35 Burst results for "Kirk Siegler"

Federal Government Is Accused of Leaving Migrants in Border Towns

Morning Edition

01:30 min | 3 weeks ago

Federal Government Is Accused of Leaving Migrants in Border Towns

"Of people that US authorities air taking into custody at the southern border is on pace to set records. Most people are being sent back to Mexico. But there are exceptions. NPR's Kirk Siegler reports from rural Arizona, where there is a big controversy over whether the federal government is just dropping migrants off. From Tucson, Dr West 100 miles across the remote, mountainous and hot Sonoran Desert, just north of Mexico, and Highway 86 starts getting rougher and narrower as you get close to the old mining town of Ah ho, Arizona. Behind the Ah Hope Plaza and its ornate Spanish colonial buildings to white U. S. Border Patrol vans pull into a dusty allergy. Agents Hop out slide. Open the doors and families with Children pile out. One woman, limp says she picks up her suitcase and a plastic bag with bed sheets. This one woman I'm watching right now looks very tired, very stress. Volunteers, then usher them inside a small gym. They've converted to an improvised shelter for their handed water and told where they are Most of no idea. I've just been released from detention. Have another baby. That's what she said. He moved us. Welcome Our explains the first need a covert tests, which the U. S government isn't doing less migrant show symptoms. The families, most of whom looked middle class, sit down and wait. Exhausted.

Kirk Siegler Dr West Ah Ho White U. S. Border Patrol Mexico Arizona Sonoran Desert NPR Tucson Federal Government United States U. S Government
Biden Pressured to Restore Boundaries of National Monuments in Utah

WBUR Programming

02:05 min | Last month

Biden Pressured to Restore Boundaries of National Monuments in Utah

"Confirmed interior secretary Deb Holland is traveling to Utah shall meet with tribes and elected leaders, and the focus is on the future of the Bears, Ears and Grand Staircase Escalante national monuments. Former President Donald Trump dramatically slashed protections for these monuments. President Biden issued an executive order to review that move and his administration is under pressure to restore their boundaries. NPR's Kirk Siegler reports. Former congresswoman from New Mexico. Deb Holland is the nation's first indigenous interior secretary. And in the four Corners region, there's a lot of anticipation among tribes about her official visit to the Bears Ears National Monument. When President Obama designated it giving it enhanced federal land protections. He cited its cultural significance. Land is rich with cliff dwellings, pictographs as well, A sacred camping and burial grounds. This is our chapel. This is our place of worship. Had Gonzalez Rogers runs the Bears ears inter tribal coalition representing five sovereign tribes. Ah, Holland alone doesn't have the authority to restore the monument's original boundaries. But he sees her visit as symbolic in FAC in the first kind of the world. I think it's less than 30 days of Secretary Holland on being in office, she has had more engagement more action than the previous 1300 days. When former president Trump downsized bears ears by 85% and cut the nearby Grand Staircase Escalante and nearly half tribe sued that court battle is on hold after President Biden's latest executive order calling for another review. Utah Republicans, including Governor Spencer Cox, are pressuring the administration to put a bill through Congress. Can we give on some issues? Can they give on some issues? Can we Can we come to a peaceful resolution of this? So we're not fighting this battle every year for 20 years, 25 years IN 1996, President Clinton designated the Grand Staircase Monument without consulting Utah leaders summer still fuming about what they saw as a loss and ranching and mining opportunities.

Deb Holland President Biden Kirk Siegler Bears Ears National Monument Bears Gonzalez Rogers Utah Donald Trump Secretary Holland NPR President Trump New Mexico President Obama Governor Spencer Cox Holland Escalante Grand Staircase Monument Congress President Clinton
"kirk siegler" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:55 min | Last month

"kirk siegler" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The door and Honduras to address the root causes of the surgeon. Migration. Vice President Kamila Harris is taking the lead. While we are clear that people should not come to the border now way also understand that we will enforce the law and that we also because we could shoot them and walk at the same time must address the root causes. That causes people to make the track as the president has described to come here. Most urgent part of the crisis involves thousands more unaccompanied minors making the crossing the administration is scrambling to find more temporary housing for them in Colorado, loved ones are remembering the 10 individuals killed in this week's mass shooting at a King Soopers grocery store in Boulder. One of the victims were key olds was on track to becoming store manager was NPR's Kirk Siegler reports because of the actions of a gunman. Ricky's family is now left grieving over what could have been 25 year old Ricky olds was shot and killed in the massacre. While working her shift. Her uncle Robert Old says the family is devastated. His niece will never be able to experience motherhood or fulfill her life goal of helping others. There's a hole there's a hole in her family. That won't be cells and Try to fill it with memories. You know, that's tough, old says his family has been overwhelmed by what he calls an outpouring of support, including a candlelight vigil that was held here outside the family's home Tuesday night. Kirk Siegler. NPR news boulder The administration is trying to reassure US allies in Europe that they won't have to choose between the US and China. But Secretary of State Antony Blinken says Western democracies should rally to uphold the international order. NPR's Michele Kelemen. Secretary Blinking is vowing to consult early and often with European partners as he tries to and his words modernize America's alliances. He says country should work with China, where possible, including on climate change, But he also says the U. S and Europe need to compete with China in other areas and uphold the international system, because if we work together to make real are positive vision For the international order. We're confident we can out compete China or anyone else on any playing field. His speech in Brussels comes just a week after Blink. Ins testy first meeting with top Chinese diplomats. Michele Kelemen. NPR NEWS Washington The NASDAQ has closed down 2% since the Open. This is NPR news. Live from KQED News. I'm terrorist. Siler. The Richmond City Council passed emergency tenant protections last night to keep more renters safe from eviction during the pandemic Cuties Molly Solomon reports. The order goes into effect immediately. Now, landlords can't evict their Richmond tenants unless there's a health and safety concern or if they're taking the property off the market. There was passionate debate from renters and tenant advocates, as well as landlords who pushed back on stricter rules. At KQED Analysis of sheriff Lockouts found the rate of evictions was 28 times higher in Richmond than in Oakland. Which already has stronger protections. Vice Mayor De Melissa Johnson voted on the ordinance because, he said, county and state moratoriums don't go far enough. It's ridiculous, and it's embarrassing. I understand that people need their money, but at the same time we're in the middle of a global pandemic. The local ordinance remains in effect for 60 days after the local emergency ends. I'm Molly Solomon KQED news. State lawmakers introduced a new bill today that would increase income taxes for wealthy Californians. The bill would add an additional 2% tax on income over $1 million. It's intended to address income inequality and help the state recover from the costs associated with the cove in 19 pandemic. Berry Assembly member Alex Lee is co sponsor. He says the pandemics aftermath could have long term negative impact on the state's general fund. And working families. The road to recovery for our working class families will be difficult. The added that in 2020, the richest Californians profited while record numbers of low income people relied on unemployment. I'm terrorist Siler in Oakland. This is KQED news. Support for NPR comes from I drive with remote PC, providing remote access to pieces Max and services from anywhere, assisting those working from home and also enabling remote assistance for customers at remote PC dot com. And the listeners of KQED. Mix of sun and clouds for the rest of the day. High temperatures low sixties at the coast to the low seventies inland Tonight partly cloudy and breezy, dropping down once again to the low to upper forties. And wins about 30 MPH out of the northwest, decreasing after midnight, then sunny and windy tomorrow and a big chillier with the high temperatures getting into low sixties. I'm scared to go back. I just don't know. Couldn't trust anymore. Thistles. The takeaway. I'm 10 Ft of Vega. After more than a year of isolation, quarantine closed businesses and mask wearing the United States is starting to open up again. Across the country. Americans are posting vaccine selfies and beginning to think about warm weather and finally being able to visit with friends and family. Grand parents have even been given doctor's orders to hug their grandkids. Under the veneer of joy. There's an unease that many people myself included are feeling about a so called return to normal. The collective trauma of more than 500,000. Americans. Dead from the virus isn't something that we can forget so easily. There's also anxiety underpinning questions like Am I safe? What kind of filtration system is this building using? How often should I be sanitizing and there are some darker elements of American society that also portend to return to normal. Shootings in Boulder, Colorado and Atlanta. Georgia, which killed 10 and eight people, respectively, have reminded many Americans of the risks of being in everyday spaces. The thought of eventually returning to a crowded concert hall or riding a packed subway train can cause many folks to feel anxious. Here's what some of you had to say about how you're feeling. Hi. Yeah. This is Robin from San Diego. I really enjoyed working from home. I love.

Michele Kelemen Alex Lee Oakland Boulder Atlanta Robert Old San Diego Colorado 2020 Molly Solomon 10 Blink Brussels 60 days Tuesday night Kirk Siegler Robin Antony Blinken Ricky 2%
The Celebration Over, Deb Haaland Now Faces a Long To-Do List at Interior

Weekend Edition Saturday

03:44 min | Last month

The Celebration Over, Deb Haaland Now Faces a Long To-Do List at Interior

"When she was confirmed as the first indigenous interior secretary on Monday. Now that the celebration's over He's promised to begin repairing a legacy of broken treaties and abuses committed by the federal government in Indian country. NPR's Kirk Siegler reports on the huge challenges ahead for Secretary Helland. With so much land under federal control. There's an old saying here in the West that the interior secretary has a more direct effect on people's day to day lives than the president. This is multiplied on reservations. In her confirmation hearing, Deb Holland nodded to the fact that the department she now leads was historically a tool of oppression toward tribes. If an indigenous woman from humble beginnings can be confirmed as secretary of the interior Our country holds promise for everyone mending a legacy of broken promises is a priority for many of the 574 federally recognized tribes on the Nez Perce reservation elders like Mary Jane Miles, See Holland as a turning point. It feels like we're moving and we are claiming What we could have done a long time ago. The Nez Perce consider much of the northwest their ancestral land, but through a serious of treaties there, now confined to a small slice of remote Idaho River country. U. S government is supposed to protect that land and it's salmon. But the fish the lifeline for people here along the Clearwater River are nearing extinction due to dams and climate change. Miles. Also points to a legacy of toxic mess is from mining that the tribe had little say over. I think we've noticed that maybe we've been taken, but nationwide, tribal leaders think this might start changing under Holland. The Biden administration is reinstating an Obama era rule requiring consultation. That means any future lands, development or right of way. Projects like a pipeline must be approved first by tribes and Secretary Holland is going to oversee all of that protection of this government relationship is all important to the tribes in Colorado. John Echo Hoggett, The Native American Rights Fund says that relationship is fraught because interior agencies like the Bureau of Indian Affairs have been chronically underfunded. He says. The previous administration also spurned tribal input on major lands, decisions, something he's looking forward to restarting. Well, it would prevent things from happening. You know, happened to us here during the last administration elimination of 85% of the Bears ears National Monument, the Keystone XL pipeline, President Obama formally protected the Bears Ears Monument on Utah land considered sacred to native people. Then the Trump Administration dramatically reduced its boundaries, and there's pressure on the new administration to reinstate or even expand them. Secretary Holland will travel there next month for a listening tour. Her to do list is a big one. Doctor. Look good afternoon in the money Quest, we add two not to. Ah, hiked back on the Nez Perce tribal leaders like Casey Mitchell want Holland's ear on saving the salmon, and he's optimistic. Unlike with previous administrations, there's no learning curve with Secretary Holland. There's always such high turnover within government entities that you know, sometimes that plays as an excuse. And as a government entity, there should not be any excuse for the trust responsibility that you hold to the tribes for the nest purse That trust responsibility is at the heart of a new deal brokered by a Republican congressman to remove four dams on the Snake River just downstream from here. Plan they hope Deb Holland will put in front of the president soon. Kirk Siegler,

Kirk Siegler Secretary Helland Secretary Holland Deb Holland Mary Jane Miles Idaho River Biden Administration Holland John Echo Hoggett Native American Rights Fund NPR Clearwater River Bureau Of Indian Affairs Federal Government Bears Ears Monument U. Trump Administration Casey Mitchell National Monument
The Celebration Over, Deb Haaland Now Faces a Long To-Do List at Interior

Environment: NPR

03:44 min | Last month

The Celebration Over, Deb Haaland Now Faces a Long To-Do List at Interior

"Deb holland made history when she was confirmed as the first indigenous interior secretary on monday now that the celebrations over. She's promised to begin repairing a legacy of broken treaties and abuses committed by the federal government in indian country. Npr's kirk siegler reports on the huge challenges ahead for secretary held with so much land under federal control. There's an old saying here in the west that the interior secretary has a more direct effect on people's day to day lives than the president. This is multiplied on reservations in her confirmation hearing dabhol and nodded to the fact that the department she now leads was historically a tool of oppression toward tribes if an indigenous woman from humble beginnings can be confirmed as secretary of the interior. Our country holds promise for everyone. Mending a legacy of broken. Promises is a priority. For many of the five hundred seventy four federally recognized tribes on the nez perce reservation elders like mary. Jane miles see holland as a turning point at feels like we are moving and we are claiming what we could have done a long time ago. The nez perce consider much of the north west their ancestral land but through a series of treaties. There now confined to a small slice of remote idaho river country. The us government is supposed to protect that land and it salmon. But the fish the lifeline for people here along the clearwater river are nearing extinction due to dams and climate change miles. Also points to a legacy of topic. Messes reminding that the tribe had little say over. I think we've noticed that maybe we've been taken but nationwide tribal leaders think this might start changing under holland. The biden administration is reinstating. An obama era rule requiring consultation. That means any future lands development or right away. Projects like pipeline must be approved first by tribes and secretary holland is going oversee. All of that protection of this government relationship is all important to the tribes in colorado john. Echo hawk at the native american rights fund says that relationship is fraught because interior agencies. Like the bureau of indian. Affairs have been chronically underfunded. He says the previous administration. Also spurn tribal input on major lands decisions. Something he's looking forward to restarting will it would prevent things from happening in. Oh happen to your. During the last administration who emanation of eighty five percent of the bears national monument the keystone excel pipeline. President obama formally protected the bears. Ears monument on utah land considered sacred to native people than the trump administration dramatically reduced its boundaries and there's pressure on the new administration to reinstate or even expand them secretary hall and will travel there next month for a listening tour. Her to do list is a big one dot to look good afternoon. In when nick west we add to not to a hiked back on them says birsh tribal leaders. Like casey mitchell watt holland's ear on saving the salmon and he's optimistic unlike with previous administrations. There's no learning curve with secretary holland. There's always such high turnover within government. Entities that you know sometimes that plays as an excuse and as a government entity there should not be any excuse for the trust responsibility that you hold to the tribes for the nez perce that trust responsibility is at the heart of a new deal. Brokered by republican congressman to remove four dams on the snake river just downstream from here. A plan is deb. Holland will put in front of the president's soon

Deb Holland Kirk Siegler Jane Miles Federal Government Idaho River Secretary Holland Biden Administration Holland Native American Rights Fund NPR Clearwater River Bureau Of Indian North West Mary Nick West Casey Mitchell Watt Holland Barack Obama Colorado President Obama
"kirk siegler" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:30 min | 2 months ago

"kirk siegler" Discussed on KCRW

"It's not just here. This is the case across much of Indian country. Tribal leaders across the country say they plan to keep holding the Biden administration accountable to its treaty obligations to deliver health care. There's an obvious legacy of mistrust toward the federal government, and this is playing out when it comes to the vaccines to even though they've been proven safe, Most things stay tell us have been studied for a long time. This has been rushed, and that's what puts appear in a lot of people. Wayne Bear Shield is standing outside the Rosebud tribe headquarters. He's showing me a huge banner that he just helped put up. We call this that she Congo nation We happy And the circle is all our people. The sign reads, Protect the circle get vaccinated. I know a lot of people out there scared, but it's something that we as people need to survive. Even before the pandemic, this county had the second lowest life expectancy rate in the nation on Lee Pine Ridge. Next door is worse. Pre Covad wakes like this one in high school gym for a mother and daughter killed in a car crash were all too common. Can I help you find? Uh, It's here where I met. Lila kills in sight. Who we heard from In the beginning of this story. She was dropping off food. She told me she was hesitant to get the vaccine at first, too. She has survivor's guilt. She knows her mother would have wanted her to get it. So she's been helping pick up surviving elders and driving them to get their shots. I've been soul adamant about telling people take it. Take it. We have to Because that's the only way it's going to stop. Kirk Siegler. NPR News Rose Bud, South Dakota This is NPR news. I'm no Vienna Caramel and today on morning becomes eclectic. 20 year old singer songwriter Arlo Parks is having an amazing year. So far. Her sweet and soulful debut album just dropped a raving reviews, and she's even got a TV show. She joins us for a chat about her music, her story and what's ahead, and she'll even share some exclusive recordings with US Morning becomes eclectic with yours truly. And Anthony Valadez starts at nine right here on KCRW. Good and always home to my KCRW. Sponsors include Amazon studios, presenting one night in Miami, now nominated for three Golden Globe awards, including best director Regina King and best supporting actor Leslie Odom Jr. Also nominated for two SAG awards,.

Anthony Valadez Kirk Siegler Lee Pine Ridge Leslie Odom Jr. Arlo Parks NPR Miami Amazon studios three NPR News Lila Pre Covad Regina King today South Dakota two 20 year old one night Congo Golden Globe awards
Boise, Idaho, Abandons Fight To Clear Homeless Encampments

Morning Edition

02:28 min | 3 months ago

Boise, Idaho, Abandons Fight To Clear Homeless Encampments

"City of Boise, Idaho, has decided to abandon its more than decade long legal fight to clear homeless encampments. The settlement reached yesterday has implications across the West Coast, which has long been the epicenter of the nation's homelessness crisis. Here's NPR's Kirk Siegler. More than 12. Years ago, several homeless people sued the city of Boise for giving them dozens of tickets for sleeping outside even when there weren't adequate beds available in local shelters here. Boys. He fought the case all the way to the U. S. Supreme Court, where it was joined by many West Coast cities in arguing they need broad authority to prevent the spread of homeless encampments. But late in 2019, the Supreme Court declined to hear Boise's latest appeal. Now, apparently acknowledging it likely wouldn't prevail in lower courts. They're already ruled the ticketing unconstitutional. Boise has decided to end the fight. The city is settling the lawsuit and pledging to put more than a million dollars toward housing and support services this year alone, so the city is going to decrease the number of encampments and Boise permanently. Housing people rather than by arresting them for simply trying to survive, which only prolongs their homelessness. Eric Tars is legal director of the National Homelessness Law Center, which helped the plaintiffs in the case. He says The settlement shows that cities should follow Boise's lead and build more housing. Instead of putting police on the front lines of the crisis. The courts have said no, you can't balance your failure. To create adequate housing policy on the backs of the victims of that very failure. Legal experts say there's been scattershot compliance with the ruling outside Boise, a relatively a fluent midsize city. Some city leaders in California, where there's been an explosion in homelessness, since the recession say they need to be able to control encampments because they threatened public health and safety. Professor Michael Casino at the University of Southern California says What mostly happens is the police will clear a tent city Then people just move somewhere else A few days later, this is a game changer in the sense that it's going to save the cities and counties. Right now, you're gonna have to be serious about not just taking down this encampments and moving people around, but actually getting him into the housing with the pandemic. There's now more money available for them to start doing that. Biden administration says it will fully reimbursed cities for the costs of putting their unhappy used residents and local hotels. Kirk Siegler NPR NEWS, Boise

Boise Kirk Siegler U. S. Supreme Court Eric Tars National Homelessness Law Cent Npr News Idaho West Coast Supreme Court Professor Michael Casino University Of Southern Califor California Biden Administration
Misinformation Spread By Anti-Science Groups Endangers COVID-19 Vaccination Efforts

All Things Considered

03:56 min | 4 months ago

Misinformation Spread By Anti-Science Groups Endangers COVID-19 Vaccination Efforts

"In some parts of the country. The biggest challenge surrounding the Corona virus vaccine won't be distributing it. It'll be convincing people to take it. Anti science groups and politicians are spreading misinformation about the safety of the new vaccines. NPR's Kirk Siegler reports from Idaho estate with one of the nation's highest immunization opt out rates since the start of the pandemic far right extremist groups of pro tested rules enclosures imposed for public health safety reasons. Sometimes armed, they have openly flouted mask ordinances in the few cities here that have them protesters and Boise, chanting. Let us in outside of Public Health board meeting this month is Idaho dealt with one Of the worst covert outbreaks in the country. In newspaper editorials and on local TV news doctors here are warning this backlash toward medical professionals is worsening in conspiracy theories or spreading. This is the backdrop as the first vaccines arrive in Idaho. Sarah leads is in charge of vaccine distribution in the state. The challenge with dealing with misinformation is that it's very reactive. It's hard to predict what's going to come out next. So the State Health Department is holding weekly meetings on Facebook about the efficacy of vaccines, among other things. And so far, no disruptions Lead says the government carefully crafts messaging, stressing their safety and effectiveness, but it's almost impossible to keep up with social media where anything goes, It's so easy. For anti vaccine groups and individuals to post misinformation and throw a few scientific sounding terms into An article that folks can believe. But this was a common thread in Idaho long before the pandemics, so public health officials here have a lot of practice methods of combating misinformation. Lead says Even the most responsive and innovative education isn't going to change some people's minds. It's those hesitant people who maybe are listening to a family member and Not sure what the data actually is, but are listening to a family member who sounds like a good authority. I think those are the people that we can really impact. But public health officials in conservative states like this say their work is being made even harder by the conflicting signals being sent by President Trump and his allies. Last week, Fox News host Tucker Carlson Sow doubt about the vaccines on his show the night before Vice President Mike Pence was to get his on live TV. Here in the rural Northwest, prominent far right figures on talk radio and Web sites that had already pushed mask protests are pivoting to vaccines. Now the media and politicians would like you to believe that Things will go back to normal if you just simply comply. This is commentator Spirits chorus and a post on readout news. The readout is a loose movement that encourages people to relocate the Idaho in part due to its libertarian vaccination laws. I'd like to clarify right now that I'm not a doctor. I'm not a scientist. Most scientists and doctors are hoping these contrarian voices are a small minority, though they may have an outsized megaphone. And I think it probably is. I'd like to believe that Chris Tramp is a family practice doctor in rural Sabbeth, a Kansas his strategy is to meet people where they are, If they're worried, are skeptical about the vaccine. He says. He tries to get to the bottom of why that is and then give them the best information he can, including that he was one of the first and his small town to get vaccinated against Cove. It 19 1 thing that I'm really going to be preaching to people is kind of a message of you're crazy if you don't take it and what I mean by that is that the vaccine so far is looking so very efficacious. But for now, Dr Tramps says battling misinformation is just one more headache, medical professionals or confronting in this very long, exhausting year.

Idaho Kirk Siegler Public Health Board State Health Department NPR President Trump Boise Vice President Mike Pence Sarah Tucker Carlson Facebook Chris Tramp Fox News Sabbeth Northwest Kansas Dr Tramps Headache
Nursing homes and healthcare workers are top priority for Covid vaccines

Weekend Edition Saturday

02:07 min | 5 months ago

Nursing homes and healthcare workers are top priority for Covid vaccines

"Workers and nursing home residents expected to be first in line to get the Fizer bank seen enough for the general public not expected until spring, so public health officials are urging Americans to continue wearing masks. And keep their social distance from others. The federal Indian Health Service says it's allocation of the first expected Corona virus vaccines will be enough to cover 100% of its healthcare workforce. NPR's Kirk Siegler reports. Native Americans have been disproportionately affected by the pandemic. The I just says it expects to distribute 22,000 doses of the first Fizer vaccine and 46,000 of Madonnas. Rear Admiral Francis Fraser says As the vaccine supply increases, tribes will then be able to prioritize distributions for elders and others with health conditions. They put them at greater risk of serious illness or death from Covina. Our ultimate goal is to ensure that safe and effective vaccines can reach Indian country. As quickly and equitably as possible. Native Americans have long suffered from healthcare inequities, and during the pandemic, they've been four times as likely to wind up hospitalized. Kirk Siegler. NPR NEWS President Trump attacked the Supreme Court in a Syriza of Friday night tweets complaining about the court's rejection of a Texas lawsuit aimed at overturning Joe Biden's election victory. NPR's Jen Newman has more Trump called the decision a legal disgrace and embarrassment and continued his baseless claims that the election was rigged. He said the Supreme Court quote really let us down. No wisdom, no courage. Trump had called the lawsuit filed by Texas against Georgia, Michigan, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin, the big one that would end with the Supreme Court undoing Biden substantial Electoral college majority. But the court said Texas does not have the legal standing under the constitution to soup. For the past five weeks, federal and state courts rejected nearly all of Trump's attempts at overturning the election court. Electoral College meets Monday to formally elect Biden.

Kirk Siegler Fizer Bank Federal Indian Health Service Fizer Rear Admiral Francis Fraser NPR Donald Trump Npr News Jen Newman Covina Supreme Court Texas Joe Biden Biden Substantial Electoral Co Georgia Pennsylvania Wisconsin Michigan Electoral College
Wildfire-Ravaged Washington State Farming Town In Limbo As It Awaits Aid To Rebuild

All Things Considered

02:54 min | 5 months ago

Wildfire-Ravaged Washington State Farming Town In Limbo As It Awaits Aid To Rebuild

"Almost three months ago, A wildfire destroyed most of a farming town in Washington state mold in Washington is still waiting for the Trump Administration to respond to the States Disaster declaration request. NPR's Kirk Siegler reports that many of the town's mostly lower income residents have had to rely on donations while they wait when historic wildfires overwhelmed the West Coast. In September, the governors of California, Oregon and Washington followed Standard protocol and asked President Trump to declare a major disaster. That frees up millions in federal aid for everything from temporary housing the cleanup to rebuilding infrastructure after some politicking and tweeting these air blue states after all, California and Oregon's major disaster declarations were mostly quickly approved organ heard nine days after their fire, and their fire was on the same day as ours. September 7 2020 Scott Hawkinson says it's been 71 days since Washington asked the president for its disaster declaration. On Labor Day, A wind driven range fire destroyed approximately 80% of homes in mold in Washington, including Hope Henson's, He's on the Town council and is trying to lead its recovery task force. The fires were worse overall in California and Oregon. Thankfully, nobody died in Maldon. But most of it's some 300 residents were uninsured and already living on the economic margins. But to see this on the news reports that you know the FEMA trailers are rolling in to help some people. We're in exactly the same condition. It just makes you wonder. Even in the best of times where we at did we get for gotten so fire survivors are left only to speculate. Is this politics bureaucracy just incompetence. In a brief email of FEMA spokesperson told NPR only that the administration is still reviewing Washington's request. Waiting this long and not even getting denied. Aid is extremely unusual. Yeah, I've never heard of this happening before Carolyn Kousky runs the Warden Risk center at the University of Pennsylvania. Delays create a lot of extra costs for families for the community. And the longer it takes, the more those cost can ripple and create problems, problems like delays and getting people into basic temporary housing or just cleaning up the town. And the longer Molden is in limbo, Kousky says. The harder it gets to try to rebuild smarter and more resilient against the next seemingly inevitable wildfire. This is what Scott Hokanson, the town councilman, has been trying to push even with so many people, including himself in crisis right now were hampered and how much we can move forward in which direction we could go until we hear from Dina Hawkinson says. The mayor recently resigned. So did the city clerk and there are real worries. Maldon won't rebuild and may empty out. He's trying to stay upbeat night chuckle because it's gotten to the point where it's not funny that way. It's just you have to laugh or else you'll cry. Kirk Siegler NPR

Washington Trump Administration Kirk Siegler President Trump Oregon Scott Hawkinson California Henson's NPR Fema The West Coast Carolyn Kousky Warden Risk Center Maldon Molden Kousky
"kirk siegler" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:52 min | 5 months ago

"kirk siegler" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"At noon on January 20th. He will lead a country that has sharply divided between rural and urban areas. Biden did well in cities and suburbs. Donald Trump, the departing president, won many rural counties. So how can Biden reach out to those counties? NPR's Kirk Siegler reports. For conservatives like Judy Burgess, who's a longtime state legislator from rural Arizona. President Trump did as well as he could of managing the Corona virus pandemic. She waited in line to vote this fall, Burgess said. Lockdowns have hit small towns hard. This girl, the virus is really Shut down a lot of businesses. We have a lot of small businesses going out of this incense. So we're losing sales tax revenue. Republicans mostly spurned the covert business shutdowns, Many Democrats called them essential to protect public health. The pandemic is a big reason why the urban rural vote split even sharper on party lines this year than in 2016, while Blue America blasted the president's chaotic pandemic response and is spreading of racist conspiracy theories. Trump racked up wins and some rural counties by even bigger margins than in 2016. Kathy Kramer is an expert on the rural urban divide at the University of Wisconsin. There's this sense that decisions about the pandemic are being made in cities and kind of imposed on rural spaces, and that doesn't sit very well with a lot of folks and may have driven them. Further from the Democratic Party, Rural Wisconsin has been a flash point for divisions over coronavirus policy, even as many rural counties saw alarming spikes in cases and hospitalizations leading up to the election. Kramer says Trump was still able to capitalize on rural resentment. There's a lot of mistrust and government authority here and the proud tradition of individualism when it comes to mask mandates or social distancing laws. Trump also sent billions in subsidies to farmers. Rural communities across the country have been feeling increasingly that the government is not paying attention to people like them and doesn't really care about them and doesn't respect them. So can a president Biden even make inroads into Trump's Red America and 2021? The farmer who's also the Senate. Democrats. Defacto rural leader Montana's Jon Tester, is trying to stay optimistic. You know if he gets a good person and as a secretary of egg, and he's willing to do what I say, listen first And react to what you're hearing. I think we'll be in fine shape, Tester says Republicans have been winning rural voters on what he calls hot button issues. But he faults both parties for mostly shunning rural America and its complex problems that aren't solvable over one election cycle, the American family farmer and rancher or going away. And the parties that can figure out how to stop that from happening will win Real America, analysts say. The rural urban divide is sharpest in the middle of the country, which has been hit hard economically and where many small towns air losing population. Democrats like tester see an opening in the West, though, where in 2021, the party will control all the Senate seats in New Mexico, Nevada, Arizona and Colorado, the first time since the 19 forties. I think rural America is literally up for grabs, and the 2020 election also exposed vulnerabilities for Republicans in states like Colorado. The GOP lost even worse than it and in 2016 in the cities and suburbs and also in rural counties with ski resorts and tourist dependent economies. There was a lot of frustration going into this election. Rose Puglisi is a Republican commissioner and traditionally conservative Mesa County, Colorado, which picked up some big wins during the Trump era when it came to oil and gas development on public land. She's skeptical about what a Biden administration will mean for rural economies. But she's eager to listen. I mean, really, when we talk about what's important to you, all parties than all political persuasions. They want to make sure they have economic opportunities. And so it'll be interesting to see how he talks about rural America and our economic opportunities. For now, Pugliese, he says, rural counties like hers are mostly worried about the potential form or lockdowns due to Corona virus. She hopes the new administration will continue to leave those decisions to states and local jurisdictions. Kirk Siegler NPR news Thistles. NPR news This is morning edition on W when my C I'm David first President Trump has been a vocal supporter of fossil fuel companies, but he's about to be replaced. Gut reaction is that this isn't good news for the industry, but we're actually cautiously positive. We'll have more on what the oil and gas industry should expect from President elect Joe Biden coming up later this hour and then on the BBC news hour at nine o'clock, large scale trials of a third Corona virus vaccine are showing promising results. Also Israel's prime minister, is reported to have made a secret trip to Saudi Arabia and a look at Nebraska, where the surge of Corona virus is beginning to overwhelm medical staff. That's All coming up on the BBC News hour at nine o'clock on 93.9 FM w N. Y c. W. N. Y. C is supported by 13 presenting great performances. Broadway's best streaming Now is James Corden's performance in one Man, two governors now on PBS dot org's slash Broadway on PBS and the PBS video APP. We're coming up on what's usually a busy time of year for travel. But in 2020 airlines are bracing for a bad holiday season because of Copan 19. Well, look at how the airline industry is trying to adapt. Plus with so many of us not traveling. We're taking your calls and ideas at +8778 might take about how to make this Thanksgiving and the holiday season a little brighter. I'm tan Xena Vega, and that's next time on the takeaway weekday afternoons at.

President Trump Joe Biden president America Kirk Siegler NPR Senate Colorado Trump Arizona Judy Burgess Kathy Kramer Democratic Party Blue America James Corden BBC GOP Copan Wisconsin
"kirk siegler" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:14 min | 5 months ago

"kirk siegler" Discussed on KCRW

"At noon on January 20th. He will lead a country that has sharply divided between rural and urban areas. Biden did well in cities and suburbs. Donald Trump, the departing president, won many rural counties. So how can Biden reach out to those counties? NPR's Kirk Siegler reports. For conservatives like Judy Burgess was a long time state legislator from rural Arizona. President Trump did as well as he could've managing the Corona virus pandemic. She waited in line to vote this fall, Burgess said. Lockdowns have hit small towns hard. This Corona viruses really shut down a lot of businesses. We have a lot of small businesses going out of its incense, so we're losing sales tax revenue. Rural Republicans mostly spurned the covert business shutdowns, Many Democrats called them essential to protect public health. The pandemic is a big reason why the urban rural vote split even sharper on party lines this year than in 2016, while Blue America blasted the president's chaotic pandemic response and is spreading of racist conspiracy theories. Trump racked up wins and some rural counties by even bigger margins than in 2016. Kathy Kramer is an expert on the rural urban divide at the University of Wisconsin. There's this sense that decisions about the pandemic are being made in cities and kind of imposed on rural spaces, and that doesn't sit very well with a lot of folks and may have driven them. Further from the Democratic Party, Rural Wisconsin has been a flash point for divisions over coronavirus policy, even as many rural counties saw alarming spikes in cases and hospitalizations leading up to the election. Kramer says Trump was still able to capitalize on rural resentment. There's a lot of mistrust and government authority here and the proud tradition of individualism when it comes to mask mandates or social distancing laws. Trump also sent billions in subsidies to farmers. Rural communities across the country have been feeling increasingly that the government is not paying attention to people like them and doesn't really care about them and doesn't respect them. So can a president Biden even make inroads into Trump's Red America and 2021? The farmer who's also the Senate Democrats. Defacto rural leader Montana's Jon Tester, is trying to stay optimistic. You know if he gets a good person, and and there's a secretary of egg, and he's willing to do what I say, listen first And react to what you're hearing. I think we'll be in fine shape, Tester says Republicans have been winning rural voters on what he calls hot button issues. But he faults both parties for mostly shunning rural America and its complex problems that aren't solvable over one election cycle, the American family farmer and rancher or going away. And the parties that can figure out how to stop that from happening will win Real America, analysts say. The rural urban divide is sharpest in the middle of the country, which has been hit hard economically and where many small towns air losing population. Democrats like tester see an opening in the West, though, where in 2021, the party will control all the Senate seats in New Mexico, Nevada, Arizona and Colorado, the first time since the 19 forties. I think rural America is literally up for grabs, and the 2020 election also exposed vulnerabilities for Republicans in states like Colorado. GOP lost even worse than it and in 2016 in the cities and suburbs and also in rural counties with ski resorts and tourist dependent economies. There was a lot of frustration going into this election. Rose. Bugliosi is a Republican commissioner and traditionally conservative Mesa County, Colorado, which picked up some big wins during the Trump era when it came to oil and gas development on public land. She's skeptical about what a Biden administration will mean for rural economies. But she's eager to listen. I mean, really, when we talk about what's important to you, all parties in all political persuasions. They want to make sure they have economic opportunities. And so it'll be interesting to see how he talks about rural America and their economic opportunities. For now, Pugliese, he says, rural counties like hers are mostly worried about the potential form or lockdowns due to Corona virus. She hopes the new administration will continue to leave those decisions to states.

President Trump Biden Jon Tester America president Bugliosi Judy Burgess Kathy Kramer Colorado Arizona Democratic Party Blue America Kirk Siegler GOP Wisconsin NPR
Idaho governor orders rollback to Stage 2 as COVID-19 cases swell

All Things Considered

00:54 sec | 6 months ago

Idaho governor orders rollback to Stage 2 as COVID-19 cases swell

"With hospitals in his state nearing capacity, Idaho's Republican governors reimposing some of that state's original coronavirus restrictions. But as NPR's Kirk Sigler reports the governor's refusing to implement a statewide mask law Idaho Governor Brad Little has mostly resisted rolling the state back into tougher restrictions that were in effect until the end of May. Despite a record number of cases and hospitalizations, especially in urban counties, bars, nightclubs here will mostly be able to remain open public gatherings will be limited to 10 people, but those rules won't apply to churches or political rallies. The conservative governor has faced criticism from health care workers for not enforcing tougher measures while also getting criticism from the right wing of his own party for implementing any restrictions. The announcement came on the same day that to neighboring states, Washington and Oregon announced new travel advisories for out of state visitors. Kirk Siegler.

Kirk Sigler Brad Little Idaho NPR Oregon Washington Kirk Siegler
Idaho governor orders rollback to Stage 2 as COVID-19 cases swell

All Things Considered

00:37 sec | 6 months ago

Idaho governor orders rollback to Stage 2 as COVID-19 cases swell

"Resisted rolling the state back into tougher restrictions that were in effect until the end of May. Despite a record number of cases and hospitalizations, especially in urban counties, bars, nightclubs here will mostly be able to remain open public gatherings will be limited to 10 people, but those rules won't apply to churches or political rallies. The conservative governor has faced criticism from health care workers for not enforcing tougher measures while also getting criticism from the right wing of his own party for implementing any restrictions. The announcement came on the same day that to neighboring states, Washington and Oregon announced new travel advisories for out of state visitors. Kirk Siegler. NPR

Oregon Washington Kirk Siegler NPR
Coronavirus surge has caused hospitals in rural America to reach full capacity

All Things Considered

01:57 min | 6 months ago

Coronavirus surge has caused hospitals in rural America to reach full capacity

"Officials in rural America are struggling under the weight of the Corona virus pandemic in the upper Midwest and Rocky Mountain states. They warned that hospitals are at or nearing capacity. NPR's Kirk Siegler reports. Here's how things look in Rural America to Dr Andrew Pervy ahead of infectious diseases at the University of Utah Hospital, So the situation really has to be described his dire, especially in the northern Rockies and upper Midwest states that weren't hit that hard when the Corona virus raged in American cities last spring. Via traces the current crisis to colleges and schools here opening back up, as did sports and most extracurricular activities and states. Seeing the most new cases like Idaho, Wyoming, South Dakota have generally not good, many restrictions in place. Nor is there much enforcement on large gatherings because of the local politics. They're probably not As drastic as firm measures is, we really needed to turn the tide? So I think that situation in 2 to 4 weeks is going to be groom. Hospitalizations usually go up two weeks after a spike in cases deaths a month later. Hospitals in cities like Salt Lake, taken overflow patients from surrounding states, which had shortages of specialists and intensive care beds before the pandemic in North Dakota Cove in 19 hospitalizations were up 60% over this time last month, and it's not just capacity that stretched This week, The state said it would begin allowing medical staff who test positive for the virus, but asymptomatic to keep treating Covad patients here's Republican governor, Doug Burgum. This is particularly important for us to help get healthcare workers on keep them in the game at a time when health care workers is the key constraint in our ability to provide Care for everyone, Burgum says. Some people still don't believe the virus Israel he pleaded for them to be compassionate anyway, because hospitals are filling up. Kirk Siegler. NPR NEWS Boise

Kirk Siegler Dr Andrew Pervy University Of Utah Hospital Northern Rockies Midwest America Rocky Mountain Infectious Diseases NPR North Dakota Cove South Dakota Wyoming Idaho Doug Burgum Salt Lake Burgum Israel
Easing fires not as simple as climate change vs. forest work

Morning Edition

03:57 min | 8 months ago

Easing fires not as simple as climate change vs. forest work

"The West Coast are again putting a spotlight on climate change. But it is not the only reason why we are seeing such destruction, even in the iconic and typically wet woods of the Pacific Northwest. For more. We've got NPR's Kirk Siegler, who's covered wildfires for this network for more than a decade. Kirk Hi, Good morning, Rachel. So we know that the forests and the brush the grasses in the West. Are extraordinarily dried out because of climate change. Kind of remind us how we got here. Well, right. There are a couple other big things going on here that we have to consider. And one is that we've also spent the last century stamping out Wildfires, and we actually continue to do this today. It's just the few that get away there in the news and healthy forests need fire, and what we've gotten ourselves into is what the experts call the wildfire paradox. So by doing this, we're actually making the problem worse, because now the forests and the brush lands are overgrown and in this really unnatural state, So you add climate change to that mix, and it's the worst case scenario that we're seeing. Right now. We hear the U. S. Forest Service often referred to as the Fire service because so much of their budget goes to fighting fires, not actual forest management work. But hasn't the federal government and individual states haven't they made some progress in doing some prevention work? Not very much. You know, the people who say the government isn't doing enough to manage is for us, to some extent, have a point. But a lot of that actually comes down to funding. If you're spending all of your resource is on trying to stop wildfires from burning in tow whole towns, then there's not going to be a lot of money left over to do the things like The thinning projects that prescribed burns. The plan burning Forster Andrew Sanchez Madore has been keeping close tabs on this where all the states are with their prevention work. He heads the Ecological Restoration Institute at Northern Arizona University in California. Oregon. Treatments that they've been implementing for years haven't really been at this scale that they need to be to cost a wind driven and climate change is exacerbated event. Some of this has to do with money, he says. And the lack of a really big, clear national strategy, But it's more complicated than just blaming the forest Service or the firefighting apparatus in the country. Or, frankly, is the Trump Administration likes to do try to just make this about logging and logging on Lee. We are now seeing those these fires. They've destroyed whole communities. It doesn't seem quite adequate to call them forced fires anymore. I mean, these are burning up residential areas, urban settings. That's right. And here's where things get really messy on the West Coast. In particular, there's been this huge amount of development into the forest that you say there now very vulnerable. The burning, especially with climate change. Now, in some cases, people have to live in these places because it's the only place they can afford. But regardless all these subdivisions, these new towns are actually becoming the fuel that's helping make these fires even bigger and local building codes are still pretty loose. Kumiko Barrett I talked to about this. She's at the research firm Headwaters. Comics, and she told me the county's still don't really have any disincentive to stop this development because of one big reason When you look at when a wildfire does occur, it's the federal government that comes in and pays for that suppression cost. So there's this inverse fiscal incentive on what is happening about local scale versus who's actually paying for the wildfire cost. So basically local communities they don't have to pay for the cleanup. The federal government does it, so they make money when these developments keep getting built. Exactly And there is no disincentive like she says, because they know the federal government is going to come in and pay for the suppression and the cleanup. But at some point you look at all of the disasters happening at once. We're in the middle of hurricane season and We're not even really at the peak of wildfire season in California, there is going to become a point where this just isn't going to be sustainable anymore. NPR's Kirk Sigler reporting from Boise, Idaho. Thanks so much, Kirk, You're welcome, Rachel. It's a Kurt. They're

Kirk Andrew Sanchez Madore U. S. Forest Service Federal Government NPR West Coast LEE Kirk Siegler Rachel California Pacific Northwest Kirk Sigler Kumiko Barrett Kurt Oregon Boise Trump Administration Idaho Northern Arizona University
"kirk siegler" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:07 min | 9 months ago

"kirk siegler" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Lifeline. Kirk Siegler, NPR NEWS HACKBERRY, Louisiana. Let's move now to the presidential race. Both major parties have wrapped up their nominating conventions. And whatever happens in November, 1 thing is certain. The next president is going to be a man in his seventies. But as millennials and the generations that followed become a bigger part of the country's voting population, we've been keeping tabs on what younger voters have on their minds. Last week, we heard from three young delegates to the Democratic National Convention. Now we turn to three young Republicans who are all first time delegates for President Trump this year. Maria Vasquez is the chairwoman of the Champagne County Young Republicans in Champaign, Illinois. Maria Hello and welcome. Hi happy Saturday. How are you? Great. Thank you. Hayden Pageant is the chairman of the Texas Young Republicans Federation. He joins us from Plano, Texas. Hayden Thank you so much for joining us as well. My pleasure. Thanks for having me on and Jesse Rappel. J is the National Committee chairwoman for the young Republican Federation of Virginia. And she joins us from Chesapeake. Virginia. Jesse Hello to you as well. Hi. Great to be with you. Thanks. So I'm just going to start by asking each of you what one or two issues you feel is most urgent for you personally, like what's driving your vote, and Jesse. I'm going to start with you because I hope you don't mind my mentioning at 23. You're the youngest. Some wanted to ask. What do you think is top of your mind when you're casting your vote? Yeah, of course. Well, I think for everyone right now there have been a lot of changes due to Cove it and one of the things that I've been really impressed by is President Trump's economic policy so far building an incredibly strong pre coded economy and the recovery From Cove it and during Cove. It has been much faster than anyone expected. So I'm really happy to continue that with four more years of President Trump. I also think that criminal justice reform is is something that the president has. Kept top of top of mind and a high priority. And so that's been really fantastic to watch, especially with everything currently going on in the national conversation. Do you think that your concerns track with most people your age, I would say, you know, a lot of people in the young Republicans demographic are young professionals, and so many of them are either early in their career or just entering the workforce. And so definitely having a strong economy and the ability to create their own American dream is something that most people in at least in my age demographic are concerned about and want to see moving forward. Hayden, You're 28. What about you, like what's top of the mind for you when you vote? And when you're going to vote this year, yeah, couldn't agree more with what Jesse just said. That's exactly what's top of mind. For me. That's exactly what's top of mind for my members in the Texas and Republicans. Economy number one And criminal justice reform number two on DH. What That means for us is really looking at the future we have and the prospects we have to. As Jesse said, Continue trying to find our own American dream. Or, as we say in Texas, our Texas dream. Andan number two is making sure that everybody has the rights that they are entitled to are able to live in liberty in our country. Those are things that are most important to us. And when you say criminal justice reform what do you mean by that? Come with us to form really is two parts to it. The first one is the way the police are asked to do certain things. What they're asked of what task they're given. And then the regulations and rules around their behavior and their conduct and how we hold them accountable if something goes wrong. On the second part is the way the actual justice system handles cases the way they try people the way they give sentences. The way we rehabilitate or help people get back into society after they have been evicted. That's what criminals for means to me. Maria. I'm going to mention I hope you don't mind my mentioning your on the upper end of the young Republican scale. If you don't mind, my invention and your great We're glad you made it And you're also a parent. So perhaps your concerns might be a little different. Or maybe not. So what? What's top of mind for you when you go to vote well, like the two prior delegate said that you know, economy is definitely on the forefront of everybody's mind at this point for me. Yeah, I do have a child so You know, Education is important. You know, I really, you know, support Presidents Trump helping the US workers by expanding a printer ship's programs and reforming job training. Bringing programs that are bringing educators and businesses together to ensure high quality classroom instruction. And I'm job training because a lot of our our Children are being educated in the classroom on, you know, books and and you know that type of curriculum, but we have to get them prepared for when they go out on the job and have this on job training in apprenticeship available to them, So they are ready, You know, for the really world and jobs. Justin. Hey, I'm gonna go to you on this question, cause both of you mentioned criminal justice reform is something that's important to you personally, but also important to the to your peers that the people that you represent..

Jesse Rappel President Trump president Hayden Pageant Texas Young Republicans Federa Champagne County Young Republi Texas NPR Lifeline. Kirk Siegler Maria Vasquez Republican Federation of Virgi Virginia From Cove Plano US Champaign
Sierra Club Denounces Founder John Muir For Racism

Environment: NPR

02:28 min | 10 months ago

Sierra Club Denounces Founder John Muir For Racism

"A historic icon of the American environmental. Movement is in the spotlight John Muir founded the Sierra Club in eighteen, ninety two in San Francisco. The group's current leaders says the ongoing civil rights protests, leading to the dismantling of confederate monuments is causing the Sierra Club to reexamine its own racist history NPR's Kirk. Siegler reports. The group is pledging to remove some of its own John Maher statues. John Muir has long been revered by environmentalists. The California naturalists Biblical love. Wild places led to a legacy of federal wilderness protections, including Yosemite National Park, but mirror was also well known for making derogatory comments about blacks and native people and the modern conservation movement has wrestled for years with these transgressions in a letter to the Sierra clubs members today, current Director Michael Brune said this moment. Moment is a time to reexamine. The clubs own substantial role in perpetuating white supremacy. Bruins says the group will reconsider the views of some of its founders that lead to the modern movement being so white today when it comes to John Muir, we're looking to advance the conversation about yours legacy to look at him in a more comprehensive and inclusive way. That acknowledges his limitations. Limitations and shortcomings, the Sierra Club says it's considering removing some monuments to its founders. Brune is also pledging that the group will reorganize to ensure that a majority of its leadership is comprised of people of Color, and he hopes to spend five million dollars on diversifying their staff and training. The announcement was welcomed by Mustafa Santiago Ali of the National Wildlife Federation. You know it's long overdue. Overdue we have to address the sins of the past. He's one of the few people of Color who's actually in a leadership position in a major environmental group that major sin of the past, many of those folks felt that those spaces those natural spaces, those sacred spaces where meant for white men Ali says the modern day environmental movements lack of diversity in its writ large. Of Communities of color has had major consequences, one example, industrial facilities are often put in underserved neighborhoods and pollution from them as drifting into national parks like those John Muir fought to establish. Kirk, siegler NPR

John Muir Sierra Club Michael Brune Mustafa Santiago Ali Kirk John Maher Siegler Sierra Clubs San Francisco Yosemite National Park National Wildlife Federation NPR Bruins Director
A Lawsuit Seeks The Removal Of The Directors For Park Service And BLM

Environment: NPR

01:58 min | 1 year ago

A Lawsuit Seeks The Removal Of The Directors For Park Service And BLM

"A lawsuit filed today seeks the removal of the controversial acting directors for two federal agencies. The agencies are in charge of millions of acres of public land energy development and the country's national parks. Npr's Kirk siegler reports the National Park Service and the Bureau of Land Management Have Not had permanent Senate confirmed directors for the entire trump presidency. That's a violation of the Constitution which requires Senate oversight of these key positions according to a lawsuit filed by to Washington DC and Idaho based conservation groups. And they're just a freewheeling detouring around the constitution in allowing these lower level political appointees to be running a show Peter Jenkins is senior counsel for Public Employees Environmental Responsibility the overall pattern is to weaken the environmental bureaus and allow state interests in private extractive industry interest particularly in the case of Bureau land-management to be able to call the shots. This lawsuit is the latest to shine light on the trump administration's unprecedented use of acting agency. Heads but the group's suing have long been suspicious of William Perry pen-li in particular leading the B. M. His temporary appointment has been extended now five times since taking over the agency last summer. Penalty once advocated for transferring ownership of the very public lands. He now manages over two states and private interests but in a recent interview. Pen-li told me that is not part of president trump's agenda regardless of what I've said in the past the one thing is clear is I'm a marine. I understand how to follow. Orders follow orders in this case in a statement the trump administration called the lawsuit that seeks to oust penalty and David Vella the park service. Baseless and a distraction as the park service in particular is trying to safely reopen national parks during the corona virus. Pandemic Kirk Siegler. Npr News Boise.

Kirk Siegler Senate Donald Trump National Park Service Public Employees Environmental NPR Bureau Of Land Management David Vella Peter Jenkins Idaho William Perry Senior Counsel Washington Boise President Trump
Bureau of Land Management Defends Move to Oil-And-Gas Town in Colorado

Environment: NPR

04:25 min | 1 year ago

Bureau of Land Management Defends Move to Oil-And-Gas Town in Colorado

"The idea had been floated for years but President. Trump is actually doing it is administration is moving the headquarters of the Bureau of land management the Federal Agency that oversees drilling mining and recreation on about a tenth of all land in the US. The agency's main foot main office is now in a traditional oil and gas town in Colorado. Npr's Kirk siegler reports the new headquarters a long way from Washington DC. Like nine thousand nine hundred miles to the small western Colorado City of Grand Junction here. It's impossible to ignore. You are surrounded by federal public. Land the towering Mesas Red Rock Canyons and the Colorado National Monument Lobby the Acting Director William Perry penalty caught flack after announcing the move because of the other tenants in this office building their Chevron upstairs and on the main floor right next to the BLM's new glass entryway Colorado's lead oil and gas lobbying firm. You can't help but notice when you walk in. This office is right next to the Colorado oil and gas the Kogo Office and I'm just thankful it's not a marijuana dispensary. There's no dearth of pot shops around here but the agency says it's also hard to find an office space where the industry doesn't have a presence. Grand Junction is surrounded by public lands. That produce a lot of oil and natural gas. You know frankly. Let's be real. The oil patch can always afford to fly to Washington and sit down with somebody in Washington. The people can't do it farmers and ranchers and people from small community and county commissioners in a crisp wight Western shirt and Black Bolo tie the six-foot-five pen-li says the General Services Administration found this space. I think the more important story is that were out here. Were in the local community and locals can come and see us and we're just a you know a short drive away from a lot of people who would never think of flying to Washington. Dc to sit down with the director for penalty. This move is about decentralizing the US government the seventy four year old attorney spent most of his career at the Conservative Mountain states legal foundation re challenged the BLM in cases representing miners ranchers and recently Utah counties who fought bears. Ears National Monument. Some Westerners have long complained that the agencies leaders in Washington are disconnected with rural resource dependent communities here in Grand Junction Mesa County. Commissioner Rose Puglisi pushed hard for the relocation we have great relationships with our local field offices but ultimately we've learned that the decisions are made in Washington DC where they don't really even know where Mesa County is or the impacts of their decisions on our economy. Puglisi is a Republican but there has been some bipartisan support in Colorado Anyway for the relocation in part because the government is moving higher paying leadership. Jobs out here but mostly. Democrats and many conservationists are fighting this. They lost a bid to strip funding for the move but they did convince the Government Accountability Office to launch an inquiry. A lot of people come here like walk. Dogs defined right in activist and environmental filmmaker. Cody Perry is in. Bangs Canyon is a popular recreation site just to the edge of the Grand Junction sprawl. Is this public lands. That belongs to not just the people here in this county but all Americans he points out that the vast majority of BLM staff is already living and working full time in the rural west any worries that removing leaders from the halls of power and DC will turn the agency into a backwater. But he thinks that's by design. I think it's an absolute effort to undermine and dismantle an agency where essentially removing institutionalized knowledge that is being basically dismantled by industry actors. That's crazy talk. There's no other way to say back at the. Blm's still mostly empty offices near the city's Small Airport Acting Director William Perry pen-li says if anything the BIELEMA staffing up to carry out the administration's public land's agenda. Why in the world would we fire? People are dismantling agency this critical to accomplish your goals like energy independence like increasing recreational access like decreasing the likelihood of wildfires all across the West but for the third straight year. President trump has proposed. Cutting the agency's budget penalty hopes to have up to forty staff here by the end of March around the time that is temporary appointment. Expires Kirk Siegler. Npr News Grand

Washington Dc Colorado Grand Junction United States Grand Junction Mesa County BLM Kirk Siegler Commissioner Rose Puglisi Cody Perry Donald Trump President Trump Acting Director William Perry NPR Colorado National Monument Lob Government Accountability Offi Bureau Of Land General Services Administratio
High Avalanche Danger Out West Affects Transportation And Ski Areas

Environment: NPR

03:49 min | 1 year ago

High Avalanche Danger Out West Affects Transportation And Ski Areas

"To another story now. It's been a chaotic couple of weeks in the rocky mountains where large avalanches have closed highways ski resorts a single storm near Salt Lake City. It triggered a record forty eight slides as NPR's Kirk siegler reports. The increased avalanche risk comes at a time when more and more people are hitting the slopes in the high country. God probably Craggy Teton Mountains of North West Wyoming steep and deep Jackson hole is as a magnet for extreme skiers right. They're buddies goading them on on Matt Beauregard. And Rick lawler drop a fifteen foot cliff in this glade. Area called the tower three shits as just a melody honestly. You were just rep around rounded bounce. Skiing inbounds inside. The patrolled boundaries of the ski resort generally thought to be safer when it comes to avalanches. That's because all season skiers. I've been packing this snow down and stabilising it. But Matt Beauregard knows that's no guarantee we've actually triggered small slides on this exact face. They may duck a rope and ski ski out of bounds into the back country. But even here at the resort. They're wearing avalanche transceivers and safety gear. Just in case education's probably the most important thing. Rick here's wearing an air bag for added protection so in the case that he is stuck inside an avalanche you'll be able to pull this cord and hopefully float to the surface inbounds or in the back country. Avalanche danger is high across the mountain west. An unusually snowy early season followed by drought than dry powder. Storms then a punch of heavy wet snow last weekend in Utah. Today's storm dumped six and a half feet in Little Cottonwood Canyon home to the snowbird and Alta resorts awards and it ended up closing little cottonwood for fifty four hours and forty eight. Avalanches were reported one of those hit. The Road Mickey Champion is a forecaster here at the Utah Avalanche Center. She recorded wind speeds up to a hundred miles an hour on Ridge tops that further destabilize the already volatile snowpack in the Wasatch satch mountains. And then you put a big wrong heavy load or a wind load on top of that it just kind of upside down. It's like a pyramid when you take out the Baser Django when you remove one of the pieces says there were no fatalities reported in Utah. But last month skiers were buried and killed in avalanches within patrolled terrain at resorts in California and Idaho. Oh all of this is putting the round. The clock work. People tasked with keeping these mountains safe under the microscope Jackson Hole. Ski Patrol Director Drew Neilan stepping into his bindings above. You can't see it in the fog now. But there's a big cirque above us here and that's Casper Bowl. All and all that terrain is avalanche terrain every morning at dawn before the tram and the Gondolas Starts Spinning Army of Nielsen's patrol or detonating explosives lives to intentionally trigger slides. Now so skiers don't later and some of these can even be detonated remotely thanks to new robot like trolleys that reach even more dangerous surest remote places. Obviously we worry about avalanches coming down into the heavily congested areas. So that's one of our biggest concerns to get that work done early. Another big concern is simply that more. People are venturing out further into areas. They normally wouldn't have thanks to improved equipment. I think people assume that we're able that. We have the ability to completely eliminate the risk of avalanches within the scary. And that's just not the case but avalanche forecasters say along with the increased risk. It comes a new cachet becoming cool to say. You've taken avalanche courses and Dir as prepared as you can be Kirk Siegler N._p._R.. News Jackson Wyoming.

Kirk Siegler Rick Lawler Matt Beauregard Utah Utah Avalanche Center Craggy Teton Mountains North West Wyoming Salt Lake City Little Cottonwood Canyon NPR Skiing Forecaster Jackson Hole Wyoming Casper Bowl Drew Neilan Nielsen Alta Director Idaho
Feds May Open Utah National Monuments For Mining And Drilling

Environment: NPR

01:55 min | 1 year ago

Feds May Open Utah National Monuments For Mining And Drilling

"In southern Utah. The trump administration's finalized. Its plan to remove protections from bears ears and other land designated as national monuments. The announcement comes despite an ongoing legal legal challenge by native American Tribes Tribes Argue. The White House acted illegally by dramatically shrinking stabbed boundaries. NPR's Kirk Siegler. has this update. It's been more than two years. Since president trump flew to salt lake city and signed an order that became the largest reversal of national monument protections in US history located in price Utah Canyon country the Clinton Era Grand Staircase Escalante. National Monument was cut nearly in half and bears years designated by President. Obama among went from one point three million acres to about two hundred thousand. The monuments were opposed by. Utah's influential rural Republican. County commissioners who worried read the added protections would stifle ranching and mining these new management plans restore balance. Says Casey Hammond. He's an acting assistant secretary at the department amount of interior. With these decisions. We are advancing our goal to restore trust and be a good neighbor. Many native American tribes who pushed for protections at bears ears in particular. You're seeing differently. We find that this is an ongoing failure to meaningfully consult with tribes owner. Keeler with the group Utah the neighbor Kia says protections are now going away for land full of sacred artifacts Barrio sites and other cultural resources seems to be an indicator. The treatment of indigenous peoples in the United States the president's authority to Shrink National Monuments. The act remains in dispute. The Nineteen O. Six Law says has presidents can designate monuments but legal experts have widely held that only congress has the power to abolish or downsize them tribes and conservationists say these management plans should be on hold until the courts. Way in Kirk Siegler N._p._R.

Utah President Trump National Monument Acting Assistant Secretary Shrink National Monuments United States Kirk Siegler Clinton Era Grand Staircase Es Utah Canyon Barack Obama Salt Lake City Kirk Siegler. Donald Trump White House NPR Congress Keeler KIA
Scientists Studying Extreme Winds And Wildfires

Environment: NPR

03:02 min | 1 year ago

Scientists Studying Extreme Winds And Wildfires

"In southern California a rare extreme red flag warning is in effect high winds make wildfires more dangerous. NPR's Kirk siegler reports that scientists are linking wind conditions to climate change this story about wildfires extreme win starts with snow supposed to get about a foot today climate scientists Daniels key mountains so what does that have to do with dangerous California wildfires it turns out everything and it's that extremely cold air mass to the east of California it's driving the extreme wins and the extreme fire weather conditions in that state right now swain says the prolonged warming in the Arctic is his dry season is ending but climate change is causing the traditional winter rainy season here to shorten dramatically and Swain says California is a lot hotter vegetation extreme winds like these make wildfires much harder to control let alone even fight especially as embers or igniting new fires more than a mile or more ahead of the initial wall of flames that's why tens of thousands of people have faced evacuation orders across California the wind Ribbon Getty fire ignited in densely populated west Los Angeles early Monday. La Fire Chief Roth Terrazas warned the winds could reverse all the progress aide building containment lines this is a record setting event and a big worries that choppers will be grounded due to it being too dangerous to fly that is a new fire starts forecasting has gotten a lot better fire managers are better prepared to deploy engines to the most at risk neighborhoods ahead of the winds understands why the authorities are being so cautious due to the winds especially for me it's hard to get out and I don't want to impose on anybody I'd rather be safe than sorry extreme

California Swain Los Angeles Chief Roth Terrazas Kirk Siegler NPR Arctic Getty
"kirk siegler" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:13 min | 2 years ago

"kirk siegler" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Are subject to a sixty day. Public comment period. Kirk siegler, NPR news. You're listening to all things considered from NPR news. Partisan divisions have been deepening on Capitol Hill for years, one. Longstanding exception, though, has been the House Armed Services committee for fifty eight years straight. It has passed a big annual defense policy Bill with broad bipartisan support, but as that panel met today to hammer out this year's national defense authorization, Bill, it was very different picture. NPR's David welna has a story. All right. The committee will come to order, welcome all went House Armed Services committee, chairman Adam Smith gavelled in today's markup as the defense policy. Bills final drafting session is known the Washington state democrat had appointed reminder for the panels fifty seven members this committee, I think has an incredibly bipartisan tradition, and tradition of understanding how important it is for us to pass this Bill MAC, Thornberry, Texas Republican, who had to relinquish the chairman's gavel to Smith this year. Sounded a tad less optimistic. I've gotta confess at the beginning. I have some worry of the possibility of a partisan outcome this year. And that's because democrat drafted defense, Bill reject some key Trump administration defense policies while it authorizes seven hundred thirty three billion dollars for defense outlays next year. That's seventeen billion dollars less than what the White House wants the Bill bans spending any military money for walling off the border with Mexico. It also bans, sending anymore war cap. Gives to Guantanamo in separate breakfast meetings, this week with reporters committee chairman Smith and ranking member Thornberry. We're like two boxers talking up their prospects before a big prize fight. Here's Smith playing down the Democrats differences with Republicans, the amount of stuff to disagree on his probably about two percent of the Bill. I don't know about two percent and that's aren't very undercutting Smith. One thing both lawmakers agree on. Is that one issue dramatically divides, the panel, along party lines? It's whether so called low yield nuclear weapons meaning bombs not big enough to destroy entire cities should be loaded onto submarines, the Trump administration wants those low yield nuclear weapons to deter, the Russians or Chinese from using similar weapons, ah policy, Thornberry supports, it is more effective to say, we've got something to match you at whatever level you trust. Don't try buddy. That's what we have to convey. But the Bill, the committee's voting on today. Would ban arming submarines with low yield nukes? The issue was debated last week during a contentious session of the strategic forces subcommittee. The chairman Tennessee democrat, Jim Cooper argued such nuclear weapons likely would never be used that they'd be displacing the submarines more conventional missiles, I hope that members realized that adding a small number of low yield weapons to our submarines will actually decrease not increase our strategic power by subtracting priceless missile tubes. And by risking exposure of our submarines to attack, Wyoming, Republican, Liz Cheney offered an amendment removing the ban on submarine base, low yield nukes, not to do, so she said, would send this bad message to the nation's adversaries keep moving forward with your stabilizing policies, because the democratic majority in the house seems unwilling to do what is necessary to keep this nation safe in an outcome. More reminiscent of a supreme court nomination fight. Cheney's amendment was rejected in a straight party line vote for high Republican Mike Turner. It was a turning point. There is not one member on this side of the aisle that will be voting for the subcommittee, Mark. And this will be a I it would also be I should the entire defense Bill, the approved along party lines later tonight and outcome that could cloud the prospects for this must pass legislation. Getting an acted fifty ninth year straight.

House Armed Services committee Bill MAC Adam Smith chairman Bill Thornberry NPR Liz Cheney Kirk siegler White House Guantanamo Washington David welna Texas Mark
"kirk siegler" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:57 min | 2 years ago

"kirk siegler" Discussed on KCRW

"Morning edition from NPR news. I'm Rachel Martin. And I'm Steve Inskeep. Last week's mass shooting. A New Zealand was an extreme example of white nationalist violence. But while it's extreme it is not alone. White hate ideology is rising around the globe. And especially in the United States NPR's. Kirk siegler reports it's a common misconception that your average. White supremacist is some disaffected white guy with economic anxieties, according to Kathy Blee who studies white extremism at the university of Pittsburgh, her research shows middle-class and even upper middle class men from the mainstream are increasingly getting drawn into this movement, which is mostly online and worldwide we reached her while traveling through the Detroit airport. Very casual viewers initially, and they get pulled into these very extreme idea, Lisa's, this online world is a lot more convoluted and complicated than we think. People who are already spending huge amounts of time online discover or are recruited into racist communities, and they become radicalized and some are prone to act on this anger urgently world can treat people who are aimless marginalized isolated and quite extreme shaking was as horrified as the next person about the murders at the New Zealand mosques. But maybe not as surprised here in the US. There's been a spike in white supremacists. Motivated violence and murders. According to the Anti-Defamation League, ideologically motivated extremists killed at least fifty people in the US last year. According to preliminary figures in all, but one of those murders had at least some link to right wing, extremism, just one. According to a recent report. Was blamed on his Llamas, extremism and therein lies another widespread and dangerous misconception says Brian Levin, he heads the center for the study of hate and extremism at Cal State, San Bernardino, this threat of homegrown, far right-wing white nationalism terrorism and extremism is the most prominent threat since two thousand fifteen Levin says Islamist extremism directed at westerners has dropped that movement has splintered as white extremism has strengthened. And during these periods of polarization, and when there is declining trust and communal institutions who gets targeted immigrants foreigners people of color and Jews speaking to reporters after the attacks. President Trump said he didn't believe white nationalism is on the rise. Experts say the hard numbers prove the opposite where we're not getting much if any national leadership in terms of route to respond to hate and extremism at Chapman university in Southern Cal. California sociology professor Pete seamy says whether intentional or not President Trump. Also speaks the language of white supremacists. When he makes derogatory remarks about immigrants in the countries they come from and repeatedly talks about a quote invasion at the US Mexican border. He did. So again on Friday when vetoing Congress's attempt to block his emergency declaration. We're on track for a million illegal aliens to Russia borders, people hate the word invasion. But that's what it is. When you have a president who's endorsing those ideas, and and using that kind of language, it does send the message that hey, you know, this is not only permissible it's encouraged after the New Zealand attack. A White House spokesperson called it. Outrageous to make any connection to Trump saying the president has repeatedly condemned bigotry and racism, Kirk siegler, NPR news, Los Angeles. It's morning edition from NPR news. I'm Steve Inskeep. And I'm Rachel Martin. On.

President Trump NPR US Steve Inskeep Rachel Martin Kirk siegler New Zealand White House Brian Levin New Zealand mosques president Anti-Defamation League Kathy Blee Lisa Congress Chapman university Russia California San Bernardino
"kirk siegler" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

01:36 min | 2 years ago

"kirk siegler" Discussed on Here & Now

"He aside from the eleven victims that have not been named yet who were in the bar. He Lewis was a first responder he arrived within about a few minutes of the first reports of gunfire. And just a few minutes later. The sheriff told us he entered with the state highway patrol officer with him. He loses a twenty nine year veteran of the police force. He the sheriff described him as a good guy and a hero and was hoping to retire soon. He was shot. He he tried to engage the shooter and he was shot. He died at a local hospital and here shortly. We're expecting a procession which will be of course, well, attended, but that from law enforcement from the local hospital or is that too funeral home. He was a couple years away from retiring. The sergeant a rather the sheriff Jeff dean is retiring tomorrow. Look we also hear that there were a security guard. There was a security guard at the door. And there are a couple inside. All of them reportedly shot by the shooter. Yes. I mean, it we have not had an update for a couple of hours now from the authorities. So it's been difficult to confirm as I said, it's a very active situation as you might expect police are being pretty tight lipped because it's an active situation. We do know the gunman is believed to have died from the gun self inflicted, gunshot wound. And we're hoping to learn more information soon about who some of the rest of these victims were that'll be very sad moment. NPR's Kirk siegler. Thank you very much. You're.

Lewis Kirk siegler Jeff dean officer NPR twenty nine year
"kirk siegler" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:49 min | 2 years ago

"kirk siegler" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Incident. Kids part of the horrors that are happening in our country and everywhere, and I think it's impossible to put any logic or any sense to the senseless thirteen people are dead. That is what we know so far, and let's work through what happened when with NPR's Kirk siegler who is on the scene. Kirk would you just work through having heard law enforcement officials having spoken with eye-witnesses how did this incident begin? And where well, Steve as you just said, we heard there from the Ventura County sheriff that press conference is still wrapping up right shortly. Few steps from where I am. And I'm across the street from the borderline bar there were apparently a number of college students in the bar for a regular event that happens here, we're told on Wednesday evenings and sometime shortly before midnight Pacific time. There was gunfire. I've been talking to eyewitnesses streaming out and people who are in the bar just describing a very, you know, as you say an all too familiar scene in a harrowing scene people getting out not knowing what's going on at one woman at one point told me that you know, she was dancing on the dance floor, and then it became very clear that there was all this noise and commotion and it was no longer music and they docked and they ducked under bar stools. And then they were able to run out, unfortunately. And and get out here where I'm standing and kind of ducked behind cars. The authorities have secured the scene as we should be clear about that. But for a while there a couple of hours, even even while I was when I got to the scene, it was still very chaotic. And no one knew exactly what was happening. And no one knew if this neighborhood even was safe. What descriptions do you have at the gunman Kirk? I we can't speculate at this time, we know, of course, that the the gunman is a deceased the Ventura County sheriff just told the media scrum that I just ran over from saying that we just don't have any more information at this time in terms of motives or anything else. He did say the word this could be or they're going to have to investigate whether this is a terrorist incident because this is the era that we live in he said, but there are no indications that this terrorist incident, and there still very much under investigation. Okay. So we're talking about one individual here so far. No granting that it's early. Is that right? That's right. That's right. There was no go ahead. And this is a heavily armed individual any description of the weapons notice scriptures yet of the weapons, but we know there were obviously there was a lot of gunfire in there. A eleven Bargo hours were killed. There.

Kirk siegler Ventura County NPR Steve
"kirk siegler" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:06 min | 2 years ago

"kirk siegler" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Chris Freeman we are focusing on getting a good, deal for a win win win overcome for the long term we have our is resolutely on that prize and we are not focusing on or responding to any other factory on Monday the US. And Mexico reached a tentative deal on a revamp regional pack that excludes Canada America's second. Largest trading partner President Trump has set a Friday deadline for Canada to come up with a. New agreement federal prosecutors have charged a California man for making violent threats against employees at the Boston Globe Newspaper as NPR's Kirk siegler tells, us the incident stems from a. Coordinated editorial campaign by newspapers nationwide to denounce threats against journalists the thirties. Charged. Sixty eight year. Old Robert chain of Los, Angeles for making threats against the Boston Globe newsroom after the paper organized a national campaign to. Denounce President Trump's verbal attacks on reporters at political rallies and on Twitter prosecutors say chain, made more than a dozen threatening phone calls the newspaper over a twelve. Day period he allegedly referred, to the. Globe as the quote enemy of the people a term the, president, has used. To describe journalists further chain is alleged to have threatened to kill, newspaper employs and specifically on the day the actual editorial was published prosecutors say he called the globe and threatened to shoot employees in the head he could face up to five years in prison. And a two hundred and fifty thousand dollar fine Kirk siegler NPR news Los Angeles stocks. Finished lower on Wall Street ending a four day winning streak this is NPR and this is WNYC, in New York I'm Sean Carlson city council members drug policy advocates rallied out front of city. Hall against mayor de Blasio and the NYPD's new marijuana enforcement strategy the. Policy will mean a ticket for marijuana smoking not. An arrest that's unless the smokers on probation or parole has. An existing warrant a documented, history of violence or has no, benefit Chris Alexander is with the drug policy alliance he says the Blasios. New policy just expands racially discriminatory policing practices by this carve outs that focus on specific populations he's. Essentially just, sharpening the, tool that they've already had to focus their, enforcement the NYPD's new marijuana enforcement. Strategy goes into effect this Saturday The city released a. New plan for its Brooklyn and queens waterfront streetcar project WNYC Stephen s. reports the new plan. Shrinks the route and increases the cost the two point seven billion dollar Brooklyn queens. Connector or BQ x. would run streetcars for. Eleven miles between red hook and a story ah the plan now cut out sunset park entirely, which the, report says. Saves money plus they've got the archery in any way mayor Bill de. Blasio says still almost half a, million people. Live near the root is the shape of things to come we need more mass transit and the. Center of gravity is cities moving to Brooklyn queens, the plan relies on yet to be allocated federal funding is only five percent designed and isn't expected to be completed for over a. Decade a north jersey towns controversial decision to. Bar nonresidents, from using its streets during rush hour has been struck down earlier this year leonia issued an ordinance to. Stop out of town commuters from using its streets to bypass rush hour traffic, GW bridge but today a judge ruled that the. Restrictions were Valid because it applied the. Streets leading to a state road and the town hadn't gotten approval from the state transportation department in a statement Yup mayor Judas. Ziegler says the plan plans to appeal or the town plans to appeal the decision in the, meantime he, says he'll. Work on new ordinances that reflect the judge's ruling World renowned dance choreographer Paul Taylor has died he. Was eighty eight years old, WNYC's, dance critic marina harsh says she inspired generations of choreographers it. Was something about his imagination, that made young dancers feel like dance with the way that they could really express themselves is dance company has an annual three week season at Lincoln. Center. For, the rest of this evening here area we could see some rain otherwise increasing clouds tonight. With a low, of about seventy two degrees this.

Boston Globe Newspaper President Trump marijuana Brooklyn mayor de Blasio Kirk siegler WNYC NPR NYPD Boston Globe Chris Alexander Chris Freeman Mexico US Canada California marina harsh Ziegler president
"kirk siegler" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:34 min | 2 years ago

"kirk siegler" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Live from NPR news in Washington. I'm Shay Stevens two top Trump administration public land's managers are touring the destruction from the car fire in northern California NPR's Kirk siegler reports that interior secretary Ryan Zinke and agriculture secretary Sonny, Perdue say that more active forest management will help prevent massive places like the ones burning in California agriculture secretary Sonny. Perdue, who oversees the US forest service says that better forest management, to mitigate against wildfire threats doesn't mean, clear cutting forests we're talking about prescribed burns and safe period of time in the, year where we can, reduce the fuel load, where these, fires just, don't take off and get so hot and so. Devastating creating their own weather systems, produce better management of forests will also improve water quality and help rural timber dependent economies now this has long been a, bipartisan argument among many western lawmakers but one hurdle. Has always been, infrastructure. Whether, there are enough mills still an opera To handle. All this timber even if it was easy, to log Kirk siegler NPR news the state of Nebraska, plans to proceed with its first execution. In twenty one years Tuesday despite legal challenges to companies that make the drugs to, be used in the lethal injection, say their, court battle to stop. The execution is not over grant girl lack of any t. news has that story it would also be, Nebraska's first ever lethal injection sixty year old Carrie dean Moore was convicted of murdering two cab drivers. In Omaha in nineteen seventy nine. The state plans to carry out his death sentence with an untried four drug combination a German pharmaceutical company went to court to try to stop the state from using its products for lethal, injection but those appeals were denied a second company filed its own complaint but the judge in that case will not. Make, an immediate ruling there is one more legal challenge from the, ACLU of Nebraska they're asking the state, supreme court to intervene arguing that after thirty Eight years on death row more is effectively serving a life sentence for. NPR news, I'm, grant girl lock Florida's stand your ground law is back in the spotlight this time over, racially charged shooting, in Clearwater forty. Eight year old Michael Drako who is, white is charged with killing motorists marquees mcglockton. Who was black attorney Kelly McCabe represents the mcglockton family they did. The right thing in this case and they chose the right charge they didn't succumb to. Any pressure either way to either overcharge or undercharged they looked at the case law. And the law that we have in Florida and this case is a manslaughter charge Drake is is being held, on one hundred thousand dollars. Bail it's unclear whether he has legal, representation Florida's standard ground law gained national attention in two thousand twelve. And it protests over police handling of the fatal shooting of. A black teenager by a neighborhood watch volunteer, this is NPR news Multiple interim police Commissioner Gary tuggle says the officer videotaped while punching a. Man has resigned taco. Calls the unnamed officers. Actions disturbing and unacceptable and says investigators are considering assault charges the weekend incident comes at three years. After Baltimore was in the national spotlight over the death of Freddie gray in police custody. Riots broke out after grace funeral. And six officers were charged in his death, one case ended in mistrial three. Ended in acquittals and the remaining charges were dropped President Trump and fire. Top aide Omarosa manigault Newman are in a war of words as NPR's timber. Keith reports Trump is responding to manacle. Newman's media tour to promote her tell all book about being. In the White House perhaps it was. Inevitable that a relationship that began on the set of a reality TV show has devolved into a feud playing out in TV interviews and tweets in her book and. In interviews manigault Newman And calls Trump racist. And says he has dementia, she's released audio she secretly recorded of herself in. Conversation with chief of staff John Kelly and also Trump in a series of tweets, the president describes manigault Newman as wacky nasty vicious not smart and a loser she was among. The, highest paid aids in the Trump White House and the president tweeted that. He kept her around because she only said great. Things about him until she got fired tamra Keith NPR news on Asian stock market shares are mixed up nearly two percent in Tokyo following a.

NPR Omarosa manigault Newman Florida Kirk siegler Nebraska Trump White House Trump secretary Keith NPR Perdue California Drake US Ryan Zinke Sonny president Washington Shay Stevens Omaha
"kirk siegler" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:36 min | 2 years ago

"kirk siegler" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Kevin, Wilson's. New book that's unfair share First. News Live from NPR news. In Washington I'm Jack. Speer President Donald Trump has signed a record defense spending Bill the seven hundred sixteen billion dollar measure named for Senator John McCain signed into law by the, president today speaking at, four drama New York state Trump without mentioning the AirAsia under Senator who's battling. Brain cancer so the measure will help replace aging tanks planes and ships is. Authors Asian we'll give America's warfighters. The firepower they need to win any conflict quickly. And decisively the Bill also authorizes billions of dollars for military. Construction projects the Bill provides no money for Trump's requested, space force but does authorize the. Military parade he wants in Washington, in November two of the Trump administration's top public land's managers are in northern California touring the destruction from the car fire and meeting with federal and, state firefighters and Kirk siegler reports, interior secretary, Ryan Zinke Agriculture secretary Sonny Perdue say. That more active. Forest management will help prevent firefighters firefighters like those in California agriculture secretary. Sonny Perdue who. Oversees. The US forest service says that better forest management to mitigate against wildfire threats doesn't mean clear cutting forests. We're talking about prescribed burns enough safe period of, time in the year, where we can reduce fuel load where these fires just don't take off and. Get so hot in.

Speer President Donald Trump Sonny Perdue secretary Trump Senator John McCain Washington California Brain cancer NPR Senator Kevin US Kirk siegler president Ryan Zinke Wilson America New York AirAsia seven hundred sixteen billion
"kirk siegler" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:33 min | 3 years ago

"kirk siegler" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The idea is to bring services directly to neighborhoods that you're seeing an alarming increase in people living on the streets npr's kirk siegler reports it also spreads around the responsibility there's long been criticism that low income housing and homeless shelters get clustered in poor neglected neighborhoods and this is by no means just in l a phenomenon but the city's new bridge home initiative could turn the paradigm on its head by decentralising and spreading out services around the city los angeles mayor eric garcetti says the humanitarian crisis is at the breaking point and it's touching everyone everywhere today there are people are gonna bathroom on the street people who are camping on the sidewalk people who are being assaulted overdosing that we know bring them indoors is the first step but already there's been loud opposition in some of the first neighborhoods picked to house these new temporary shelters love his choice residents of the koreatown neighborhood held this protest outside city hall in venice beach john dasche has been organizing his neighbors to find another shelter propose just two blocks from the ocean worries it will hurt property values having lived in venice now for ten years these people that are homeless are not just homeless they're drug addicts and they're also mentally unstable their dangerous so the early roll out of bridge home has been rocky in places not in my backyard or nimby 'isms a perennial barrier when it comes to building any low income housing says korean scully she's an expert who studies this at the washington dc based urban institute i do think that they're perched being taken his rather unique let's because the city can largely circumvent nimby opposition because the shelters are on city owned property and existing zoning laws will be waived at least facilities will have targeted services mental health counselors social workers housing and job placement but scalise sees a broader public relations strategy at play behind bridge home too i think that there's a human story here where the the city is also perhaps trying to affect attitudes and to help people see these individuals experiencing homelessness last as nuisance and more as a neighbor for sure there has been support for building these temporary shelters at public meetings to even in some of la's more tony neighborhoods mayor garcetti says nimby ism grabs the headlines but overall given how bad the situation is here he thinks the city is moving past it even in some neighborhoods where people are saying i don't want this particular location they're saying but i do want something in the neighborhood so if it's not if but when shelters will be built the question now is whether they will be used one morning this week at a large encampment next to the hollywood freeway i met harvey who refused to give me his last name because instead he feared for his safety out here is a waste of taxpayer money one of the new shelters this proposed a few blocks from here but harvey says he'd rather see the money spent on tiny houses in the secured area in one of the vacant lots nearby have on bring those little micro homes there you go we got shelter not a building and plus we got privacy and that's the thing that they're trying to do they're trying to take away your privacy harvey as a tent and lives in it it's where he stores all of his stuff and he says that's where he'll likely remain kirk siegler npr news los angeles time now for story cores military voices initiative recording the story is veterans and their loved ones today story of courage on an off the battlefield we'll hear from vietnam era vets who share another kind of sisterhood shimmer connell and christian we'd are transgender women at insert transition plus fifty eight i guess that was fifty how'd you family except you well my son disown me he told his mother that he wanted to deal with the freak so i'll get to talk to my grandson or my granddaughter my family's similar to yours your daughter disown you both my daughter yeah yeah growing up i always knew there was something different i didn't like to say the other boys did they wanted to play army and cowboys and indians i won't be the girl in a wagon was sewing and making right but you know i had to be who.

npr kirk siegler ten years
"kirk siegler" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:31 min | 3 years ago

"kirk siegler" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Neighborhoods that are seen an alarming increase in people living on the streets npr's kirk siegler reports it also spreads around the responsibility there's longman criticism that low income housing and homeless shelters get clustered in poor neglected neighborhoods and this is by no means just in l a phenomenon but the city's new bridge home initiative could turn the paradigm on its head by decentralising and spreading out services around the city los angeles mayor eric garcetti says the humanitarian crisis is at the breaking point and it's touching everyone everywhere today there are people are going to bathroom on the street people who are camping on the sidewalk people who are being assaulted overdosing that we know bringing them indoors is the first step but already there's been loud position in some of the first neighborhoods picked to house these new temporary shelters what choice residents of the koreatown neighborhood held this protest outside city hall in venice beach john dasche has been organizing his neighbors to fight another shelter propose just two blocks from the ocean worries it will hurt property values having lived in venice now for ten years these people that are homeless are not just homeless they're drug addicts and they're also mentally unstable they're dangerous so the early roll out of a bridge home has been rocky in places not in my backyard or nimby 'isms a perennial barrier when it comes to building any low income housing says korean scally she's an expert who studies this at the washington dc based urban institute i do think that they're perched being taken his rather unique let's because the city can largely circumvent nimby opposition because these shelters are on city owned property and existing zoning laws will be waived at least facilities will have targeted services mental health counselors social workers housing and job placement but scalise sees a broader public relations strategy at play behind the bridge home too i think that there's a human story here where the the city is also perhaps trying to affect attitudes and to help people see these individuals experiencing homelessness lasts as a nuisance and more as a neighbor for sure there has been support for building these temporary shelters at public meetings to even in some of la's more tony neighborhoods mayor garcetti says nimby ism grabs the headlines but overall given how bad the situation is here he thinks the city is moving past it even in some neighborhoods where people are saying i don't want this particular location they're saying but i do want something in the neighborhood so if it's not if but when shelters will be built the question now is whether they will be used one morning this week at a large encampment next to the hollywood freeway i met harvey who refused to give me his last name because instead he feared for his safety out here is a waste of taxpayer money one of the new shelters this proposed a few blocks from here but harvey says he'd rather see the money spent on tiny houses in the secured area in one of the vacant lots nearby have on bring those little micro homes there you go we got shelter not a building and plus we've got privacy and that's the thing that they're trying to do they're trying to take the where your privacy harvey as ten and lives in it it's where he stores all of his stuff and he says that's where he'll likely remain kirk siegler npr news los angeles time now for story chorus military voices initiative recording the stories of veterans and their loved ones today story of courage on an off the battlefield we'll hear from to vietnam era vet who share another kind of sisterhood shimmer connell and christian we'd are transgender women insert transition tossed fifty eight i guess that was fifty how'd you family except you well my son disowned me he told his mother that he wanted to do with the freak so i'll get to talk to my grandson or my granddaughter my family's similar to yours your daughter does on both my daughter yeah rabs growing up i always knew there was something different i didn't like to say the other boys did they wanna play army and cowboys and indians and i won't be the girl in a wagon that was sewing and making copies right but you know i had to be who.

npr kirk siegler ten years
"kirk siegler" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:42 min | 3 years ago

"kirk siegler" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The city los angeles mayor eric garcetti says the humanitarian crisis is at the breaking point and it's touching everyone everywhere today there are people are going to bathroom on the street people who are camping on the sidewalk people who are being assaulted overdosing that we know bringing them indoors is the first step but already there's been loud opposition in some of the first neighborhoods pick to house these new temporary shelters ever residents of the koreatown neighborhood held this protest outside city hall in venice beach john dash has been organizing his neighbors to fight another shelter propose just two blocks from the ocean worries it will hurt property values having lived in venice now for ten years these people that are homeless are not just homeless they're drug addicts and they're also mentally unstable they're dangerous so the early roll out of a bridge home has been rocky in places not in my backyard or nimby 'isms a perennial barrier when it comes to building any low income housing says korean scully she's an expert who studies this at the washington dc based urban institute i do think that they're perched being taken his rather unique let's because the city can largely circumvent nimby opposition because these shelters are on city owned property and existing zoning laws will be waived at least facilities will have targeted services mental health counselors social workers housing and job placement but scally sees a broader public relations strategy at play behind bridge home too i think that there's a human story here where the the city is also perhaps trying to affect attitudes and to help people see these individuals experiencing homelessness last as a nuisance and more as a neighbor for sure there has been support for building these temporary shelters at public meetings to even in some of la's more tony neighborhoods mayor garcetti says nimby ism grabs the headlines but overall given how bad the situation is here he thinks the city is moving past it even in some neighborhoods where people are saying i don't want this particular location they're saying but i do want something in the neighborhood so if it's not if but when shelters will be built the question now is whether they will be used one morning this week at a large encampment next to the hollywood freeway i met harvey who refused to give me his last name because he said he feared for his safety out here it's a waste of taxpayer money one of the new shelters this proposed a few blocks from here but harvey says he'd rather see the money spent on tiny houses in the secured area in one of the vacant lots nearby have on bring those little micro homes there you go we got shelter not building and plus we've got privacy and that's the thing that they're trying to do they're trying to take away your privacy hurry as a tent and lives in it it's where he stores all of his stuff and he says that's where he'll likely remain kirk siegler npr news los angeles time now for story core military voices initiative recording the story is veterans and their loved ones today story of courage on and off the battlefield we'll hear from vietnam era vets who share another kind of sisterhood shimmy connell and christian we'd are transgender women didn't transition plus fifty eight i guess i was fifty how'd you family except you well my son disown me he told his mother that he wanted to do with the freak so i'll get to talk to my grandson or my granddaughter my family's similar to yours your daughter disown you both my daughter yeah rods growing up i always knew there was something different i didn't like to say the other boys get they wanted to play army and cowboys and indians and i won't be the girl in a wagon was sewing and making copies right but you i had to be who i wasn't so they can survive i spent fifteen years in the army and i enlisted of all places as a paratrooper going to the eighty second airborne division and the unit was in the soldiers were pretty hard charging so that was image edge portray i didn't start worrying women's clothes until i was out of the military i wouldn't do it because oh military yeah but then we minute to translate support group yeah the va support group and we started joking and then just like picking at each other people said well you guys really are sisters.

eric garcetti los angeles eighty second fifteen years ten years
"kirk siegler" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:49 min | 3 years ago

"kirk siegler" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Sleeping on warm blankets on the ground health and safety concerns are growing especially for the many kids and aid workers in the mexican authorities are urging people to move to nearby shelters while they wait in line to see if they can be processed for asylum whether police will begin forcing them to move with a heavier hand is an open question kirk siegler npr news san diego the puerto rico national guard is expressing sorrow after the crash of one of its c one thirty cargo planes near savannah georgia this morning as many as nine people were on board officials have so far confirmed five dead air force master sergeant roger parson says the plane was on a training mission and belong to the one hundred fifty six they're wing out of puerto rico echo where brothers and sisters we we supported one another in these missions and so no matter who it is you know it it hurts us when something like this happens and it affects all of us they cargo plane crashed around eleven thirty this morning shortly after taking off from georgia on route to arizona in new jersey a bill requiring employers to offer workers paid sick leave has been signed into law by the state's new democratic governor governor phil murphy says workers should not have to choose between getting a day's pay or going to work sick legislation has been in the works for years stocks finished lower on wall street today you're listening to npr news this is wnyc in new york i'm jamie floyd a bill headed to the governor's desk takes aim at some outdated language in new york law wnyc's alex hamilton reports the new york state senate and assembly both voted unanimously in favor of the legislation which would replace the words fireman or policeman or any variation of them with firefighter and police officer regina wilson has been in new york city firefighter for nineteen years she says.

kirk siegler savannah georgia roger parson governor governor phil murphy new york jamie floyd alex hamilton senate regina wilson san diego puerto rico arizona npr officer nineteen years
"kirk siegler" Discussed on NPR News Now

NPR News Now

02:12 min | 3 years ago

"kirk siegler" Discussed on NPR News Now

"Support for planet money and the following message come from i shares because the best preparation for tomorrow is building for your future today i shares by black rock inspired to build live from npr news in washington i'm shay stevens the trump administration is refusing to speculate on the fate of the rest of the asylum seekers currently camped out in tijuana mexico npr's kirk siegler reports vice president mike pence toward a california border area yesterday speaking of border patrol agents and collect so california vice president mike pence called the caravan an attempt to undermine us law he said the migrants who say they're fleeing violence in countries like honduras and el salvador are victims but they're being exploited by quote open border activists and an agenda controlled media pence also says that thanks to the cooperation of the mexican government the caravan than had numbered close to a thousand was now less than one hundred and fifty people about two hours west of where the vice president spoke dozens of migrants including many small children and babies camped on a warn plaza on the tijuana side of the border crossing they sleep on blankets and wait kirk siegler npr news tijuana the justice department has filed a criminal complaint against eleven members of the caravan of central american migrants according to a federal court complaint filed yesterday the defendants were apprehended by border patrol agents in the san diego area it alleges the defendants referred to as aliens illegally enter the us and tried to allude examination by immigration officers a justice department statement says the defendants are separate on the first eight caravan members allowed into the us for processing of their asylum claims secretary of state mike pompeo says the us is trying to fix the nuclear deal with iran speaking at joint base andrews pompeo was asked about is really claims to have documents proving that iran lie about its weapons program and plans to build a nuclear warhead and other people talking about these documents not being benthic i can confirm for you that these documents are real they're authentic iran's foreign minister calls the israeli leader's comments propaganda president trump has set a may twelve deadline for deciding whether to pool.

president andrews pompeo mike pompeo san diego tijuana california kirk siegler tijuana mexico npr washington iran us justice department mexican government el salvador honduras mike pence vice president