17 Burst results for "Kirk Cara"

"kirk cara" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:36 min | 2 weeks ago

"kirk cara" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Future students for NPR news. I'm Kirk Cara Plaza in Boston. The Dow is up 130 points at last check. This is NPR news Live from KQED News. I'm Raquel Maria Dylan. San Jose Mayor Sam Accardo is putting out a call for volunteers to help the city and Santa Clara County get the word out about the Corona virus vaccine. They're especially trying to reach eligible Latino residents who have borne the brunt of the cove. It 19 devastation. We particularly volunteers to speak Spanish and other languages who can help us and outreach. Aunt to ensure that we are getting information to everyone, according to county data of the 144,000, Santa Clara County residents over 65 who've received a first dose Only 8% are Latino. That's despite the fact that Latinos make up more than a half of the county's covert 19 infections and 28% of deaths. The Alameda County Sheriff's Office began administering vaccinations to its staff yesterday. But look defenders, district attorneys and officers with other law enforcement agencies are eligible to receive vaccinations at the sheriff's office in Dublin. Sheriff spokesman Sergeant Ray Kelly. It's an act of kindness to get the vaccine. The best thing that you could do for your community to keep other people say. Kelly says. The sheriff's Department is expected to start vaccinating inmates at the Santa Rita jail next week. State workplace safety regulators find the Alameda County Sheriff's Department last month after two employees died of covert 19 in July..

Raquel Maria Dylan Kelly Alameda County Sheriff's Depar 28% Dublin next week Boston NPR 144,000 Santa Clara County two employees Alameda County Sheriff's Offic 130 points last month KQED News July yesterday Santa Rita Spanish sheriff's Department
"kirk cara" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

02:06 min | 3 weeks ago

"kirk cara" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Mention of the relentless rise of the stock market. A recent signs of market froth, including some surging prices for stocks, like games stop another company's targeted by retail investors. Nearly half of all college students and new national survey are reporting symptoms of depression or anxiety. This past fall Member station GBH in Boston, Kirk Cara Pensa has more Healthy mind study surveyed 33,000 students and found 47% of students showed signs of depression and or anxiety. Eight intense students said their mental health has negatively affected their academic performance. Boston University. Sarah Lipson, co authored the study. And, she says that's the highest rate since the annual surveys began in 2007, the burnout the monotony of what we've been doing for nearly a year now there's this stress of what this is actually done to our brains and our neural pathways. For the first time, the survey as students about loneliness, two thirds said they feel isolated from others, sometimes or often for NPR news. I'm Kirk Cara Pensa in Boston Kudo features prices closed, higher Oil up 32. Cents a bale to 58 68 a barrel in New York. I'm Jack Spear, NPR news. Support for NPR comes from NPR stations. Other contributors include I Drive with remote PC, providing remote access to PCs, Max and servers from anywhere. Assisting those working from home and also enabling remote assistance for customers at remote PC dot com. Thank you for joining me. For all things considered on 90.3 k A Z, you and KZ you dad Organ Happy to be with you and Mary Jane Peter's support for Casey. You comes from Santa Cruz Montessori school, nurturing, learning through Discovery collaboration and community hosting online tours of their programs for Children 18 months through 14 years old. Information at a CMS dot org's The time is 506..

"kirk cara" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:30 min | Last month

"kirk cara" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Most immediately. There's unequal access, how straight up expensive it can be and now decreasing demand. A study from McKinsey says the number of high school graduates in the United States Is expected to peak in the next several years. And so there's a move to expand the kinds of education being offered and to whom. GBH in Boston. Kirk Cara Peasant reports. Justice Cove in 19 hit the region. In March, Claudia Cabrera was accepted into a new certificate program at Stonehill College of four year liberal Arts schools south of Boston. On my Dee Dee for about a year and I didn't really know where I wanted to go with my career. My education, I felt like I wasn't gonna be able to go back to school because I was a young mom. The 24 year old mother of twins was also homeless. Living in a shelter with 20 other families. She was exposed to someone with covert 19. She says. Although she didn't get sick. I just needed to get out of there. Stuck in the shelter Cabrera Suss Stonehill certificate program as an opportunity to earn a living wage as a technician. I'm a hands on type of learner. I don't really understand until I do it for myself Between 2019 and 2037. The number of new high school graduates in New England is expected to shrink by nearly 13%. And that spells problems for small colleges like Stone Hill and for the region's high skills. Economy. Massachusetts alone. Is facing a major shortage of technicians. Ah handful of liberal arts schools have invested in career and technical certificate programs that cost students less and last. Just a few semesters, these institutions air needing to enroll as many learners as they possibly can. Shihlin Joe T. She is a senior policy analyst at the Think, Take New America. He recommends all kinds of colleges adopt short term non degree programs as the traditional college going demographic shrinks in order to stay afloat and hopefully expand. Private LeBron's colleges will need tol come up with new sorts of offerings that respond to the market demands your tissue points to research that find since March, Americans are increasingly interested in non degree certificate opportunities. Offering more short term affordable programs will make you more attractive to a broader range of learners. Whether their traditional college age or adult learners. Stonehill now offers certificates that costs about $10,000 compared to the full cost of attendance that can run north of 65,000 year. I think it provides access to a different type of student that Stonehill Has not catered to. That's Melissa Ratliff, the new dean of graduate admissions at Stonehill, she says the college traditionally served recent high school grads who live in dorms. So she says administrators were surprised by some of the older students needs. We had some students that didn't have access to WiFi. He didn't have access to a reliable laptop. Stonehill secured funding from professional societies to loan students, laptops and upset tuition. The college also helped Claudia Cabrera finding apartment that she could afford. So she could leave the shelter. Can you please pick that up off the floor? You guys want to start cleaning and making lunch inside her new apartment? Cabrera negotiates with her twins. I guess Billy after falling behind last semester, she said, she's all cut up on her course work now. I think I want to work for the people who make robots and stuff like that. What technology being such a big thing and The world right now, especially during Cove in Cabrera expects to complete her advanced manufacturing courses later this year before entering the work force in Boston. I'm Cooker Plaza for marketplace. Thats final note on the way out. Today we started with an item about a company that has as one of its missions to sell everything. We end with a company that has as its mission. It seems to deliver everything Uber announced today it's going to spend a billion dollars 1.1 billion to be precise to buy drizzly, the alcohol delivery service once he by the way. It is, according to the wine and spirits Wholesalers of America, the biggest deal yet in the online alcohol business or In a word reading between the lines here if I might.

Claudia Cabrera Stonehill Boston Stonehill College of Melissa Ratliff United States liberal Arts schools Kirk Cara Peasant McKinsey technician Dee Dee Justice Cove New England Massachusetts Cooker Plaza spirits Wholesalers of America Stone Hill LeBron senior policy analyst
"kirk cara" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:31 min | Last month

"kirk cara" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Of students, saying these kinds of programs have provided them with an education they didn't think was attainable before. Kirk Cara Pezzo runs the higher education, desperate our partner station GBH and has been reporting on this story and he joins me now, Kirk, welcome back. A tent city. Good to be here. So why has enrollment in four year liberal arts schools been on the decline? Since covert hit, I mean enrollment is down across the board. But even before the pandemic, the number of new high school graduates here in New England and really in the Midwest was plummeting. And the number of new high school graduates in New England is now expected to continue to shrink through. 2037 that drop Enrollment really spells problems first small, non selective public and private colleges like Stone Hill and really for our region's high school's economy. So some of these schools are turning to technical programs. Like what? Right. So you know, we mentioned cloudy at the top there with advanced manufacturing course. But you know, Massachusetts and other New England states are facing a major shortage of workers and technicians. So economists say that these liberal arts schools air providing career technical education in very specific fields. Things like Photonics, which is the science of putting, you know, light technology on really small chips, which is so critical right now is we're all on zoom and using our devices every day, and so they're turning to these Courses that really cater to market demands, and they can be advanced manufacturing that could be very niche programs. But they're really you know, as the as the number of high school graduates drops, they're aimed at older, nontraditional students. Interesting. And so why are they offering these types of programs can they make up for some of the enrollment declines not just the numbers, but also the money. Right? Many not just community. Technical colleges are operating in the red. Now, a lot of these four year private schools are also leaving money. So you know the New England border Higher. Ed recently estimated that Pandemic has cost the region's colleges here about half a billion dollars in tuition and fees. That estimate doesn't even account for covert related expenses. So these schools have invested in career technical certificate programs. That cost less and less just a few semesters, and they can really, you know, just diversify basically what they offer. So despite the challenges presented by Cove it some labor economists are recommending that all kinds of colleges adoptees short term, not degree programs as the traditional college age demographic shrinks. You know, they say that the schools need to enroll as many learners that they possibly can in order to stay afloat. And hopefully expand. At some point. These private liberal arts colleges that are non selective can come up with, you know new sorts of offerings that respond to the market demands. It seems like you know, this is something I've been hearing about for a while. I think initially, the idea to sort of re train people, for example, who worked in traditional manufacturing jobs was very popular, you know, probably about a decade ago, but it seems like this is something that's not just meant to, um increase enrollment at the colleges but also to provide or create a workforce that's more prepared. For the future. Is that right? Right, and we were both, you know, working parents? There's research now that shows 65% of adults hoping to pursue higher education now prefer Non to re programs, and that's compared to 50%, who prefer them pre covert and because there's so much going on, and this is, you know, you'll hear from some faculty of liberal arts colleges. Who's that, you know, See, this is too focused on career and technical education. But I really do think this is about the future of work and you talk to economists and hired leaders. And they think that these degree or certificate programs cannot just retrain the workforce but kind of preserve our democracy in this moment and help people who might feel left behind, you know, find dignity and work while also encouraging some kind of active, informed citizenship and No matter what their backgrounds are, what color their skin is. This is a way to re engage people who might feel left behind. Those are some big lofty goals there, Kirk. What do we know is taking advantage of these courses right now? What's the profile of the folks? That you've talked to. I know you spoke to the mother We heard from the top, Claudia, but other folks who were taking advantage of these courses. Yeah, I mean, they're designed for adults for older students, but they're also encouraging young 18 20 year olds Tol rolling in Claudia stories interesting. You know, she was accepted into this new advanced manufacturing program that Stonehill You know, she had her G d but you feel like he wasn't going anywhere. You know, she didn't know where else you could go is a young mom and she first enrolled. She was actually living in a shelter and she had been exposed to someone with covert 19, and she tried to isolate herself. I mean, these people are kind of living on the margins of our society and the people who are most affected by this pandemic. And she was, you know, Claudie was stuck in the shelter She's falling behind in her lab work, struggling to keep up with the courses. She missed a lot of school, She almost dropped out. Stonehill stepped in, and some of the administrators at Stonehill told me that they weren't prepared. The needs of these students that they, you know, as a school that traditionally enrolls young people who live in dorms. They didn't fully understand the needs, but they came together. They provided laptops. They helped her move out of This homeless shelter and into a new apartment, and even her classmates came together. They will launch to go fund me page and we were kind of living in the era of go fund me where.

Kirk Cara Pezzo Stonehill New England Claudia Massachusetts partner Stone Hill Photonics Midwest Ed Claudie
"kirk cara" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:36 min | 3 months ago

"kirk cara" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Losing their financial lifeline. When federal relief payments run out at the end of this month, Congress has been discussing various proposals to extend those benefits. So far. No agreement has been reached. Scott Horsley. NPR NEWS Washington, California Governor Gavin Newsom says a new coronavirus stay home order goes into effect tomorrow. It links business closures and travel restrictions to ICU bed capacity at local hospitals. Colleges and universities in New England say the pandemic has cost them nearly a half billion dollars. Kirk Cara Pezzo with member station GBH reports from Boston. Michael Thomas is the president of the New England Board of Higher Education, which ran the enrollment numbers and estimates the region's colleges are facing the loss of more than $413 million in tuition and fees alone. Estimate doesn't even account for increased expenses, everything from costume going online to PEOPIE equipment. Certainly, testing has been a really critical expense for institutions among sectors of the economy in the region. New England postsecondary institutions of accounted for a fairly large share of total testing done. Thomas says federal and state aid is critical to keeping schools afloat to cut cost he recommends college is operating on the brink. Consider alliances with each other and potentially mergers for NPR news. I'm Kirk therapy as a in Boston, the nation's top infectious disease expert, Dr Anthony Fauci, is apologizing for his comments about this week's decision by Britain to approve the emergency use of fighters covert 19 vaccine. The UK was the first to do so. Now, she tells the BBC. He didn't mean to suggest the UK was rushing things when he said British regulators hadn't acted as carefully as those in the U. S about, she says he meant to say the FDA does things differently. Not better. This is NPR news from Washington. President elect Joe Biden says he's asked Fauci to remain in his current job. When a Biden administration takes over in January, Biden tells CNN he once found she to be his chief medical advisor on the Corona virus pandemic. By now also says when he's sworn in on January 20th. He plans to ask Americans to commit to wearing a mask for 100 days to reduce the spread of the virus. Police in Connecticut say they seized an estimated $15 million in marijuana from a storage facility in West Haven, they say was being used by drug dealers to sell the drug illegally across the northeastern U. S. Two men from Northern Virginia are under arrest. The Drug Enforcement Administration and the FBI say their investigation led to the discovery of £1700 of the drug. In Texas. Authorities say they've rescued dozens of people from a home in Houston, where human trafficking was taking place. Jen Rice with Houston public media has more. Police responded after receiving a report about a man running down the street in his underwear, yelling that he'd been kidnapped, then held in a house along with 30. Other victims officers rescue 26 people from the home in southwest Houston. 25 men and one woman. Authorities say it was a human smuggling operation and Houston police are cooperating with the Department of Homeland Security. The rescued victims were taken to a school gym to get out of the cold. According to media reports. The man told authorities he was kidnapped in Houston by a person with a gun and police have detained one person of the house for NPR news. I'm generous in Houston. I'm David Mattingly in Washington..

Joe Biden Dr Anthony Fauci NPR Washington Houston Michael Thomas Boston UK president Kirk Cara Pezzo New England Board of Higher Ed Governor Gavin Newsom Drug Enforcement Administratio Congress New England Scott Horsley David Mattingly
"kirk cara" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:27 min | 3 months ago

"kirk cara" Discussed on KCRW

"I'm Laxmi saying ah, U. S official tells NPR. The White House has given a verbal order to reduce the number of troops in Afghanistan from 4500 to 2500 by January and in Iraq. Troop levels will be cut from 3000 to 2500. Official who is not authorized to speak publicly about troop drawdown, says a formal order is expected by the end of the week. The move comes his top military leaders, including Joint Chiefs Chairman General Mark Milley and Central Command's top officer, general Frank McKenzie, were advocating that troop levels in Afghanistan. Remain, as is into the spring to pressure the Taliban to reduce violence and engage in peace talks. And then there's the matter of a transition, President Trump's national security advisor says. There will be a professional transition of power to a Biden administration. NPR's Frank Ordo. Nia's reports. Robert O'Brien says Biden's team should be given time It needs to put its people in place. National security adviser, Robert O'Brien noted the legal challenges the Trump campaign is pursuing, but said if they are unsuccessful president elect job buying deserves the chance to implement his policies. Look if after biting Harris ticket is determined to be the winner, and you know, obviously things look that way now. We'll have a very professional transition from the national security question Counsel. There's no question about it. But his comments at the Global Security Forum stand in sharp contrast to President Trump's refusal. To acknowledge he lost the election divide him, O'Brien said The Biden team would put highly skilled and capable people in place, many of whom worked in the White House before. Franco or Dona is NPR news? Well with just a little over nine weeks to go before Biden sworn in as the 46 president, the Trump administration says it's launching the process of leasing oil and gas drilling sites in Alaska's Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. Officials hope to auction off leases before Biden takes office, The refuge is home to polar bears, caribou and migratory birds. Tens of thousands of former Boy Scouts have filed claims of sexual abuse against the Boy Scouts of America. Today is the deadline to file a claim. NPR's Wade Goodwyn, says the BS a filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection nine months ago. Boy Scout records show that the problem of sexual predators being drawn to the organization began not too long after it was founded more than 100 years ago in an attempt to protect its scouts. The Boy Scouts kept a list of men who had been caught sexually assaulting the boys first called the Red Flag files, then the perversion files. While more than 82,000 former scouts have filed claims the true number of boys abused over the decades. Maybe in the hundreds of thousands. The boy Scouts have over a billion dollars in assets and hope to survive the bankruptcy. Wade Goodwyn. NPR NEWS Dallas This is NPR news. The number of international college students studying in the United States is significantly down this fall. From member station GBH in Boston. Kirk Cara peasant reports. That drop is largely due to the Corona virus pandemic. A survey of 700 colleges and universities finds international enrollment is down 16% and new or first time international enrollments are down 43% this fall. Steep drop is devastating to the bottom lines of colleges that depend on these students and their tuition. Dollars. The surveys the first look at how the Corona virus is undermining international enrollment and was conducted by the Institute of International Education. Says it's never seen such a precipitous drop. International students were already facing travel bans and navigating stricter visa regulations. College leaders say a lack of a national coordinated response the pandemic. Made the climate even worse for NPR news of Kirk Cara Plaza in Boston. Hoping to lower the risks of Corona virus transmission. The NC double A says the entire 2021 men's college basketball tournament will take place in one geographic location. The N C. A a Division One men's basketball committee says hosting in one area will quote enhance the safety and well being of the event. It's negotiating with Indianapolis to be the host city. The final four was already scheduled to be held in Indianapolis next year..

NPR Biden President Trump Boy Scouts Robert O'Brien Afghanistan Boy Scouts of America Wade Goodwyn president Arctic National Wildlife Refug Boston Indianapolis official White House Taliban Kirk Cara Plaza General Mark Milley Central Command Kirk Cara
"kirk cara" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:39 min | 4 months ago

"kirk cara" Discussed on KQED Radio

"San Francisco and Qet QE II F M 89.3 North Highland Sacramento. It's 4 36. From NPR news. This is all things considered. I'm Ari Shapiro in Washington and I'm Elsa Chang in Los Angeles with an update on a case that has ramifications for college admissions across the country. A federal appeals court has found that Harvard University's admission policy does not discriminate against Asian Americans. The lawsuit against the university had been filed six years ago by a group that opposes race conscious admissions policies designed to increase racial diversity on college campuses. Kirk Cara Pensa covers higher education for member station GBH in Boston, and he joins us now welcome. Elsa remind us Kirk who exactly were the plaintiffs in this case, And what did they claim that Harvard was doing wrong? Sure that the group students repair admissions are S F f A has argued Harvard systematically rates Asian Americans lower on certain personality traits like courage and leadership in last year at this is Judge waited on this and said no, Harvard does not discriminate. In her decision, The judge cited 42 years of Supreme Court precedent that allows admissions officials to consider race as one of many factors. I spoke with U. C. L. A law professor Rick Zander. He's a longtime critic of considering race in admissions, and he supports the plaintiffs. In this case, he says, the district judge never confronted statistics and analysis. Revealing what he sees as Harvard's intentional discrimination against Asian Americans. The few took roughly the median student who gets admitted by Herbert, if that's true, that's African American. I am about 92 95% chance of the mission. If they're Asian American, they have about 25% chance of admission. This is not just one of many factors right? This is a very heavy weight being put on race. Elsa, Of course. Harvard flatly denies that allegation. And in court, it presented its own statistical analysis. The college points out that the percentage of admitted Asian American students is now spike to its highest level ever. It's a 25%. It's up 7% points from a decade ago, and the population of Asian Americans in the U. S is just 6%. Okay, well, what did the appeals court today have to say about why the plaintiff's claims should fail? The court unanimously upheld the district court's decision, saying it didn't care and finding Harvard does not intentionally discriminate against Asian American applicants. By holding up the higher personality standards. The court says Harvard values all types of diversity, not just racial diversity, and his consideration of race in admissions is constitutional. And how we heard from Harvard or from the plaintiffs in response to all of this, yes, Harvard says the court's decision quote once again finds that Harvard's admissions policies are consistent with Supreme Court president and now is not the time to turn back the clock on diversity and opportunity. Conservative political strategist Edward Bloom, who's the president of students repaired missions, he says while his group is disappointed with the decision there hope is not lost. And the lawsuit is now on track to go to the Supreme Court. Yeah, I want to ask you about that. I mean, how likely do you think it is that this case really will be considered by the Supreme Court and tell us what would be at stake there? I think it seems increasingly likely. I spoke with Attorney Ted shot he directs the Center for Civil Rights at University of North Carolina Shut says the appeals court has recognized this lawsuit for what it really is. It's a frontal attack on race conscious admissions. You know, I think it's pretty much an attack through the front door. On the ways consciousness. I think what they're doing is Going in for a the kill shot and else. In fact, the group's president Edward Bloom says their goal is to get this in front of one of the most conservative leaning courts in our lifetime and to end the consideration of race it emissions at Harvard. And all other colleges. Kirk Cara Pezzo with member station GBH. Thank you, Kirk. Thank you. For families with kids. Pandemic life is still a hot mess. Many moms are just drowning and dance lives have also been up ended, NPR's Andrea Hsu talked with a few dads were finding themselves in unfamiliar territory. Will station knew his kids were bummed about remote school this fall, so he decided to shake things up. He made his Children go outside with their backpacks and come back in through their own front door. But that's not all. Each kid had to complete some fancy footwork with their dad before he let them pass. Their new ritual made the local news. Maybe because of those dance moves, but also because, well, here's this dad making the most of virtual.

Harvard Supreme Court Harvard University Elsa Chang Kirk Cara Pensa NPR Rick Zander Edward Bloom Kirk president Ari Shapiro Kirk Cara Pezzo San Francisco Sacramento Andrea Hsu Los Angeles Washington Boston
"kirk cara" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:50 min | 4 months ago

"kirk cara" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Race conscious admissions policies designed to increase racial diversity on college campuses. Kirk Cara Peasant covers higher education for member station GBH in Boston, and he joins us now welcome. They also remind us Kirk who exactly were the plaintiffs in this case, and what did they claim that Harvard was doing wrong? Sure that the group students repair admissions or S F F. A has argued Harvard systematically rates Asian Americans lower on certain personality traits like courage and leadership. In last year, a district judge waited on this and said no, Harvard does not discriminate. In her decision. The judge cited 42 years of Supreme Court precedent that allows admissions officials to consider race as one of many factors that we spoke with U. C. L. A law professor Rick Zander. He's a longtime critic of considering race in admissions, and he supports the plaintiffs. In this case, he says, the district judge never confronted statistics and analysis. Revealing what he sees as Harvard's intentional discrimination against Asian Americans. If you took roughly the median student who gets submitted by harbor if that's jeunesse, African American They have about a 92 95% chance of the mission. If they're Asian American, they have about 25% chance of admission. This is not just one of many factors right? This is a very heavy weight being put on race. Elsa, Of course. Harvard flatly denies that allegation. And in court, it presented its own statistical analysis. The college points out that the percentage of admitted Asian American students has now spike to its highest level ever. It's at 25%. It's up 7% points from a decade ago, and the population of Asian Americans in the U. S is just 6%. Okay, well, what did the appeals court today have to say about why the plaintiff's claims should fail. The court unanimously upheld the District court's decision, saying it didn't care and finding Harvard does not intentionally discriminate against Asian American applicants. Hold them to higher personality standards. The court says. Harvard values all types of diversity, not just racial diversity, and its consideration of race in admissions is constitutional and how we heard from Harvard or from the plaintiffs. In response to all of this, yes, Harvard says the court's decision quote once again finds that Harvard's admissions policies are consistent with Supreme Court president And now is not the time to turn back the clock on diversity and opportunity. Conservative political strategist Edward Bloom, who's the president of students repaired missions, he says while his group is disappointed with the decision there hope is not lost. And the lawsuit is now on track to go to the Supreme Court. Yeah, I want to ask you about that. I mean, how likely do you think it is that this case really will be considered by the Supreme Court and tell us what would be at stake there? I think it seems increasingly likely. I spoke with Attorney Ted shot he directs the Center for Civil Rights at University of North Carolina Shut says the appeals court has recognized this lawsuit for what it really is. It's a frontal attack on race conscious admissions. You know, I think it's pretty much an attack through the front door. On ways consciousness. I think what they're doing is Going in boy, the kill shot and else. In fact, the group's president Edward Bloom says their goal is to get this in front of one of the most conservative leaning court in our lifetime and to end the consideration of race and emissions at Harvard. And that all other colleges Kirk Cara Pezzo with member station GBH. Thank you, Kirk. Thank you. For families with kids. Pandemic life is still a hot mess. Many moms are just drowning and Dad's lives have also been up ended. NPR's Andrea Hsu talked with a few dads who are finding themselves in unfamiliar territory. Will station knew his kids were bummed about remote school this fall, so he decided to shake things up. He made his Children go outside with their backpacks and come back in through their own front door. What's.

Harvard Supreme Court District court Kirk Cara Peasant Rick Zander Kirk Edward Bloom president Kirk Cara Pezzo Boston Andrea Hsu Elsa NPR professor Ted shot Attorney Center for Civil Rights University of North Carolina
"kirk cara" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:39 min | 5 months ago

"kirk cara" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Louisiana is bracing for yet another strong hurricane just six weeks after Laura came ashore, devastating large portions of the Southwest. Forecasters say Hurricane Delta is churning in the Gulf of Mexico is a dangerous Category two Storm the mayor of Lafayette Parish, Guillory is urging folks to avoid driving in these conditions. Best thing we can do for our first responders for farming for police officer sheriff's deputies. For utility workers trying to get power back up and running. Best thing we can do stay off the roadways unless it's an absolute emergency. Hurricane Delta is expected to make landfall tonight in the same area of southwest Louisiana. Where scores of homes and businesses are already damaged. Delta is expected to weaken somewhat as it approaches the coast this evening. In Massachusetts. The White House Corona virus response coordinator is meeting today with college presidents from member station GBH. Kirk Cara Paisa tells us Dr Deborah Burke's his warning students and the public to remain on guard against the virus. Speaking to reporters outside MIT and Harvard's Broad Institute in Cambridge, Dr Burke said the Northeast and its colleges have some of the most quote militant covert testing in the country. But she also emphasized the importance of wearing mask and maintaining social distancing during the upcoming holiday. We see that from the high holy days, people are just yearning to be together. And believe that if I know you or if you're my family member, you couldn't have asymptomatic Cove it and we now learned that you could. Burkes said She's confident students that Massachusetts colleges won't spread Corona virus when they had home for the holidays because of their low positivity rates. She also said she wishes the government could replicate regular testing across the country. For NPR news. I'm Kirk Cara Pensa in Cambridge. Stocks finished modestly higher on Wall Street, the Dow was up half a percent. This is NPR news. And this is WNBC in New York. I'm showing Carlson, a federal judge declined to grant a temporary restraining order that could have halted restrictions on religious gatherings of more than 10 people. Agudath Israel of America and ultra Orthodox Jewish advocacy group sued the state and argued that the restrictions made it impossible for their community to fulfill for the just obligations. Rabbi. Every Shafran is a spokesman for the group. It was a decision that was that went against what we feel is a very compelling argument about the judges. The judge and the decision is a decision, so we respected for what it's worth. The restrictions apply to areas of Brooklyn and Queens, where rates of positive Koven 19 tests are more than five times the city average. The state and city say strict social distancing measures are needed in those areas to save lives. Because of the ongoing covert 19 pandemic. Broadway will stay closed at least through next spring. Broadway producers announced today that the shutdown will extend through at least May 30th of 2021. And Gotham's Binaca says, Don't expect to see shows streaming online either something like Hamilton, which was already a humongous success for them to make a deal with Disney Plus and have that streaming there. That makes total sense. But most shows even from a couple of years ago, you're not going to find them streaming online. As for fans who bought tickets for shows through the spring theatres are offering refunds and exchanges. Many New York City teachers are awaiting a decision on whether or not they'll receive a final back pay installment from the city. The city told teachers it couldn't afford to make the payments because of the current financial crisis. The two sides headed into arbitration this morning, Gothamist reporter David Crewes says. If the arbitrator decides the money needs to be paid, it won't be without consequences. If the teachers received the money immediately. It could trigger the kind of mass layoffs that Mayor Bill de Blasio has been trying to avoid. Back bay dates to win. Teachers were without a union contract under the Bloomberg administration. The original total sum was $900 million and has been doled out over time. Four payments have been made so far. Our weekend is looking pretty sunny tonight. It'll stay clear. We'll have love about 59 degrees. Partly sunny through the day tomorrow with a high of about 77 degrees. A few clouds you on there tomorrow night Low 63 on Sunday a chance of showers in the afternoon. Slight chance of showers, otherwise partly sunny high near 71 on Monday. Showers are likely. Mostly cloudy high near 62 degrees. It's 69 Sunny here in a Brooklyn at the moment at 5 35. Support for NPR comes from W. N. Y C members and from Hub spot whose enterprise C R. M platform is designed to help marketing sales.

Hurricane Delta NPR Louisiana Burkes Massachusetts New York Brooklyn Dr Deborah Burke Cambridge Kirk Cara Pensa Kirk Cara Paisa Gulf of Mexico Mayor Bill de Blasio officer Lafayette Parish asymptomatic Laura Guillory
"kirk cara" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

06:06 min | 7 months ago

"kirk cara" Discussed on KCRW

"I'm Windsor Johnston. President. Trump continues to claim without evidence that mail in balloting would lead to voter fraud in the November election. Speaking at the White House today, Trump said, the nation's voting system is not equipped for it. We don't have a rigged election. I know that And you have to be very careful when you mentioned As you constantly do, Russia or you mentioned China or you mentioned Iran or others. That attack are Election system, and when you have this mail in voting, it's a very susceptible. It's is something that can be easily attacked. The president was abruptly evacuated from tonight's press briefing by the Secret Service after a shooting was reported outside of the White House. Trump returned a short time later, saying that authorities had shot a suspect. The White House was briefly put on lock down following the incident. Judging California is ordering that ride sharing ABS, uber and lift reclassify. It's hundreds of thousands of drivers in the state as full time employees. NPR's Bobby Allen reports. The ruling is a setback for the companies, which have long defended treating its drivers as independent contractors. California Superior Judge Ethan Schulman ruled that uber and lifts thousands of contract driver should be given the same protections and benefits under labor law as other full time employees. Last year, California passed a law to protect gig workers. It made it more difficult for tech companies to hire contractors for full time work, but uber and left say the law does not apply to them. Shulman says that is not true. Writing that the companies are depriving legions of workers of the basic protections given to them under state labor law, uber and lift say they plan to appeal. The companies say drivers prefer the flexibility their contractor status gives them. Bobby Allen. NPR NEWS SAN Francisco A national survey shows that 40% of first year college students say they plan to stay home this fall because of the Corona virus pandemic. For Cara Paisa of member station W. T V. H reports. Of the 1800 students contacted for the study, four in 10 are likely or highly likely not to attend any college this fall. The trend includes highly selective colleges like Harvard, which announced last week that 20% of freshman differed enrollment. Jason Simon is CEO of Simpson Scarborough, which conducted the survey. It's just a really, really highly volatile time. There's still a lot of students who are rethinking what their plans are and are Waiting. For the last minute to try to make any of those decisions. That might be because the survey also found that a vast majority of students don't trust other students to follow public health guidelines for NPR news. I'm Kirk Cara paisa in Boston at the close on Wall Street. Today, the Dow was up 357 points. This is NPR news, and this is Casey AR W News on a Monday, August 10th on Larry Parole. Thanks so much for being with us this afternoon issue thing Rather, here's what's happening at 70 for health officials said today that L. A county continues to make progress and slowing the spread of the Corona virus Hospitalizations. And deaths, especially keep trending down. Daily Hospitalizations are now averaged about 1600 patients. They averaged 1900 just last week L a once accounted for more than half the deaths statewide, fueled by nursing home fatalities. Now the county makes up less than half the deaths. Here's Barbara Ferrer, who heads the public Health Department. This progress that we've made is essential as we continue building what we call our new normal. This month so that we can get to a point where we're able to reopen our schools for in person learning, and more of our neighbors are able to get back to work for a reconfirmed another 19 deaths from Cove in 19 and more than 1900 confirmed cases today, she said. She believes that these new numbers are accurate and that she was cautiously optimistic. But she stressed that L. A county has not yet received any backlog update from the technical glitches with the state's database. An error involving the state's medical program, and its automated system for renewals has triggered huge drops in coverage. That's despite the governor's executive order earlier this year that was supposed to protect people's access to safety. Net programs during the pandemic Medical provides health insurance to about 12.5 1,000,000 low income Californians. A spokesperson for the California Department of Health Care Services, which oversees the medical program, said it's still assessing this week how many people may have been affected, but that the department had sent notices to 200,000 people. The department also says some benefits have already Been restored. Big changes are coming to the modern day shopping mall with indoor malls closed at the moment due to the pandemic has KCR W's Matt Dillon reports, one Orange County complex is taking a creative approach to retooling retail for the covert era. The high end stores of South Coast Plaza are the camping from the air conditioned indoor mall to a parking garage attached to it. Yes, on the second floor of a parking structure, which counts as an open air venue for retail, you can browse clothes by Dior Crystal from baccarat or Harry Winston Diamonds. The fame. Costa Mesa Malls. Pandemic pivot is called the pavilion. Well, it may be in a parking garage. The wall separating boutiques are permanent, and the floors and furniture plush South Coast Plaza even stocked it with fresh flowers, So they're sent not exhaust fills the air. Shopping at the pavilion is by appointment only mask required customers contact the stores. They're interested in browsing and tell them what they'd like to see. The store sets up shop in a boutique space in the pavilion and at the agreed upon time, the customer and a concierge Mito look at merchandise or try it on at this case. Yardley's Matt Dillon reporting, Disney is taking a step back amid a surge of Corona virus cases in Florida. Disney says it'll reduce operating hours and all four of its Florida attractions but not right away. The shorter schedules will begin next month and last through October. That's according to the Hollywood reporter. L. A is mourning the loss of a dream maker, a man named Julio Gosden ski. If you've ridden the old timey carousel at Griffith Park, you probably met, maybe even saw him. He started working.

Trump White House California NPR Bobby Allen President Matt Dillon California Department of Healt Florida Cara Paisa Windsor Johnston South Coast Plaza Disney Harvard Jason Simon Kirk Cara
"kirk cara" Discussed on NPR News Now

NPR News Now

04:56 min | 2 years ago

"kirk cara" Discussed on NPR News Now

"Support for NPR and the following message come from Dulles International Airport with the highest on time takeoff percentage of any airport on the east coast. I a d means I'm already departing more at fly Dulles dot com slash fast. Live from NPR news in Washington. I'm Laurie London. A new poll finds three out of four Americans want attorney general William bar to release special counsel. Robert Muller's full report NPR's, Danielle Kurtz, Laban says the poll from NPR the PBS NewsHour and Marist also shows more people now view Muller favorably, President Trump's approval rating now at forty two percent has barely changed since before the investigation concluded one thing that has shifted is the public's view of Robert Muller nearly four in ten adults. Now view him favorably up from three in ten in December that shift is largely due to a huge Republican swing around eight percent of Republicans viewed him favorably in December this week. It's thirty two percents house. Democrats say they may subpoena Muller's report if the attorney general doesn't turn it over by their imposed deadline of next Tuesday. Fifteen parents. Accused of bribing and cheating to get their children into selective. Colleges are appearing in federal court today from member station W G B H in Boston. Kirk CARA Pezzo has the latest developments in the sweeping college admissions scam. The government says the parents, including former casino executive Gamal these make contributions to sham charity that was just one part of the elaborate scheme, the FBI in IRS say some of the parents even took a tax write off for their contributions, which were actually bribes Rick singer, the admissions consultant at the center of the scandal has already pleaded guilty to falsifying their kids test scores and athletic profiles to help them gain admission to schools like Stanford Georgetown and the university of Texas Austin on Thursday, former Yale University women's soccer coach Rudi Meredith became the third person to plead guilty in the case joining singer and the former sailing coach at Stanford for NPR news. I'm Kirk Kerr has a in Boston today was the day the U K. And was supposed to leave the European Union. But parliament has again, given a no vote to Prime Minister Theresa May's Brexit plan and PR's Frank Langfitt reports from London the prime minister laws by nearly sixty votes may criticized lawmakers for failing to support some way forward. This house has rejected not ill. It has rejected. No Brexit and today it has rejected approving withdrawal agreement on Monday. Parliament is expected to consider other options which could include remaining in accustoms arrangement with the U Jeremy Corbyn, head of the opposition labor party the has to be an alternative found on. If the prime minister context set that then she must go not at an indeterminate date in the future. But now so that we can decide the future of this country through a general election. You came now has two weeks to find a solution and ask for an extension or crash out of the U. Frank Langfitt, NPR news, London. At last check. The Dow up two hundred points. This is NPR. The rock and Roll Hall of fame thirty fourth induction ceremony takes place tonight in New York City from member station W K, SU cupbearer Bettiah reports. Many of the artists in the class of twenty nineteen go way back in terms of eligibility. Stevie nicks will become the first woman to be inducted into the rock hall twice. He's being honored tonight per solo work, but she was also inducted in nineteen ninety eight as a member of Fleetwood MAC acts can be nominated for the rock hall twenty five years after the release of their first record several of this year's inductees have been eligible for over a decade, including Janet Jackson def Leppard. The cure the Zambia's and Roxy music rounding up this year's class as Radiohead who debuted in nineteen Ninety-two with the EP drill presenters. This year include Brian May of Queen David Byrne and Trent Reznor of nine inch nails for NPR news. I'm Kabeer Bhatia in Cleveland, White House economic adviser. Larry cudlow says the Federal Reserve should immediately cut interest rates by a half. A percentage point the comments in an interview with axios are aligned with the views of Stephen Moore conservative commentator that President Trump plans to nominate to a seat on the feds. Board of governors more has been a critic of the Fed's rate hikes in his interview conlow also said the US and China are making progress in trade talks. I'm Laurie London. NPR news in Washington.

NPR Robert Muller Laurie London prime minister Parliament Dulles International Airport Washington Boston President Trump London U. Frank Langfitt attorney Stevie nicks Federal Reserve Prime Minister Theresa May Kirk CARA Pezzo rock hall Jeremy Corbyn
"kirk cara" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:57 min | 2 years ago

"kirk cara" Discussed on KCRW

"With Amy Walter on the takeaway right back after these headlines. Live from NPR news in Washington. I'm Laurie London. A new poll signs three out of four Americans. Want attorney general William bar to release special counsel. Robert Muller's full report NPR's, Danielle Kurtz, Laban says the poll from NPR the PBS NewsHour and Marist also shows more people now view Muller favorably, President Trump's approval rating now at forty two percent has barely changed since before the investigation concluded one thing that has shifted is the public's view of Robert Mueller nearly four in ten adults. Now view him favorably up from three in ten in December that shift is largely due to a huge Republican swing around eight percent of Republicans viewed him favorably in December this week. It's thirty two percent house. Democrats say they may subpoena Muller's report if the attorney general doesn't turn it over by their imposed deadline of next Tuesday. Fifteen parents accused of bribing and cheating to get their children into selective. Colleges are appearing in federal court today from member station W G B H in Boston. Kirk CARA Pazar has the latest developments in the sweeping college admissions scam. The government says the parents, including former casino executive Gamal these make contributions to a sham charity that was just one part of the elaborate scheme, the FBI in IRS say some of the parents even took a tax write off for their contributions, which were actually bribes Rick singer, the admissions consultant at the center of the scandal has already pleaded guilty to falsifying their kids test scores and athletic profiles to help them gain admission to schools like Stanford Georgetown and the university of Texas Austin on Thursday, former Yale University women's soccer coach Rudi Meredith became the third person to plead guilty in the case.

Robert Muller NPR Robert Mueller Kirk CARA Pazar attorney Amy Walter Rudi Meredith Laurie London Washington Boston Danielle Kurtz Yale University Gamal special counsel William bar Rick singer FBI soccer university of Texas Austin President Trump
"kirk cara" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

08:24 min | 2 years ago

"kirk cara" Discussed on KCRW

"Well, Hello, it looks like they've cleared that Sigler in Agoura Keenan road for Cornell way that earlier semi has been moved at a lanes in traffic is flowing again and in Thousand Oaks on south. One and one at Moorpark, however, a multi vehicle crashes slowing down traffic in that area. Got you covered on traffic news and weather all ahead as we move on for that information for you this evening that's Tuesday evening, KCRW, six 6:35 from NPR news. This is all things considered. I'm Audie Cornish. And I'm Mary Louise Kelley to the news now that dozens of people have been indicted in college, admissions cheating scam among them wealthy parents, including celebrities such as actress, Felicity Huffman, also college, sports coaches and people who administer the standardized college admissions tests. Kirk CARA Pezzo has details from W H in Boston. At least fifty people have been charged with participating in alleged conspiracy that involved cheating on college entrance exams, like the SAT ACT some of their children were admitted to elite colleges including Yale Stanford UCLA and the university of Texas by bribing coaches, we're not talking about donating a building. So that a school's more likely to take your son or daughter at the federal courthouse in Boston. US attorney Andrew welling announced the charges in what he called the largest college admission scam ever prosecuted by the Justice department. We're talking about deception and fraud fake test scores fake athletic credentials, fake, photographs bribed. College officials. Here's how willing says it worked between two thousand eleven and two thousand eighteen wealthy. Parents paid Rick singer the head of a foundation and for profit admissions consulting service more than twenty five million dollars singer would then use that money to pay a ringer to take the SAT or ACT for children or correct their answers. He'd also bribe division one coaches singers foundation purported to be a charitable organization, but was actually a front singer used to launder the money that parents paid him in return for bribes ranging from two hundred to four hundred thousand dollars coaches agreed to pretend that certain applicants were recruited competitive. Athletes in many instances singer helped parents. Take staged photographs of their children engaged in particular sports. In other cases, he helped them use stock photos pulled from the internet photo shopping the faces of applicants onto the bodies of athletes. Make no mistake. This is not a case repairs were acting in the best interests of their children. That's Joseph bona Volonte special agent in charge of the Boston FBI. He says more than thirty parents flaunted their wealth to cheat. The system and set their children up with the best education. Their money could buy some spent anywhere from two hundred thousand to six and a half million dollars for guaranteed admission. Their actions were without a doubt, insidious, selfish and shameful. None of the schools named in. The court filings are under investigation for fraud. The US attorney's office says college, admissions officers were tricked college, admissions counselors, say the real victims in this case or hardworking students who did everything they could to set themselves up for success in this country. Crazy, college admissions process. The scale of it is utterly shocking. Elizabeth Hedin is with the company college coach in Watertown, Massachusetts. She works with students and families trying to navigate college admissions. There aren't enough spots for everybody, and it's hard to take to stomach the idea that a couple of those slots were taken by people who bought their way in in federal court. Rick singer pleaded guilty to racketeering money laundering, conspiracy to defraud the United States and obstruction of Justice. Stanford has fired Salen coach who pleaded guilty. In a statement. Yale says, the university has been the victim of a crime perpetrated by its former women's soccer coach, and it's cooperating in the investigation UCLA says it is placed it's men's soccer coach on leave for allegedly taking bribes. And in a statement says the charges against him are deeply disturbing for NPR news. I'm Kirk in Boston for context, we're joined by journalist, Dan Goldin. He's a senior. Editor at propublica and has been reporting for years on ways the wealthy helped their children gained admission to these schools gopro says in some ways today's cases, an outgrowth of what some may call unethical, but perfectly legal activities in this case, the allegations that these students essentially pretended to participate in upper crust sports like crew or sailing when actually they didn't. But as I pointed out in in my book, the actual preferences for these sports that are limited to very few people and are predominantly at prep schools or suburban public high schools are themselves an unfair advantage for the wealthy because most kids in say inner city schools, never get a chance to try these sports. I wonder if a lot of people listening and reacting to this news today, we'll say look, this is the way it's always been particularly at elite schools, if you're really rich. You're gonna have a leg up. You will be able to. To have the financial wherewithal to affect the outcome in ways that families with with lesser resources would not what do you say to that? I'd make two points. The the first is that it's gone on for a long time. But it's it's not openly admitted I mean, if you go to a college night at your high school, you know, they don't have two lines one for ordinary applicants in one for the wealthy. They'll tell you you get in based on your test scores, and your grades and your recommendations. And so on the other point make is that the problem of the rich buying their way into college is if anything getting worse because the percentage of alumni overall donate essentially makes small donations to universities is going down. So they're very dependent on big donors, the kind who give enough money to earn it admissions tit for tat. So it's something that is getting ever more out of control. And I think that's what this case might symbolize the spiraling of this issue to higher and higher level of urgency as you read through this indictment. Did it suggest to you that this is a few bad apples or that? There are systemic problems. Well, it's it's hard to tell. But I think it does point to some systemic issues. Not just a preference for upper-crust sports. But also the use here of a private college counselor. Most kids in a typical public school. Rely on a overburdened guidance counselor who's also helping hundreds of other kids, the wealthy can spend a lot of money to use a private college counselor who's outside the system and some of them are very good and well intentioned, and helpful. But a certainly in this case appears to the council appears to be quite unscrupulous. And I doubt that this is the only one what surprised you in today's indictment. Well, I think the brazenness of the alleged behavior. I mean, it makes you wonder why didn't these parents just make huge donations to the college of their choice or their child's choice rather than going to these extreme and apparently criminal legs their specific universities that the names come up in today's indictment. But what kind of impact you expect to see on the wider community of elite of elite colleges and universities. I'm not I'm somewhat pessimistic on this issue that there will ever be real change or at least for the foreseeable future. Because colleges are so wedded to cultivating the wealthy and they see themselves as so dependent on big donations that it's hard for me to to an -ticipant any fundamental change to the to the system really though for something like this that would prove so embarrassing to a college admissions office. Well, I think they might take face-saving measures. But I'm talking about a fundamental change to something that undermines the kind of very equal opportunity and upward mobility. I don't see a wholesale fix. That is Dan Goldin senior editor at propublica and author of the book the price of admission how America's ruling class buys.

Boston Dan Goldin Rick singer fraud US attorney Thousand Oaks Audie Cornish Moorpark KCRW Kirk CARA Pezzo Felicity Huffman NPR Mary Louise Kelley Sigler Yale Cornell Joseph bona Volonte soccer
"kirk cara" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:57 min | 2 years ago

"kirk cara" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Live from NPR news in Washington. I'm Dave Mattingly officials in North Carolina say more than a thousand roads remained closed across the state because of flooding from hurricane Florence. The governor says it could be next week before the high water subsides about seven hundred water rescues have taken place in the Wilmington area. The cape. Fear river is expected to crest today at a record sixty two feet. Mitch Colvin is the mayor of Fayetteville preparing for the worst case scenario praying for the best. So we'll see what happens today. Goldman was speaking to NPR's morning edition Florence's blamed for at least thirty two deaths. Mostly in North Carolina US customs and border protection is indefinitely suspending a border patrol agent who is facing four murder charges. Joey Palacios with Texas public radio reports on one David Ortiz. Authorities with the Webb county sheriff's office say Ortiz new his four victims through the sex work or drug use communities in Laredo and had met. Some of them multiple times district attorney. Alani says it's not clear what motivated him to kill them. We are seeking to try to put the pieces together to figure out why. And how come he targeted this certain community within Laredo Ortiz has confessed to shooting his four victims over the last two weeks. He was arrested after a fifth potential victim. A woman was able to escape from him and alert police for NPR news. I'm Joey Palacios in Laredo, Texas. This is NPR news. Russia's defense ministry says a Syrian missile brought down a Russian reconnaissance plane last night as it was returning to base all fifteen people aboard were killed Moscow is criticizing the Israeli military, saying the Russian plane was caught in crossfire as four Israeli military. Jets were firing at targets in Syria. The Israeli military is not commenting a new poll finds most Americans support free speech from many points of view on college campuses. Kirk CARA Pezzo with member station. W G B H reports from Boston W H news survey two thousand Americans and fifty seven percent said call just should invite a speaker to campus, even if he or she offensive students. Thirty two percent said no colleges should not invite such speakers. Greg lewke enough is the president of the foundation for individual rights in education, a civil liberties group, and he says, it only takes a few students to shut down the speaker. If you have a very vocal minority of. Students and you have everyone else, you know, being kind of like, you know, I don't feel very strongly about it. It can result in a situation. That is a lot less in favor of freedom of speech, the poll also shows more than half of Americans say students are not hearing a full range of viewpoints on campus for NPR news. I'm Kirk a in Boston police in Los Angeles say they're looking for the person who beat three homeless men with a baseball bat before robbing them. I'm Dave Mattingly in Washington..

NPR Laredo Ortiz Dave Mattingly Joey Palacios Laredo Kirk CARA Pezzo North Carolina Washington Boston Texas Wilmington Mitch Colvin hurricane Florence Fear river Florence Webb county Alani Fayetteville
"kirk cara" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:57 min | 2 years ago

"kirk cara" Discussed on KQED Radio

"From NPR news in Washington. I'm Dave Mattingly at least seventeen deaths are now blamed on Florence three days after the storm came ashore in North Carolina as a category one hurricane food and water being flown into Wilmington. Where roads are flooded a US border patrol agent in Texas is facing murder charges after confessing to killing four women. He's identified as doin David Ortiz. Joey Palacios with Texas public radio reports, according to an arrest affidavit authorities were alerted about Ortiz when a woman escaped from him Friday night, he held her at gunpoint, but she fled his vehicle and ran to a nearby. State trooper Ortiz was arrested a few hours later at a hotel. He admitted to committing four murders over the span of about two weeks. All four were shot several times in the head and left on the side of highways near Laredo Laredo was on the Texas Mexico border Ortiz has been with customs and border protection for ten years for NPR news. I'm joy Palacios incentive. Antonio the US and Canada are still trying to reach a deal on a reworked NAFTA. Here's Dan carpenter. Several sources close to the talks data mood is far less cordial. Then foreign affairs minister Kristof really does lead on she said after face to face meetings with US trade czar, Robert lighthizer that the talks had been productive constructive and full of goodwill. Many auto are hoping congress won't approve a US Mexico deal without Canada. But that may change if Ottawa doesn't sign on soon. This is NPR news. In massachusetts. Federal investigators say they're examining gasline pressure sensors to see if they played a role than last week series of natural gas explosions north of Boston, they left one person dead and dozens injured a new poll shows a majority of Americans believe race should not be a factor in college admissions, Kirk CARA Pezzo with member station W G B H reports for the past forty years. The supreme court has ruled the colleges can consideration as a factor in deciding which applicants to admit that president is being challenged in a lawsuit against Harvard. W H news surveyed more than a thousand adults across the country and found seventy two percent disagree with the court. However, eighty six percent, say racial diversity is important northeastern law. Professor Daniel Medved says there's a disconnect in the findings Americans love hotdogs, they wanna grill they're hot dogs they want, but they don't really want to know what's inside the hotdog or how the hot dog was produced Midwood thinks. The same applies to college admissions most Americans don't want to understand what it takes to diversify enrollment for NPR news. I'm Kirk has a in Boston New. Mexico's sunspots solar observatory is reopening today with a team of security officers. It's been closed for more than a week because of an unspecified security threat. The FBI is referring questions to the association of universities for research in astronomy. Which manages that facility. I'm Dave Mattingly. NPR news in Washington..

trooper Ortiz NPR US Dave Mattingly Kirk CARA Pezzo Texas Washington Boston Laredo Laredo Mexico Joey Palacios Canada North Carolina Dan carpenter supreme court Wilmington murder FBI
"kirk cara" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:59 min | 2 years ago

"kirk cara" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"News I'm Rachel Martin I'm Steve Inskeep President Trump's administration signaled which side it's on a lawsuit against. Harvard University, the suit has been filed on behalf of Asian American applicants for admission they say Harvard discriminated. Against them, as part, of. Its admissions process and their sued? As being as a challenge to affirmative, action. More broadly now the Justice department has filed a brief as the government can arguing in support of the plaintiffs, Kirk CARA Pezzo of Boston member station, w., g. b.. H. is on the line is covering, this story good morning good morning. Steve what is the Harvard admissions practice that's at the heart of this lawsuit Steve, this lawsuits brought by a group. Called students for fair admissions and accused Harvard of systematically ranking Asian American applicants much lower on intangible characteristics like courage kindness and leadership they've also accused the college of capping the, number of qualified Asian American apple From attending the school well let's just clear on this, Harvard does actually. Use those intangible characteristics like courage or are kind nece they do. Factor those things. In when they're deciding. Who to let in this lawsuit did shed some light on on. On Harvard's admissions practices I think it's important to point out that this. Same group, students, are fair admissions is led by a conservative strategist Edward blunt and he's filed suits against the university of North Carolina at. Chapel, Hill university of Texas at Austin but in those previous cases he said that white students are. At a disadvantage in college admissions okay so we have a group here that has a broader broader objection. To affirmative, action yeah, this. Group and other conservatives they all? Want Harvard and other selective schools to, drop. Race conscious admissions altogether okay so what is Harvard say an explanation for the way that it approaches things and, how it does treat Asian-Americans the university, is, denying all. Of these charges that says race is, considered it's just one factor weight against A number of other? Factors like what your parents do or your hometown or your class or whether you can turn a double player you? Gotta, jump shot Harvard also points. Out that Asian Americans now account for about twenty three percent of all. Admitted students in a statement yesterday the university said it's deeply disappointed that the Justice department has taken the side of the plaintiff in this. Case and the brief really surprised absolutely no one in higher education since the. Trump administration has already repealed Obama era, regulations are, guidelines on the consideration of race it admissions and many you're telling me, that they see this as. Just a Trojan horse to, end affirmative action to thanks to deal with very quickly I the. Justice. Department brief in essence they argue that Harvard has to have a has to have. A, lot of evidence on its side in order to consider race at all and it didn't meet its burden. That's. The Justice department argument? But the other question is who is harmed here are these plaintiffs this group that opposes affirmative action are they going to be able to show, in court that. There were actual Asian Americans who Were harmed in some, way that's unclear, I got an Email from Edward Plum earlier. This week and I. Asked him I said where are these students who speaking out on this is their face for your case here and he, said that at, this point no age American students are prepared to take the stand and testify when this case, goes to trial in October. No Asian Americans not one is willing to say I was harmed by this by, this policy not publicly and as a reporter. It's a tough story. To tell because we've asked a number of Asian American groups whether they can introduce us to a student they haven't been able. To, come forward a lot, of civil, rights groups are backing Harvard including Asian American civil rights groups Kirk very much thank Steve Kirk care of w. GBH a year ago hurricane, Harvey devastated many parts of Texas. It also slammed the petrochemical. Industry along the coast releasing millions of pounds of? Pollution not for some companies to reassess how they? Prepare for big storms NPR's Rebecca hersher has been talking to chemical companies and the communities around Them Look what one Florez grew up and still lives in a neighborhood surrounded by industrial, sites a gas terminal on one side chemical company on another, end the busy Houston ship channel running along the. Edge the biggest leak caused by Harvey happened a few blocks from his, house at least four hundred sixty thousand gallons of gasoline released when a tank flooded the whole area wreaked a year later Flora's took me out to see one of the most visible changes that he's noticed since the storm huge lender goal tanks used to store petrochemicals now have geodesic domes on their. Routes you start seeing more literature levels now have the Domani While back they. Weren't like that some of the. Biggest leaks during Harvey including the one in Florida neighborhood happened because the roofs, of those tanks sank under the weight of rainwater that allowed the chemicals inside to get out these domes, prevent that Harvey made it inescapably clear how high the stakes can be for keeping chemicals contained at one plant.

Harvard University Harvard Justice department Kirk CARA Pezzo Harvey Steve Inskeep university of North Carolina Steve Rachel Martin Edward blunt Hill university of Texas Trump Obama President Boston Austin hurricane NPR Edward Plum Houston
"kirk cara" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:39 min | 2 years ago

"kirk cara" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Spike dot com It's, morning, edition from NPR news I'm Rachel Martin and I'm Steve Inskeep President Trump's administration signaled which side it's on a lawsuit against Harvard. University the suit has been filed on behalf of Asian American applicants for admission they say Harvard discriminated. Against them as part of its admissions process and their sued as being seen as a challenge to affirmative action more broadly now the Justice department has filed a brief as the government can arguing. In support of the plaintiffs Kirk CARA peasant of Boston member station w. g. b. h. is on the line is covering this story good morning Hey good morning Steve. What is the Harvard admissions practice that's at the heart of this lawsuit Steve. This lawsuits brought by a group called, students for, fair admissions and Dave accused Harvard of systematically ranking Asian American applicants, much lower on intangible characteristics like. Courage kindness and leadership they've, also accused the college of capping the number of qualified Asian American. Applicants. From attending, the school let's just on this. Harvard does actually use those intangible characteristics like. Courage or or kindness they do factor those things in when they're. Deciding who to let in this lawsuit did shed some light on on. On Harvard's, admissions, practices I think it's important to point out that this same group students are fair admissions is led by a conservative strategists Edward. Blunt, and he's filed suits against the university of North Carolina Chapel Hill the university of Texas at. Austin but in those previous cases he said that white students are at a disadvantage in college admissions okay. So we Have a group here that has a broader broader objection. To. Affirmative action Yeah this group and other conservatives they. All. Want Harvard and other? Selective schools to drop race conscious admissions altogether okay so what is Harvard say an explanation for the way that it approaches things. And how it does treat. Asian-Americans the is denying all of these charges it says race is considered it's just one factor way against, a number of, other factors like what your parents do or. Your hometown or your. Class or whether you can turn a double player you gotta jump shot Harvard also points out that Asia Americans now account, for about twenty three percent of all admitted students in a statement yesterday the university said it's deeply disappointed at, the Justice department has taken. The side of the plaintiff in this case and the brief really surprised absolutely no, one in higher education since the Trump administration has already repealed Obama. Era regulations are guidelines on the consideration of race in admissions and many you're telling me that they see this as just a. Trojan horse to end affirmative action to thanks to deal with very quickly I suggest is Department brief in essence they argue that Harvard has to. Have a has to have a lot of evidence, on its side in order to. Consider, race, at, all, and it didn't meet its burden that's the Justice department argument that the other question is who is harmed. Here. Are these plaintiffs this? Group that opposes affirmative action are they going to be able to show in court that there were actual Asian Americans who were. Harmed in some way that's. Unclear I got an Email from Edward Plum earlier this week and I asked him I said you know, where are these, students who speaking out on this is her. Face for your case. Here and he said that at this point no Asian American students are prepared to take the stand and testify when this, case goes to trial in October no Asian Americans not one is willing to say I was harmed by this, by this policy not publicly. And as a reporter it's a tough story to tell because we've asked a number, of Asian American groups whether they can introduce us to a student. And they haven't been able to come forward a lot of civil rights groups are backing Harvard including Asian American civil rights groups. Kirk thanks very Much bake Steve Kirk carapace w GBH a year. Ago hurricane Harvey devastated many parts of Texas it also slammed the petrochemical industry along, the coast releasing millions of pounds of pollution not for some companies to reassess how they. Prepare for big storms NPR's Rebecca hersher has been, talking to chemical companies and the, communities, around them See again like what one Florez grew up and still lives in a neighborhood surrounded by industrial sites a gas terminal on one side chemical company on another end the busy Houston ship channel running along the edge the biggest leak caused by Harvey happened a. Few blocks from his house at least four hundred sixty thousand gallons of gasoline released when a tank flooded the, whole area wreaked, a year later flurries. Took me out to see one of the most visible changes that he's noticed since, the storm huge cylindrical tanks used to store petrochemicals now have geodesic. Domes, on their roofs you start seeing more little levels now have the Domani While back. They weren't like that some of. The biggest leaks during Harvey including the one in Florez neighborhood happened because the, roofs of those tanks sink under the weight of rainwater that allowed the chemicals inside to get out these, domes prevent that Harvey made it inescapably clear how high the stakes can be for keeping chemicals, contained at one plant that lost power during the storm a fire broke out spreading pollution, now that plant's owner is facing criminal charges rod Herrick manages. A chemical facility for the company Cova Stroh he. Says they reassess their hurricane plans after every storm the one thing I, can say I've learned about hurricanes and tropical storms there's never one that's the same Eric site didn't report releasing any additional pollution as a result of hurricane Harvey which he attributes in part to moving things to higher ground after the last big hurricane in the year since Harvey Herrick has taken. It upon himself to collect info on what worked and What didn't from companies all over the region severe. Weather prepared as as practices and it's it's. Got thirty five pages. But it's got sixty five pages of attachments on all these different in the binder there's info about winter shutdown how to store different chemicals plus mundane things you might not think of like when there's a hurricane. Approaching make sure that the people on the emergency team aren't on vacation hurricane season is in the summer after all another thing you. May not think of employees won't. Show up to work if their homes are. A mess you have to stock the things they need to. Clean up, cleaning supplies it can be bobbed broom squeegees. It can be diapers soon be v feminism items that aren't available here. That wouldn't even think about it. Women cer- certainly would so how do we take care of that Howard country, third directs the Wharton risk management and decision process center at the university of Pennsylvania and he wrote a, book on how big companies manage risks from disasters it's the immediate impacts that are Really important to them he says companies are, generally more likely to spend money on things that pay off in the, short term like helping employees fix their homes which isn't ideal it'd be better and. Cheaper in some cases to, prepare for long-term disasters before they happen he. Says a good way for companies in their boards to do, that is to consciously change how they calculate risk for example the, risk of a flood or hurricane. Happening next year might be low it may be the level of one and one. Hundred maybe too low to justify, spending money on say upgrading your tanks but if you look at the. Next twenty five years, then, there. Might be a greater than. A one in, five chance of at least one of those floods occurring and. When you mentioned one. And five people will pay attention to it and they'll? Say maybe I better start thinking about what I can do any says regulators should, do the same thing long-term because with climate change the risks from storms..

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