the creativity you could. Yeah so it was. It was a really fun period and I learned a lot and stay in touch with many of those friends. Yeah you need A. We need some like twitter classes for all the all the folks that are are people borrowers on Kiva. They probably need those twitter tips to figure out how to market themselves better. It's definitely Bernie's improve the market growth. Right yes. So how much were people spending onto like? What was that target segment? Are they spending like twenty five bucks a year? They spending twenty five hundred bucks a year. You know it was very the time there were people who were spending fifty bucks because they wanted to get a few extra followers but but there were companies that were spending Alex. Small businesses were startups. They're only getting started. We're spending tens to hundreds of thousands of dollars a year quickly graduated in to manage. Count those different thing but it was really very which made as a as a marketer was really it was really fun challenged work right at one point. I'm working with a HOT STARTUP. That has fresh budget and trying to emulate. I want to spend all this money in one. Part of my marketing investment to go into twitter and other times was someone who writes a blog and just once again a few followers on or like they wrote a very funny tweeted. They want people to see that tweet there. They WANNA buy impressions in one by They want to They want to pay to have their their tweets. Show up and people timelines. I don't follow them right so it was sort of. It was very widened and how to think about the product experience marketing capabilities to do this at scale in in a segmented way personalized way. It was really fun. Yeah that is really fun. I remember I remember. When the first time I was seeing like promoted tweets consistently was T. MOBILE. Oh Yeah John legare whatever. He's GonNa be me now anyway. Is John La- gear? Yeah I'm probably butchering yes. How to pronounce the name but I remember his account was always Roy now. Yes like millions. Millions millions But But I did always. I always felt like and I still feel this way and a lot of listeners to the show I'm sure in the same boat where you have tons of people on twitter that our senior executives or just any buying persona that are on there that might not be super active but like leverage twitter. Like their new source right and they follow one hundred fifteen people that sit and they stay up to date on those people. Whatever it is for sports or this or that or whatever and but they're really impactful people in there and they could be buying from you and I always felt like it was underutilized because who you follow is so intent based And it was something that I just felt like and I still feel like is really underutilized. I know price comes into a lot of that. Should've miked up Dylan for this We'll give you some questions Since he's are headed growth but Yet curious like what? What did you see that advertisers? Doing a great job of or some stuff. That was really interesting that you saw novel innovative. I mean what was interesting about twitter. Is that the the immediacy of your engaging with can be such a powerful signal totally right and that's what really sets it apart in all these all the networks have something that sets them apart right if you google for if.

twitter Kiva Google Kiva Org facebook Dylan Joe executive Khiva Netflix Howard Disney jill Hulu Siegel northwestern university team John legare John La Roy
"kiva" Discussed on Marketing Trends

Marketing Trends

02:19 min | 1 year ago

"kiva" Discussed on Marketing Trends

"We are joined by special guests enrica. What's going on? How's it going in great to be here? Thanks for having me. Yeah. It's well. It's great to be here. We're at Khiva in Sunny San Francisco. Today it's a great day to be talking marketing and a great day to be talking about all things. Kiva. We're huge fans. I've never got AKIVA microloans before but I have heard so many success stories and it's an incredible platform so we'll get into that but before hall of that. How did you get into marketing in the first place whole before going to that? I'll make sure you make alone on. Keep it before you leave the building very Galileo but Greek question one way or another. I feel like I've been in marketing. My career but the way they started was early my career I was in sales. Which really when you think about is just a part of the marketing funnel but for the first five years of my career. I was doing sales and I was. I'm originally Brazilian. So I was doing international development Working with an American company in Chicago and Doing Business Elements America so I split my time between Chicago and Brazil mostly and we were pretty successful at selling these tools that had been built originally for the US and European market into South America. And at that point we started to think about this market has real potential. How about we developed some tools and products for Latin America and I was a big part of that process. And that's when I discovered. Wait a minute thinking about the customer thinking about building a product thinking about bringing a product to market is a lot more interesting than sending cold emails. So that's when I decided I wanNA pivot and go completely into marketing and I decided to go back to school and and to facilitate that pivot. I I went to Kellogg to get my Mba and northwestern university and That's how I pivoted completely to be one hundred percent focused on marketing but it was really that sales experience that gave me that foundation of interacting with customers day in and day out understanding their their their needs making sure that we're delivering on that need is what really got me interested in doing it in scale Through the marketing department so flash forward to today tell me a little bit about your role as head of Marketing Brand Kiva. That is a great question so as you know very well..

head of Marketing Brand Kiva Kiva Chicago AKIVA microloans Kellogg Latin America South America San Francisco Brazil US
"kiva" Discussed on Parcast Presents: Summer of '69

Parcast Presents: Summer of '69

03:17 min | 1 year ago

"kiva" Discussed on Parcast Presents: Summer of '69

"Kiva looked out with concern upon the misty road in front of her home. Weeks of preparation led to this tonight. The farmers had worked quickly in the fields so that the harvest was complete. The animals had all been brought in and shuddered safely flee in their barnes so they wouldn't be vulnerable and Kiva herself made sure to get all of her cleaning and clothes washing done earlier in the week weak. She couldn't risk doing chores tonight. She jumps at the sound of someone pounding on her door clutching her robe. She removed to answer it. Standing on the other side was a small figure clothed in a white gown with a dripping glistening. Face is it held a sack in its tiny hands. Kiva gagged held her breath then asked yes the figure figure cried out a soul a soul a soul cake moving quickly Kiva reached over to her stove for a small baked good and dropped it in the ghoul sack. The figure giggled said thank you. Miss then scampered off down the road. Kiva quickly shut the door and locked it behind her. That was a close one for tonight was the most dangerous of all night's the night when the spirit world crossed over with the earthly plane. It was the dying of the year. It was the bane of kings. It was salwen it was hollow. We welcome to the dark side light of a podcast original a show where we delve into the CD underbelly of pop culture icons and historic events. We aim to expose the ugly the truth behind cultural moments and public figures. We hold most dear proving that there is always more to the story than meets the eye. I'm your host Richard and I'm kate. This is our third episode on the dark side of holidays. The holiday season may be seen as a time of celebration for many any. But it's saccharin exterior conceals many unpleasant truths at podcast. We're grateful for you our listeners. You allow was to do what we love. Let us know how we're doing reach out on facebook and instagram. At podcast and twitter at our cast network you can find wind all episodes of the dark side of and all other par- cast originals for free on spotify or wherever you listen to podcasts to stream the dark outside of for free on spotify. Just open the APP and type the dark side of in the search bar. Today's episode is part of our series on Halloween. We delve into the fascinating traditions. Behind the world's scariest holiday if you enjoy this episode of the dark side of be sure to check out the rest of the park cast presents Halloween feed on spotify.

Kiva spotify twitter facebook Richard
"kiva" Discussed on Parcast Presents: Summer of '69

Parcast Presents: Summer of '69

03:03 min | 1 year ago

"kiva" Discussed on Parcast Presents: Summer of '69

"Tonight. The farmers had worked quickly in the fields so that the harvest was complete the animals had all been brought in and shuddered safe Flee in their barnes so they wouldn't be vulnerable and Kiva herself made sure to get all of her cleaning and clothes washing done earlier in the weak. She couldn't risk doing chores tonight she jumped at the sound of someone pounding on her door clutching her robe removed to answer it standing on the other side was a small figure clothed in a white gown with dripping glistening face it held us sac and its tiny hands Kiva gagged held her breath then asked yes the figure cried out a soul a soul a soul cake moving quickly Kiva reached over to her stove for a small baked good and dropped it in the Google sack the figure giggled said thank you miss then scampered off down the road kiva quick shut the door and locked it behind her that was a close one for tonight was the most dangerous of all nights the nights when the spirit world crossed over with the earthly plane it was the dying of the year it was the bane of kings it was Sawan it was hollow we welcome to the darks I'd of a podcast original a show where we delve into the CD underbelly of pop culture icons and historic events we aim to expose the ugly the truth behind cultural moments and public figures we hold most dear proving that there is always more to the story than meets the eye I'm your host Richard and I'm kate this is our third episode on the dark side of holidays the holiday season may be seen as a time of celebration for any but it's saccharin exterior conceals many unpleasant truths at podcast we're grateful for you our listeners you allow wind all episodes of the dark side of and all other par- cast originals for free on spotify or wherever you listen to podcasts to stream the dark outside of for free on spotify just open the APP and type the dark side of in the search bar. Today's episode is part of our series on Halloween where we delve into the fascinating traditions behind the world's scariest holiday if you enjoy this episode of the dark side of be sure to check out the rest The park cast presents Halloween feed on spotify.

Kiva spotify Sawan Google Richard kate
"kiva" Discussed on The Dark Side Of

The Dark Side Of

03:03 min | 1 year ago

"kiva" Discussed on The Dark Side Of

"Tonight the farmers had worked quickly in the fields so that the harvest was complete the animals had all been brought in and shuddered safe flee in their barnes so they wouldn't be vulnerable and Kiva herself made sure to get all of her cleaning and clothes washing done earlier in the weak. She couldn't risk doing chores tonight she jumped at the sound of someone pounding on her door clutching her robe removed to answer it standing on the other side was a small figure clothed in a white gown with dripping glistening face figure cried out a soul a soul a soul cake moving quickly Kiva reached over to her stove for a small baked good and dropped it in the Google sack the figure giggled said thank you miss then scampered off down the road kiva quick Shut the door and locked it behind her that was a close one for tonight was the most dangerous of all nights the nights when the spirit world crossed over with the earthly plane it was the dying of the year it was the bane of kings it was Sawan it was hollow we welcome to the darks I'd of a podcast original a show where we delve into the CD underbelly of pop culture icons and historic events we aim to expose the ugly the truth behind cultural moments and public figures we hold most dear proving that there is always more to the story than meets the eye I'm your host Richard and I'm kate this is our third episode on the dark side of holidays the holiday season may be seen as a time of celebration for any but it's saccharin exterior conceals many unpleasant truths at podcast. We're grateful for you our listeners you allow wind all episodes of the dark side of and all other par- cast originals for free on spotify or wherever you listen to podcasts to stream the dark outside of for free on spotify just open the APP and type the dark side of in the search bar. Today's episode is part of our series on Halloween where we delve into the fascinating traditions behind the world's scariest holiday if you enjoy this episode of the dark side of be sure to check out the rest The park cast presents Halloween feed on spotify.

Kiva spotify Sawan Google Richard kate
Boris Johnson heads for Brussels as Brexit deal hangs in the balance

BBC World Service

00:55 sec | 1 year ago

Boris Johnson heads for Brussels as Brexit deal hangs in the balance

"The British prime minister Boris Johnson will travel to a crucial summit in E. U. leaders in Brussels like today as efforts continue to secure a brexit deal that could be improved in London British and the unique SEAT's were finalizing a legal text and it's understood that most outstanding issues have been resolved but reports suggested that democratic unionist MPs from Northern Ireland who support is crucial was still reticent his Kevin Connolly well two days of reports of the brakes it tool for making good progress the leaders will gather in Brussels hoping for history the bracing the bumps in the road there were rumors yesterday that the process is almost complete but the complications in London negotiations a Westminster have held things up the bridge that representative to the E. U. parliament kiva Hofstad that it was possible that a deal could be done at this summit I think the progress had been made possible because Boris Johnson had given ground Kevin Connelly reporting

Boris Johnson Brussels London British Northern Ireland Prime Minister E. U. Kevin Connolly London Representative Kevin Connelly Two Days
"kiva" Discussed on Dentistry Uncensored with Howard Farran

Dentistry Uncensored with Howard Farran

02:28 min | 2 years ago

"kiva" Discussed on Dentistry Uncensored with Howard Farran

"So you mentioned pulp dense activity, Activa bioactive products for proactive dentist, so you're not a fan of pulp, dense, Activa bioactive, restorative restorations by friend. That was the biggest marketing blitz scam of dentistry ever, they put this stuff out. They've got the they've got these individuals that promote this, that aren't dentists claim to be scientists, but don't have any degrees. I can see that tell us all their bioactive this that and the other thing when we use. Them in combination with silver, diming fluoride when we use at Kifah in combination with silver Damian fluoride, we get failures. And then people come back to us and say smart doesn't were why is that? Because when I write an article for Dr by cusp ID for instance, okay? I write the article about silver, Diomede fluoride and glass, I honor and they put a banner for kiva on the top. I didn't put that banner there. They did why because Dr by cusp is owned by shine and shine wants to sell Akiba for pulp debt. So they put the banner up or dentist, who's reading my article, he actually or she actually is reading this thing. Oh because really very quickly because they're very busy. I'll use Activa for Mark technique that doctor for shelhah is recommending, and then they fail. And then they say smart fails look, we gotta stop with the advertising and the B S. This is, you know this is Dennis. Uncensored right Howard right about it. This is real. This is not science resin is in hurt. Dammit, you need to ask. What is in the material need as a dentist as a new Dennis graduating from dental school? You mentioned the numbers you need as a new dentist to do your due diligence. What is in the material? Now, if the manufacturer and let you poke that this instance, says to, you know, we can't tell you what the formulation of that kiva is we aren't allowed to tell you how much last is inactive because it's proprietary walk away. You need to know..

Activa kiva Akiba Dennis Kifah Howard shelhah
"kiva" Discussed on Good One: A Podcast About Jokes

Good One: A Podcast About Jokes

02:21 min | 2 years ago

"kiva" Discussed on Good One: A Podcast About Jokes

"They know a lot of the times the songs were making our that also or just our impression of various styles of music when I interviewed guys for Popstars e kiva, you said, the benefit, partly of writing for a character. It's useful for whatever percentage of the audience doesn't get what we're doing in so much as I think having explicit character is. As a benefit is have you noticed that it's sort of like it's clear to what you're trying to say when it is a character that is they have names, and you can point to them. You have backstory like that probably. I mean it definitely clarifies that it's not specifically us whereas you might be like, why are they saying that if it was a saying certain things? I mean, we feel like we've only done like three or four songs where it's truly supposed to be us, and even then the joke is generally how much we suck. And it's still not we're making up lies within like it's not true. You're saying the story about us having a four way with an alien didn't happen. That was that's real. That's our words story. It's about as much as I assume like Larry. David is in curb your enthusiasm, or like me and REBA exactly that That one. one that was all too real. When I first saw the songs that cluster. I remember again, from when I first interviewed kiva, you said you guys like making fun of posturing pretending to be cool, and tough and masculine in that way. How are the bash brother sort of perfect, muses for your style? You just said it basically, they definitely embodied that eighties vibe. That is both. Really fun and entertaining, to watch and behold. But also has more and more and more become clearly problematic. But that's also not even specifically them that we could have been any sports star from I believe. Yeah, it'd been football players or baseball players. Any other baseball player a lot of what ju like drew us doing this weird project is just those general ideas of, like, yeah. Honestly it combined with a lot of sort of realizations about stuff. We grew up on, like, we recently have had a lot of discussions about, like revenge of the nerds, and all these movies that we grew up on that seemed really harmless and goofy..

kiva baseball David Larry football
"kiva" Discussed on Rob Has a Podcast

Rob Has a Podcast

03:30 min | 2 years ago

"kiva" Discussed on Rob Has a Podcast

"That could be the podcasters yelling at the listeners. Okay. All right. Anything else in regards to Minnesota? I think that's it. RAM EP at Rob's website, the com or tweet at me, or DM me, and let us know if you're not coming. You don't have to tell us I think that's fine. I, I wanna come. But, like that's okay. But if you're coming, let us know. And so we could start planning ahead for that. And then if we do hear from enough people, then we'll update you in the next episode and talk about what the live show. We'll ideas are potentially going to start sending ideas for that. If you have an idea, hey, this would work great for a live show. It has to be something that's it can like it can't be to visual, right? Because we also have to release it as a podcast, right? And it can't be something with, like, okay. Caitlyn Herman life. Coach. I is like we need like we would needlessly fly in Caitlyn Herman righty. That's our way to get it. Maybe we have a local guest that we would look things are on the table for the maybe there are things that you could only do in Minnesota that are part of his. This potential idea. Yeah. That's all right. We are what our Minnesota Centric renege Reneged by by. interviewing Chester's friend, that was hitting up the strip clubs for the thirty six hours before the podcast that guys come in. He's invited. Also, any, you know, people are like, well, what happens if like a real weirdo wants the Cup? So if you're sitting at home, and you're if you're listening to this k- want to come to Minnesota, but, like I know deep down a serial killer. Then I think you have to sit this out, right? We respect you. Yeah. Right. Like, but, but you have I think you can't come here because I put us in jeopardy. So if you are serial killer, or, you know, leave if you only murder, like once or what, what makes someone a killer three murders, I think one murder one murder. That's not in self defense. I think we'd overlook self-defense. Yes. So if you've done murdering probably sit this one out. But if you know you just had some light, arson will probably let you come flight away. What constitutes? Light, arson fire, wearing them like not a full house. But maybe like a like a shed some shatter. So is it by accident? Did you leave oily rags accident? I don't think it's arson. I think it's only arson. If it's is that arsenal firebugs, no no firebomb. No, you. Because then they get if we get an Airbnb, we don't want to burning down there being be. That's right. That's true. No arsonists and no murders. Please. Okay. All right. Kiva should we set up what we're doing here on the final four? Please do because this is a little bit of a confusing premise. Do we know who sent this in the who shot up Tim say, we do too many Tim ideas? And they might really be saying it after today. We don't know shut up to him. Can I tell you what shut up Tim sent me this week as, as a pitch that he wanted in the mail bag? Yes. Just because people are like, how come you take somebody Tim ideas and the really answers because he sends so many in. And you should see the ones I reject. Here's the one I reject that recently podcast idea. Robin kiva are dead in this morbid podcast. Robin kiva discuss what they think they're funerals will be like hula tend tool snub, and what will happen to their podcast post, Robin, Akiva, conclude, episode presenting the geez, that they wrote for each other, or they touching are they said, or they funny..

Minnesota arson Tim Caitlyn Herman Robin kiva murder Rob Kiva Chester Airbnb Akiva thirty six hours
Democratic Republic, Congo And Heidi discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

00:58 sec | 2 years ago

Democratic Republic, Congo And Heidi discussed on Science Friday

"The second largest Ebola outbreak has killed over one thousand people in Africa sweeping through the north kiva region in the northeastern part of the Democratic Republic of the Congo during the last outbreak in west Africa, the question was could enough vaccine be produced for this outbreak. The good news is over a hundred thousand people have been vaccinated in the area. The bad news this outbreak comes amidst a background of political unrest in the area and the violence is spilling over into clinics responding to the outbreak. There have been a hundred and thirty one attacks on clinics. Heidi contain an outbreak in a war zone. That's we're gonna be talking about. Let me introduce my guests. John Johnson is the emergency coordinator for Doctors Without Borders based in Goma, Democratic Republic of the Congo. He joy. Us from the field. Welcome to science Friday. Thank

Democratic Republic Congo Heidi John Johnson Doctors Without Borders Africa West Africa Ebola Coordinator Goma
"kiva" Discussed on Rob Has a Podcast

Rob Has a Podcast

05:15 min | 2 years ago

"kiva" Discussed on Rob Has a Podcast

"Kiva? Yes. Akiva, what does Israel. That is correct. Okay. Does worth five points. Keep is up to twenty one rub has thirty one. There are a lot of time left in round two. Now, we're almost done. Okay. Okay. Separate the sheep from the ghosts was the category added kiva what category? Would you like here teacher meeting? All right. This is worth five points. What media talion city is home to Europe's oldest university? Akiva. Yes. Akiva. What is this really? That is incorrect. Tim. I heard Tim Hamburg at his incorrect camber German. Rob. Yes. Rob maples? No it was bologna. I missed baloney ital-. I missed the Italy part that was a place in Germany. Keep got four dunce hats now. Right. Picture sunsets. On. Center of attention is the next category added, and I think Cuba's your there's a lot to keep track of so doing a great job, man. You're crushing it the road the victories, paved sweat and awards. Okay. This is worth three points, which former NBA player is the only person to be named NBA MVP coach of the year and executive of the year. Tim, Tim Magic Johnson. Incorrect. Yes. Akiva, Larry Bird that is correct. Kiva? Okay. The next category out of the board is rock and roll. And Akiva what category? Would you like? Let's do survival of the literate. Survival of the literate. This is worth three points, which lecturer wrote the book and Cass McLellan's. Favorite? How to win friends and influence people is rubs. Throb? Dale Carnegie that is correct. So is three points for Robb. And the next category added is death on my side, and it is your category to pick. Rubs up by ten for those wondering. Okay, let's do. Death is on my side. This is worth four points who became president after the assassination of ABRAHAM LINCOLN. Rob. Yes, Rob Andrew Jackson. That is correct. That's worth four. Yes, you can still buzzing Cuba. You're still allowed to compete if you'd like passing gas is the category added, and rob what category do that one. Okay. This is worth two points. What airship caught fire and crashed in nineteen thirty seven while onlookers commented with the famous phrase. Oh, the humanity. Tim, I heard rob the Hindenburg that is correct. And the last category added to the board is until die. Do us parts. How much was it less question to that too? Yes. At forty Akiva, twenty four won't do things get money too. Or just the winner. I don't get twenty four bucks. Right. Right. That I get my money back from the loser. Okay. I didn't know that. Okay. Let's do a rock enrolled. Okay. Rock and roll. This is worth two points. What multiple Grammy award winner? Once ran into a burning house to save a pound of marijuana. Tim. I heard snoop Dogg. That is incorrect, Akiva. Yes. Akiva, Willie Nelson. That is correct. Yeah. Yeah. Who's like the second. We'd guy. He's the second. Billy Ray Cyrus next. But I don't think there's any Grammy wait now for all town wrote. But before that, I can have any did to keep it get seventeen points for that. It was to apply hundred twenty six Keefe twenty-six comes through. The last question. So that was the last question of the second round. So rob we'll be moving on to face off against him in the third and final round. Take my twenty six dollars back from Akiva. And put it back on the board. Tim before you walk away can run one hundred forty dollars if he wins or mex- at.

Akiva Tim Kiva Rob maples rob Grammy Tim Hamburg Rob Andrew Jackson Tim Magic Johnson Cuba NBA Billy Ray Cyrus bologna Europe Dale Carnegie snoop Dogg Israel ABRAHAM LINCOLN Germany Keefe
"kiva" Discussed on She Who Persisted

She Who Persisted

02:45 min | 2 years ago

"kiva" Discussed on She Who Persisted

"Then the other one I've seen kind of coming up in I've participated in. I really like is like the kiva. So. Right. So that is it's kind of the evolution of the Sally Struthers adopted child, you know, plea from the eighties, right? But it's the the twenty first century way. Kiva is this platform where you kind of go on and it profiles kiva is doing work throughout the world in proof women in developing countries who kind of make their case for hey, you person lend me X money. Right. And so, you know, you go in and news Armenia is trying to raise twenty five hundred dollars for and this is what I've kind of seen. It's often. It's these women running these little data's write these little lake kind of defeating food away cysts issues in the developing world. Are we supposed to use developing world? I am not sure what the term is anymore. I feel like developing word is world is not correct. The now it implies that they are in a stage of development that is. Is like big behind us. And I feel like that's really like colonial language for how to talk about the developed. The developing words talk about other countries. Yeah. I mean, I definitely know we're not supposed to use third world because for a second and third world is just bullshit. But developing world, also, I think is wrong. And I'm sure there's a better way to say that I am not sure what that is. So lovely listeners educate us. Let us know. I mean, I I'm not telling you to do our work for us. But they're so much on the internet to to like point us in the direction of what the best way to talk about. You know, countries that are struggling are struggling. Yeah. Christine Lagarde, Ron this podcast to be so much better. I know. I know. Yeah. So anyway, you kind of you know, as a as as a lender, right? And I even like, you know, women women in in the western world or in the privileged world. You know, we need ways to access meaningful opportunities right to lift up our sisters around the world. And so, you know, it is kind of cool as it should be considered a lender. Right. You're not a donor. You're not a savior your lender. And you're you're actively investing in in these other women so often, you know, you're giving this chance to kind of see like, which potential Lendys kind of match your your priority giving areas Hyoety lending areas, and you can invested any level, right? Like, you can invest twenty five dollars..

Kiva Sally Struthers Christine Lagarde Armenia Ron twenty five hundred dollars twenty five dollars
"kiva" Discussed on Rob Has a Podcast

Rob Has a Podcast

03:07 min | 2 years ago

"kiva" Discussed on Rob Has a Podcast

"That would have been easy. It's all right. We we might have a few things up our sleep. I I can tiebreaker as well. Okay. Let our first tiebreaker. This is going to be prices prices, right? Prices Rourke rules, you're gonna guess number between one thousand and the closest without going over gets their idea to move on. There's going to be an honor system. Both of you were going to write down an idea. And I'm going to ask a number, and I'm going to ask you what your number is. Okay. And I in the chat for you guys. And then it keep it could just say it. Excellent. Okay. Here's your question. We asked shut up Tim to name a number between one and one thousand without going over closest wins. What was that without going over? Can I change my number? Now, you don't have to I'm going to type in my number. Okay. And then you get to say what yours is. So I sent my number two digital Klein into. Jess, they have it. Okay. All right. So then get a kiva number, and you already have mine kiva. What is your number one hundred kiva has guest one hundred rob what is your number? I put in five a one five oh one. So in order to determine the winner of this bracket the closest without going over we shut up Tim number between one and one thousand in his response was and I quote four. Twenty. Kiva me in the middle listeners. Oman, Nebraska, baby. Okay. We're putting through an idea that has a zero percent chance of actually being probably thought perhaps or whatever your percent chance, and we send like well people out on what we're we're going to get people to fly into Omaha Nebraska to meet and record audio and that will be a podcast, and this is going to come up on the wheel. And then we are we sending the people sort of pre do it. Yeah. We'll send them ahead. Okay. How about this? It doesn't go on the wheel until the counter happens. Of course, not. But also phones it didn't win the whole go on the wheel until it wins, the grow it may grow in rob. As we go on here. Can't wait until we have. One two in the in the first round thing to more. Yeah. More just to tie the loosened on the tiebreaker. I asked him without him knowing what it was he responded for twenty. Broth, I followed up and said just so, you know, this is for a tiebreaker on, Robin. Akiva, Neto podcast. Would you like to change your number? And he said, no, I'm sticking with good. Excellent. Okay. Let's move onto our next match up. We got to use tiebreaker. Finally, here we go to ideas, you get to decide the winner. I idea rob..

Nebraska Tim Akiva Rourke Oman Jess Klein Robin Neto zero percent
"kiva" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"kiva" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Kiva robots. They look like large room buzz carrying yellow shelving units in traditional warehouses. It's the people who walk to the shelves here. It's the robots the bring the shelves to people. The machines know what to bring in went to get each order packed in time for delivery. It's a I keeping track of all items and almost a million square feet of this warehouse. I constantly arranges the shells. So the things you're about to buy already to go. There's a mix of industrial automation manual processes and more sophisticated robotics. Brad porter is the head of robotics for Amazon operations. This is controversial work in retail where playoffs are rampant. Just as automated reshapes, the workforce, economists are divided on how much exactly a I will eliminate or create jobs, especially for lower income Americans in its defense. Amazon often. Points to how much it's actually been hiring to porter. We are in the latest chapter of industrialization, industrial automation and robotics are here. They've been here for a long time one area where a has created a new type of job is in deliveries in the last mile in busy cities, Amazon has to pull out all the stops. The company took a page from Uber and now hires drivers for side gigs making super fast deliveries that pay as much as twenty five dollars an hour. Fuels this it matches package size car size and even recommends what package to put in last. She buys says when you're in one hour race every minute counts. So is timing estimates consider traffic and building entry codes and it learns from its mistakes. The driver forgets his key at reception and has to walk a little bit longer the drives delivering a package, and it's an elderly lady, and they talk a little bit. It's hard for me to predict all these scenarios. He says, but next time maybe the address with a chatty, Cathy will get a few more minutes baked into the algorithm. Alina? So you NPR news Seattle..

Amazon Brad porter NPR Alina Cathy Seattle twenty five dollars one hour
"kiva" Discussed on Skip and Shannon: Undisputed

Skip and Shannon: Undisputed

03:41 min | 3 years ago

"kiva" Discussed on Skip and Shannon: Undisputed

"This is a humbly experience to be at home to feel like I should be I when you know, I know in the league, I know I can play and still provide skill sets in a the ability to get things done in playmaking ability. Yes, my attitude, my beat of my drum is going to kind of tone back a little bit because I wanna be I wanna be given a chance and to get that contract, you gotta be on the team right now. He's at home training, working out, trying to get in a position to where he can get another contract. So yes, his attitude can change. I don't think we, we need his attitude to change. I think for for kiva Cleveland Browns. I bring this Brian in because I know what is track record is as far as numbers. Yes, I w-. Once your fire, won't your passion. I want all of that, but I want you to come in here understanding. You're not the number one guy. What are you already? And he knows if he would have come in and do anything else, Greg, he would become yes, so so he can't come in and have you love the idea of turning into a choirboy really is just about commonsense once you put in that spot and you know you're looking at your future ahead of you and you know what you have to do and get done, and you know what not to do. So I don't. I don't think you're asking them to change and do not be fiery and not what the no all you won't want that that you want your signing Dez Bryant, not somebody else. You wanna yelling at Baker Mayfield Gill, right Raj law Tigers stripes, rob, you know that guys don't change overnight. Greg. I applaud you for defending one of your brethren in Brian good receiver, but I'm telling you the Cleveland Browns give you a call. I've seen you in the hall down here working out you, you're a better shape and better locker room presence than Dez Bryant. Go to the locker room presence better. I'm not. I'm not trying to compete with Dez Bryant. I, I have my my cons when it comes to Dez Bryant as far as route running in different things. But as far as being a playmaker impacting that team that has not won, they won one game in two years. Like, you can't tell me this isn't a good opportunity for both sides like weaken both capitalize on this. I can get back into the league and I can try to work myself into another contract another deal and showcase that. I'm still who believe that I am in Dez Bryant rounds, which struggled like we just talked about struggled in the red zone. We got a guy who's done it been there, yes, and help us out. Open up, help open up other receivers if he's a productive. So it does work for both side hard pass. Brian. I mean ruining potential. The young guys ruining locker room. That's one thirty one that signed a rebuild. I think you Jackson. Once that on the sideline is a guy who huge exit. If they start one in five or one six, he's gone. He's not making it to Halloween and Dez. Bryant Inca help that a couple of red zone touchdowns is not worth the potential locker room outer keg that you're can says, no one key component that I think you're missing here. If the Cleveland Browns really didn't want this Brian, they have someone in house that has worked with this brand on the sidelines and has had heated confrontations with him base the face in Todd, Haley. So settled talk and say, look, no, we're ready. We'll see in the next seventy two hours. Maybe if this was just for TV, as I as I predicted Todd alias for real, bring him on, we need. We'll see. I don't know just for TV, but we'll see if scorpion turns choirboy ran lightning..

Dez Bryant Cleveland Browns Brian Greg Baker Mayfield Gill Todd Jackson Haley seventy two hours two years
Congo’s latest Ebola outbreak taking place in a war zone

The Science Hour

03:30 min | 3 years ago

Congo’s latest Ebola outbreak taking place in a war zone

"Start with the new and very worrying outbreak of the abode of virus in the Democratic Republic of Congo is just two weeks ago, the authorities they had to Clinton early outbreak in the west of the country to be over that success was put down to the rapid response approach device after the poorly contained epidemic in west Africa in two thousand thirteen to two thousand sixteen, but now more than two and a half thousand kilometers way in north key province near the border of Uganda, they've been thirty six deaths as we record this program, some of which have already been confirmed as Ebola. It's the same strain as before, but the outbreaks probably not actually linked the problem in dealing with it as the deputy director of emergency preparedness. Peter Salama. The World Health Organization told Claudia Hammond is this outbreak is going to be far more challenging to contain and even riskier. For the medical staff involved. The outbreak is centered around Mela beco- health zone, and particularly around us Motown cooled, men Geena. That really is the epicenter of the outbreak. We are however, receiving notifications of suspected cases that go beyond this particular healthy area and health zone. So they're being investigated in there more than thirty suspected cases currently. That this outbreak is completely separate from the one that was only declared over a couple of weeks ago. Is it because it's it's so far away across the other side of the country. We don't have definitive evidence as yet, but nor do we have any reason to believe that these outbreaks connected the distance between Ecuador, province and north keeping provinces is around two thousand five hundred kilometers. We know that this outbreak is likely to have taken off towards the end of July, and there were no active cases in the Equitor outbreak. After early Jews, how worrying is this new outbreak? This outbreak is extremely concerning in the Ecuador outbreak. I spoke of number of complicating factors, logistics affected health workers were infected early, which is, of course a ruse fan publication. The fact that the sites were much close to forested area. The fact that we have multiple sides simultaneously to address in terms of outbreak response. The fact that we also had proximity to Buddha's. So in this outbreak in northern kiva province, we have all of the above, but above and beyond. All of that here, the biggest constraint is security. There are more than one hundred groups in the North Kivu province more than twenty highly active and there is of operation really of Aleppo. Unfortunately, we've many of the areas which we're going to have to cover to reach all of the context out of the eight million population of northern kiva. One million people are internally displaced, so it's a population on the move, so that must make it much more difficult to work with communities. If you've got communities. So broken up on areas of conflict, metro difficult, much of this province is in UN security level for and what that means in practice is that many of the roads will have to travel alone who require escorts. Now, staff will require security, pistol protective equipments and not just the regular PP. We're used to using any Bill. Outbreaks to protect from infection, and we'll be relying heavily on the UN to help us with negotiations if needs be with some of the armed groups in order to access the population.

Ecuador World Health Organization UN Roland Pease Democratic Republic Of Congo Claudia Hammond Deputy Director North Kivu BBC Peter Salama Ainsworth Aleppo Sarah Uganda Motown West Africa Clinton Two Thousand Five Hundred Kilo Thousand Kilometers
The Latest Ebola Outbreak Is Centered in a War Zone

Midday on WNYC

05:36 min | 3 years ago

The Latest Ebola Outbreak Is Centered in a War Zone

"Spiro discusses her new feature night comes out and exploring the links between the multibillion dollar oil boom out west and violent crime against native American communities. This is midday on WNYC. All that is next after the news. Live from NPR news in Washington I'm Jim hark at a came a, campaign stop Thursday in Pennsylvania President Trump lashed out at the news media for underplaying his political accomplishments as Bobby Allen of member station WHYY reports. Trump rounded up the usual suspects, Trump is in. Wilkes Barre which, helped, propel him to the White House to back Lou bar ladder for Senate Republican, with hardline views on illegal immigration but Trump spent a large chunk of his speech making swipes at the news media pointing at the TV. Cameras in the back. Of the arena and. Even these people back here these horrible horrendous people Trump said news coverage of a recent meeting with Queen Elizabeth of England was slanted against him but they. Can make anything bad because. They are the fake fake disgusting news Today a report, from the United Nations. Found that Trump's verbal attacks on the media could trigger more violence against journalists for NPR news I'm Bobby. Allen in experience the national. Archives and records administration says it won't be able to finish the review of nearly one million documents regarding supreme court nominee Br Kavanagh's time with George W Bush White, House before October that's creating a potential roadblock GOP hopes to get the confirmation done, before the November midterm election Iowa Republican Senator Chuck Grassley blames. The opposition for requesting too many, documents one of. My researchers said, that, maybe compared to the last five supreme. Court nominees it would be more than, all of them added together Grassley hopes to start confirmation hearings sometime in September Firefighters battling blazes across the western US are getting. Reinforcements from abroad Matt Gillam with Boise state public radio reports fire personnel from Australia and New Zealand are. Expected to land in, Idaho this week top US fire managers requested around one hundred fifty fire specialists from Australia and New Zealand they've assisted and partnered with America for over half a century fire professionals including division supervisors strike team leaders and helicopter. Managers are among those on. The way American fire managers tapped Australia and New Zealand for assistance because fire infrastructure and the two nations is similar to that. Of, the US when international personnel arrived they'll undergo a one day. Orientation at the Boise based National Interagency Fire center before being deployed to wildfires across the, west, firefighting resources, are also being provided by Canada they've sent to air tankers. And a lead plane help battle blazes in the Pacific northwest for NPR news I'm, Matt Gilman Boise heavy rains of prompted authorities to evacuate. Parts of Virginia city in case of dam fails The Lynchburg department of. Emergency services says areas near the college lake dam or being evacuated the national weather service says at this. Time the dam has, not failed and is being closely monitored by emergency personnel for any signs of structural failure This is NPR news The World Health Organization says the latest Ebola outbreak in Democratic Republic of Congo was in what it calls. An active conflict zone there have been twenty six suspected cases and at least. Twenty, people, have died. NPR's Jason bobbie-ann reports the conflict could slow efforts. To control the outbreak this latest outbreak is in the North Kivu. Province of the DRC it's close to the border with Uganda fighting among militant groups, for control of gold diamond and coltan mines in the province has forced nearly a million. People from, their homes a groups. Say the armed conflict in addition to the large number of displaced people in the area may make. Controlling this outbreak difficult the Congolese health ministry has sent a team of a dozen bowl of specialists to the village where the cluster of. Cases was, first, reported they stress however that this new north kiva outbreak is not. Related to an outbreak the began in April on the other, side of, the country. Jason bobbie-ann NPR news State officials in California vowed to press on with a clean air lawsuit, blasting the Trump administration Thursday for weakening automotive fuel efficiency standards California's attorney general also promised. Another lawsuit if the administration makes. Good on plans to revoke longstanding waiver allowing California and other states to set their own stricter auto. Emission standards at least twelve other states and the district of Columbia follow California's rules I'm mixed day on Wall Street Thursday the s. and. P. five, hundred, index closed up thirteen points the Dow Jones industrial average slipped seven. Points the NASDAQ composite jumped ninety six points I'm Jim Clark, NPR news in Washington Support for NPR comes, from NPR stations other contributors include e. c. m.. C. foundation. Working through improve postsecondary educational outcomes for under. Served students through evidence based innovation learn. More at ease EMC foundation dot org WNYC.

NPR Donald Trump United States Bobby Allen Washington Wnyc California Jason Bobbie-Ann Democratic Republic Of Congo Senator Chuck Grassley Spiro Boise Based National Interagen United Nations Australia New Zealand Jim Hark
High-heel Crocs shoes are selling out. Really

Hammer and Nigel

05:01 min | 3 years ago

High-heel Crocs shoes are selling out. Really

"It depends upon what the meaning of the. Word is This anything Hammer how do? We play is? This anything I got a couple of stories in front, of me. Big Niger I'm going to run them. By you what is? Your job your civic duty to inform all. Of us if this story is anything or not something worthy, of discussion a second thought or if it's a whole bunch. Of nothing is this anything producer return that down to give me some real mood music here Lacey DC never go back enrolling noise pollution According to a biology professor at Mississippi, State rock and. Roll. Was. Actually noise pollution despite what ACDC thanks okay This professor play, different kinds of music for, ladybugs and plants. And if these ladybugs heard rock music day eight fewer of things if they heard quired abuse they behave better. So. He found the same result with actual noise pollution like, recordings city and people honking their horns and traffic yeah if this is what my kids can expect learning college I'm just gonna fly to Vegas, now and blow. Their. Tuition Dummy wimp PC college professor I do I'm actually going to prove that rock music is. Indeed, noise pollution and I'm going to start a petition regulate, rock music because ladybugs aren't getting enough nutrition in their life No nothing And you know that's exactly how that professor sounded. Like two that's exactly what he sounded like lady bugs aren't eating right because the, rock music I'm going to start a petition voted for. Chuck, Schumer Titian my Senator to regulate Rochman Is this. Anything boxer Floyd Mayweather junior top the Forbes celebrity one hundred. List of the highest paid entertainers he made two hundred. Eighty five million dollars a cashier George Clooney came in. Second with two hundred and, thirty nine, million Megan know. Movies two. Hundred three hundred million that's his the kiva company sold off its tequila company didn't? They made a bunch of that why didn't we think of the way we get into the? Tequila businesses in the radio business my friend I've been in the. Tequila business for a long time Drinking drinking it his business businesses good there's nothing worse than? That that, warm well tequila you'd go order at the college bars Just the, war like I, can't. Drink tequila I'll do I'll. Do like. Chilled, silver avion type the Milagro tequila love blocks Oh man. Put that stuff in the freezer get. It nice and frosty even Cuervo silver but the boy the yellow stuff I can't I will throw that. Right back up if I take. A warm shot at the Quila I'm a fun guy to. Be around when I've had I'm a blast. To be around I'm. Looking at this list of the highest paid entertainers fulsome Floyd Mayweather is on top George Clooney seconds, judge judy's in there the rock is in at number five with one hundred and twenty four. Million u two and Coldplay both. At the six and seven spot you to made one. Hundred eighteen million dollars last, year Coldplay made one hundred and fifteen Ed Sheeran a. Hundred and ten are you kidding me Ed Sheeran made Herndon. Million just off I tuned sales alone anybody. That gets married has. To have Ed Sheeran music as a wedding DJ I'm telling you cocktail hour first dances Ed Sharon, was made for that kind of stuff is this anything last one there's a new line of. High heels coming out from crocks You know crocs right the little sandals like looking things rubber sandals look like a. You know the middle aged fat white dude like me where. With white tube socks? And shorts right not only to the. Beach but like to. The grocery store to the movie yeah there's high heels coming out from. Crocs they're supposed to sell for eighty bucks but. Right now I'm seeing them go for about. Three times that amount on? Amazon look at him right here two hundred and twenty dollars All for lady high heeled crocs no this is. Nothing, so what does the beautiful missile Lindsey do if you say Honey I bought. You gift a spat two hundred and thirty dollars on it I know you're gonna love it she's got a. Copy of the divorce papers Back pocket at all times is ready to go coming up next we will play, back a pretty. Fun phone call we got last hour we're gonna play him, again, the crazy liberal Bob liberal Bob we will hear from him and we. Got some legal stuff it's all. Coming up after the news with STAN Lear IPC mobile news on the level on the.

Professor Ed Sheeran Floyd Mayweather George Clooney Coldplay Lindsey Vegas Stan Lear Ed Sharon Megan Amazon Forbes Lacey Dc Mississippi Producer Senator Rochman Chuck Schumer Judy
"kiva" Discussed on News Radio WGOW

News Radio WGOW

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"kiva" Discussed on News Radio WGOW

"You or any of this because my children were trafficked ten years ago i think there have been lots of good books and movie thrillers have been written about that scenario where somebody's white or their children are kidnapped and then there's a there's a real there's a real exciting movie that that goes on for two hours after that event and that's what happened to me my children disappeared overnight they were they were kidnapped by the state i didn't have any warning and i never saw him again that's what happened to me and that's why i pay attention and that's why for ten years i've been doing nothing but connecting the dots as to what the hell happened to me what the hell is going on and and and and when i call you guys i get i get a few seconds to connect you know one more dot or a half a daughter to dots and there are thousands of them that i've identified and the and the one world thing that's just a couple of them and i am because you were talking about that immediately before bringing me on so i connect a couple of my dots for what you said so that nobody can accuse me of hijacking the conversation not that you care about that here but it's actually connect and other dot in other you're a radio station and you and and you do free talk live and you do it really well you do it better than anyone else because on any other venue i'd have been hung up on five minutes ago because of the second you start talking about something on our local radio and i won't name him and i don't know why i can't name them but i don't want to risk getting hung up on and it's not it's not kiva the one that carries you right now kiva doesn't do any of that but keep us competitive does they they they censor anything that that starts to drop the show a bad light on people that come on their radio station.

kiva ten years five minutes two hours
"kiva" Discussed on Forked Up: A Thug Kitchen Podcast

Forked Up: A Thug Kitchen Podcast

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"kiva" Discussed on Forked Up: A Thug Kitchen Podcast

"This was should we say the name of the company okay okay well it's it's papa and barkley is the name of it and it's it's a thc to cbd ratio it's three to one and i put it on my hands because we both work with our hands so much like i'm constantly in the garage making surfaces for photography you're like you know we're both in the kitchen like this is great for your hands often the kitchen eilly i'm in the kitchen come on yeah and you like the kiva chocolate bars good sleep time for me too it tastes so good it's dangerous because i'll be sitting there and i'll just be breaking off little pieces of the chocolate bar and they're like oh no this is the we'd one that's always my fear with with canis like tough they we have cell these these dose espresso beans like chocolate expressive means that's easy but yet take one and put the whole bag away otherwise they make you seven later seven later do you like oh got him in for a fun time the only thing i miss about old school we'd brownies is that they tasted so bad it was a self regulating don't ever make mushrooms his good holy shit your best selling item yeah so i think i think you really have a good rate here is on the table we have the bliss pen from doses it's a great way and we'd find we find it's a really strong seller especially among you an older crowd who comes back in and once again the boomerang customer those who like smoked weed in college or when they were younger and kind of dropped off because it was weird now that it's legal they're interesting coming back into it and these pedigree their pre dosed you'll like it tells you it buzzes exact when you've had one like serving i love traveling with that does cest head i think it's two point two five milligrams or i'm each like you're saying you just take a normal inhale and it buzzes and that's one hit and it's two point two five milligrams and at super lightweight like me that's enough for me to walk around and left my life to hits that i'm at home enjoying myself i'm laughing at old episodes of new girl and really enjoying.

barkley