32 Burst results for "Kissinger"

Why China’s Move to Rein In Hong Kong Is Just the Start

MSNBC Morning Joe

06:31 min | 4 months ago

Why China’s Move to Rein In Hong Kong Is Just the Start

"China's move to exert greater control over the semi independent city of Hong Kong caused more turmoil over the weekend does protesters to fide social distancing rules and clashed with police who fired tear gas and a water cannon arresting at least one hundred eighty people critics of. Beijing's move to impose a national security law on Hong Kong. Say that it is an attempt to stifle descent putting an end. The city's independence. The White House said yesterday that China will likely face sanctions for its actions in Hong Kong. So admiral the China is becoming more aggressive by day. Fairly remarkable if you look at it just in recent history that they are responsible for the unleashing of a pandemic that has wrecked the world. Economy killed So many people. We don't know where that death count is going to end up and instead of being back on their heels or working aggressively for a vaccine or are reaching out to the world community. They are actually Acting more aggressive whether it's toward Hong Kong toward Vietnam or even in the concentration camps inside their country what what is going on what. How is the United States failed in its response to Shave Power? And why in the world can we do moving forward? Let's start with the premise. Here let's go back to twenty one thousand nine hundred twenty nineteen teams like a long time ago. We already had a rich basket of disagreement. China South China Sea huge body of water. China claims it in its entirety. Five G. The network controversy as you mentioned the territorial disputes around the edges of the South China Sea with Vietnam the Philippines Taiwan additional pressure on them trade and tear disputes. So we have this very rich. Unfortunately basket of disagreement. Now you drop a nuclear bomb in the middle of that which is called Kobe. Nineteen irresponsibility of the regime in allowing that to get into the wild so to speak. And so you really have this witches brew of relationships and Newsflash. It's occurring during an election year in the United States in which the trump administration predictably is going to maximize the ability to use China. Like opinion OUGHTA and beat it for electoral advantage. So terrible fact pattern. At the moment I think the real question you nailed it show is. What do we do about it? And I'll tell you three things very quickly. I we need a strategy that means not just episodic responses but thinking about diplomacy economics military deterrence bringing that Inter Agency sensibility to the challenges of China. Secondly even more important. We need international coalition. That's all of our allies. In the Pacific and many Japan South Korea Australia New Zealand Malaysia Singapore Thailand be at Phnom Increasingly. We need to internationalize the response to China and that includes the response to co did in third and finally we need to recognize. We've got a bend this relationship with China. We've got to change the terms of it. But we don't want to break it. I E get ourselves stumbling into a Cold War. It's going to be complicated and from now to November is going to be a very difficult stretch water. Well as you talk about. Strategy the United States needs to develop a long-term strategy. We just need to start by having a coherent message to send to the Chinese. We've been so erotic if you look at the president's fawning praise of President Shea and of course we always talk about what he said on January twenty four th when he thanked president she for his transparency and all the great work China was doing. That was a bizarre tweet to send out at the time. This is also the same president. Who who saluted she for consolidating power in the past has more power than anybody since Chairman Mao in that country? But you have that fawning praise one moment Max moment you have a continuation of these erratic trade skirmishes where the president doesn't have an overall strategy and then follow that up with occasional master tweets and insults toward the people of China just because seems to be checking that off his list for the campaign. It's really hard to figure out where Donald Trump stands when it comes to China because any any attack of China any critique of China is usually followed up by the president talking about what a wonderful leader Person President Xi is exactly and reference our earlier conversation. What do you want leaders to do? You want them to bring order. Out of the chaos. He want them to have a plan. You want them to communicate in steady waves and what we don't want to do with China is treated like an on and off switch on the wall that we turn on. Oh we love China. Then we turn it off ups. We're going to get into a war with China. We've got a dial it in. It's like estate like the dimmer on the wall. In your dining room we have got to be able to have a coherent strategy. That is steady and finds balance not this jagged on and off. Switch all the time and again. I'll close on this Henry Kissinger said late last year that we were in the foothills of a Cold War I think we are continuing to ascend that mountain. It is a mistake for both nations. We need to confront where we must when the behavior warrants but we ought to try and find ways to cooperate where we can confront where we must cooperate where we can build a strategy Admiral Stavridis. Thank you very much for coming on this morning

China South China Sea Hong Kong South China United States President Trump Vietnam Beijing White House Henry Kissinger Chairman Mao President Shea Admiral Stavridis Person President Xi Donald Trump Pacific Inter Agency
White House or Fight House? Tevi Troy’s new book looks at tiffs and turf wars among White House staffers

THINK! America

08:20 min | 7 months ago

White House or Fight House? Tevi Troy’s new book looks at tiffs and turf wars among White House staffers

"With us and we're gonna talk about that you know the fussing and fighting vet says going on in the White House and don't think for a second that that's exclusive to Donald trump's administration you know it's kind of interesting anytime it's its whatever you're closest to write in history and other things they have to be the worst you know and so Donald Trump his administration's wise it just has to be the worst all the fussing and fighting in in fighting that's going on like no other president before well before you really jump that shark and think that that is the case then you start believing you're hyperbole I once you get your hands on this new book called White House from doctor Tevye Troy bestselling author and former White House adviser okay he's been on the inside he's known as and researched and studied this and he's right about now with his book White House rivalries in the White House from Truman J. trump Dr Troy welcome to the show good to have you with us thanks bill Bradley on talk about played out hello this is this is it this is exciting you know that you know to put this out because you know this conversation has come up from time to time and you always hear from you know the hyperbolic that downhole trump is the worst ever and then you you start bringing back some of the the stories and histories and now here it is you've documented it I imagine if you wanted to go back even before Truman we we have to do episodes inch you know volumes of all the fussing happening in the White House right no absolutely and and we know that they were fighting before experiment where we are perfect I mean you look at the administration of Washington and Hamilton and Jefferson murder each other's throats but the difference is they were cabinet members and when I try to get that in my house how the dynamic change once we had the creation of a White House staff there was no real White House staff before Roosevelt and Truman the first person to enter the White House staff and make change the dynamic in that certainly you have the people who are close to the president meaning in the same building advising him on foreign policy and economic policy and then you might have a treasury secretary or spectators biggest ticked off that somebody else is inviting in his area that was one thing that changed in that that meant that I wasn't quite interesting to note that that the dynamic in the entrance of more humanity just because the more issues right yeah look and government was growing mistake became higher and then also you have this right the best celebrity White House aide the whole idea of a White House staff was supposed to be people with a passion for anonymity but that went away pretty quickly especially in the Kennedy administration when he hired people who are already famous like orcas lessons or to work in the White House is suddenly how celebrity White House they had its own reputation has long ties to the craft and they they could get their word out there if the policies were not going their way and to suddenly you have this idea of leaks and counter leaks you can make you look good in the press and that also at the White House right now make that I talk about the book in the course that is continued and become almost like a to the degree of a tender green black belt when you talk about all this and leaking and stuff going on you know but bad enough that it happens in DC but now of course with the most recent refill we understand that even ambassadors in our state department is running rampant with it as well yeah well you talk about ten degree black belt and that that was Henry Kissinger I'll tell you one great story that's been quite how's that Kissinger was dating Jill St John a very attractive bond girl actress Mandy comes out in the papers that Kissinger's dating this woman and Kissinger ghost and extending complains that his rival Christy William Rogers leaked the information about your retaining but the truth is that your lease it because a he wanted everyone to know he was dating that the truck the bond girl would be he wanted to hurt Rogers any internal wars and bribery deposit so what happened what was it what was the conclusion that well well written exam would rail about all the leaking that happened at the state department and constant complained about it but just not your fat it but at least some of the time we know the kiss your will the guy doing the leaking and then blaming the state department and of course everybody knows because your date of birth second longer up there with a win win corrective measure like you would can degrade black belt in Plato's exactly so he gets the he gets the reward and the award let's talk about president Truman we touched a little bit on that I mean he he he was I guess the modern era of the expanding the staff and and really kind of bringing this into play and of course it's just been kind of kind of a a monolith that like the blob is just been growing unto itself right yes Sir but instrument you have the right there were just unbelievable I don't I'm a presidential historian I've been putting this stuff for decades and the story behind in spite house were were things I'd never even heard of and one breaks during the ministration is that the secretary of state George Marshall as opposed to the recognition of the state of Israel which is flabbergasting to update the business interest on July especially right there at that critical time because it was true and that led the battle for inferred knowledge meant of Israel that would that would be very fight with marshals on the wrong side of it Clark Clifford a junior White House beat it on the right side of it make an argument in front of Clifford Clifford and Truman and Marshall are all arguing out in the White House Clifford wins the argument Truman recognized Israel Marshall is still mad that he never again the clippers or mentions his name for the rest of life right yeah right because so it's pretty petty but yeah such as such as you can't be the government the illusion of the Kennedy Camelot regime you said was not devoid of conflict as well of course in Kennedy do you have this notion of Camelot music wonderful people sitting around a table can you never even heard the term Camelot elections administration that comes from our interview that took place after the administration after he was dead yes but even in the administration there was fighting taking place especially between Lyndon Johnson and Robert F. Kennedy canteen was the product any would be turned general and the president brother Lynn Johnson vice president that you hated each other going back to their time in the Senate together when we can't even the lowly staffer and Johnson with the Senate Majority Leader and they had these nasty nicknames for him brought Robert if they reported Johnson is ruthless corded phone and get a canny referred to by Johnson as bunny boy really didn't like each other and they're always trying well anyway and we've known that that that tension what is it was pretty extreme there between them what else within the Kennedy at Camelot compound anything else that you discovered yeah there was a a a a rivalry between artists less intervention before they collect their prize winning historian who came to the White House when the first intellectual ever worked in the White House and then there was Ted Sorensen it was not as well known but he was closer to Kennedy and there was tension between them that continued even after the administration because the two of them we're kind of bracing to get their books out first hand stories then asked her to stop and stop writing his books but it's different in different book out first plus you're obviously would not agree and there were and the race was on and it it colored their relationship there's tension between them that went on for a long time and I got to imagine especially after the assassination these rivalries it would increase all the more would they not yeah and if there is one great story that dean Rusk with the sector state did not like that Slazenger called him brutalized in silence in meetings during the Kennedy administration implying that he wouldn't say anything that's a rough put it out there the only reason he was silent in meetings this lessons are within the facilities are respected leaker and we would talk about everything that he heard needing three wins Mr this is this is great fun Dr Chevy try I'd say it's good fun because you know the politics is just right for comedy it's it's when we take it too seriously like at times we're doing right now in this current environment then we deprive ourselves of of the little bit of humor in thank you Dr drive for presenting

White House Donald Trump
"kissinger" Discussed on Hacking Your Leadership

Hacking Your Leadership

02:22 min | 9 months ago

"kissinger" Discussed on Hacking Your Leadership

"Hey everyone and welcome to another pay. It forward Friday episode. Will we highlight people that we feel are doing a great job of publishing leadership content that resonates with us us we will include links to their work and tag them on our post to make sure they know we appreciate them. This is our way to say thanks to other leaders individuals that are having a positive impact on helping others become better leaders through sharing their thoughts opinions and ideas online for all to see and hear. Chris and I have always wanted wanted to use our platform to advocate for other people passionate about leadership and give our listeners as much content as possible to help sharpen their own skills through different perspectives and approaches approaches. If you would like to check out any one specific please tag them in the comments or send us a message with links to their content on this episode. I I WANNA recognize Nicholas Kissinger first of all very cool name. Second of all Nicholas is a store manager at the vitamin SHOPPE and is a power user. Sir On Lincoln what I love about Nicholas content is genuine happiness for being a retail leader. He shares his excitement for the work that his team does he. He big up big up says direct leaders and even take selfies with vendors that swing by store to deliver new products Nicholas recognizes performance both by individual individual and for his team as a whole he is constantly sharing gratitude. I people and also share some great inspirational quotes. He volunteers for his local community. Eddie and his merchandising is on point. Yeah I'm the guy who's zooms in on the background of the pigs to check pricing laser lining. That's what twenty plus years of retail. Gets you anyways what I really enjoyed about. Nicholas's content is two back-to-back post for about a month ago in one post Nicholas wishes one of his peers. Holly Holly Erickson. Good luck for an epic day and thanks for her mentorship in the next post he gushes over being so proud of a man to klay who used to work for him as as an assistant manager and now has her own store and is doing great. This type of positive energy and genuine excitement for others is contagious. So please click the Lincoln the episode notes to learn more about Nicholas and see his lincoln posts. Great Job Nicholas and thanks for helping to Hashtag be a better leader. Thanks for listening and let us know who else deserves some Kudos..

Nicholas Kissinger Holly Holly Erickson Lincoln lincoln Chris assistant manager Eddie klay
Why is Aung San Suu Kyi at the International Court of Justice

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

05:13 min | 10 months ago

Why is Aung San Suu Kyi at the International Court of Justice

"Awarding someone the Nobel Prize for peace is always tempting. Fate saw cha the vagaries of human affairs. Yesterday's warmonger is tomorrow's peacemaker and vice versa. That it's not really the Norwegian Nobel Committees Fault when Pulse Charity Makes Mockery of some of their judgements. When you give a piece Gong to someone like Henry Kissinger oh Yasser Arafat? It's just a risk you run. And it is nevertheless startling to see an actual Nobel peace laureate appearing at the International Court of Justice in The Hague to defend the government they lead against allegations of genocide. It's pretty much the one thing that isn't supposed to happen. History had given us the opportunity to give up our best just for a cause in which we believed when the Nobel Committee chose to honor me. The road had chosen of my own free will aw became less lonely path to follow sang suci daughter of the founder of modern Myanmar Aung San and a formidable politician diplomat and and activist in her own. Right won the Nobel Peace Prize in Nineteen ninety-one at the time she was rivaled only by Nelson Mandela as a universally admired Royat. Avatar of all. That was good displaying exemplary courage in resisting. All that was bad. She led the National League for Democracy as it faced down only terrifying and ruthless military GIONTA which had turned Myanma into North Korea with Palm. Trees saying SUCI spent most of the period between Nineteen nineteen ninety nine and two thousand and ten under house arrest. She was a hero aside from the Nobel Peace Prize. She was awarded the Sakharov Prize. US Congressional Channel Gold Medal and Presidential Medal of freedom an honorary order of Australia. Honorary Citizenship of Canada and Amnesty International's ambassador of conscience since award. Luke pestle made a film about her. U2 wrote a song about and in time she triumphed the NLD won a landslide election victory in two thousand and fifteen though denied the presidency on a technicality. She became state councillor effectively. Myanmar's prime minister it. It was hailed worldwide as a victory for decency determination and patience and now she's denying that she is some kind of an accessory to crimes against humanity he sang Succi has been fair to say on a journey. These ban mind this complex situation and the challenge to sovereignty and security already in our country when you're assessing the intent of those who attempted to deal with the rebellion. Surely under the circumstances genocidal decider intent cannot be only hypothesis loan and it is important to be clear that while Aung Sang. SUCCI is in The Hague. She is not in the dark. She is appearing voluntarily and has not been charged with any crime the allegation before the ICJ EJ is against her country. Not Her the case has been brought by the Gambia. Backed by the fifty-seven members of the Organization of Islamic Cooperation Asian a coterie which includes several nations who might want to pause before mounting their high horses where human rights are concerned. The allegation is essentially essentially that Myanmar's recent persecution of the Hindu people Myanmar's Muslim minority. Who lived mostly in the country's raccoon state amounts to genocide this? This is a term with specific legal meanings and it will be for the court to determine if events in Myanmar meet the threshold. What is known is bad enough? Enough since two thousand and sixteen perhaps a million ranger have fled Myanmar mostly to neighboring Bangladesh journalists NGOs and the UN win have reported a consistent pattern of atrocious violence much of it directed at civilians not excluding children Myanmar's military known as has the top Madore have consistently claimed that they are waging a counter insurgency against Islamist terrorists though Sang Suci does not directly command the Tatmadaw. Aw this is also the line that she has held. The most sympathetic imaginable interpretation of aren't sang Suu Cheese behavior. And it's a reach is that that she is still in some respects the prisoner of the same military which once held her under house arrest. She may have calculated. This is a compromise. She has to to make to maintain such democracy as me unmanned now has that if she takes hold in the military the military will once again take charge of the country. This is a question unlikely to interest the hundreds of thousands over hinge in now wondering if they'll ever be able to go home again and they of course are the ones who have have survived the Tatmadaw's pogroms justice for the victims. If it is coming at all maybe years away

Myanmar Sang Suci Nobel Prize Myanmar Aung San Norwegian Nobel Committees Succi Aung Sang NLD Nobel Committee Sakharov Prize Suci Luke Pestle International Court Of Justice Henry Kissinger Yasser Arafat Nelson Mandela Royat Gold Medal Gambia
"kissinger" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

03:25 min | 1 year ago

"kissinger" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

"Politicians this is where this is where something called the American Servicemembers Protection Act of two thousand two comes into play it essentially it's a law that might be hilarious or terrifying to some of US listening outside of the U._S.. It's a law in the United States the authorizes the use of military force to liberate any American or citizen of U._S. Allied country being held in the International Criminal Court. That's located but in the Hague this has been called The Hague invasion clause people in Europe particularly in the Netherlands. Obviously hate this idea. The Law Aw provides for the withdrawal of U._S. military assistance from countries that agree with the I._C._C. Treaty. It Restricts U._S. participation in U._N.. Peacekeeping unless the U._S. is immune from prosecution so and and there's a provision that says the president can change his or her mind on this whenever due to the national interest wow wow so if for instance Paul's dodgy international past catches up with him and he is he is arrested and taken to the International Criminal Court the U._S. has law on the books that says this country can send an invasion force to you physically rescue him in extricate him from Europe while well Paul whatever you did <hes> you know I'm sure it's <hes> <hes> a much more three dimensional thing that occurred there reasons behind the reasons you did it but you know in the end. We're going to get you back buddy and that also is terrible. Example because Paul is a hero he is and he is a known as a gem <hes> <hes> domestically and abroad but one thing is for sure Henry Kissinger did conspire to do numerous things that were at the very very least unethical dirty pool he actively PRU ably created and participated in a number of conspiracies to advance. That's what he saw as the greater good for the U._S.. On a global stage that is true. It's not a theory that's not a person's opinion and that is a fact. The big question is was it all worth well. We we're going to figure that out in in the next hundred years just really looking back at it. I think in generally when someone passes I think the the harsh realities of a person's life can be viewed. I guess more fully at least by society by history and we can actually talk about in a way that we couldn't when they were still living <hes> so I have a feeling you know unfortunately for Henry Kissinger probably pretty soon he he won't be with US and maybe we'll get a little more light. Shed on exactly what happened. Perhaps perhaps perhaps or it'll go to the grave of them. Maybe oil it will go to the grave. We want to know what you think. Is it true that these sorts of things occur and do you serve a greater good or is that an over simplification. You know what I mean..

Henry Kissinger Paul U._S International Criminal Court Europe American Servicemembers United States Netherlands president hundred years
"kissinger" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

04:52 min | 1 year ago

"kissinger" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

"That's a history history professor at New York University saying that you should probably tribute three or four million deaths to this man and this doesn't even touch on the conspiracy theories. Oh No my God again when you are a part of all of these different organizations when and you're essentially the power behind government or at least <hes> you know if if it's a Disney movie he's <hes> who I forget all the main like Jaffar Afar type characters but the the counselor that sits next to the king that whispers dark things into the king or Queen's ear. I mean that's essentially that's that's really whittling down but that's a lot of what he ends up doing whispering to two other people in power who make the decisions and I think when you're when you have that position you are going to be at least targeted by people who see conspiracies if not actually actually taking part in conspiracies absolutely well well said well put so as as you mentioned this is due to his membership in these enormously enormously influential bodies is a member of the Bohemian Grove a member of the Council for relations a member of the Bilderberg Group A member of the Aspen institute a participant in the trilateral commission. We have episodes on pretty much all of those except they believe the Aspen Institute we also need to mention that the the recent antisemitic conspiracy theories come into play here to the harp on Kissinger due to his Jewish background and you'll you'll read you know the these sorts of things saying that he is a key player in some sort of secretive Jewish cabal this gets tied into those allegations of international banking cartels and so on but while the Jewish conspiracy claptrap has been thoroughly and thankfully debunked there is bad news here. The bad news is that banking cartel conspiracies spiracy do have said some of them are very very very true and it is highly likely that Henry Kissinger ran into something like banking gain lead conspiracies during his career. I mean he did want to be an accountant. Oh Wow I didn't even think about that. I didn't think we would have one that goes into one hinges on his accounting. I mean that's a very good point man so he is he's been both oth participants in genuine conspiracies and subject to <hes> speculation on other conspiracy theories series right and for a lot of people the big question is at what point do these policies become war crimes the conspiracies that he created good and enacted at what point do they go beyond <hes> being secretive for the purpose of national security and becomes something that you should prosecute someone for four and what really is the difference between those two things right. Where's the line? Where is the And author of the Eccentric Realist Henry Kissinger in the shaping of American Foreign Policy he he reacts in in a different way throws. Whoa a little cold water on this he says I am afraid that by the standards some of his critics have applied to Kissinger numerous post nineteen forty-five U._S. statesman could be accused accused of crimes against humanity and that applies perhaps to the vast majority of the leaders modern great powers very good point right <hes> Lake at some point if you're in charge of the country? Are you responsible for every bad thing that country does oh gosh it's true. That's kind of a tough truth proof. I guess we have to face a little bit here right absolutely left to face it head on. Let's also let's also continue just a little bit because Del del Perro doesn't believe that Henry Kissinger was very good at his job to be honest. He says he's not some sort of arch manipulator. He says Kissinger was simplistic. Binary even uninformed during his tenure he was dogmatic. He adhered to the zero sum game of international politics and then they'll Pero says in short he wasn't a war criminal. He wasn't a very deep or sophisticated thinker. He rarely challenged the intellectual votes or fads of the time time and once in government he displayed a certain intellectual laziness. Wow that's interesting. It's an interesting take right right. That's saying that saying look the argument. Here is almost like if he's a war criminal everyone else's and also the hypes not real. He wasn't that good at what he did yeah..

Henry Kissinger Pero Aspen institute Del del Perro Bohemian Grove New York University Bilderberg Group professor Council for relations
"kissinger" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

02:28 min | 1 year ago

"kissinger" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

"Thinks it's obvious you should switch because yes switching to gyco is a no brainer pitchy in most nesting dollond her lot in life now hold on it's fair to say hey governments big and we need to avoid the lazy fallacy blaming all these events on a single man he might have had his hands tied. He might have not been aware that this was all happening at all right right. It is true <hes> we have been pretty rough on Kissinger already saying that he engineered all these things basically blaming him for for all these deaths. I don't know maybe that really isn't all that fair. I mean maybe the here's the problem. At experts including including people who applaud Kissinger's actions disagree with the idea that he was unaware of these things Christopher Hitchens is has recognized for a number of other things he's political. He's <hes> he was in his time a huge proponent of atheism and so on right that may be one of the ways he's best known today. I am quite hilarious in his <hes> digs of other people <hes> yeah cantankerous yeah and also <music> <hes> hated or loved essentially yeah absolutely he had no chill there you go free agents had no chill one way or the other he wrote a book called the trial of Henry Kissinger and in this book he says the degree of micromanagement revealed in Kissinger's memoirs forbids the idea that anything of importance took place without his knowledge knowledge or permission of nothing is this more true than his own individual involvement in the bombing of neutral Cambodia and so that's that's one of the many arguments in full disclosure hitchens is not a fan of Kissinger and it's pretty it's pretty obvious in the way he writes about him but even people who we're like you know gotta break eggs and some geopolitical omelettes work even they are. They will say that Kissinger did this. It didn't just happen happen when he was off on vacation on a Friday according to a guy named Greg Granton who's a professor of history at New York University this means that quote a back of the envelope cow would attribute tree maybe four million deaths to kiss his actions but that number probably undercounts his victims yikes yeah..

Henry Kissinger Christopher Hitchens Greg Granton Cambodia New York University professor of history
"kissinger" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

04:03 min | 1 year ago

"kissinger" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

"Might say as some imperfections imperfections including massacring millions of people but it's also not communist and it's good to have that chess piece in play hey to to prevent the spread of communism now remember he's working closely with Richard Nixon during a lot of this stuff and he he ends up being one of the primary reasons that Nixon begins wiretapping everybody in recording everybody and he ends up being a part of Watergate or he's involved evolved at least but we can leave that for perhaps another episode <hes> it. You should just know that he was involved in Watergate N.. Wiretapping yes yeah that definitely happened happened. He also aided <hes> Indonesia under the brutal dictatorship of Soeharto in terms of financial aid and military refunding in seventy three he overthrew the democratically elected Salvador Allende in Chile installing the dictator Augusto Gusto Pinochet Yeah and remember he didn't do it with his bare hands like that but man that guy made it happen through <hes> you know I guess engineering thing is a good way to put it then he made it occur with his voice right he puppeteer yes so the also supported Operation Condor Operation Condor was a campaign designed to get these secret police of fascist dictators in South America to work together supporting coups on non-fascist countries and facilitating drug dealing in the region as a way to provide funds for these kinds of activities. He was a <hes> who was a fan of Pinot chain because he was not a communist and he was also a fan of the junta in Argentina at the time we also so found according to documents that were released in twenty four team that he signaled in the nineteen seventies to Argentina's right wing military leaders. There's something along the lines of hey you know. Dissent is just a real pill isn't a guys if you need to crack down on those commies those pinkos hippies you know we don't really have a problem with that. We just want you to know we don't have have a problem with it and that became implicit support of what is called the dirty war. The dirty war resulted in the deaths of more than thirty thousand thousand people in one of the craziest things about those documents that you mentioned Ben that were released in two thousand fourteen is there are counts from several people one of whom room was Robert Hill who was the ambassador to Argentina and it's this conversation that Kissinger had with a foreign minister there named Cassidy and okay so apparently this foreign minister was was really afraid that if they were doing this thirty war they were going to carry this stuff out and they're going to continue doing it. They were afraid that the United States would end up cracking down on their activities in their government in general as a way of fighting against these human rights violations that were occurring right right and then Kissenger says to him. I mean this is paraphrasing but you you don't you don't need to worry about that. That's not gonNA happen right so it is maybe a little bit hyperbolic but it was a breakfast purpose that resulted in the death of thirty thousand people but it wasn't really they were going to they were probably going to make the dirty war happened anyway. Kissinger in this case knew about out and did not stop it and gave them sort of an Atta boy yeah and let's go to one more example in December of nineteen seventy five. He approved the Indonesian nation invasion of eastern more resulting in one hundred thousand to one hundred eighty deaths conflict related deaths US and conflict related.

Richard Nixon Argentina Kissinger Salvador Allende Augusto Gusto Pinochet Indonesia South America Chile Atta United States Kissenger Ben Cassidy Robert Hill
"kissinger" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

05:42 min | 1 year ago

"kissinger" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

"Here's where it gets crazy. I get while opinions on Kissinger Kissinger may differ over the course of his career. He has been implicated in numerous activities that could be called at the very least illegal aw he's also been the subject of numerous conspiracy theories. Let's just laundry lists. Some of the illegal actions that he was is directly involved. Absolutely let's jump to nineteen sixty nine and seventy in Cambodia now Henry Henry Kissinger is considered guest one of the one of the main architects of the secret bombing that occurred there in Cambodia and this <hes> this bombing itself played a really important role in bringing about the Chimera Rouge that we've discussed before on this show certainly on youtube as well <hes> bringing them about as a power our there in Cambodia as basically an unintended side effect of taking out the power that already existed in that country attempting to eliminate the communist threat they saw yet and let's just go ahead and say this at the top here many times we've seen over the history of the United States that there is is a major enemy that we will identify and attempt to eliminate or even if it's just ideological and then by militarily or through a Kuu eliminating that there are these unintended consequences that come about because of the vacuum of power that exists in whatever that places where some group or desperate or person will come through and just grasp that power and that's what we see happening in Cambodia in Nineteen sixty-nine seventy yet yet <hes> at least just forty thousand people died as a result of this the bombing itself that he was the architect right any entered into a ceasefire negotiations with North Vietnam. He was awarded awarded a Nobel Peace Prize for this and his critics find that ironic and reportedly even Kissinger himself was I was like I don't deserve this yeah well especially when you think about the Commute Rusian and what happened afterwards because because of them <hes> millions of people people were slaughtered. Yes absolutely let's go to October nineteen sixty nine he had this thing called Madman Theory and madman theory theory now with the benefit of retrospect is weird and hilarious. It was essentially a P._R.. Branding campaign whereby Kissinger wanted to make leaders of Communist nations think that Richard Nixon was insane gear them basically yeah like like larger life kind of crazy person you don't know as you go and left is going right as he launched a nuke this. Is it remind Eastern border and they're hoping that this madman theory is believable enough that the Soviet government will panic and say A. and pressure. It's proxy North Vietnam to accept U._S.. Peace demands and could you say this is a brilliant sign I up. Could you say it's just it's ugly <hes> yeah it's a bleed tactic but bully tactics kind of par for the course in a lot of these things especially especially for playing realpolitik and you know and you're playing with nukes triclean with nukes. That's the problem yeah and then in the end North Vietnam is victorious and and <hes> you know in the Paris peace accords anyway right so nineteen seventy-one at least in the case of I wanNA know at at least in the case of giant Lance thousands and thousands of people did not die yes in nineteen seventy one. He supported Pakistan as it massacre over a million people during what was called the Bangladesh Liberation War he also joked about the massacre of Bengali Hindus and and he sneered at Americans who quote bleed for the dime Bingo rallies that's according to professor Gary Bass who is writing in political magazine about this bass us also says that Kissinger's policy was again oriented toward what he saw as the greater good Pakistan he might say as some imperfections imperfections including massacring millions of people but it's also not communist and it's.

Henry Henry Kissinger North Vietnam Cambodia Gary Bass Soviet government Pakistan youtube Chimera Rouge Richard Nixon United States Paris Lance political magazine professor
"kissinger" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

04:34 min | 1 year ago

"kissinger" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

"Show called mobile blood. It is now available. It's number three on the charts right now. Tunes congratulations yeah. It's all it's Erin. Maki Qian Dana Schwartz. It's an Trevor Young Congratulations Paul how you doing out there got a thumbs up thumbs up at a stylish anger right from mission control. I want to bring us before we get too deep into this. I just finished mister robot season three finally <hes> and you know we have a bit of a history with that show. He did a couple of episode surrounding season to have masks we do I have one sitting in my room and when I watched the show I always put it on <hes> <hes> which is I don't know. Is that too weird now. That's awesome. That's great. Okay cool just had to bring that up. I was just excited that the next one is supposedly coming out this year. Yes I heard I heard no <hes> they'll still have Rami Malik. I imagine I certainly hope so what we're going to talk about. Maybe a sensitive subject to some people who find themselves politically partisan right at least in the in the Western sense and we want to hear your opinion so as always if there's there's something that you want to tell us and you're not near a keyboard at the moment just pause this episode. We'll wait for you and call us directly. Yes <hes> caller number. It is one eight three three S. T. D._W._i.. K. What I love about this conversation with Mister robot is it. We're we're kind of foreshadowing shadowing something that will come into play later right yeah without fully saying rights right and there's there's a character within the university or a couple but there's there's one in particular in the universe Mister robot that I find that maybe you will too <hes> has some similarities to our guest estimate honor infamy our person of interest there we go there. We Go R._P._O.. I today Miss Robot concerns shadowy. We forces working in secret conspiring ripe the power behind the throne and it's often said in fiction and nonfiction alike that the true power of Nation Kingdom or an empire isn't usually the face. It's often not the person on the throne. It's the people behind that person Jason The folks you see standing silently behind a king a prime minister or president as they deliver a speech. They probably did not write. Today's episode is about <unk> out one such character one of the most influential people in the history of modern U._S.. Politics Henry Kissinger to let's go to the beginning beginning. Henry Kissinger was born Heinz Alfred Kissinger on May twenty seventh nineteen twenty-three in a place called furth Germany now he was one of two sons of the Parents Paula Stern Kissinger and Louis Kissinger he was one of two sons born to Paula Stern Kissinger singer and Louis Kissinger now his father was a teacher and <hes> you know there was this group of people that came to power called the Nazis he's and when that occurred he lost his job and his entire career. You know the Nazis of course we're carrying out the orders of Mr Adolf Hitler and they of course begin prosecuting Jewish people through Germany and countries all surrounding Germany and <hes> the Kissinger's were in fact Jewish and their family <hes>. I guess the larger family saw saw the effects of this firsthand now of course Henry was just a little boy at the time and he's he seemed to be a better student at least <hes> to his parents into the people around him. They know he's a better student than perhaps an athlete or you know someone who is going to pursue sue some kind of physical career and you know as the antisemitism was increasing their in Germany where they were living the whole family decided we have to get Outta here and in one thousand nine hundred eighty eight they ended up going to England and then not long after that they ended up going to the United States which was a prescient move for any student student of history the family once they reach the U._S.. They ended up settling in New York City which you may remember from several Salsa Commercials Kissinger completed high school there and began taking night classes at city college with the intention of becoming an account it a C._p._a.. o- on what small things does history hinge you know what I mean. It could have gone a very different way. Can you imagine him as a C._p._A...

Henry Kissinger Paula Stern Kissinger Kissinger Maki Qian Dana Schwartz Germany Rami Malik New York City Trevor Young Mr Adolf Hitler Nation Kingdom Henry United States Paul Jason The England prime minister president
"kissinger" Discussed on The President's Inbox

The President's Inbox

05:07 min | 1 year ago

"kissinger" Discussed on The President's Inbox

"The Tj approach next would know the basic way, Henry is going to go about it. But then he would not nitpick him. He would have enough confidence that they on the same page that he would let Kissinger carry it out. Well, when we in Beijing, and we were presented in October nineteen seventy-one with the Shanghai communique approach of the Chinese revolutionary and completely driven than what Nixon thought we were going to do that kiss. Joe left Henry had no way of getting back to the White House. And yet, he had enough confidence that the president would back them up that he adopted this radical new approach, and in fact, Nixon it. So essence president Nixon empowered, Dr Kissinger in backed them up. That's what everybody wants from from any boss in closing his. One last issue, I really wanna touch on take advantage of your crate expertise on China, not just having been there for the opening, but having been US ambassador there in the nineteen eighties and your your lifelong work. Where do you see u s Chinese relations going given the current climate in context? I'm glad I got other our interview, first of all, we're at the most serious juncture newest John of elections, I think since the opening, but certainly sends the tenement square massacre, by the way was a mask not an event. And as in as in past, we've had ups and downs in relationship, but it's usually been key to one issue might be Taiwan missiles or could be planes, colliding bombing the long embassy, etc. Now, we have a problem across the board because in previous courses even tenement square we didn't have that much interaction with the Chinese Chinese so much weaker than we were. Now, there is in power the established policy. You got that historical challenge of how we just two other, then you got into dependence across the board both up attorneys and problems. Number one. We're at a very serious situation. I would put the blame primarily trying to be objective on the Chinese because under she they become much more assertive overseas and much more repressive at home. I think the basic turning point started in two thousand and eight the financial crisis. We lost some self confidence and American people began to have a backlash against globalization and feeling populism, even back then, and so or poach some of the economic issues that changing and the Chinese and turn so that would we screwed up financially? They look pretty good at least for the time being, they had more power. They got more Troy ounces, so the problems with China asserting itself. Many of which legitimates because they are rising power. They deserve more seats at the table began, but under she they've really cracked down at a hole in the most agree example, of course, being imprisoning at least a million years with so many other examples could cite their aggressive militarily in the south and East China seas squeezing. Juan squeezing Hong Kong recently seen economic the turning away from the market become predatory America to Listrik and raising influence in some unacceptable ways in America, and other countries domestic societies. So all of this presents a new challenge, it doesn't mean we go to containment or decoupling, which is impossible. It doesn't mean we should be smart competitors. And I think we have enough assets if he got back together at home. And that's a big if then we can compete. Well, with the Chinese future problems, not ten feet too. I wanna numerate them here. So rather than ending into another Cold War. Trying to treat on enemy. We ought to be realistic a little firmer, and certain areas, and we have been, but be willing and being able to compete my Plum with the current approach. I think the Trump administration deserves some credit for recognizing China's. He competitor. We gotta make clue. We don't turn out automatically and the enemy, and they've gotten a Chinese attention in certain areas, but I think we're missing. What I would prescribe three main assets, we need to do with China, they have to relate to foreign policy in general in many respects number one. Get your act together at home not only get over this political pull of his Asian. But also, so we can get together and invest it off your science and technology, infrastructure energy, and so on and also restore the appeal of democracy, which is being destroyed. And so we can, we are soft power is very limited, and we can hardly talk about other countries systems were fooling whether own, so number one is to have a strong domestic base in mall, political and economic terms to work with your allies, for example, in its current trade will be much better off focusing everybody on the legitimate grievances with China. We have more leverage with China, and we should not have pulled out of the Trans-Pacific Partnership. I'd like to see rejoin that somehow because it gives us leverage economically, and it's important geopolitically. She want your allies to work with you not pick fights with your allies and talk about love letters with dictators and Thirdly multilateral institutions. We shot us sales on the foot by pulling out of the Rondo, the climate change not to mention the Trans-Pacific Partnership. So if we invigorate our assets at home, work closely with friends and allies and show.

China Nixon Dr Kissinger Henry East China president Beijing Shanghai Taiwan White House Joe US America Hong Kong Troy Juan
"kissinger" Discussed on The President's Inbox

The President's Inbox

12:06 min | 1 year ago

"kissinger" Discussed on The President's Inbox

"Come join him more than turn bought me over to the NFC. I had an interview in February nineteen sixty nine Kissinger that was only a few minutes, but he made it clear that he welcomed the bait within the administration. But also insisted on loyalty once policy decisions were made for the first year I was sitting in the executive office building. Now, the is now a betting across from the west wing and sending memos. The Kissinger about the future policy considerations contingencies, several of which were critical of Nixon and kissing policy because of the not not, despite that he hired me as a special assistant in February nineteen seventy people, a sense what, what does a special assistant to the national security adviser. Well, it depends on the particular national security about in my case. It was an incredible opportunity because he wanted one person short of himself to have a global view of what the administration. Is trying to do, so I was paired with regional experts, and I got to be involved in all the major issues of the time, including the ones that are treated in this book as join Kissinger. So the Vietnam peace negotiations. The opening of China arms control and taught with Soviet Union and middle shuttles and all of those hours involved, and he wanted to see how all the pieces fit together. He knew better than anyone. So I was very fortunate to be so well pleased, so you were at ground zero for a lot of history. Well, modesty, prevents me from acquiescing net? But I wouldn't deny, well, that's pretty impressive list of events to have had a front row seat at into participated in, let's talk a little bit about the book in how it came about. I will note for readers. This is actually very slim volume. I think people can get through it in, in a sitting or two. So also, they'll -able as an audio book for people like to listen to books, while they're driving, but tell us a little bit about what the book is about a few years ago. Katie mcfarland. I conducted a series of. Video panels on four or five key issues. And the Nixon administration KT foreign who went on to work for Fox News and correct. God and was briefly in the White House is deputy, Nashes, Cody of. And we covered the issues I just mentioned, plus the structure of the NFC. And so, at the end of these panels, I thought it'd be good idea to try to get Henry to look back with forty five year perspective, the thirty thousand feet level on these events. And he had never done it all history. This is first and only one not surprising. As well. And we have to talk them into it to be honest. But after one session, which is always thought we were going to do it was so good, even by his estimate, and we barely scratched the surface, he agreed series of five more. So the book is based on those transcripts that were videotaped, and what's amazing is that, when you read the book you see how ticket he is spontaneously without notes with forty five year old advance and early nineties, so anyone at any age being able to speak, this coherently would be marketable before Hindu, that on these events was really quite extraordinary. And we did very little to the transcripts. There was some repetitions few awkward sentences few trucks, structural changes in terms of placement of the material, but it's almost forbade them and it's really quite extraordinary. I should point out that he not only talks about those four key issues, China Russia, Middle Eastern Vietnam. But I tease out of him his. Thoughts on more generic topics that are relevant even today, for example, the need for strategy on foreign policy, the qualities, you look for in a leader. Hi, you organize administration to conduct foreign policy. What's the best way to negotiate his relationship to the president? So these issues transcend the specific events of the nineteen seventies. Well, let's talk about his relationship with president Nixon, Winston because obviously, for any national security advisor, that's the most important relationship to have in Dr Kissinger's, quite opening Frank about sort of what he brought to the table in what president Nixon brought to the table. It's always unimportant position under Nixon was a crucial position because Nixon wanted to dominate foreign policy as everyone knows he basically ran out of the White House. So this was his most important appointment at it's quite extraordinary, he'd never really met Kissinger, had heard about him and read about here. He was a conservative Californian with distrust of the east coat elite places like Harvard where Dr king. Jewish faculty members that actually and at the same time Kissinger was a Jewish immigrant working for years for Nelson. Rockefeller Nixon's primary opponent and yet a Nixon reached out and tap. The Kissinger turned out to be a perfect marriage. Nixon brought an incredible wealth of knowledge and thinking on foreign policy. I've worked for seven presidencies by far the most well versed, and I think strategic and any president that I've ever seen comes through. I think it is book. He had traveled extensively when it was out of office. And then, of course, he was vice president for many years. So he really knew what he was talking about, and had a strategic approach to foreign policy question that when you see he had a strategic approach, what do you mean by that, that you think of what you want to end up that you see how the pieces fit together whether issues linkages or how one country affects another, and that you don't just react to, discreet bents. Think tactically. That's the shorthand version Kissinger at the same poach Kissinger with. Them historic, or knowledge and philosophic knowledge, Nixon bought, practical knowledge and a sense of the domestic political underpinnings for foreign policy, and quaint with many of the world's leaders. So it was a very good fit to, they complimented each other a good example, both of them independently felt that we should open up to China if we could Nixon wrote about it, and fun affairs magazine in nineteen sixty seven his main motivation for opening Z felt the world couldn't be stable if one fifth of the world's people was left outside the world order. So he was thinking more in terms of world order perations Kissinger, although he would embrace that idea was primarily interested in leverage against the Soviet Union figuring that if we opened up with China, we would have impact on relations with Moscow. So they had the general same worldview sometimes for different reasons, based on different backgrounds, and then finally Nixon struck divide balance between how much he ran on policy how much he delegated so he set this TJ framework, often with the help. Memo's kissing you with my assistants would right? And he would approve a basic approaches, but then he would let kissing do the negotiating and carry out the tactical t tales, he had to make Hickson did the key courageous decisions. But then he was very comfortable with Kissinger implementing those decisions. Well, one of these, she's just mentioned China, and that's often held up as one of the greatest, if not the greatest cheap -ment of president Nixon's foreign policy key tells a little bit about how that came about because I think from today's vantage point where the two societies are integrated people flooded China all the time. There's a challenge tremor, what it was like, in terms of US Chinese relations or non relations in the nineteen sixties, or I think you're younger lesson is in particular, my not fully understand the environment in which Nixon kissing, you're working for generally, but also with respect to China, we had fought a war and career and the fifties with China, we had no contact sanctions mutual enmity for twenty two years. Nixon felt. As I said, in his foreign affairs article that you wanted to move as Kissinger. Now their motivations were the following number one didn't want the communist world to speak with one voice, which Moscow was doing. Secondly, we want a better relations with Moscow, but they were not going well. And we felt that if Nixon Kissinger felt that if we opened up with China, we get Moscow's attention. That was a controversial view wasn't it? Because at my sense was reading the book in other things that many Soviet experts said that, that would actually drive the Soviets further way. Absolutely good point, George Kennan. George Kennan Tommy Thompson for Colo and others. All said that if you open they could see the signals that were coming. I'll get back to hell implemented this decision. So they sense what Nixon was up to an said. If you go ahead with China, like this, you're going to relations with Moscow is an example of both stategic thinking in the courage of the president, not to mention Kissinger, they went ahead anyway, and we're prove invite because within weeks after the announcement of Kissinger's sickle trip in nineteen seventy-one leading toward Nixon summit, and seventy two the Russians who had been dragging their feet on a summit agreed to their summit with us. We made major progress arms control, major progress on Berlin negotiation. So these are the motivations and our side, an addition, we felt that we could get some help from the Chinese, ending Vietnam, war, not that they would really squeeze Hanoi, but the least have an interest in seeing this out of the way, there would be more stable Asia. And I think, in many ways, most significantly, they felt I think this was true that if we open. Nd up dramatically with China. And by way, took a courageous decision people think it was inevitable. It was a little easier for Nixon goes his right. Flank was protected by the Republican party metaphor. Nixon goes to China's example are, but Hubert Humphrey would have had more trouble from the Republican, so but it was still a courageous decision had to be paid with the secret trip. The Vietnam war was clearly going to end it an ambiguous fashion going to be victory parades, down Fifth Avenue and the American people were fatigued. We had tremendous domestic two days of riots, assassinations protests and this dramatic opening served to lift them around the American people could put in context that withdrawal from Phnom in the context of opening up with fifth of the world's people. And also it showed the world that the US wasn't bogged down in a quagmire in Vietnam and couldn't exercise diplomat skill. So I think these cosmic impact as well as the specific ones were important now was a win win situation that Chinese wanted to balance again. The polar bear, the Soviets that just had a border clash with them. And they wanted to break out of the 'isolation at into the United Nations and get more normalized relations with countries. So both sides succeeded in goals. If you could just tell us a little bit about how the opening came about. I mean, the stories that are told the Booker fascinating, particularly at one point, the president wants to communicate to the Chinese that he wants to talk and directions or given to I miss the US ambassador to Poland to go up to his counterpart have a conversation in the ambassadors. First reaction to doing that was heck. No, not gonna do it. That's correct. Well Nixon Kissinger had to challenges if they want to open up China into show. Hi, apology was Nixon sent Kissinger memo on February one sixty nine one week after his inauguration saying, get in touch with the Chinese. So we went onto tracks. The ply attract was the find some intermediary country that could be reliable transmitter of messages between us the Chinese, because we, we had no diplomatic relations way to talk to them. And that was a good example. There were these propaganda exchanges in war, so with the Chinese, but no relationship, and therefore ambassador, what after the Chinese and the guy was so scared he blew him off. So we had to find a way to get in touch with the Chinese secretly. We ended up using the Pakistani chattel, but Secondly at the same time, it was important to signal publicly the direction, we were headed, no one thought that was going to be a secret dramatic trip in July seventy-one. But we wanted to indicate both to the Chinese to American audiences and the world that we were looking for a new relationship. So some speech. These were given some terminology was used like the People's Republic of China. We've relaxed some very modest travel and trade restrictions Chinese after respond. But they got the signal. And so we were preparing audiences for the direction of our policy, even as we were trying to get in touch privately, and we manage in nineteen seventy one to pin down the fact that kissing we go secretly to see whether some, it made sense. And if so what the agenda would be okay. So did you go on the ruling going to secret trip?.

Nixon Kissinger Rockefeller Nixon vice president China Kissinger perations Kissinger Vietnam Moscow Republic of China White House Soviet Union US China Russia executive George Kennan special assistant Middle Eastern Vietnam
Perspectives on China and global power

FT News

12:48 min | 1 year ago

Perspectives on China and global power

"How will the struggle for power between China and the US play out. And how will it determine the future world order, Fred Stedman, put this question to China expert, Ron meter he was reviewed a series of books looking at the issue from different perspectives. Ron, thanks for coming in. You looked at a number of books for us in a book Sesay about China and the west. And what struck me right? From the get-go was that you talked about this interaction between these great powers, China and the west, the US is being almost unique in its complexity, and I thought, why is that? Why is this more complicated than other great power interactions, that we've witnessed over the centuries? I think it is different. And the reason fundamentally is that we've never seen an engagement between two different types of regime that are so closely intertwined so different in terms of their values. So if you think back to the Cold War, we had at that time, basically, to political and economic systems, which were fiercely opposed to each other, but they didn't actually connect all that much. Of course, we were all terrified at the threat of nuclear war, but the Soviet Union's economy was not a major factor for the west and vice versa that AKU. It's not remotely true for the People's Republic of China. It is the second biggest economy in the world. It is now a primary economic actor in pretty much every single continent of the world and the United States. Of course, in China have been entwined in terms of finance for more than twenty years, more like thirty. Really? So the fact that we now have a rising China, which from the point of view of many liberals in the west but elsewhere has variety values particularly, of course and authoritarian type of government that is very different from what a liberal government would put forward, but it's not a place that we can simply close off or ignore that provides dilemma that was still right in the middle of solving on both sides, and one of the aspects of that. I think I'm right and say you say there's a choice there. Do we engage more with China and we're seeing this stuff that's happening in the world of technology while way, and whether it should be allowed to be part of the five G project or do we push back and one comes with a security risk? And the other one comes up tension financial economic risk that. That's lemon. But let me give you a specific example. Let's take away, which, of course, it's become this company that in the UK where we're sitting. Now, nobody had heard of probably not nobody very few people a year ago. Now, of course, is a headline every single morning on the news usually pronounced in a variety of other creative ways Hawaii audit wrong is not an upset. Right. I've heard is one prominent politician refers to it as Hawaii, which is not quite the same thing. I think that's not so much of an issue. So ten twenty years ago, we might have said that the biggest threat from the Chinese technology sector was that they were basically borrowing without commissioners, the polite way to put it intellectual property from the western world from the US from Britain from Europe Chinese would basically, taking technology that they hadn't paid for an putting into their machines had to be stopped. That is no longer the main problem does exist. But the wider problem is that actually China is now producing its indigenous technology to a very very high standard. So the reason that the United Kingdom, for instance is having a debate about whether or not, they put while way equipment in the five G network is nothing. With intellectual property theft. It's the fact that the cheapest highest quality most effective broadband network. You can have is made by hallway, and if you don't have that, then you're basically saying that you have to give an alternative company, the rights to put in the network that may actually not be at the moment, overs, higher quality. So there's a genuine balance between quality. And as you say, the question, whether there's a security risk or not, that's a new dilemma, not just for the UK but for the entire liberal world fascinating, I wanna come onto the books now because we get a perspective from China. So it's a bit more about a few from Beijing in terms of how these relationships are going to develop, what China sees its role and the other they have different conceptions of types of political systems, one of the books. I've reviewed in this particular China books essay is book leadership in the great powers by yen Shu at home. Professor yen is a very senior scholar in China. He's at Ching-ho university, one of the top institutions in that country. And he's become known. I'd say of the last. Twenty years or more in that particular field as probably one of the three or four best known most respected analysts of China's international relations. Now international relations terms without getting too technical. He's what's known as a realist is the accusation that sometimes put Henry Kissinger, Henry Kissinger, his pushes back and says, he's an idealist in realists, clothing, or was that effect. In other words, what professor yen believes is that power is the thing that actually makes a difference. So that's the position he's always had. That's why this book is so interesting, not just about him, but about China, because it makes actually in some ways rather, different case, a case that, if China is going to take fullest vantage of its rise in the world. The fact that it is now the second biggest economy in the world, and may by GDP be the biggest one within ten years. The fact that it is this huge international actor than it has to change the way, that looks the world, not just talk about power relationships, but also about what you might call the human relations, the narrative, that surround saddened, professor Yannis jesting that it will be time, maybe not yet but. Quite soon for what he calls, a more humane, the what he used the humane view of how China should relate to the rest of the world. Now that is in a sense, part of a process that we've also seen earlier with the most recent hegemony in world politics, the United States, which of course, became a power that had more battleships and more fighter planes, than anyone else particular during World War Two, but really seduce the world through what's become known as soft power. In other words, having a story to tell the world, I read professor Jens Booker saying that China has got the military. It's got the realist power. Now, it has to find the story and does he believe the Chinese leadership is current inclination to they buy that will this is one of the things that you have to read quite carefully in the book. It's not I would say a book to necessarily put next to a thriller at an airport. You know, it does take a bit of time. But I'd say get a glass of wine, give it a good going over, because it's well worth it prevents. The end doesn't at any point in the book talk about the current leadership, so Xi Jinping. The current president of China is not mentioned for Donald Trump is Donald Trump is along. With a few other names. So the United States certainly comes into the line of fire, you might say, but the wider question that he also is one that is very relevant China, which is, is the current system that China's operating, which, as we know is one that has been economically, very, very effective in terms of growth rates in terms of creating a kind of middle class, that's now, see very, very powerful in China and creating a sorta prosperous lifestyle that many consumers in China very much enjoy, but also really closing down political discourse. Is that going to be the way in which trying to get to the next stage in the implication? It's an implication of a statement but it isn't implication, is that maybe China's going to have to go beyond that if one looks at conclusions that he comes through. And again, this is very interesting because it is so much view from Beijing from thinker who is well respected both in the western China in that field, is that there's not going to be a war. This is not a story about a confrontation between China and America on the military front. But the is going to be a sort of battle for ideas and the dominance. Spouts largely economic in the Asia Pacific region. He does say very firmly the Asia Pacific region is where you're going to have to look, if you want to see what comes next for world politics. It's moving away from Europe moving away from North America. The Pacific for yen is where it's at right. Which is also the subject of one of the other books, that you looked up as referrals, China and Japan which comes to some interesting conclusions. I think it's fair to say it makes some interesting observations. It absolutely does Ezra Vogel is a scholar, but also a diplomatic figure who has actually sort of seen the rise and change in America's relationship with Asia, over the decades, he served in the Clinton administration, as secretary of state, and he became very famous in the seventies earliest that with the book who Japan as number one, which was on every business leaders bookshelf, as well as the cost many scholars, but he's always been a speaker both Chinese and Japanese and this book is about China and Japan, their shed history, which he points out, actually is not always as confrontational as it sometimes appears. We tend to think, of course of. The second World War when the two countries did have a massive conflict, of course. But he also points out that, for instance, if you look at statistics in the last few years, a few years ago, when tensions were pretty high between the two countries something like a million million a half Chinese visited Japan pass, not that many that number last year two thousand eighteen is more like eight million. So if you look below some of these surface rhetoric is saying, actually, there is a more cooperative story about economics about tourism about cultural values that are shared the maybe means the countries aren't as far apart as they might be. And this is I think, part of the white of Vogel, viewpoint because he comes from that generation of Americans who sought as part of their duty. I think in the post World War Two era to try and create a sort of agreed shed set of values in a stable community in East Asia America course, encouraged that in Europe, very successfully European Union NATO and so forth. It's never quite worked out in the same way in Asia. But that hasn't stopped a lot of those people actually, I think trying over and over again to create that similar sorts. Of stability for go. Yours decided mentioned former administration official, but other American voices take sort of more by guessing old money once say hawkish view new picked up on one someone. I believe you're actually at one point taught Jonathan ward who's written a book China's vision of victory which sounds alarmist oil is very concerned, and feels the American needs to be much more assertive in its response. That's right. Yes. New Jonathan ward. I taught history when he was an Oxford where I teach. But this book is very much about current affairs, and it's very much about policy not about history as such. And yes, I think it's fair to say that the argument he puts forward in the book is one that says that China is used the phrase hawkish, I'll say, clear and present danger, that's probably the phrase that comes to my mind. When reading it now, should say the book is one that has a great deal of information in it. It's got a lot about military power, and how China's building up its navy in particular. It's got a lot about economic power, and also of course a lot about values and the argument there, essentially is that. The United States, whether it wants to or not is going to have to deal with the fact that China is there to challenge the United States. So in a sense, that's a different story from the end should tone story where he's basically saying look the Americans and the Chinese are both going to be in the Pacific, where they're going to have to engage with each other. What story will, maybe it's time for America to actually set down the red lines if you can set down the red line in the Pacific Ocean. And actually say thus far and no further so between them those books actually point out in some ways, where the difference of view comes in terms of what's going to happen in the next decade in that Asia Pacific region. You mentioned around all the books that sort of sense that there are tensions, there is a competition of ideas, but the, the authors dancing, we're heading towards some military confrontation. And that things will be settled through dialogue to share that. I think you can see a generational difference in these books, which was as I say, in the essay, it's was reading them in tandem, because they all say something slightly different than they make up out of the picture for. Yang Tong speaking from Beijing. But, you know, with I think quite measured frame of mind. The argument is about to powers that have to live with each other, which have the potential to be confrontational, but not necessarily military sense. Maybe more on the economic sense. I think it's fair to say that as revivals book is talking about the areas where you can find agreement rather than disagreement between the actors and that in a sense, reflects his long decades of experience in the region. Jonathan ward is of a different generation. He's in his thirties. He's living, right there in the policy world of Washington DC right now, and the world, he sees is a much more confrontational. One, one in which America and China have different goals, different values different viewpoints. And that maybe just maybe those can't be contained together. Now, we're going to have to see what happens to work out in say the trade war between China and the US whether that actually could reach something more like a confrontation, but reading three books makes you realize that actually all of these viewpoints exist simultaneously. In part of the existential struggle almost is about what? Which one of them is going to prevail. Ron amid. Thank you very much. Thank you for it. That was Fred Stephen F teabags editor talking to Ron Mischer director of the Oxford University, China center. Thanks for listening. And if you're interested in events in China and Asia Pacific, lookout for latest episode of world weekly, where we talk about the protests in Hong Kong. Thanks again. If you missed our recent episodes on the US standoff in the Gulf China's threat cheese. Rare earths as a trade weapon, or the fall

China United States People's Republic Of China America United Kingdom Beijing Europe Ron Mischer Asia Pacific China Center Fred Stedman Soviet Union Jonathan Ward Pacific Gulf China Professor Yen
Why Werner Herzog loves cat videos

Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

14:06 min | 1 year ago

Why Werner Herzog loves cat videos

"Today on studio. Three sixty what energizes the legendary filmmaker Werner Herzog sometimes when I don't know how to order my thoughts, I switched on crazy cat videos and immediately. I'm rejuvenated. We talk a lot about cat videos, the art of narration and his latest movie meeting. Gorbachev. Plus from the first time you heard this song, it was just absolutely mind. Melting. The story behind when doves cry, which prints released prepare to feel old thirty five years ago this week. This is what it sounds like the head on studio. Three sixty right after this. This is scheduled for sixty I'm currently at I'm sitting on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial this first level of guard this Thomas Jefferson's vegetable, I'd like to have the roasted chicken very well done, editing is all about timing. I tried to get a little bit away from the actual subject must get sick of your place, right? Three, sixty with good Anderson. Werner Herzog has made more than sixty movies. They're often about man versus extreme forces, the Amazon jungle in FitzGerald. Oh, active volcanoes in the documentary into the inferno. His latest film meeting, Gorbachev also fits into that frame. It's the story of Mikhail. Gorbachev versus a crumbling political and economic system. Food consensus, Kevin over a six month period last year and the year before Hertzog went to Moscow and interview the very last president of the Soviet Union, Mikhail Sekkei bitch. I'm sermon. And the first term and that you probably met wanted to kill you. Hertzog and a co director Andre singer, combined interviews with lots of archival footage to tell the story of the one Soviet leader almost everybody in America, and the west light even adored, and the film is all held together by Herzog signature narration here. His home village is it looks today. It is hard to imagine that from such a godforsaken place in the middle of nowhere, one of the greatest leaders of the twentieth century emerged. And when Hertzog is here with me now to talk about meeting Gorbachev, sir. Welcome back to studio. Three six eight thank you. Thank you for having me. So you feel three long conversations with Gorbachev. How did you prepare for those mostly reading I did a lot of homework? I read compensates memoirs Rhoda most excellent biography by William helpmann. Otherwise, I arrived without pain, my hands. I didn't have a catalog of Chris that would rectal down. It was just a conversation from men to men carried on by curiosity. Wave. I was gonna lead me or us. Was unknown the film talks about how Gorbachev is beloved and considered a hero by many Germans, and obviously being a German, a west German at the time, you must have paid keen attention to the Soviet Union at that moment. Sure. And among other things when Germans reunification were somehow abandoned, give him up the real real big thing, about reunification, these it came without bloodshed. It came without violence. Gorbachev allowed peacefully his predecessors would send tanks in and, and suppress the liberation movements of countries like Hungary Poland is terminal. You just name, it chuckle Slovakia, take a Slovak, yo cyst that was attitude of the Soviet Ryan and Gorbachev completely different in his approach and is in west Germany had been separate countries. For essentially your entire life. It just must have seend being a forty odd year old man, having never known anything else impossible that this was never going to happen. Yes, I personally believed I would not see during my lifetime something of that magnitude would take much more time history would be slow, but I was surprised. And when the wall came down in Idi nine and reunification happens, as you say, in the film. So quickly crazily quickly. What was your feeling when I heard about the wall coming down? I was in the southern tip of South America, a mountain, and with five days delay through shortwave radio hurt that the won't had come down, and it's this kind of joy in the shadow of elation, his never left me, I was pleased, given the seriousness of the subject by the touches of humor in this film, like. When they're cutting down ceremonially cutting down the barbed wire between Austria, Hungary, and spend a long time showing this bit of the Austrian nightly news that night I'm going to play that clip. Busy plea for the entire world. I n curtain started to be lifted. However, Austrian evening news was curious about the magnitude of the event retail two minutes. I didn't really metric their lead story was about slugs. It's very funny because they advise you to fill up old with beer in slugs, as lovers of beer would crawl it get drunk and you could harvest them in the morning, then on the miscellaneous much later. So the anchorwoman comes to mention that I am curtain. Being lifted. So it points to that sometimes news completely clueless. In other news, the Cold War is over. Yes. Yes. Do you feel as though humor is, is central to your sensibility, as a filmmaker as a creator, I think this human almost all of my films, and I've been labelled as grim teutonic sort of God knows warrior who, who is determined to risk his life in all all this, all this kind of nonsense. So what you spot it is. There's a lot of human gover of, of course, a lot of human other films. I wanna talk more about your narration, and how you do it. Do you begin with some rough draft? Or do you make the film? I know I the Nori I write the take spontaneously during editing and I know here heft to explain something and I write it down. On incessantly and in the editing room. I have very professional microphone, and I speak the commentaries. Right, then and there while I'm proceeding and sometimes I notice the texts overlaps into the next scene. It's three seconds too long. So I would delete one or two words and rephrase it a little bit in speak again and it would fit. That's amazing. So literally, as you are cutting scenes together, you're coming up with the necessary narration, and recording simultaneous. Yes. Exactly. Is that what I do that extrordinary? Well, I realize it audiences like the way I narrate in not, it's not only my voice. It is a text the context that I create the observation said, I make. So I'm writing the commentaries, and I'm speaking them and ended makes a lot of sense and gives a coherence to films that they would otherwise not. What have? And in his someone there, directing you. You know, saying, hey Werner, let's let's do another take that. No with exception of the editor. He is the only one who would tell me the phrase, doesn't sound right? The grammar is a little bit crooked. Why don't you change? So earth of words, his says to me pronounciation of the word should be different in, in English. So I, I do have helped India seek advice. That's amazing. And also, I'm I'm struck by how demystifying you are of the process. There is nothing. Mysterious about filmmaking. It's just professional work period. Here is a great example of that work from your film, grizzly, man. One of my favorites. This is some of the last football shot by the subject, Timothy Treadwell, a grizzly bear enthusiast. It's a close up of one of his bears, and what haunts me is that in. All the faces of all the bears that trade will ever filmed, I discover no kinship now understanding no mercy. I see only the overwhelming indifference of nature. To me, there's no such thing as a secret world of the bears. And displaying stare speaks only of a half board interest in food, but for Timothy Treadwell despair was a friend, a savior. In a way in that makes film, different and unique I Esa filmmaker heaven ongoing argument with treadmill. Sometimes trade will say something very new agey into how fluffy these Baz I in to hug them, and you have to sing to them and, and here on of sudden night. Chime in say here. I differ with Treadwell in my opinion, wild nature is different. It's chaotic and in dangerous and murderous, not fluffy, like involved, his knee movies. So I just have an argument with him. You didn't always narrate your films, in fact, in your early films. There are other people doing their rations. I believe it was, the, the great ecstasy of would cover Steiner in the seventies that was your first first one. Here's a bit of that finished Pessoa Costa sheaf league in his. Emas. He even so what, what made you decide to start doing that? Forty five years ago. I didn't. Yes, I didn't decide it, it was the signature of TV series all the other films have filmmaker appear in the film and giving the chronically, so right? Not only my voice, head to be in a head to be physically onscreen, as well. I hated the beginning. And, and then I thought when the film was finished I should do at least voice myself I felt uncomfortable but I hit the feeling afterwards, that was something good about it. Steiner's Esther training spoon. Sponsored Fatu got. Wow, your voice was so much higher. You know how Americans feel now about Werner Herzog narrations do Germans here. You're germination think nothing special about that. No. Since I speak own mother tongue. It doesn't really stick out like a sore thumb and insurance, of course. Yes. You'll sense that my first language was Bavarian dialect. It's like let's say Texan, drawl, ereck ignites must come from Texas while he must come from Bavaria, right? The earliest one documentary of yours that I can find that you narrated in English was herdsmen of the sun, which is about a nomadic tribe in the Sahara. This is a clip in the Republic of new Shia. The voter behalf gathered for the annual celebration of care covari towards the end of the rainy season in the month of September tribal meetings are held all over the half desert. Now we hear that we go. Of course, Werner Herzog. That's what he does. But when you first started narrating thirty years ago, was there any pushback from US distributors country Lee say so that was very quick. Aknowledge -ment that audiences feel comfortable and they like the way I make things clear. He really understand what I'm saying. Although I speak with the Nexen with a heavy ex and not as heavy as, for example Kissinger, but that's true. That's true to audiences responded favorably. And that's always a good sign. Your voice is part of the attraction ES, India can tell that it's very easy to make satires and to imitate my voice, you see the internet is full of imposed us. Do you know there's a? Actor and writer Paul Tompkins who has done one. Do you know it, let me play a bit for you and see what you think this is him doing the character on Andy dailies podcast? Okay, if you don't mind I've just uploaded this review to yelp. This is the trader Joe's on hype urine.

Werner Herzog Gorbachev Timothy Treadwell Soviet Union Hungary India Amazon Lincoln Memorial Hertzog Steiner Anderson Mikhail Sekkei South America Thomas Jefferson Germans United States Nexen Moscow Slovakia Sahara
The politics of chess

FT News

09:51 min | 1 year ago

The politics of chess

"Selection. New president of tresses governing body fee day was the Bishop in the organization's history with accusations flung from all sides of bribery, electoral fraud, embezzlement and a vast diplomatic influence campaign waged by the Russian state. Some Jane's has been investigating. What's happened? And he space John Thornhill about what he discovered. Sam you've written a wonderful Osco for the F T magazine about the geopolitics of chess and the fist fight to run its governing body feed given that a computer or a ten million dollar alarm clock has Gary Kasparov called it beat the best human player back in one thousand nine hundred seven why does chess matter anymore. I suppose you could ask a similar question about any kind of game playing in a way that obviously from sort of human point of view, something attracts us to the competition. The display of skilled because I suppose we could have designed perfect football playing machine. Had we have wanted to or a perfect bridge playing sheen, but it would be no fun to watch two machines play against each other would it. So we don't do that. And the only reason we're interested in watching deep blue play Kasporov is because Kasporov is there. We want to see him pit his human wits against machine. So I think regardless of the abilities of computers to handle chess. And by the way, they still on not perfect chess players. There will always be a space and a need for people to watch that kind of competition. And I think the interesting thing insofar as this article goes is that that's the heart of the issue. Really? It's about what games humanity plays with each other and the significance those games have. And chess is one of the oldest, isn't it? It goes back hundreds thousands even of years if you want to go deeper into history right back to India was of significance to rulers. It was a political significance hugely throughout history. Right back to the sort of wig chessmen on Lewis. You know, they were symbols of something that politically culturally connected a world, and for many, it still has that cultural and political relevance is still enormously popular as a game, isn't it? Yeah. Absolutely. It's something perhaps that in the UK, and certainly in some parts of Europe and the US as well, it might not immediately obvious because it's not a sort of mainstream sport. You don't see it on TV for various reasons that can't be much more boring than watching chess on TV, but it is hugely popular. And there was a yougov survey. I think in twenty twelve so even that a little bit out of date now, which suggested that there's more than six hundred million regular chess players in the world. And the interesting thing about it as well is that even if you're not a regular player. It's a sport or skill game. That has touched a lot of people. And a lot of people have played it on certainly know how to play I think in some places seventy percent. The statistics said from that you surveyed in Europe of people have played it at some point, and therefore know the rules of it. So it's got this sort of huge cultural resonance, even if we don't see it all the time on our screens for a supposedly cerebral game. The fight to win control of feeder his involved in extraordinary amount of low down politics involving as you put it small-time oligarchs and corrupt officials broking deals in Siberian mining towns and Islam theocracies. Why has this battle become quite so heated? I don't know. It's sort of an interesting one to explore. I'm not sure there's a clear on, sir. There's a degree to which it's that sort of old adage, which is often attributed to Kissinger, but is actually Wallis sad about student politics that the processes so vicious precisely because the stakes oh small, and you could probably say something of that about fee day because the amounts of money to run feeder on not huge by any means. Although the we're talk millions, but we. Sort of in fever levels of wealth. But at the same time, it's a universe of people who are competing with each other. You have a very particular kind of people that end up in chess obsessional, very intelligent people that quite literally spend their lives playing games. So why don't they do that politically as well? But also, you know, since the end of the Cold War chess has been in search of a meaning really because it had such relevance political relevance during the Cold War missile post, Cold War, period. It's still got a lot of cultural cachet and people obviously trying to latch onto that. And to use that for various purposes, but at the same time it's been a little bit rudderless until recently and a little bit forgotten. No, it hasn't had the direct attention of the Kremlin. Or certainly not in Washington. Anyone in power there? You know, we're not the sort of Fischer Spassky kind of matching Reckitt level of international awareness. Now, you say that there has been a revival of interest in chess, and blah, Dima Putin. Russia's president is clearly someone who is taking an increasing interest in chess. And he said once. Chess makes men Ysern clear-sighted. Does he see chess as a means of reasserting? Russia's soft power. I think increasingly yes, I mean feta is been run for the past twenty years by very colorful Russian national cooled kiss on allusion of. And he hasn't exactly been the best Representative of Russian influence around the world euphemism. Yes. Well, quite he's sort of said that he was met by alliens on his balcony at one stage. He's said that chess was gifted to the world by aliens. But he's also had some sort of quite shady dealings with unsavory characters like the Assad family in Syria for which he was recently sanctioned by the US treasury, but the new head of feet are Cardi volka vich is much higher caliber Russian recently deputy prime minister and the organizer of the World Cup in Russia last summer and clearly whilst restoring fee day to some degree of kind of international prominence and credibility will also be doing a lot to champion Russian soft. Power interests by saying here is an organization a sporting organization that Russia is not only in charge of cleaning up which obviously is going to have a particular importance in the wake of the doping scandal, which continues to dog Russian athletics. I think the other point to make is that Putin and his method of power his conception of power draws so very heavily on the Soviet passed in the Soviet experience of Russian greatness. And so the significance of chess is that it was such an important part of the Soviet conception of soft power and Soviet influence that even if ideologically Russia is moved on by years. It still has this important culturally that Putin wants to tap into. Now there were three contenders to succeed Ilyumzhinov for newest pushed out why did Volkova twin? Well, I mean, I don't think there was a clear choice. So it wasn't a simple case of the Russian candidate versus the reform candidate versus fee day has had these issues under Yoshino for longtime around mismanage. -ment around corruption allegations of bribery in the organization, and the problem was that you previously had a Russian Illumjinov who was very fake in his financial affairs running it. And then in the elections, you had three candidates as you say, you had a Russian who was promising reform, and it obviously delivered a very successful World Cup and had credentials for that. And then you had an insider Kyo Macropoulos who is also a longtime Lieutenant of Ilyumzhinov and therefore tainted by that. But similar Tena sleep. Also, promising reform rather unconvincingly, but similar tenuously also saying that he's not the Russian and he's not bribing anyone in the elections. And then you had a third candidate the Briton Nigel short who I think was always a very much an outside candidate and divided people on a personal level in feed because of his quite spiky comments previously and his long history of antagonizing people in your organization, he fell behind four kovic even though he'd been quite critical of him at the start ends. Then he did. So I mean. Nigel's point was very much that it was better to have a competent pair of hands running fee day, regardless of whether they were rushing or not than it was somebody who he felt was incompetent. And it'd been running it for the past twenty years in the form of Macropoulos, and there's definitely a personal animus between Macropoulos and Nigel Short as well that sort of flavored their relationship and at the last minute, he declared his votes Ford. Walk vich, and rather stinging Lii in very characteristic fashion posted on Twitter a picture of himself shaking hands with dwarf Vichit Simpson's in the strand in London, which is this story chess restaurant, and he captured it underneath how'd you say check Maton Greek clearly aimed at his opposition. How does Volkova which intend to promote chess? Well, I mean, if his last few months of being anything to go by then money is going to be a key element of it. So he's delivered on the promises. He made in the election by putting three million euro into fee day to fund development. He's also promised a much more rigorous oversight regime of. Chess. So he's mentioned that you know, every penny spent will be judged by performance indicators is no longer going to be sort of pushing money into regional federations with no sense of what it's being spent on. And he's definitely I think hoping to build on the relationships he has in the football world and elsewhere in the sporting and political world to sort of revive the prominence of feed in Europe, and the US the west in particular because I think they're really has fallen into disrepute, and there was a real danger for quite a long time in the US in particular federation, their supporters people at Kasporov in fact would split away from fee day altogether. So when I met tool kovic, he'd come straight from Davos, where he was sort of pressing the flesh with CEOs and politicians many of whom he knows, and I think one of the other things he's done is already tried to build relationships with fee for directly. He's actually friends with Infantino at fee for an invited Infantino to give a little sort of a speech for him at his election at feed, and they have already I think. Announced some sort of chess football events that are going to be held together in the future. So more of that kind of thing think to imagine

Chess Russia Europe United States Dima Putin Bribery President Trump Ilyumzhinov Gary Kasparov John Thornhill Jane Kasporov India SAM Davos F T Magazine UK Nigel Short Washington
Whistleblower says Ivanka, Jared got security clearance over experts' advice

Ethan Bearman

06:12 min | 1 year ago

Whistleblower says Ivanka, Jared got security clearance over experts' advice

"According to a source familiar with a whistle blower testimony. Trump's daughter, Ivanka and her husband, Jared Kushner are two of the three unnamed White House officials described in the memo. Kushner was identified as senior White House official one and Yvonne co was described as senior White House official too. In the memo. There was written. That was written and released today. That's the story. Now, the memo was sent from the democratic oversight committee staffers to the committee members it summarized an interview democratic and Republican mini staffers conducted with the White House security advisor Tricia Newbold. That was completed on March twenty third. Newbold is the adjudication manager in the personnel. Office of the White House has worked there as a nonpartisan career employees for over eighteen years. So that means she served under Republicans and Democrats now according to the memo Newbold claimed decisions that she and other career officials made to deny individual security clearance were routinely. Listen to this in quotes overturned by senior officials in order to grant the employee's access to classified information last year. Newbold began keeping track of all employees who were granted clearances after first being denied them and the memo said her list, and I quote directly her list eventually grew to twenty five officials, including two current White House. Senior officials these individuals had a wide range of serious disqualifying issues involving foreign influence conflicts of interest concerning personal conduct financial problems, drug use and criminal conduct. Now, I want to be crystal clear here. The memo described Newbold. As having gone to the committee because she strongly believed that congress must intervene and immediately investigate and reform the White House security clearance process. Newbold has not yet responded to requests for comment on the story and a spokesperson for the oversight committee. Democrats also declined comment. We are told that none of the twenty-five officials on new bowls list where identified in the memo, but there were sections detailing her allegations against three specific individuals who are described as and I quote, senior White House official one two and three the source familiar with new bolts testimony said Kushner, the president's son-in-law was the first anonymous official and vodka the second. The source did not reveal the identity of the senior White House official number three. The memo stated new bowls claimed that Kissinger that Kushner's clearance was initially denied after the background investigation revealed significant disqualifying factors, including foreign influence outside activities and personal conduct. Well, we knew that remember none. The president said he had nothing to do with overruling. Well, if he didn't who did, and we know the general Kelly, the former White House chief of staff wrote a memo, which the White House refuses to release talking about this. According to Newbold that decision was overruled by the director of the personal office who noted the disqualifying activities quote occurred prior to federal service end of quote. Let me remind you before joining his father-in-law in the White House Kushner was an executive at his family's real estate company, which is actively tried to woo. And wow. Foreign investors. And then it goes on to say senior White House official to who the source said is President Trump's daughter is also described as having had clearance issues. The memo said Newbold claimed an initial clearance. Reviewer wrote an extremely thoughtful fourteen page summary, Ivanka Trump's case, the described multiple disqualifies, including foreign influence and outside activities afterward Newbold told the director of the personnel officer don't touch her. When new bold step aside. She said the director ultimately granted the clearance. Wanna remind you before entering her father's administration. Yvonne Cole worked for Trump's real estate company and her own fashion brand both of which courted foreign interests four one five eight zero eight zero eight ten. Is this a scandal? Or is this not? Should we be talking about this or not? Republicans on the oversight committee released their own memo. Objecting and I quote determine Cummings unilateral and partisan investigation into the White House security clearance. That rebuttal said the Democrats memo amounted to cherry pick ex- excerpts from MRs new bowls transcribed interview but were designed to justify a continuing investigation into the clearance process. Now, can you imagine if this is a sure on the other foot? Do you think that there would have been a concern? By the Republicans. If this were a democratic president doing this. By the way, the Republican she's been in there. So many years the Republican memo also argued that Newbold had limited knowledge about the clearance in question and said Republican members of the committee were given short notice about her interviews. It also noted that new bowls acknowledged the Trump administration had improved some aspects of security clearance process since

Tricia Newbold White House President Trump Jared Kushner Official Director Yvonne Co Congress Ivanka Advisor Kissinger Yvonne Cole Kelly Cummings Chief Of Staff Executive Personnel Officer
$1 Billion Downfall: Elizabeth Holmes and Theranos

John Williams

03:01 min | 1 year ago

$1 Billion Downfall: Elizabeth Holmes and Theranos

"By the way, I was doing my. Elizabeth Holmes voice because I watched that documentary last night. I don't know if you've done that. Have you watched that HBO documentary called the inventor out for blood and Silicon Valley, it's about the woman who was behind? She really was theranos that company that said with prick on your finger. You'll get a drop of blood and be able to test for all sorts of diseases and ailments who's going to revolutionize the world. She was the Stephen judge was the Bill gate. She was the Archimedes. I mean, she was like one of these great transformative human figures, she was a fraud. She was a sham the book about that by John Kerry, you which is referenced considerably in. The doc is really the go to source for me. There was an article in the New Yorker, the book followed that now the documentary, then a feature film, when we interview John from the Wall Street Journal about this his I think reporting telling of it was really really good. And you know, how the books are always better than the movie. This really is a classic case. And point the documentaries. Good, and she's she's bizarre. And it's it's fine. But it to me it leaves more questions unanswered than it does answer. And the big one is what was her motive was. She scam artists from the beginning. Or was she just faking it until she could make it were her intention sincere producer Griffin doesn't think that that's as critical a question at the end of the day that technology would not did not in does not work. It doesn't exist in the real world. And it was a scam. Whether she intended it to be or not, I think that's a distinction worth pursuing. But one of the really interesting parts about the documentary is that the old white men lover here. She is this twenty year old blonde with really red lipstick on and she's thin, and she wears dark turtlenecks the way Steven Jobs did and Oliver closer that way. You know, why she dresses that way? Not because she wants to emulate her hero that would be almost juvenile. But no because she's so focused on the corporation. She still living and breathing turnovers that it be easier for her to go into her closet and just grabbed the black turtleneck and put it on. That's why she does it that way. She can focus more. She's not worried about a close. She's worried about changing the world. So there's George Shultz former secretary of state, George Shultz going y'all have some and there's Mike Mattis, and there's Henry Kissinger, and there's venture capital guys. And they're all going. Well, she doesn't really know any science, and we don't know any science. But I think I'll give her one hundred million dollars and that happened Walgreens did that for crying out loud. I'm interested to see the feature film on this. If you watch the dock at least, we'll get a chance to look at her and to see the wacky -ness of it. See how thin it is. But if you want to a sort of a thicker dive on it, then read the book, which is called bad blood, bad blood is the book that you want to read if you really

Fraud Elizabeth Holmes Walgreens George Shultz HBO Silicon Valley John Kerry Wall Street Journal Bill Gate Producer Henry Kissinger Steven Jobs Griffin Mike Mattis Oliver One Hundred Million Dollars Twenty Year
White House Summit With Big Tech Tackles AI, Job Losses

WSJ Tech News Briefing

06:02 min | 1 year ago

White House Summit With Big Tech Tackles AI, Job Losses

"Late last week tech leaders discussed at the White House hopes for closer collaboration with the government on artificial intelligence and support for US workers likely to be impacted by its rise Ivanka Trump helped convened the roundtable with the CEO's, including Microsoft's Saatchi, Adela, Google, Sundar Pichai and other notable attendees, including former secretary of state Henry Kissinger here to talk about what we know happened. And what we don't is the Wall Street Journal's Douglas MacMillan joining us via Skype Douglas, either it appears as though there's been a heightened level of concern, it almost appears as though, you know, all the adults are getting into the big room and about to discuss something serious. So what is the state of concern as it pertains to a is impact on the US workforce and our central future as a whole? Yeah. There's a number of topics that they covered at this meeting. The main one probably was a I. I and this concern that as more and more of our world gets automated and more and more industries become automated that a lot of jobs will be replaced by robots and that millions of American workers truck drivers and retail cashiers inmate probably many others that we're not thinking of yet will potentially be out of work that those people will be searching for new jobs. So the the White House has been thinking about this and has been von Trump in particular has been leading some efforts to try to think about how we can prepare those kinds of American workers for jobs of the future. Try to get them new skills. Try to arm them with some data about the job market. But really what what is crucial about this push. And and really the only way that is going to work is if they have the support of industry, and if they have leading company is like, Google and Microsoft involve at the very beginning and coming up with solutions for. For this potential crisis and the American workforce in the American economy, and I know it was very closed door meeting. But you know, there is such such question about where that relationship stands where big tech stands with big government. It's it's certainly had a rocky relationship and going into it. There were a lot of questions about where that dynamic stands actually, surprisingly very little from inside. The meeting has leaked out we run able to get much information about actual content of the discussion, we do know that President Trump himself made it a brief appearance towards the end of the meeting. But we don't know exactly what what happened. We don't know. Exactly. What people said, I think to some extent this is not a formality. But this is a way to kind of help the relations between White House until validly. Those relationships had become a little icy in the first few months of President Trump's tenure in office. You know, he enacted the travel ban that the CEO's tech companies protested against. They have been vocal outspoken critics of other policies, including his immigration policies. It's climate change policies. So there has been kind of this this tense relationship between tech and the White House. I think what we saw was evidence that CEOs such as do not CHAI at Google while they may have their disagreements with Trump's policies. They see a needed to work with this administration and a see an opportunity to build some initiatives together to work together on key areas. Such as a I where more and more tech companies are calling on the government to help regulate that right? And you know, what's really sort of interesting. You look at this. Impressive list was almost more impressive is who's not on it the top three tech companies were missing. So what do we know about any of those relationships? Yes. So three of the largest tech companies in the world. Amazon Facebook and apple were not invited to this meeting. According to senior administration official it's unclear how much to read into that their signs that the White House is engaging with some of those companies of oncology, Trump personally had breakfast in a in a meeting with Tim cook the CEO of apple on during an event see weeks ago in Idaho, where they were talking about the need for stem education, science technology, engineering mass skills for young people in America. I'm so so at least in that case, it doesn't seem like apple was snubbed, you know, Facebook a lot of its own issues going on right now with Washington. So perhaps there, you know, not is not the best relationship there. But you know, I think we should keep an eye on that. And see these are the companies that are involved in these discussions going forward. Certainly if you're having a discussion about the future of a. I you wanna have the key leaders in that at the table Amazon Facebook, Microsoft, Google, apple these are the US titans of artificial intelligence and from from a competition standpoint from an American competition standpoint, the US government needs these companies in order to compete with China, which is quickly becoming a world leader in artificial intelligence and its own companies are going head to head with these American companies in this field of AI for talent for new products that they put in the market, and for, you know, radical new uses of AI that we haven't even thought of yet. So the US government needs to have a close foster close relationship with relationships with all of these companies in order to make sure it's it's an you into compete on a global stage. Good. Yeah. Like, you said, it's, you know, we don't know much. But we know that there's an important conversation. That's been. Started. So it'll be interesting to see how this all pans out. Douglas as usual, thank you so much. Thank you for having me

Ivanka Trump White House Google CEO United States Apple Microsoft Douglas Macmillan Facebook Donald Trump President Trump Amazon Wall Street Journal Sundar Pichai Skype Douglas Henry Kissinger AI
Infamous blood testing company Theranos is shutting down

KCBS Radio Weekend News

13:25 min | 2 years ago

Infamous blood testing company Theranos is shutting down

"As we first reported last may homes founded the startup theranos and boasted her technology could take a pinprick worth of blood from the finger and perform hundreds of laboratory tests, it was she claimed quote, the most important thing humanity has ever built at a zenith theranos was worth nearly ten billion dollars. And Elizabeth Holmes became the youngest self made female billionaire in the world today. She and her companies one time president STAN criminally charged by the US government of perpetrating a multimillion dollar scheme to defraud investors doctors and patients you're about to hear from insiders how the theranos deception worked. Our work is in. Being able to make testing more accessible Elizabeth homes built her company theranos on this invention. She named the Edison a miniaturized blood analyzer that would disrupt the sixty billion dollar lab testing industry dominated by giants Labcorp and Quest Diagnostics homes called her invention. The ipod of healthcare, and it made her a celebrity, she greased magazine covers and was praised by politicians and the press alike. Founded this company twelve years ago, right? Tell him old your I was nineteen. The woman who I will be interviewing needs no introduction. She sold her vision with grandiose claims that her blood tests would cost a fraction of current prices. What we're doing in just pricing is saving Medicare and Medicaid hundreds of billions of dollars on an annual basis. Homes. Biotech startup was backed by a lustrous board packed with national security heavyweights like Henry Kissinger and James Mattis. The current Defense Secretary the board was filled with friends of George p Shultz the former secretary of state who helped end the Cold War. He introduced his grandson Tyler to homes dazzled Tyler Schultz became a believer in joined the company soon after getting his degree in biology from Stanford University when you met her and you heard about Elizabeth homes vision. What did you think I was totally sold on it? Tyler Schultz began working at theranos in September two thousand thirteen. It was a pivotal moment. As the company announced a partnership with Walgreens, the deal would put an Edison machine in every store. Elizabeth Holmes claimed the Edison performed all the tests big lab machines like these could from cholesterol to cancer. Oh from a painless finger prick the Tyler shoot says the Edison he saw just didn't work. Was it a sophisticated visa machinery? No, there were components that would kind of fall off in the middle of testing that you would have to fish out. They had doors that wouldn't close. They would get too hot. And then they will get too cold. What I was there. We could not complete any test accurately on the devices that we were manufacturing matchy joined theranos in two thousand twelve after getting his doctorate in biochemistry. His job was to adapt. Blood tests for the Edison. Tests, which homes told investors were ready to use on patients. But Elizabeth homes had told Walgreens in two thousand ten that it had developed this device that was capable of running any blood test from a few drops pricked from a finger in real time and less than half the cost of traditional laps was that true. No. Do you think she was lying to Walgreens? I do. Are you a Clinical Lab specialist? No, Erika Chong was fresh out of Berkeley with a degree in molecular and cell biology when she went to work at theranos, she was just twenty two but even the novice lab techs, suspected something was very wrong. When she saw faulty test results sent a Walgreens patients when did you think I probably shouldn't be doing this? Pretty pretty soon in the process, especially when we started to pick up more patients ampoules, and when those samples were retested she says there were often contradictory results. Did you ever alert the patient? Now, we didn't let them know. Hey, we ran your patient sample, and we're not actually positive about what the diagnosis this is. Someone's health information exactly this isn't an ABC crashing this. Isn't you know, someone's food delivery coming late? That's just a different ballgame. It's not the only game. Elizabeth Holmes was playing theranos employees told us they were instructed to stage fake demonstrations for investors who visited company headquarters, it was kind of a show. All they would see you was there blood getting collected. They didn't see what was going on behind closed doors about how it was processed. They will get their finger prick this all out of blood, then they'd be let out of the room. They go have a meeting. Go. Have lunch whatever and which plan and GM would run in the room grab the cartridge bringing down to the lab. So was the Edison doing the testing? Absolutely. Who was doing the testing scientists at the bench by hand. It was a bayton. Switch for investors that kept the money rolling in theranos raised nearly nine hundred million dollars from those investors who now say they were swindled by Elizabeth homes and company. President Ramesh sunny bull Wani the pair claimed investor documents obtained by sixteen minutes, the theranos technology was validated by the FDA pharmaceutical companies and was deployed on the battlefield by the US military in Afghanistan. Those claims were fabricated and in one public appearance after another homes is pitch became even more fantastic. And reckless we've done some work with people at Hopkins who have developed in demonstrated that in blood, you can see the onset of pancreatic cancer seventeen years before a tumor forms. We call Johns Hopkins medicine, they told us they never collaborated with theranos and Doug matchy says test data he compiled for the food and Drug administration was falsified. There was so much pressure from above to get good looking results that are going to be able to pass FDA guidelines that people were pressured into making things disappear bad results. That's deceptive. For sure did you ever go to your boss and say, this isn't right, absolutely. All the time. But you know, he was under a lot of pressure from the people above him. And he was his best to make to make everyone. Happy this invention. It's going to be way up there. With the discovery of antibodies day to day operations were run by company. President sunny ball Wani Wani is a millionaire software engineer with no training in the biological sciences. But he did have a powerful connection to Elizabeth homes. Sonny Bono money was her secret boyfriend some people are here because of the mission because some people are opiate for the science. Money was also homes in four, sir. Firing employees is on the spot and berating scientists for failed tests after year and a half matchy quit. I saw that. There was a potentially fraud taking place there was far too much. Illegitimate things going on there talked to Sonny decided they want to be there anymore and left. Tyler Schulz was also becoming disillusioned I had a personal relationship with Elizabeth. She was close to my family. And I felt like she was deceiving my family and the public little tight end almost every media outlet, including us here at CBS body into the theranos a healthcare pioneer is being compared to visionaries like Bill Gates and Steve Jobs. Do you think she wanted to be the next Steve Jobs? She does a really idolize him. So she wore the black turtleneck thinks she created a world where she was Steve Jobs for a little bit. As her wealth and reputation soared Elizabeth Holmes took on the trappings of power. She bragged bulletproof windows were installed in her office. And she traveled with a full-time security detail. Their nose employee's told us they were closely watched and required to sign nondisclosure agreements. All reinforced they said by a threatening team of lawyers in private investigators. That's why when Tyler shorts alerted authorities in the spring of two thousand fourteen he used a fake name. Why did you come up with an alias? I knew how seriously theranos protected their trade secrets I knew they would not take welfare knew that. I was talking to regulators easy meal to New York State Department of health regulators Schulz outlined questionable lab is and said he believed test results were being switched. I said this happened in my laboratory, and I just want to know if this is okay. And there is funded and said, no this is cheating. This is not how it's supposed to be done. Tyler Schultz was ready to resign. But I he sent Elizabeth homes and Email about his concerns. He got a response from sunny ball Wani that I was arrogant, ignorant, patronizing, reckless. And I was lacking the basic understanding of math science and statistics that if I had any other last name that I would have already been held accountable to the strongest extent Tyler Schulz quit in April two thousand fourteen and soon after Erika Chong did too by February two thousand fifteen the theranos fairy tale was about to unravel publicly at the Wall Street Journal Pulitzer prize winning reporter, John Kerry ru who was written a book about the theranos saga. Got a call. It was a tipster casting doubt about the Edison theranos and its charismatic founder, Elizabeth homes. She is. Is a pathological liar. She wanted to be a celebrated tech entrepreneur she wanted to be rich and famous, and she wouldn't let anything get in the way of that. What kind of job did the board do in holding homes accountable? This is one of the most epic failures in corporate governance in the annals of American capitalism. They did nothing to verify that her scientific claims were true Kerry ruse, I started cool appeared in October two thousand fifteen and revealed theranos did less than ten percent of its tests on Edison machines. What do you think's going on here homes struck back? This is what happens when you work to change things. And I they think you're crazy, then they fight you. And then all of a sudden you change the world. Let's skeptics we're no longer buying the theranos deception what I'm showing you. Now is the result of hundreds of engineers and scientists work homes repeatedly insisted she would present proof that a major industry. Conference that her technology worked. It can see the tray dropping into the Texan module. There was proof that never came and the evidence that you presented fell far short of that in two thousand sixteen after a series of surprise inspections. Federal regulators shut down the company's laboratory saying it posed immediate jeopardy. Patient health and safety. Nearly one million theranos test results were invalidated once. She started using this technology on the blood samples taken from consumers in Walgreens stores that was an unauthorized, medical experiment. There's no other way to put it theranos was on the brink of collapse. Big name investors found their stock was worthless. Education secretary Betsy DeVos in her family and media mogul Rupert Murdoch each lost more than one hundred million dollars. Walgreens, Sube theranos and settled for less than a quarter of. One hundred and forty million dollar investment. Why do you think this was outright fraud as opposed to any other Silicon Valley startup that just wasn't able to deliver on lofty goals because she raised money hundreds of millions of dollars on the basis of this technology, not only being ready and working but being commercially rolled out? You're also lying to the public relying the patients, you're lying doctors. You're lying regulators. Most people would call that fraud as well the securities and Exchange Commission called it massive fraud when they charged Elizabeth homes and sunny Bonnie in March home settled the SEC case without admitting guilt and paid half a million dollar fine. Bonnie who left theranos two years ago calls the SEC charges unwarranted and is fighting

Theranos Elizabeth Elizabeth Holmes Walgreens Edison Sube Theranos Tyler Schultz Tyler Schulz Fraud Elizabeth Homes President Trump United States Edison Theranos Erika Chong Tyler Steve Jobs Henry Kissinger
"kissinger" Discussed on Dumb People Town

Dumb People Town

02:30 min | 2 years ago

"kissinger" Discussed on Dumb People Town

"People in the room assumes that everything was going smoothly for the first twenty or thirty minutes. Then Dr Dunn started to complain that he was having trouble seeing her spine. You were say, there's so much blood. I can't see Kyle. Kissinger was one of the nurses in the operating room that morning hit worked with Dr Dench the day before and was already starting to wonder how good a surgeon he was. So here's using one of the subtext from our hospital. And so he just keeps telling her suck more more. Get that what other? I can't see a lot of blood way more than there should have been. It was seeping through the blue draping around flow Ellis body and tripping onto the floor. There was a bucket on the floor for use sponges. Usually when they're tossed into the bucket there splotch. -i are slightly pink, but not this time I was giving back dark red sponges. This sponges were soaked through with blood. The surgery lasted a long time way longer than it should have when it was done flow. Ella had lost a lot of blood. And the recovery room, though she said she felt okay. She asked for ice. That evening. Joe came to visit with their son and granddaughter. Joe was worried something about his wife didn't seem right. He would later describe her as fidgety. When he came back at around five thirty. The next morning, her condition had deteriorated flow. Ella's body was convulsing Joe dash to the front desk and told the nurses. She needed help. A half hour later flow. Ella Brown, lost consciousness. When Kyle Kissinger arrived for work. Another nurse told me, hey, you know, did you hear what's going on with the patient from yesterday? Kissinger ask if Dr Dench had been to see her might they'll have you called him or you know, she just says, we're unable to get a hold of them, so which is concerning. In fact, Dr. Dense was nowhere to be found that was just a preview of Dr death to hear the rest of this episode and not miss what happens. Next subscribed to Dr death on apple podcasts, wherever you listen to podcasts or find a link in the episode notes.

Ella Brown Kyle Kissinger Dr Dench Dr Dunn Joe dash Dr death Ellis Dr. Dense apple thirty minutes
John McCain, Dr. Henry Kissinger and America discussed on The Daily Article

The Daily Article

00:39 sec | 2 years ago

John McCain, Dr. Henry Kissinger and America discussed on The Daily Article

"Filled with paradoxes. Begin with a name. We honor America's one hundred sixty million laborers by giving them a day free from labor. Then we call their holiday Labor Day. However, the name is unfortunately appropriate for our largest labor group retail employee's. They'll have one of their longest workdays today as Americans flood into stores for Labor Day sales Labor Day could have led to a four day weekend, but congress intervened the first labour day was on a Tuesday in eighteen eighty two. In eighteen ninety four. Congress moved the holiday to the first Monday in September. So when you go back to work tomorrow, blame them, the good news is that the

John Mccain Dr. Henry Kissinger America Jim Denison Congress Washington National Cathedral Charles Spurgeon Sern Writer KAT Ohio Nishit Lord Ninety Four Year Four Day
Right-wing protests fueled by anti-immigrant sentiment continue in Germany

Red Eye Radio

00:29 sec | 2 years ago

Right-wing protests fueled by anti-immigrant sentiment continue in Germany

"A protest in Germany over immigrant, rights turned, violent Saturday, night, the demonstration in the city of Chemnitz was organized by right wing groups angry after Syrian and Iraqi immigrants were arrested for stabbing and killing a thirty five year old German citizen. Thousands of counter-demonstrators also showed up yon Henrik Viva from the site t-online. Was there I experienced violence against myself because, a right wing people attacked. Me and my timer I lost my.

President Trump John Mccain CBS Executive Mccain Henry Kissinger Liberty Mutual Insurance Brad Kavanagh Bush White House Annapolis Nicole Canada New York Times Sheryl Stolberg Henrik Viva Vietnam Chemnitz Andrew Gillum Idaho Washington Tom Foty
Megan McCain, Trump and President discussed on 24 Hour News

24 Hour News

00:59 sec | 2 years ago

Megan McCain, Trump and President discussed on 24 Hour News

"Senator John, McCain, remembered, at the US capitol members of congress paid their respects the sky over Capitol Hill opened up as McCain's body arrived rain pelting flag draped casket. Before it was carried into the rotunda where he's lying in state generations of Americans We'll continue to marvel, at the man lies before. US Senate majority, leader Mitch McConnell among those remembering McCain at a service, under the Capitol's dome President Trump was not there to wander. McCain. With whom he had a long feud but the vice president, was as, President Trump said yesterday we respect his service. Daughter Megan McCain said holding the hand over one hundred six year old grandmother Roberta who crossed herself after being wheeled. To her son's casket tomorrow there will, be a service at. The National Cathedral. In Washington former presidents George W Bush Barack Obama will deliver eulogies other. Speakers include Henry Kissinger and Joe

Megan Mccain Donald Trump President Trump United States Vice President Henry Kissinger Mitch Mcconnell Barack Obama Senator John Joe Lieberman National Cathedral Congress George W Bush Senate Washington Roberta One Hundred Six Year Four Dollars
"kissinger" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

02:29 min | 2 years ago

"kissinger" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"And delighted to have you with us tonight as we take a look at this summit that is going to be taking place now it looks as though it will happen this time kim jong un of north korea and president donald trump in singapore as had been scheduled earlier on june the twelfth their time the evening of june the eleventh monday our time our guest if dr graham allison who was the dylan professor of government at the harvard kennedy school in cambridge massachusetts and i thought we might look at the the kissinger rule regarding summits and henry kissinger's view always was that no summit should ever take place in which essentially things aren't pretty much hashed out beforehand by underlings and so the leaders the summiteers show up they shake hands they do their photo ops in the may agree to what has already been agreed to in kissinger's view if you try to actually due do summiteering at a summit that is to say the two leaders start from scratch that's a recipe for disaster your thoughts since i met student of henry's fifty years ago and remain a colleague and good friend is hard to disagree with them and is no question that this has been traditional diplomacy and diplomacy that summits have been in effect for the leaders to come and sign communicates that have already been written and reviewed by all the parties so ceremonial trump has become president by breaking all the rules so part of the reason people have difficulty understanding what's going on now all of us is that the new book is not the way that he got the nomination rule book is not the way he got elected president the will book is not the way he's operating as president and so imagine that he has through whatever the series of tweets and banter in threats and promises established some report with kim jong wu and i find that hard to believe exempt little by lula's i watch it i'm picking maybe these two unusual characters actually have established so element of ood report i think trump imagines that when he sits down with him the way he would sit down for a real estate deal he's going to be able to impress him he's trying to.

kim jong un north korea president donald trump singapore dr graham allison professor harvard kennedy school massachusetts henry kissinger kim jong wu lula cambridge fifty years
"kissinger" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

AM 970 The Answer

02:03 min | 2 years ago

"kissinger" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

"And that was great we both played third base that was the kick for me and i wanted to ask him a thousand questions didn't i was also like hey piscopo in the morning hey it's six thirty five and al what are you doing before we'll get to the news when we come back i was going to give you the local news we'll look at it i'm looking at president trump could be subpoenaed if he refuses to talk this special counsel robert muller will you just stop i wish we had maybe henry kissinger can do this call the democrats in call the republicans say the rhetoric scottish stop everything stops maybe we should maybe we should have like a summit at the radio station five boroughs maybe that's what we should do it's gotta stop the the witch that is the where's adam schiff by the way what boy they hit end didn't they oh those eyes with those laser right i mean what are you guys as crazy as he's been on this investigation you have to give adam schiff credit he was on one of the sunday shows i think it was the abc sean week this week and he gave a president trump credit for north korea so and for bringing north korea to the table so that you know outlook i don't like what he's doing his affect to russia but at least he's intellectually consistent you know he was an advocate of obama talking and working with north korea and bringing these north korea and now he's giving trump for doing the same because he's got nothing with russia collusion exactly nothing there and if you get a kissinger type character you to come in and say look muller's got to go away and maybe kissinger because the you know the former secretary state brilliant man still has all his faculties in his nineties sit down with the president president put the phone down let's you'll be nicest trying to work this out together at and because it's getting ridiculous and there's no credibility to it at all maybe we can get jim to impersonate henry kissinger money what was what was biscuits fate she is favourite pressured yesterday oh burgess meredith for me burgess was flawless flawless how he did but he rolls right into it and.

trump robert muller adam schiff north korea obama president jim burgess meredith special counsel henry kissinger russia secretary
Oil climbs on Saudi price ambitions and U.S. stocks draw

02:00 min | 2 years ago

Oil climbs on Saudi price ambitions and U.S. stocks draw

"A real possibility now okay that's that's theater at this point in the markets figured that out and it's moved back up at the same time i think risks have risen has for the interest rate outlook david don abedian is chief investment officer of the atlantic trust group the language from the the new powell fed has been a little bit more pocket and we think that will translate into three more rate hikes this year a little bit more than the than what's built into the market now crude oil rallied to the highest since december twenty fourteen after the us government reported across the board declines in domestic stockpiles of oil oil gasoline diesel and jet fuel opec and nonopec oil ministers will be meeting tomorrow in jeddah saudi arabia to discuss how to keep a global oil glut from returning as for the oil outlook francisco blanche's head of global commodities research at bank of america merrill lynch i don't see a sustained eighty plus throughout the whole year because again remember the peak of the of the demand season is july fourth does one every american goes on and drives but also every europeans out on vacation in in july and all this strikes let's going to press up the price of oil led by the transportation fuels like diesel and gasoline west texas intermediate crude oil advanced today by three point four percent after the bell earnings beats from both american express and alcoa stocks mixed the dow down thirty eight down two tenths of one percent sp up two points up one tenth of one percent nasdaq up fourteen up two tenths of one percent i'm charlie pellett that's a bloomberg business flash bloomberg best june grasso and ed baxter continues as mike pompeo awaits senate confirmation to become secretary of state president trump confirmed today the former cia chief met with north korean leader kim jong hoon last month for more on the us position in asia bloomberg's tom keene in france in the quad spoke with robert hormats vice chairman of kissinger associates what would be your vice to mr pompeo in terms of the speed of change.

Donald Trump Bank Of America Merrill Lynch Texas Alcoa Bloomberg Ed Baxter Senate President Trump Head Of Global Commodities CIA Kim Jong Asia Bloomberg Robert Hormats Kissinger Mr Pompeo David Don Abedian Jeddah United States
China Strikes Back at the U.S. With Plans for Its Own Tariffs

Bill Handel

02:40 min | 2 years ago

China Strikes Back at the U.S. With Plans for Its Own Tariffs

"His in how extraordinary martin luther king was and that is there are very very few people who get to these positions without being pure political animals who are not don't have this kind of humanity in them it just doesn't happen that often mahatma gandhi surly abraham lincoln martin luther king and i'm putting them in the same category because i think they have to be that's not to say they weren't very clever various political animals if you look at what abraham lincoln was about he knew politics meant he understand understood the noose nuances otherwise you don't get to be the president the same thing with martin luther king he understood the politics of what he was doing nothing he did was by accident but at the same time on the overleaf here here was a man that for the humanity came out of him when you look at presidents man it's all politics or it's a fluke like in donald trump's position i mean how many people have this kind of sort of nobel peace winning philosophy comes out 'cause the humanity i mean a lot of it is just politics yasser arafat winning the nobel peace prize boy there was a humane person henry kissinger winning the same pri boy there is humanity martin luther king was very different kind of person and as i think about him there's a reason why a national holiday is named after dr king and it is no mistake because he was able to put together like very very few people in history both his humanity and the politics of his a mediate life of the circumstances of where he was and when he was and his success you put all of those three together and that never happens but for a handful of times in modern history all right coming up dean sharp the house whisper and how to properly seal off your your home from your spouse no i have that wrong kfi am six forty there's jennifer china has proposed new tariffs on fifty billion dollars a year with of american products it's in response to a new round of tariffs on china announced by president trump the stock market opened down on the news but the president's new top economic adviser larry cudlow told reporters the market shouldn't overreact sometimes the path to this to this kind of.

"kissinger" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

WAAM Talk 1600

02:29 min | 2 years ago

"kissinger" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

"He is a die hard neoconservative trashes his views your bestselling author of the top universities harvard globalist you know you're going to go over your whole background but you you've been right there in the middle of it and let's just compare a olten to kissinger i went through that same phd program at harvard that produce kissinger and they gave me kissinger's old office there at the center for international affairs now we know for fact that kissinger has been advising president trump and mcmaster who was just fired and jared kushner and kissinger is a real politique technically it qualify and kissinger for example recently spoke very positively in public about president trump's initiative to negotiate with kim jong un and an ice rink look that i i support a peace process there with north korea after all it's kissinger and all them that did the whole deal with china is well in real politic just means hey political pragmatic that is correct highly pragmatic and i support negotiations even secretary of defense mattis you know fourstar marine corps general said war over there with the task bolton for example as i said is just a die hard deal conservative he was on the original p nak will port that was basically the mind comp for the neo conservatives that as you correctly pointed out like to the of war against iraq fifth was a total catastrophe and those of us dealing with the least knew it would be a total catastrophe indeed trump when he was running for the presidency said it was a catastrophe and and he was right let's just take north korea now bolton just recently while herod an article in the wall street journal bye saying he thinks i strike is is legitimate.

harvard kissinger mcmaster trump kim jong un north korea china fourstar marine corps herod wall street journal jared kushner president secretary iraq bolton
"kissinger" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"kissinger" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"The name of kissinger and mr kissinger went to the middle east and to hear khin plump tell the story i just sat there almost with a boost temple church and he said nixon went to the middle east and set to the oil companies especially to saudi arabia he said america yet here's rowing astronomically and we need to do something about it we will buy your oil if you owe by our debt and a number of the middle east oil companies countries agreed to this and they said okay uh we'll buy your tv tbills we'll buy you'll securities and in turn the american debt bush paid for by those countries that bought our securities clean a miracle would have been in trouble he would have been in ah in terrible problem in it's interesting that the doors to china opened up lindsay during richard nixon's administration and now lay on our debt us until they had to have someone to bother yet and the uh the arab countries gig they kept their word and they begin to vile would get now now has come down to where we are right now today he elite don't need the arabs anymore and the air arabs don't need the italy anymore but now the the next few state move cheer the so startling in relation to where the italy are going right now to.

oil companies saudi arabia lindsay richard nixon mr kissinger khin america middle east china italy
"kissinger" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

02:39 min | 2 years ago

"kissinger" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"And the american oil cockpit is begin to go in and say we will rule for your oil delete fine sh that drilling for your oil and one by one american oil companies went into the different uh middle east countries and brad in that oilfield each inform himself personally prior to going to the french last oil pipeline as senior executive which dubai and spent a number of years they're bringing the end of dubai oilfield uh each company it one might have been texaco another might have been arco another might have been exxon and each of whom were different oil companies brought in different countries in the middle east and well financed by the elite uh at this point the american oil companies in the fifth and sixth twos did this and the elites finance tomb but in the '70s 73 through seventy seven during the administration of nixon and ford that was a gentleman by the name of kissinger and mr kissinger went to the middle east at the here khin tom tell the story i just sat there almost with a boost temple church and he said nixon went to the middle east and set to the oil companies especially the saudi arabia he said america debt is growing astronomical and we need to do something about it we will buy your oil if you were by our debt and a number of literally oil companies are countries agreed to this and they said okay uh we'll buy your tbills we'll buy your and in turn the american debt bush paid for by those countries that bought our securities we have a miracle would have been in trouble he would have been in ah in terrible problems in it's interesting that the doors to china opened up lindsay during richard nixon's administration and now lay on our debt yes and so they had to have some one to buy the debt and the uh to arab countries gigs they kept their word and they begin to vile would yet now now has come down to where we are right now today he italy don't need the arabs anymore and the arabs don't need the italy anymore but now the the next few statements here do so startling in relation to where the.

oil companies brad senior executive middle east khin tom saudi arabia lindsay richard nixon dubai ford mr kissinger america china italy
"kissinger" Discussed on KOIL

KOIL

02:13 min | 3 years ago

"kissinger" Discussed on KOIL

"The tip and it'll be wide if directing the offense for the oscars they give it off to kissinger picked up by sydney lamberty lamberty a very good defender will probably see that quite a bit tonight trying to get the ball in the low post the king whyte's top of the key to kissinger kissinger starts the drive far corner mitchell struck the poet up baben partially blocked then taken away by melamine off the mess defense by favor on that one and audrey is going to be a portent defensible you know what she brings to the blue jays on offense but against the oscars two years ago here she was critical defensively against shepherd agnew three on the way no good rabata by green so the case hitting that often see board and that's one thing alley dealt exceptionally well in practice she has more offensive rebound than any bluejay green along wand that's a two right on the line but ally grain we talked about her offense growl us she gets the jays on the board just add one foot inside the arc right there did alley but if she can get off to this gonna start that's what the blue jays need a you need of me they continue to play well defensively widish almost loses the ball gets a back mitchell shirts of dr dattilo puts it up ban off glass in hand still good defense right thereby faber just a little bit late on the rotation and italy loud mitchell the get down low good position ninety seconds in both teams were the bucket here were tied at two agnew good to see her take a shot that long brave i favour that on off the back iron no good ally grain again hitting the offensive glass comes away with it does a couple of big extra possessions for the blue jays lamberty again they swing at around that one block out of bounds kissinger blocking maya mailman we get our first substitution of the game theory in washington we'll replace cain and clearly amy williams seeing something she didn't like from our freshman down low wants to get a little bit more experience with washington out there favour three ball on the way that one off the iron no good both down by singapore you like audrey getting or shot though that was fluid in rhythm just missed it mitchell with.

king whyte mitchell blue jays shepherd agnew dr dattilo faber washington cain amy williams audrey kissinger kissinger widish italy ninety seconds two years one foot
"kissinger" Discussed on WBT Charlotte News Talk

WBT Charlotte News Talk

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"kissinger" Discussed on WBT Charlotte News Talk

"And the drive bys all know what and they don't have a problem with any of it and then back channel continued when obama was in the white house iran is a mortal enemy of the united states some that we'll storms roche's doors your trump should mid with his kick and somebody as as trump discuss lifting the sanctions on russia his trump done anything the ease or make life easier for putin what what actually is happy between trump and russia all these back channel communications and all of this private negotiation all the what's happened where have we been sold out whereas trump sold us out anywhere it hasn't happened federal obama getting back to him once once obama gained the white house obama and hillary usbacked channels with the iranians to continue to push for the obama iran new deal obama even used henry kissinger open up channels with russia this is when when obama and putin were supposedly on the alex over crimea obama calls dr kissinger asks him to do what he can to help facilitate back channel communication with the russians so this is totally ginned up everything abounded is i take a break we'll be back and continue in a second magic will continue on the eib network.

obama iran united states roche russia putin trump henry kissinger hillary usbacked crimea eib