20 Burst results for "Kirsten Johnson"

"kirsten johnson" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

01:55 min | 5 months ago

"kirsten johnson" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"Will not be alone. Nation will be by her side. But I think that is the overwhelming feeling that people are having today the whatever they think about the monarchy. They're deeply devoted to this woman and her life of service. We're only about 30 people in attendance to DeKoven 19 protocols Back in the United States. Nearly 100 people detained last night outside Brooklyn Center, Minnesota after more civil unrest following the shooting of Dante, right. NBC's mark Malard reports from Minneapolis and County Sheriff David Hutchinson with a warning for those who plan to cause violence with stay peaceful. The people who are intent on causing harm. Gonna find yourself were tonight on back and then becoming jail. This was after authorities say a peaceful demonstration turned violent with people hurling glass bottles at officers. A curfew was ordered in pepper cannons were used to disperse the crowd. Margaret Malard, ABC NEWS Minneapolis Milwaukee Police Department, meanwhile, investigating a homicide which happened around 7 48 last night, a 24 year old man was shot near 49th and my Nicky. He was pronounced dead at the scene. Anyone with information is asked to contact Milwaukee police or Crimestoppers. And finally, the Brewers and bugs continued to adhere to the city's cope in 19 guidelines, But for now, don't expect any capacity limits to relax. Walking. Health Commissioner Kirsten Johnson says the Bucks and Brewers onesie more fans at their home games anytime soon. They understand that our numbers are contained to climb that we're in no position right now in Milwaukee to allow more fans at this point if numbers continue to go up, however, Johnson says she doesn't expect any businesses or team safety plans. To be tightened up. I can't imagine short of something similar. What's happening in Michigan happening in Wisconsin, US Having to dial back anyone safety plan that's in place Eric Bills to WTMJ news, sports traffic and whether our next citing a limited wtmj news time, 11 03. For the outdoor enthusiast ready to have some serious.

Margaret Malard Eric Bills United States Johnson Bucks Michigan NBC ABC NEWS Milwaukee Kirsten Johnson 19 guidelines David Hutchinson Dante last night mark Malard today Minneapolis tonight 24 year old Wisconsin, US
"kirsten johnson" Discussed on The Nocturnists

The Nocturnists

05:29 min | 5 months ago

"kirsten johnson" Discussed on The Nocturnists

"Nope. I don't stand a chance and the gang and be steamrollered anyway am sitting here teary just because you're speaking about marta. And get this. My dad went into dementia care facility in august and he is now there and being very well taken care of and is comfortable though like to come back and live with me right brother like in a heartbeat but it is no longer possible well. Marta went on from working with my dad to work with a couple of a couple who are hundred and one and ninety seven through a long and complicated story and not marcus vault. They got covid fables recovered from covid. Marta has been in the hospital for the last four weeks at age fifty three fighting for her life. The great news is that she just got released from intensive care and we believe she's going to be fine. Knock on wood but like this is like this is the craziness of life and death and healthcare right like that. We have young healthcare workers who are dying before the people there taking care of like. Can you make it up to one hundred and one year old and the ninety seven year old both cove. and we're fine and martin has been wiped out. You gotta accept it well. None of us were accepting the idea that marta day. When i learned that. Marta was in the hospital. I was like no. This is not happening. I cannot accept this. And i think it's easier for a caregiver to say we've got to accept that a ninety seven year old person is going to die then the daughter of that ninety seven year old person and i think there are some people for each of us and it might just be ourselves right. I can't accept that. I'm gonna die or i can't accept the my mom's going to die and i think that is human. I think once we get like just a little bit out from it. We're like okay. It's acceptable it's natural that people die but if you are a lifetime entangled with the person or you just fell in love with someone no you are not exempt team that they're going to die no way and i'm not i'm still not accepting that my dad's gonna die you know even though i've practiced in a bunch of times and even though i am helped and comforted by the fact that we have this movie and that he will stay alive in this movie for my children in the future that his ineffable spirit is available to other people that i don't have to try to explain what that was. They don't have to explain. Why i'm so sad to lose it. It's like look at this magical person. i don't wanna lose magical person. He is a magical person. I mean even just like his smile and his laugh and his sweetness like it really comes through even for those of us who've never met him in real life and same with marta. I mean it was a very short scene with her. Since you extraordinary. I fell in love with her in your devastated by the idea that she might be sick with covid right. Maybe i'll leave you with one last question. I really love. The scene with mike was helping. Take down the shelves in your dad's office and you say to mike. We all carry our parents in us. What are you carry from your dad now. I would like to ask that question for you when dick johnson is dead. What will you carry forward from your dad. I aspire to the way he listens. And i have to say there's a quality to the way that you are asking questions of me that you have opened up some spaces and slowed me down and it reminds me of my dad. It's like you allow you allow the space. And the time to think. And i think the fact of being a doctor is to understand a little bit about the deep complexity of what it is to be alive and that understanding i think allows potentially for people to be there fuller selves publicly so respect to you and respect to my dad and i hope that i learned to allow more create more space in relation to other people. But i just wanted to thank you for making this film. I mean truly. I've never seen anything like it. And i think for everybody listening whether you're experiencing somebody in your family with dementia or just as a healthcare worker. This film will really really open you up. It's just so original. So i think probably should be mandatory viewing for all for all health care workers. Well nothing would make me happier. Because i have such gratitude and respect for healthcare workers. Well thank you so much kerstin..

Marta martin dick johnson marta august ninety seven year kerstin mike hundred ninety seven year old one last question both ninety seven each one hundred and one year old one marcus vault fifty three last four weeks times
"kirsten johnson" Discussed on The Nocturnists

The Nocturnists

08:15 min | 5 months ago

"kirsten johnson" Discussed on The Nocturnists

"You talked about when the caregiver comes into the room or the healthcare. We're comes into the room. The tone shifts and that signals something that symbolizes. Something and one thing i noticed about this film is how little you medicalising him and how little the dementia was medical is. There was really only one scene that took place in a medical setting. And i was laughing so hard. I was really watching it last night. Where there's that woman and she does the tests and she asked him. Here are five words. I'm going to distract you. And then i'm going to ask you to recall them. And he can only recall one of the words and then the next shot it's like her back and she's typing into a computer and i was just like hooting because it's so emblematic of what healthcare has become and so i'm wondering. Was that intentional. That you wanted to keep this story out of the medical setting and really keep it more in. The home had all kinds of dreams and wishes about where this move was going to go and that and i did a trip to portugal during the course of it and we ended up eating this man who was a skin doctor. Who had this incredible office. That was like from the one thousand nine hundred thirties. Father been a doctor and then he'd inherited it and he had this amazing lithograph on his wall of people being unzipped from their skins and wanting new skins to be in and i was just obsessed with the idea of bringing my dad to this doctor and having him read the story of my father's skin and i tried so hard in my faltering portuguese and then with a translator to get this doctor to be willing film the scene because i just like how does this so amazing. And he wouldn't do it. He felt that it was unethical to film the scene with my father and that it wasn't what he did as a dermatologist. Actually to be sort of fortune teller about skin. But i in my mind. I wanted the scene so badly. I sort of wanted another doctors take on my dad like a deep psychological. Take on him. I'm not denying that that's complicated. Like is it okay. That i'm making a film with father while he has dementia a comedic film. That's a really real question. Is that okay. I think about what's special about my dad. When my kids were first born he came. I have twins and they were born prematurely. He came the first week and the he talked to them was so hilarious so respectful just like they were full human beings this revelation like. Wow he's done that for me my entire life but it reminded me of how he dealt with my mother with her alzheimer's he understood. She had a disease but he also understood. She was a brilliant person. And the person you loved like somehow. He managed to not be patronizing to her. Not medical is her. And i think unconsciously almost that sort of where i was coming from with my dad is like i want to respect him even if he's asked me the same question like five hundred times today i'm gonna answer it or i'm going to be playful with it but i'm gonna like i'm just gonna try to stay in zone of respecting him on his terms in the present moment. Yeah and i think a society. We're not very good. At respecting our elders at respecting people with cognitive impairment i think part of the whole covid pandemic was that it was affecting older populations and just the way that our society responded to that or didn't respond to that and the way that we view old people as not useful or not lovable or expendable. And how sad that is in. How in medicine geriatrics community is really trying to shape a different narrative around our elders and there was a moment in your film. That really reminded me of this which was when Dick goes to visit lolita his crush and they're flirting with each other. And he makes a joke about wanting to see her without her clothes on and she jokes about her sagging and then he says actually the wrinkles make it better because you have twice the surface area classic quite quite the come on joke and it was such a great example of how people when they're old like they still have a sense of humor and they still have their sexuality. I guess i don't really have a question about that. Just a comment. That i wanted to share. And then the other piece of that was in the scenes with you and your kids and your father just the really beautiful moments of family and in dementia. We talk a lot about the things that we lose and the things get stripped away. But i was wondering what do you and your kids gain by living with someone with dementia. Well both of your questions are around value in people right and i so echo you and i hear you about what we did at the beginning of this pandemic and we're still doing that. There's so much out there around. Who's expendable who don't want to see who suffering we don't wanna see who's physicality we don't wanna see and i think this societal levels whenever things are being hidden pay attention and whenever people are being hidden right people are being hidden in prison. People are being hidden in hospitals. I'm just always the mind of like pay attention to what were hiding. And i think that is arthur miller said about like. That's the work of art to reveal. What is deliberately being hidden and think this pandemic has revealed much to us about how interdependent we are and how quick we are to imagine each other expendable those of us who are close to a person whatever age they are and we love them. It is devastating. Their loss is devastating. But all of that is swirling around in this moment at scale. And i think we go back to that term right like this is unprecedented in human history. Not a global pandemic but that we all know about it that we can see images of it that we can all count the numbers together that we can see nations reshape. The story of what's happening that we can watch ones engage in different experiments about how to approach it see nations fail and nations succeed around the approaches and then have it all flip again. It's totally unprecedented. The only thing for me. That's familiar in some ways. The the nature of the grief like i do think it has parallels with when you have an extended death like happens with a degenerative disease. You have extended grief. You have an -ticipant tori grief. And i think we are all engaged in forms of anticipatory grief during this pandemic at the very beginning of the film. You say now. It's upon us the beginning of his disappearance and we're not accepting it and then we have marta. The caregiver who has accompanied ten different people in the last thirty years in their end of life experience. She says if you accept it it's easier and so i'm wondering. Do you think that the experience of making this film will make it easier to accept the loss of your dad when that happens. No way.

portugal arthur miller five words five hundred times twice both twins one scene last night today one thing lolita first week first born ten different people one thousand one of the words Dick nine hundred thirties portuguese
"kirsten johnson" Discussed on The Nocturnists

The Nocturnists

01:58 min | 5 months ago

"kirsten johnson" Discussed on The Nocturnists

"That or is that what you're trying to do. I think this movie is wish fulfilment for me. My wish was for my father's immortality. I wish that my father never die. So i could all of this effort into something cinematic meaningful and also. I've gathered all this evidence of who he was. But i think we often sort of don't allow ourselves wishes because when you say them you're also acknowledging fears or the potential loss and what's interesting with the camera bringing the camera into a situation in some ways is bringing loss into a situation because a camera brings the future into the room it brings death into the room we are going to create these images together but at some point in time we who animate these images will no longer be alive but the images will be here and this will be what remains of you. Buster keaton was dead long before i met him in cinema but he's incredibly alive in cinema. So you all bring death into the room you caregivers and doctores as much as you're trying to bring health and life and healing into the room and medicine into the room right. Your presence brings death into the room and it brings fear of loss into the room. I do the same thing.

Buster keaton
"kirsten johnson" Discussed on The Nocturnists

The Nocturnists

08:15 min | 5 months ago

"kirsten johnson" Discussed on The Nocturnists

"I wanted to touch on what you said earlier about really wanting to come at this topic with humor and irreverence and you stage his death multiple times but they're not really medical deaths. It's not like having a pneumonia are going in and dying of sepsis or all of these ways that people with dementia tend to actually die but there are these accidental deaths like the air conditioner falling and spurting blood and things like that. Could you just speak a little bit more to that. Like why was it so important for you to make this playful. So you're helping me clarify this and see this. They needed to be sudden-deaths. I think because dad. And i are so familiar with the gradual death. We had watched my mother dying for seven years and we knew that dementia was going to do that to him too. So i think the thing. That's really fun about this experience in this process for me is allowing the contradictions of my feelings. And i am deeply grateful for every moment. I had with my mother and i'm also you know just like wildly angry. Dementia and alzheimer's for stripping. Her away from us and it was excruciating. It was brutal it went on and on it was relentless. So i think there's some crazy wish fulfillment in like just like let it be sudden. Let's get this over with. But on a certain level. Like i have made so many different films about poverty rate them genocide sexual violence all kinds of deeply serious subjects. I really care about. But i know people don't want to take their medicine. Nobody wants to see it. It's too painful it's too hard. It's too shameful in some ways like we're still dealing with racism in this country like to acknowledge that is shameful. So there's a way in which with this film i was like. Why would anybody want to watch a movie about dementia. Like what kind of masochist are you. And so part of. It was like to come up with this idea of killing. My dad was just like so in your face. It's so absurd so wrong that it's sort of right in a way that jackass or herald mod or monty. Python is so that was part of my motivation. But i think also. I needed to find some way for us to laugh at this but also like doing. The deaths met my deepest fear that he will die. He will disappear for me. I could keep facing it and then like having it not be true so that i have is funeral and get to hug him. Afterwards he dies. And i get to pick him up and we get to laugh about it. That's what you don't get to do in life. I didn't to hug my mom. After her funeral i think movies can they can hold a lot. They can hold a surprising amount. And that's what. I find so exciting about how long it takes to make them. And the way that you make and remake them in the edit room and they teach you to make them it was remarkable this idea of sudden death or the gradual death the slow fade away without even trying. That idea starts to resonate throughout the film for some reason in this observational documentary footage. I have of my family are always turning the lights on and off and this sort of light switch of life going on or off. We founded in the footage. And all these different places. My mom does it from some very old footage where she has alzheimer's my little children do. My dad does it. But then we have this sort of problem. We had to solve with the film where he had done. A fake funeral for my dad. My original idea was that i wanted to have him in an open casket at the front of the church while we were doing this. Fake funeral. Well i told that to my father. He laughed he loved. It told it to my brother and my brother said over my dead body. You're not doing that. And but then that constraint. I tried to make this film. With respect for my father like respecting his agency even despite the fact that he had dementia to draw on fifty five years of knowing him and his sense of humor etc. But i also you know there are other people whose and perspective matter and one of those is my brother and i'm not going to make this film in contradiction to my brothers needs and wishes and so i had to respect my brother when he said you can't do that but then that gave us this cool solution. Which was the day before we did the funeral in the church space. We brought an open casket. We lit it in the same way. We put my dad in and we filmed lots of different takes with him and then later we used green screen technology. And we cut that casket into the scene. Well the wonderful editor. I worked with those beggar. It was just obsessed with. He needed audiences to know that trickery. He wanted that to not be a question that people were left asking the end. Like was he really. There was he not there. So he had to do something with that casket but he couldn't figure it out and then it sort of at the eleventh hour the very very very end of the film. We were trying to figure out that scene and cutting and cutting and all of a sudden. Now's came up with this situation. Where suddenly the casket is up there in the front of the rim but then sorts of starts to fritz a little bit and then it just fades away and the space is empty and i saw nails are metaphor about death. Does it flicker go out suddenly or does it fade away in his like. It hadn't even occurred to him but we had been sort of trafficking in this metaphor in all of these different ways throughout the film and then he just did it with this image. So you experience it as a viewer and that's what i love about. Cinema sort of bring these thoughts and ideas to it but then finds magical emotional ways to express them. I wanted to talk a little bit about the fantasy scenes. Because they're so fun and what it may may think of. as a physician is palliative. Care is a new field. Everybody needs palliative care and often. It's introduced late into the course of people's illness. And when the palliative care team finally arrives and they sit down with the patient some of the first questions that they ask are in your remaining years. What are your goals. What are your hopes. What are your dreams. If i could imagine one for you. What would you wish for. These are questions that the medical team almost never asked like. Somebody might say. Well i really want to go to disneyworld with my grandchild and suddenly all of the care is oriented around that one goal and everything just makes sense whereas before it was more scattered or somebody might say my goal is to go back to mexico and die in mexico and nobody would have known that if not asked and so these questions that you ask him like if you could have one wish what would it be. And he says to have toes and then you're able to make that happen for him through these fantasy scenes. I guess i'm wondering like it just reminded me a lot of the healthcare profession. Trying to do that wish fulfillment for people before they die. And is that the lens through which you were viewing.

mexico fifty five years seven years eleventh hour disneyworld one first questions one goal sepsis Dementia one wish dementia moment Python
"kirsten johnson" Discussed on The Nocturnists

The Nocturnists

08:23 min | 5 months ago

"kirsten johnson" Discussed on The Nocturnists

"Thank you so much for being here. Kirsten so delighted to be here. So we're really excited to have you here and was reading that the idea for this project came to you in a dream. So is that true. Oh yes it is. It is totally true. Yes i had a dream in. Which i saw a man. I didn't recognize in a casket and he sat up all of a sudden. And he said. I'm dick johnson and i'm not dead yet and dick johnson's my dad. I've made this film with him. Called dick johnson is dead. That's currently streaming on netflix. So people can watch it. And i love that. People can watch all around the world and he and i had already been through an experience with my mother's alzheimer's but when i had the dream think my father's dementia had already begun an i didn't yet recognize it. Basically the dream functioned as a wake up. Call for me and so was that the natural response was. My dad isn't getting any younger. How do i help him. And then turning to film as the way of moving through that since film had already been such a big part of your life. Yes so i had made minimum called camera person in two thousand sixteen and camera person is in some ways a memoir but basically i went back into footage that had shot on behalf of other filmmakers and i reordered it and looked at it as a whole in relation to what i had experienced as a camera person behind the camera and much of what i've filmed over time has been related to questions of social injustice questions of violence and having filmed in the aftermath of five different genocides in five places around the world having filmed in over eighty six countries. I have heard and witnessed a lot of human trauma not unlike doctors and caregivers or people who encounter other humans at moments of crisis in their lives at scale and i had sort of reached this point where i couldn't continue filming. I sort of film too much and hadn't processed hardly any of it. So camera person. Was this attempt to engage with all the ethical questions. I had about documentary camerawork. But it's a very serious film. It's a very sober and serious film. That's probably one laugh in the whole movie and it was very well received critically and it's a very experimental film. I don't speak in it really. It's just the footage itself. And you learn to know me through seeing the footage that i have filmed and the experience of making. It liberated me in all these ways. It sort of made me feel free about how i could work with. Cinematic language to engage with the questions. That are the most meaningful to me. So i'm going deep into this. Because i feel like this is shared territory and feel like a doctor or caregivers life. They're always these really high stakes. You're always faced by the ethics of how you engage with the people that you're carrying for treating and you're always being faced by your own lack of control even though you have all of this knowledge and experience and incredible huge sort of institutions. That support you and back you. You're still sort of face to face with these impossible situations and then you do that over and over and over again and you're left with all those feelings that you don't necessarily have time to engage with so all of that to say that i had been through a lot and a lot with my mother's dementia and when my brain gave me the wake up call that maybe my dad had dementia too again that i have to go through this again. I had this very strong reaction. Which was i must do something differently. I won't be able to bear this and so part of that was like i would have deal with this with humor. We going to defy death. We're going to mock it. We're going to laugh at it so the idea was going to make this film in which we work with stunt people and kill my father over and over again until he really dies for real i was going to be really irreverent about death. Well it turns out. I i needed to be really reverend. Dementia and death love this analogy between the documentary filmmaker going out into the world and bearing witness to trauma at mass scale. And the doctor or the caregiver going into a hospital and bearing witness to trauma at mass scale. And i love what you say about the decision to pivot from the serious and sober work of our towards something more humorous and i want to get to that in a bit but before we do. Your father was also a doctor. Tell us about his doctor life. So my family is generational seventh day adventists and seven. They haven't is a religion that was founded towards the end of the nineteenth century and from the beginning of its founding. It was really interested in healthcare and medicine and healthy living. So if you're a seventh day adventists you're hoping to be a doctor or a nurse or a caregiver or a teacher or missionary and those are the professions and my father's father elmer johnson came from you know working poor family who didn't have money and elmer realized he wanted to be a doctor but the family couldn't afford it so he worked all of his life as a gardener as a sort of manual labor with the wish the lost wish of being a doctor and his first child was a girl and she became a nurse. This was early when it was hard for women to become doctors and then my father was born twelve years later and apparently he was going to be a doctor from birth. It was sort of like. He was going to embody my grandfather's impossible. Wish to become a doctor and one of the interesting fun facts that you learned about my dad in the film that he was born with no toes and we don't know why this happened. We believe it might have been some medication that my grandmother took when she was pregnant. But it's never been verified. And so he was sort of this miracle baby who was born twelve years after the first child and he was a boy and he was missing his toes and he was going be a doctor but when my dad did go to the adventist medical school that he went to i think he knew he didn't have any choice about being a doctor so it was just a given in his life but i think in some ways he was drawn towards psychiatry because it was a different way of being a doctor and i mean he's totally amazing stories like at the time in medical school. One of the doctor said to him. You know there are two kinds of doctors that aren't really doctors and are the most contemptible and that's abortionist psychiatrists. But my dad loved talking to people and the other thing. That's hilarious is my dad. Wanted to sit down after doing really long rotations. His feet hurt and psychiatry. Was the one specialization where it can really count on being able to sit down all the time. So i think it was the furthest from me doctor and it was the most comfortable where the big determines his choice but he loved psychiatry and he i think always had questions and doubts about his capacity to quote. He'll mental illness but he said if anything might.

Kirsten five places netflix twelve years later first child five different genocides One two kinds elmer johnson one laugh end of the nineteenth century seven over eighty six countries two thousand sixteen twelve years johnson one of the interesting fun elmer one specialization adventists
"kirsten johnson" Discussed on The Nocturnists

The Nocturnists

01:40 min | 5 months ago

"kirsten johnson" Discussed on The Nocturnists

"At the doctrine est careful to ensure that all stories comply with healthcare privacy. Laws details may have been changed to ensure patient confidentiality all views expressed. Are those of the person speaking and not their employer..

"kirsten johnson" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

06:56 min | 6 months ago

"kirsten johnson" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"For spending part of your Saturday with us here on reporter's notebook where we take you inside the biggest stories of the week by speaking with the people who covered them. I'm Alex Crow. About two million more. Wisconsinites got some good news this week when the state of Wisconsin announced that they were moving up the start date for the next eligibility group to get the cove in 19 vaccine. This is the largest group yet it includes people with the whole host of pre existing conditions. The group was supposed to become eligible starting March 29th, but now they'll be able to start getting inoculated on Monday. At the same time, the city of Milwaukee is rolling back. It's covert 19 restrictions, and the state's top health official is signaling that we may be able to reach something resembling herd immunity here in Wisconsin by this summer. That's a lot to break down. So joining us now to make sense of it is Mike Spaulding, managing editor here? It WTMJ Mike, Can we start with that new group becoming eligible starting on Monday? What does this mean for the average Wisconsinite, who is still waiting to get a covert 19 vaccine? Well, Alex. It means that a lot more vaccine appointments are going to start being filled up. We heard from the state yesterday or the county. I'm sorry here in Milwaukee, saying we're bored, booked up essentially through This weekend all the way up until Monday, which is when you know an additional two million ish people are going to be eligible to start getting this vaccine. It's kind of a to a double edged sword here, I think on one hand But officials seemed confident that we are going in the right direction. I think the struggles of the beginning of the vaccination process last year are long gone in the past. I don't think that's really a focus at all anymore, or even a concern. So it's it's great. You know, the fact that we can move up and we're constantly one of the top five states when it comes to vaccine distribution and the amount that we've been able to Dole out compared to the ones that we've been allocated has been tremendous. All those things are good news. What At the same time, it does make you stop and think a little bit, whether it's an issue or a skirt or not. Wire. There's so many open vaccine. Well, you know, Uh ah, doses and appointments seemingly all over the state, especially when you heard from Milwaukee County specifically yesterday, say Is 8% of adults are currently vaccinated in the city. Right now. I know that jumps up when you look at what's going on statewide, But overall, it doesn't make you stop and think a little bit. I don't know how much of a concern that is, but I think it is good news and 65% of residents in Wisconsin are gonna be eligible for a vaccine here. In about 48 hours. And I know some people have already kind of gotten in a little bit early, because you know the vaccinators have the extra doses and they're in the right place at the right time and all those kinds of things so I think it's full steam ahead. It seems like it's full steam ahead. And things are going pretty well. You're gonna have little nit picks here, and they're opened down peaks and valleys stuff like that. But overall, I would categorize what we've been doing for the past, especially eight weeks. Would think is a success in this It added or just moving up with the Of the eligible people. I think it's just an example of that, Mike we heard Deputy Health Secretary Julie Williams van died say earlier this week that the state could reach something like herd immunity around the mid summer time. That was interesting to me. I didn't realize you could reach herd immunity based on state by state. Is that something? I was just unaware of? Yeah. No, that's a great question. Because it's a great point, right? How are you? And especially when you look at these variants that we've seen? We only have a handful here in Wisconsin brother stays are hit. Harder than we are, You know, states, especially that have a lot of international travel in New York or California or even Illinois with Chicago, right there obviously s O. That is a really interesting point. You bring up and it's going to, I think be a complicated process. You know what? How are you going to determine what that looks like? And as we get closer, I think something else to keep an eye on is our individual communities than going to react to that. You know, you put the carrot in front of all of our faces. How you know how close until we how close to the carrot do we consider Grabbing it, right. Is it where we're at right now? I know Washington counties looking at easing Ah lot more restrictions, almost all of them here in the next few weeks. Milwaukee on Friday introduced a new loosened up category and ease some restrictions. I think it will be an interesting thing to keep an eye on whether herd immunity means we're still wearing masks or not. I don't know what, how they categorize that. I think that will be something. We definitely want to keep it. I and as we move forward in the in the next week, we're talking with Mike Spaulding, managing editor and WTMJ. Mike, Can we talk about this city of Milwaukee and those rolled back restrictions for a second? Because you said it yourself a few minutes ago. Not a lot of vaccines in Milwaukee right now, at least, not a lot of people that are vaccinated. And yet the city just announced. They're rolling back some of those restrictions. So what do the new restrictions look like? In Milwaukee? Ah lot looser really than than what they were before. You know, not only is just going to increase capacity limits and bars and restaurants it, you know, changes the way schools are going to start operating when they're back in session. Milwaukee public schools is looking at sometime mid next month for bringing students back. It also allowed concert venues. Museums to reopen Boarding events to have more people if and when that time comes, so ah, lot of it's going to look a lot more normal, I think, you know, quote unquote normal. What we think of in summer of 2019 than it did, obviously, in the summer of 2020, but it you know, it couldn't come at a more perfect time for some of these hospitality venues right, like restaurants and bars is getting warmer outside the incidentally tournament, obviously, as we speak is underway. Bucks playoffs is coming. Brewers Baseball is starting This is gonna be a real shot in the arm, I think, And we spoke with a couple of bar owners forced bar owners about specifically what this means for them what this means for this weekend, and they said they anticipate this boosting business by about 40% so Is long as we stay on the right path. I think it's going to be good news. But as we talked about a minute ago, the number of adults who have gotten the vaccine is very low. So we're not out of the woods yet, and Kirsten Johnson, who is the health commissioner in Milwaukee, That yesterday or on Thursday, believe itwas look, if things start going in the wrong direction. We're not afraid to roll these back. And that's been something this city in the county. Specifically, it's stuck with this entire time. But for right now, if you are going out or looking at going out this weekend and join the Knights, whether this week coming up the bars and restaurants are going.

Mike Spaulding Alex Crow Kirsten Johnson New York California March 29th Monday Illinois Milwaukee County Milwaukee Alex Chicago 65% Thursday yesterday 8% Washington two million Saturday Friday
"kirsten johnson" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:52 min | 8 months ago

"kirsten johnson" Discussed on KCRW

"The difficult part of the problem is affecting the environment within which Violent elements otherwise would be able to thrive. Are there any cautionary tales your take from your past experience? Many people, including I recalled, You have argued that the U. S went too far after 9 11 with detention and interrogation programs for high level detainees. Oh, yes, absolutely. And you know, there are understandable. I'm thinking of how much more complicated it is again when we're talking about American citizens. Yeah, I think that's exactly right. And it is that much more dangerous when we're talking about American citizens. And you know, there are people in law enforcement now who are understandably saying, Hey, look, you know, maybe you should be giving us more tools. You know, maybe we need to have new legislation. That we can use to root out domestic terrorism. I think that would be a big mistake. I think that the behaviors that we're concerned about are already illegal. Thank you very much, And I think that law enforcement has the tools that they need to deal with it. And so sure, maybe on the margins. They would like to see more tools in the pouch if you will, but I think it would be a very big mistake for us to go down that road. Robert Grenier. Thank you. You're most welcome. Good to be on with you. He ran the CIA's counterterrorism center from 2004 to 2006. And this is NPR news. In a 6 29 hero KCRW. Greater L A is just moments away. We also have state and local news coming up, including why the city of Santa Maria on the central Coast is rolling out the red carpet during the pandemic. After this KCRW sponsors include Netflix, presenting the documentary Dick Johnson is dead. As her father nears the end of his life. Filmmaker Kirsten Johnson uses their families dark humor to help them both face the inevitable awards eligible. Hollywood's always had the close up in show business. But other more economical places have ratcheted up the competition over the years. How about in times of pandemic? You don't have to travel? It's far if if you do live here, you know, and you are indeed filming here. You don't have to risk getting on a plane or having to transport a lot of people and possibly deal with potential infection along the way. Lights. Camera Cove it It's greater l a on KCRW. I'm Steve to take us later here from a songwriter who penned an ode to L. A for those times when his beloved home is far away. He says the city is elusive and can be hard to describe. What you gonna write about Perseus, where.

Robert Grenier KCRW Kirsten Johnson NPR Santa Maria CIA Dick Johnson Steve Hollywood Netflix
Top 10 Films of 2020

Filmspotting

06:01 min | 9 months ago

Top 10 Films of 2020

"Michael and tasha are gonna come back. We're going to get to. I'm going to call it the consensus between the four of us top two films of the year. Because there's a fair amount of crossover. We didn't maybe all put them in exactly the same slots but it's close enough and we'll also hear the other movies that round out their top five of the year but to get started is a longtime friend of the show formerly of film spotting. Svu with matt singer and critic for buzzfeed alison willmore. This is her choice for the number one film of the year. Hey films leading team. It's alison willmore here from the late almost budding. Svu podcast hoping. I'm slipping voicemail in with enough time under the wire. My favorite movie of the year is buck. Arou- the greatest neo-western anti-colonialist most dangerous game variants. That you'll see this year And also just kind of incredible exhilarating disturbing work that if feel keeps Showing me new things. The more i kind of think on it and revisit it so definitely a feel for twenty twenty For many reasons and one worth checking out if you haven't gotten to it yet it's not right. It's been a tough year guys but hopefully the next one will be better. I mean not so. I don't know about you but i am still wrestling with back row. And i i saw it caught up with it because i had seen so many lists including allison's And it was kind of on my radar all year. Long in one i had to catch up with and sort of squeeze it in here at the end so maybe not entirely fair viewing. I glad i had the experience. I'm just not entirely sure. What sort of experience i had. Which maybe you can. sense from. Allison's voicemail there it's just it's it's wild. It's it's maybe insane. It's i think my first viewing was. I really was intrigued by all of those ideas and genres that were coming you But on a for sitting like they never it. Didn't like really hit me directly in the experience. I almost needed. There are two different groups here. There's this small town of this village really. And then there's this this group of I guess they're americans who come for. We won't give too much. We don't spoil too much but neither of those. I needed more context for both of those sections of the film for registering for me as anything more than like this intellectual experiment. I guess which is kind of how. I did appreciate it. I'm at last. I can say. No i i did as well. I think described it this way for our listeners who support us on patriot and we did some bonus content and i mentioned back arouse being basically battle royale but mixed with the seven samurai and there's probably seven other films you could merge with this movie it does feel truly uniquely its own and that's why it's worth seeing but it's also this weird kind of mashup hybrid of other types of movies. We've seen before. So i am curious to hear what our listeners think about back row came out a long time ago right earlier in the year. Yeah i think so. We just caught up with it. But maybe as it is appearing on more or less like allison's in that number one slot more people are experiencing it and maybe more people can explain to us josh. What we miss definitely worth seeing not gonna make our top ten definitely not gonna come up here in our top five. Why don't you go ahead and get started all right so you heard mentioned there that earlier. My top ten. I had dick johnson dead number six actually right after it. I have another film that deals with dementia. In dick johnson is dead. That is the struggle that Her father kirsten johnson director. Dick johnson is facing and they explore that in a very unique way In that documentary but a very different way than my number five pick explores relic This is a horror film. And in her. Directing debut. Natalie eric james. She basically chooses to confront dementia via metaphorical horror. So the main character is an adult daughter played by emily mortimer who votes her aging mother played by robin navid in rural australia. And this is on a family estate. A family home that's been held for generations and as the movie goes on the walls in this home gradually disintegrate It's a very you know. Obvious symbol for what's happening to her mother But the movie the just the way. The movie handles this. Metaphor is delicate. creepy scary unsettling frightening and it captures all of the emotions that you know you would have in the mundane experience of an ageing parent with dementia it. It makes dementia demonic and liberalizes. That which you know how it can feel. Even if you're not in this sort of heightened scenario and so. I just think that's a strong that such a strong visceral connection to make and natalie erica jeans Just handles it so expertly. Her command of the genre. Here is is astonishing and i think why relic landed on my list and this high is it's ending which i am not going to give away but this is where you know you might be saying especially horror isn't for you. Oh i get it. I get the metaphor. I can imagine what happens. i don't need to see it. You know But this ending manages to involve body horror unconditional love in a way that was completely jarring Of a piece of the horror genre but also incredibly moving and that was kind of like when the movie concluded that way. I was like okay. This is one that's Not only am. I appreciate but probably gonna end up sticking with me to the end of the year

Alison Willmore Dick Johnson Tasha Allison Dementia Kirsten Johnson Matt Wrestling Michael Natalie Eric James Robin Navid Rural Australia Emily Mortimer Josh Natalie Erica
"kirsten johnson" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:01 min | 1 year ago

"kirsten johnson" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Flack, Iggy Pop public Enemy and more This Friday at nine PM on 13 and online at PBS dot orc w. N. Y. C is a media partner of the Queen's Drive in at the New York Hall of Science presented by rooftop films. Mommy and Nice. I Dick Johnson is dead and camera Person celebrating Kirsten Johnson with Netflix Free October 17th rooftop films dot com. Welcome back to the takeaway. I'm tan Xena Vega and we're talking about coverage of the 2020 election by the national media. And we're hearing from you about what you want to see. Covered ahead of the election. Hi. My name is Jerry calling from New York, New York. I think what we want to hear when I want to hear from my news outlets. His actual news on DH, not a lot of emphasis on the rhetoric or how candidates of positioning themselves, Excellency. What I really want to hear is what are the actual platforms? What are the existing laws? You know that the address on DH? What Kinds of things. Are they actually substandard? Lee got on their agendas to do Back with me now talking about this election, or Aaron Haynes, editor at large for the 19th and Jane Coast in senior politics reporter at box Erin. It sounds pretty straightforward. They want to hear what's really happening and not rhetoric. And yet tonight there will be two town halls one on NBC, where.

New York Hall of Science New York Kirsten Johnson Dick Johnson Flack Jerry PBS Lee Netflix NBC partner Aaron Haynes Jane Coast w. N. Y. C reporter editor
"kirsten johnson" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:49 min | 1 year ago

"kirsten johnson" Discussed on KCRW

"The other interviews with both candidates in an election that has received national attention, and Kirsten Johnson Has made a documentary about her dad. She created fake scenes about how he could possibly die as he confronts his real death. I even literally said, I want to kill you over and over again, and he laughed. Kirsten Johnson on her new movie, Dick Johnson, is dead. First news lie from NPR News. I'm Lakshmi Singh. Seven people are now in federal custody in Michigan for allegedly plotting to kidnap the Democratic governor of Michigan. Gretchen Whitmer, the state attorney general, says her office made additional charges pursuant to Michigan's anti Terrorism act. NPR's Ryan Lucas. Reports of suspects are accused of conspiring to attack before next month's presidential election. Details of the alleged kidnapping plot are spelled out in a criminal complaint unsealed in federal court in Michigan. It alleges that beginning in early 2020, the men came up with the idea of taking violent action against state governments they believed were violating the constitution. Ultimately settled on Michigan Governor Gretchen Whitmire by the summer. Some of the suspects were allegedly holding meetings and training exercises to prepare. Authorities say that men also surveilled the governor's vacation home on two occasions. According to the complaint, the FBI was aware of the plot. It had undercover sources keeping tabs on the group at all times. Ryan Lucas NPR NEWS Washington After spending days, downplaying the severity of his covert 19 symptoms, President Trump now says He was very sick. In his latest online video, Trump reached out specifically to elder voters who help decide the outcome of next month's election. The president promised the population most vulnerable to Cove in 19 access to the same experimental drugs. He was given it while to read Medical Center. It remains to be seen how well those drugs have worked..

Michigan Kirsten Johnson Trump Ryan Lucas Governor Gretchen Whitmire NPR News Gretchen Whitmer NPR president Lakshmi Singh Dick Johnson FBI kidnapping Cove Medical Center Washington attorney
"kirsten johnson" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

02:31 min | 1 year ago

"kirsten johnson" Discussed on WTOP

"Resurrected day. Yeah, well, Washington Post film critic Ann Hornaday joins us on Skype to talk more about it. Good to have you back hands. Thank you so much. It's good to be back, Shawn. You know, I do want to refer people to your review of this documentary, because it really truly explains the depth involved Hiss. You say, though, that the movie veers toward distasteful, but then quickly turns away to reveal something unexpected and quite lovely. What makes this film so much different than those of the same genre? Oh, this is come. This is almost a genre unto itself. It's just been brilliantly conceived and executed by Kirsten Johnson. Who as the synopsis that little clip explained, learns that her father, who's in his eighties, is starting to lose his memory. She's already lost her mother to dementia. She knows what is coming. And in order to cope with the inevitable loss, not just his death, but really that slow loss that could happen when people start to disappear into dementia. She puts him through these really strange paces of rehearsing his death in these kind of comical. Fake accidents that she choreographs. She does dream sequences about what heaven might look like. They're their other set pieces that I don't want to spoil all the way along your kind of wind thing and thinking is this hurtful? Is this helpful? But clearly this is an act of love. And it's an act of love not only from her to her dad, but From him to her because he's really enthusiastic about cooperating. He's a psychiatrist. I think he understands processing emotions and and how we do that, and the films sort of ultimate scene that the climax Really kind of toes that knife edge in a way that ends incredibly surprisingly, I really don't want to spoil the ending here. You think it's going to go one direction, but it will surprise you in delightful ways. That's beautiful. Thanks so much and happy weekend. Thanks to both of you. Thanks. That's Washington Post film critic and Hornet will check sports Next at our CNN. Our business is all about supporting your business. We invest millions in our fiber optic network to provide industry leading telecom services for faster, more reliable ways to stay connected In a world where change is constant. You can rely on our see end to build custom and scalable.

Washington Post Ann Hornaday Kirsten Johnson Skype Shawn CNN
"kirsten johnson" Discussed on Filmspotting

Filmspotting

04:00 min | 1 year ago

"kirsten johnson" Discussed on Filmspotting

"Locum to film spotting a couple of weeks back are overlooked. . Oh, , tours. . Marathon had raving about Shantelle Ackerman's John dieleman movie about a woman who hardly left her home this week we returned to the marathon with Barbara. . LODEN WANDA WITH JOSH allows us to wonder what may have happened to John Dieleman if she just walked away and left her good for nothing son to make those. Veal . cutlets for himself while there that is a thought experiment though John and Wanda very different people i. don't . know if it would have gone down just like this very different people very different films that marathon review of Wanda coming later in the show. . But First Kirsten Johnson's Dick Johnson is dead a gift to her father and anyone who has a loved one struggling with dementia. . She Kills Me Multiple Times. . Resurrected Day. . Did that. . But now it's. . The beginning of his disappearance. . A eight most about my memory loss is it hurts people's feelings. . Pena that you woke up in the middle of the mate last night. . Fully dressed. . Remember. Any . of that. . Yeah. . What can we do that? ? Everybody has sort of prepare because everybody dies watch too much for that. . After more than two decades as a prolific cinematographer shooting her share of relatively straightforward documentaries, , which isn't to suggests boring inconsequential but more traditionally fly on the wall Kristen has now directed to inventive decidedly unconventional ones. . Two Thousand Sixteen camera person was a memoir comprised exclusively of footage shot across the globe eighty six different countries Johnson filmed in I believe is the count the content was, , of course, , deeply personal, , filmed and curated as it was by Johnson though only explicitly. . So in home movie clips of her twin toddlers playing with our camera and scenes over mother suffering from dementia. . Her latest could be called the act of killing Dick. . Johnson due to the way she employs fantasy sequences to tackle tough truths as Joshua Oppenheimer did with his twenty thirteen doc about mass killings in Indonesia during the mid sixties. . Johnson, , the daughter and filmmaker is more upfront. . This time we only hear her voice over we occasionally get to join her inside the closet over New York. . City. Apartment . she records it on an iphone and she's almost as much an on camera presence as she is a behind the camera one affectionately sometimes quite emotionally interacting with their beloved former psychiatrist father battling dementia like his departed wife before Him Josh. . Rated Camera Person One of your top ten films of two thousand sixteen calling it an intensely moving and provocatively personal consideration of what it. . Means to carry a camera especially in a world that is seen great suffering. . We've established how Dick Johnson is dead is more expressly personal than camera person, , but it also might be a more provocative consideration of what it means to carry a camera in a world in a family that has seen great suffering not that Kirsten Johnson necessarily crosses the ethical lines and putting her aging father. . Through the ringer staging, , sometimes playful, , sometimes gruesome death scenes for her own Cathartic Purposes I. think . we can probably forgive the time. . He soberly complains that shooting in the cold on a Manhattan street while covered in fake blood is even more painful than when he had a heart attack. . But how much is this exhausting process actually helping him to process the inevitable and does that even matter? ? But now it's upon, , US Kristen Johnson says in her opening video the beginning of his disappearance, , and we are not accepting it as viewers. . We can't really ever know whether making this movie Got Dick or Johnson any closer to acceptance, , which you can't evaluate Josh is whether experiencing Kirsten's death affirming stunts, , brought you any enlightenment or at least enjoyment

Dick Johnson Kirsten Johnson Kristen Johnson Josh Pena Joshua Oppenheimer New York Johnson Indonesia Manhattan joviality Iraq
Dick Johnson Is Dead Movie Review

Filmspotting

04:00 min | 1 year ago

Dick Johnson Is Dead Movie Review

"Locum to film spotting a couple of weeks back are overlooked. Oh, tours. Marathon had raving about Shantelle Ackerman's John dieleman movie about a woman who hardly left her home this week we returned to the marathon with Barbara. LODEN WANDA WITH JOSH allows us to wonder what may have happened to John Dieleman if she just walked away and left her good for nothing son to make those. Veal cutlets for himself while there that is a thought experiment though John and Wanda very different people i. don't know if it would have gone down just like this very different people very different films that marathon review of Wanda coming later in the show. But First Kirsten Johnson's Dick Johnson is dead a gift to her father and anyone who has a loved one struggling with dementia. She Kills Me Multiple Times. Resurrected Day. Did that. But now it's. The beginning of his disappearance. A eight most about my memory loss is it hurts people's feelings. Pena that you woke up in the middle of the mate last night. Fully dressed. Remember. Any of that. Yeah. What can we do that? Everybody has sort of prepare because everybody dies watch too much for that. After more than two decades as a prolific cinematographer shooting her share of relatively straightforward documentaries, which isn't to suggests boring inconsequential but more traditionally fly on the wall Kristen has now directed to inventive decidedly unconventional ones. Two Thousand Sixteen camera person was a memoir comprised exclusively of footage shot across the globe eighty six different countries Johnson filmed in I believe is the count the content was, of course, deeply personal, filmed and curated as it was by Johnson though only explicitly. So in home movie clips of her twin toddlers playing with our camera and scenes over mother suffering from dementia. Her latest could be called the act of killing Dick. Johnson due to the way she employs fantasy sequences to tackle tough truths as Joshua Oppenheimer did with his twenty thirteen doc about mass killings in Indonesia during the mid sixties. Johnson, the daughter and filmmaker is more upfront. This time we only hear her voice over we occasionally get to join her inside the closet over New York. City. Apartment she records it on an iphone and she's almost as much an on camera presence as she is a behind the camera one affectionately sometimes quite emotionally interacting with their beloved former psychiatrist father battling dementia like his departed wife before Him Josh. Rated Camera Person One of your top ten films of two thousand sixteen calling it an intensely moving and provocatively personal consideration of what it. Means to carry a camera especially in a world that is seen great suffering. We've established how Dick Johnson is dead is more expressly personal than camera person, but it also might be a more provocative consideration of what it means to carry a camera in a world in a family that has seen great suffering not that Kirsten Johnson necessarily crosses the ethical lines and putting her aging father. Through the ringer staging, sometimes playful, sometimes gruesome death scenes for her own Cathartic Purposes I. think we can probably forgive the time. He soberly complains that shooting in the cold on a Manhattan street while covered in fake blood is even more painful than when he had a heart attack. But how much is this exhausting process actually helping him to process the inevitable and does that even matter? But now it's upon, US Kristen Johnson says in her opening video the beginning of his disappearance, and we are not accepting it as viewers. We can't really ever know whether making this movie Got Dick or Johnson any closer to acceptance, which you can't evaluate Josh is whether experiencing Kirsten's death affirming stunts, brought you any enlightenment or at least enjoyment

Kirsten Johnson Kristen Johnson John Dieleman Loden Wanda Dick Josh Johnson Shantelle Ackerman Barbara Pena Joshua Oppenheimer New York Manhattan Indonesia
Filmmaker Faces Her Father's Mortality By Staging His 'Death' Again And Again

Fresh Air

00:30 sec | 1 year ago

Filmmaker Faces Her Father's Mortality By Staging His 'Death' Again And Again

"When documentary filmmaker Kirsten Johnson's father was diagnosed with dementia she had a hard time accepting the fact that his death was getting closer. So she decided to make a movie about him it tells the story of moving her dad out of his home in Seattle and into her apartment in new. York it also enacts her father's death from imagined accidents like getting hit in the head by a falling air conditioner she says Killing Her Dad in the movie helped her face his inevitable death her new film is called Dick Johnson is dead.

Kirsten Johnson Dick Johnson Seattle York
"kirsten johnson" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

05:04 min | 1 year ago

"kirsten johnson" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"Positive for covert 19. But goes to class anyway. So how does that happen? And how do you stop that from happening? Joining us now from the first Midwest Bank hotline? He is Health Department director Kirsten Johnson from the Ozaki. I'm sorry. The Washington Ozaki Public Health department. Hello, Kirsten. Hi. Thank you for having me. So you've had a situation where this occurred. I know Js kind of detailed this a little bit. The journal Sentinel. So you had a student show up for school who had tested positive. How does that happen? And how do you prevent that from happening? They're both actually questions so it happened. You know, we did. They positive case interview with the parents gave them the education that tension go to school. We called the school told them that this is a positive student who shouldn't be there. They went to school in the morning and sat through two classes until they didn't feel well enough to stay there. So they went to the nurse's office, which is when it was realised that they shouldn't have been there. And you are now for all of our district is to use their tendons software to flag students who shouldn't be there and have them excluded or, you know, have send them home. At the very first, you know when they take attendance in the morning, so that doesn't happen again. Kirsten When it comes to contacting, I guess parents or students and making sure that they stay home. There's contact tracers involved with that. Do you believe the parents aren't aren't aren't aware of that aren't aware that their kids are testing positive for how does this mishap happen? So I think I mean, I know parents are aware that their Children are positive. And if that happened now, more than one has happened multiple times. Our parents sent their kids back to school. I think it's really just A disregard for a sense of collective responsibility on DH. They want Considine school, but in be in doing so, and sending kids who are symptomatic for known positive we're really jeopardizing school for everyone, because it just perpetuates the spread. Well, even if it doesn't spread where you someone else gets it. I assume that there are protocols in place where? Hey, if you've been in the same room as this kid or near this gate, you've got to stay home, too. Exactly. It results in more quarantine, more kids being quarantined, which nobody wants. Kids sent home because they've been exposed, so that is absolutely happened. So, Kirsten a message to those parents that we're talking about that Knowingly send their kids to school with Copan 19. What would your message be to them right now? My messages, please, a respect that Respect your fellow. Your fellow parents and your your Children's friends end up to not send your kids to school when there's symptomatic or when they're known positive or even when their quarantine I mean the reason their quarantine is because they've been exposed. They could potentially spread the disease, and we all want kids to be in school. We all know that's the best place for them to be, but in being dishonest and being irresponsible, we're jeopardizing that for everyone. How has this been going so far? I know you've had some issues with this where parents were sending some kids Anyway. For the most part, what have you been? I've seen. What have you been seen as it pertains to this class is now in the last few weeks. So we've seen an increase in cases particularly and kids, Children. I think, you know, we worked really closely with their schools over the course of this summer. Their plans have been fantastic. I think within the school setting E mean there's still risk involved, but relatively safe. I think the challenge is that parents just sort of say. Okay, Well, the kids are back in school where they can play with their friends that they can participate in sports. All these extracurricular is this really where we're seeing the spread occur. But then there come bringing it back to school and is spreading in the schools. But, you know, I think if we are, we're if we're being responsible if we're still going to practices and were still playing with our friends when we have symptoms, it's going to spread and that's what we're seeing it as it spreads its being brought back into the school. Do you think that in person instruction will be able to continue? I hope so. But I we're facing some really challenges and some uphill battles. The decisions are up to the superintendent of the school board to make these decisions, but we have seen significant increases across both of our colony. Well, best of luck to you, Kirsten. I know that this has been rough for everybody. Washington Ozaki Public Health Department Director Kirsten Johnson. You know that it's been a It's been a tricky one phrase of thanks for your time. Thanks for having me. Can I ask you real quick, like Is there any way to take like in person Temps? I mean, when I go to get my hair cut, they take my temperature. Is there a way to do that? Would that help it all to just have a couple of people at the doors. Hitting everyone on the forehead quick before they walk in. That's a great question. The challenge there is not everyone has a fever. Andi have lost kids. They're also asymptomatic. So that's a huge challenge. You know, I think it's around. 30% of people have a fever. So you what? You still wouldn't catch the majority of cases doing that. Thank you again, Carson. Academy for 57. Donald Trump.

Kirsten Johnson Washington Ozaki Public Health director Ozaki Midwest Bank Health Department Donald Trump fever Considine asymptomatic Carson Copan superintendent
"kirsten johnson" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

01:53 min | 1 year ago

"kirsten johnson" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"Ebony's towns of son living happily ever after Right now news into the picture. It is six o'clock in the morning. You've got news radio 700 wlw news, Traffic and Weather news Radio 700 W. Ell delegate Cincinnati Price. A police officer injured in the line of duty with the six o'clock report on Bryant Combs breaking down the highway Patrol was involved. Uh, Butler County Sheriff's office was involved. Fairfield said he was involved. Hamilton was involved who daily battle Middletown was involved, but the shaft Richard Jones has police from across the area came together yesterday. Try and capture a man wanted for murder and Hamilton High speed chase that started in Middletown ended in a shoot out between the suspect and police. In the front yard of a home in Turtle Creek Township gun battle, leaving both the suspect and Middletown police officer injured the officer Danny Jordan. 23 year Vent was shot three times but is expected to recover. Suspect was shot several times as well. He's hospitalized now with non life threatening injuries. His name has not been released. More details on the pursuit and to shoot out are expected to be released. At a news conference later this afternoon to people who lead Cincinnati Police on a chase that ended in a deadly crash in Newport are now facing federal drug and gun charges. 28 year old Mason Myron 22 year old Kirsten Johnson, indicted for having in their possession, methamphetamine, as well as a loaded rifle and pistol that chase ended with Meyer crashing into the sidewalk in front of press, killing two people. Sitting outside the restaurant. Now. Latest traffic weather together from the UC help traffic center and you see health are renowned back neck and spine. Experts find answers for Complex conditions Learn more and you see help. Dot com crews are working with wood is reported as a hit Skip accident on Hample over 75 other than that traffic in pretty good shape.

Middletown officer Cincinnati Police Danny Jordan. Butler County W. Ell Bryant Combs Kirsten Johnson Hamilton Turtle Creek Township Fairfield Hample murder Richard Jones methamphetamine wood Newport Meyer Vent
"kirsten johnson" Discussed on Reality TV RHAP-ups: Reality TV Podcasts

Reality TV RHAP-ups: Reality TV Podcasts

03:26 min | 2 years ago

"kirsten johnson" Discussed on Reality TV RHAP-ups: Reality TV Podcasts

"Because I would have rather have seen. Monet as Kim trial. And I would have rather seen trinity as. Kristen. Yeah. Sorry. I wouldn't I keep Kirsten Johnson and Christianized mixed up. So the point being that I thought it was pretty boring, and I there was nothing memorable at all. And I don't feel like she did anything to elevate the material that the material was that great. But you know, everybody's working from the same page. So what are you going to do the runway? I do not care for this law. I do not I do not care for this. Look, I there's something about it that it's just wrong. I watched a Raja and aquaria aquaria. I think booted this look I can't remember. But she said she didn't like the fact that the patent leather and these sort of secretly fabric are two different fabrics. And they sort of clash together. I think it looks worse than this picture than it did on the runway. That's the luck. Luckily, this is where Monet's the shady lighting on the runway actually worked for Monet in this case. Because at least from what I was seeing on TV. It looked like pretty much the same color for my perspective. Yes. And that's even worse though. In my perspective. I on the runway it looked like it was all one color, and it all looked like saturated pink. And thus it looked like there was no shape whatsoever. Like, she needed a belt or she needed something to give it a little bit of form. I just think it's awkward, and it doesn't look like she synced in padded, very, well, it just looks like it looks like it's Monet with a little bit of padding wearing this body, suits. And also I'm with. The panel as well. I thought she looked like a mouse. And I knew it was a kiddy girl challenge. And so that's I knew that she was trying to be the Pink Panther. But it did look very mousy to me. And I give her credit for the makeup and the in the perspex side from that. I felt like this was this was a missed for me. I didn't care for this. I also thought it looked kind of cheap. I really did think it looked. Okay. She didn't need a belt she needed to look like a cat. Okay. She looks like a mouth. She was a mouse. I'm sorry. Like, she was just a mouse. I get that she was trying to go for Pink Panther. But she totally says I was just yelling at her the whole time. I was logic. Like, I'm a cat lady. This is not a cat. This is what my cats eat. Okay. And even the percentage like somehow made it worse, more mousy. I don't know. Oh my God. And then on top of it. You have the issues of the Mitch mismatched fabrics, even the latex colors aren't the same like, the boots and her her outfit are different colors, and you can like see her course. I mean, I think she is cinched and padded, but you can see it underneath. Oh my God. I just really didn't like this. And I really didn't get the. I mean, I guess the patterning was supposed to be like leopard spots. Maybe the sparkles. Sequin things. I have no joke. That's supposed to be. I have no idea. Then I was like, okay. But you're panther. I anyway, no, no. By the way, we should mention Leon. I know you tweeted something out a couple of days ago about this. You have your own experience with kitty cat, Katori theon. Okay. I was obsessed with the musical cats when I was little so pretty much every year for Halloween. I went as some version of a cat, and I picture. I know sad child or you will McCafferty are you a rumble teaser like what's your favorite cat Runtime? Tiger was my favorite. So I would always which now as an adult going back and relisting to those songs, I was like mom..

Monet Kirsten Johnson Katori theon Kristen McCafferty Kim Mitch
"kirsten johnson" Discussed on The Document

The Document

02:21 min | 4 years ago

"kirsten johnson" Discussed on The Document

"I decided that i would not go back to iraq in the middle of that sentence that you see on the screen you see that pause that is me sane for the first time an publicly and michael moore that i'm not going to go back to iraq and that was not a preplanned question i didn't know he was going to ask me that and at that point i had not even thought about in a would i go back or not uh and so when he asked me i as i go quick as i know in at what point did you know that people within the marines at seen it right around the time i got a call from the military know they rely w t f who egg what do you do in type deal and i had a newborn while fahrenheit night levin was making its it's rounds in uh in theater at the time the military was coming down on me it was it was a lot going on like my life literally had changed so we wrap shooting with abdel henderson and i remember feeling incredibly close to him because what abdul was doing was potentially to say that he would not go back to iraq to speak to the media at that moment in time was potentially a court martial level offence i was there i witnessed the most significant decision of his life um and i knew it in a visceral way and you can tell from the original tape the michael moore new at too i wanna play you a little bit of footage that wasn't actually in fahrenheit night eleven but kirsten johnson included it in her film of his severely trouble by around two was in jail room via the ever warrior dearly helper nor loves owner.

iraq levin abdel henderson abdul michael moore kirsten johnson