32 Burst results for "Kinshasa"

interview With Frank Toby Chi

Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

05:24 min | 5 months ago

interview With Frank Toby Chi

"Listeners. If you have been keeping up with the episodes near the end of last year You may have listened to episode number two hundred eighty where i interviewed coach. Nancy son and she and i had a pretty extensive conversation About a person did. I didn't name who had experienced a stroke and i was just kind of pushing her a bit to say well. How would you apply some of your coaching techniques to help people get past. Self cancelling self critical thinking. How would you apply to someone. Were they actually have had a physical injury happened to them and it's not something they can think away. I was already looking forward to actually having that unnamed person on soon after i posted the episode with coach. Nancy and so my guest today is that person. He's a former parishioner of the church. That i pastor for many decades he continues to be a friend and he is also a listener to this podcast and his name is toby so toby i want to welcome you to the podcast. Hello everybody had pastoral. Care is to call your pastor. Kent surrey oh habby you keep blowing my cover listener. First-time caller yeah. Yeah well you know. Did you ever think that you would be actually one of the guests one day. I was hoping yes but now hundreds of kind of circumstance which is very special for today. Well before we get into what happened to you. Tell our listeners. What your business was what you all about. Because you're one of the top people in your field of. What was that all about. I was ruining my mic production company. Doing visual effects and documentary film work for various corporations like entertainment and business and also nonprofit international ministries travelling to different parts of the world to document a workout. they're missionaries. Yeah that was happening near the end of this working. Part of your your life right. And and i was reading your facebook posts and you're pretty pumped you're saying if you had to do your career over again. You would love to do this. Because you're hanging out with people that were your now heroes and and getting to share their their work with the world yes. I think you're definitely one of the most influential person in that part of the journey. 'cause you even your servants seriously talk about joseph campbell and hero's journey storytelling technique. The very inspiring. So i wanna be a story town of himself by either doing social worker documents documentary work. Well you certainly excelled at that. I remember the excitement of the missionaries that were in dr congo. When you went over there with the team within pastor sharon and they'd never had anyone document with video of the work that they were doing out in the bush but also in the kinshasa in the city with the women at risk right. Yeah one of the most memorable shots that you took that. I think they were astounded. By was in you. Use your drone technique and you had the team going down that that big river in the congo and the jungle but you have to aerial view. That was amazing. That's fun yeah so you had just completed a trip. To thailand i think it was with international ministries doing similar work capturing for promotional purposes. The work of these missionaries and and they're doing a lot of social justice work. How would you feel about that well. That's very interesting. As i was in my filming to work of missionary kimbro. She ran the clinic for children with developmental diseases. Very moving to you. Yeah the provide like were down syndrome or learning disability physical therapy speech therapy and then you finish your work and you flew back home to culver city out out here right. The westside of los angeles pick up the story as it changed for you then will flew back. The next morning woke up too skinny ready to drive my son to school. I was still able to walk and drive those feeding kind of funny like little bit. Dizzy nosso weakness. When i came home. That's when it happened stroke. Yeah so when you were starting to feel funny. Did you have any thoughts. I wonder if. I'm having a stroke. Did that even enter your mind now than ever enter my mind though idea. Did you think it was maybe after effects of all this international travel. Maybe you cut a bug in thailand. Something like that. Will there a couple of little funny stories that can tell you about that. Yeah first of all the symptoms are just feel left we miss and what does that mean. Mike host left side of body feel very heavy like i was actually sitting on a toilet. Sorry maybe too much information. No i feel like. I'm i was going to fall off the toilet. I did end up falling off the toy onto the floor was able to push myself up. The funny thing is i was still able to walk

Kent Surrey Toby Nancy Congo Joseph Campbell Kimbro Clinic For Children With Devel Kinshasa Sharon Facebook Thailand Bush Culver City Los Angeles Mike
The Congolese Doctor Who Discovered Ebola

Short Wave

13:31 min | 1 year ago

The Congolese Doctor Who Discovered Ebola

"At the beginning of an epidemic, it's essential to discover the source of the disease. For scientists who do that work, it's extremely challenging and without risk to their own health. But the scientists who played an essential role in discovering bulla way back in nineteen, seventy six doesn't always get the credit he deserves in today's episode. We explore the history of a bowl and the consequences of scientific exploitation. It's part of our week of episodes here on the show celebrating and recognizing the contributions of black scientists enjoy. You're listening to shortwave. From NPR. Safai here with none other than NPR East Africa correspondent Ater, Peralta Hey there ater. Hey, Mattie, thank you so much for talking to us all the way from Kenya. I know there's like an eight hour time difference. I am thrilled. But I want to open with a quick question. Who discovered Ebola and do not Google it. First of all. How dare you asked me a question? I should definitely know the answer to, and don't and yeah I already, Google Bet. Came up was. A Belgian microbiologist, but I think you're about to tell me. There's more to this there. Absolutely, there always is right so. Cheated. What you probably saw is a bunch of white westerners like. Dr John Jack. Yembeh does not yeah. He was not one of the people that came up. Yes, so, he's Congolese doctor and today he's doing really important work heading up the response to the current Ebola outbreak in Congo, but back in nineteen, seventy six, we embed. First doctor to. COLLECT ANY BOLA sample. His crucial role in discovering Bolla is often just a footnote, a lot of the history of people. Has Been Written? Without your name. Yes but. You know this Yes it. Did Not quite. Today on the show correcting the record on a Bola, the story of Dr, John Jack Mugabe and what he's doing now to ensure African scientists are part of writing it's. To some in the medical community, it's a controversial move. Okay Ater, so we're talking about a Congolese Dr John, Shaq. And his role in discovering a bola. When do we begin? So when I sat down with him at his office in Kinshasa. He said we should start in. Hundred seventy three. We had just gotten his PhD microbiology at the Riga Institute in Belgium, and he could have stayed in Europe, but he decided to come back to Congo, but when I arrive via. The condition of work were not I had no lab have no. Mice for experimentation, so it was very difficult to work here. Yeah, it's tough to do lab work without a lab, you know. Without a library to instead he took a job as a field epidemiologist and just a couple of years later in Nineteen seventy-six. was sent from Kinshasa the capital of Congo to the village of Yambuku to investigate a mysterious outbreak. it's the first recorded outbreak of Ebola, but no one knew that at the time they thought maybe it was typhoid or yellow fever, and he goes to this local hospital, and he says he finds it completely empty. Why was nobody there? Local residents thought the hospital was the source of the infection and people had died there. But in the morning when they heard Giambi was sent from the capital, the thought he had medicine till they started to come back to the hospital, and we started seeing patients. So so, what's he seeing? When the patients come in, he was seeing. People who were very weak fever? They had headaches I started to to make the physical time. But at that time will have no gloves. And, of course he had to draw blood, but when I removed. They're the sit inch. Both continue to spread out. What I am to see these phenomenal. And also my fingers or with a bow. Wow. Yeah, so he says he he would wash his hands a lot, but really he says it was just luck that he didn't catchable. Yeah, definitely I mean. That's amazing that he's in there and there's no gloves and there's patients and they don't really know what's going on, and he was able to not get it in at this point. We MP he was startled. But then three nurses died that night and a Belgian nun who was working in the village, also got sick with fever. All the nuns had been vaccinated against typhoid and yellow fever. So at this point me MBA was like. Oh, it's probably not those things. Yeah! I mean in the severity to the deaths with this outbreak. He started to realize that this was something different, so he. He convinced one none took back to Kinshasa with him. So what happens next? She died at a hospital a couple of days later, but he took blood samples, and he sent them to Belgium for testing and the guy on the other end that was Peter Piot. Who at the time was with the Institute for Tropical Medicine in Belgium, the guy who turned up from Google search. Yeah. That's right, and so he and other scientists start working to identify the culprit. The CDC in the US gets involved and the realize. This is a new virus that caused hemorragic. Call it Ebola. They name it after a river by the village where it was discovered. So, what you saw out in the field, the blood samples guide all of this plays a crucial role in the history of right. It was huge, but it's PR who gets the bulk of the credit for discovering all up and you can tell this bothers John Jock membe. If you don't recognize the work done in the field, I, it is not correct. it is a team. You know it is a team. Pr Actually wrote a memoir no time to lose and he does mention. But just in passing as a bright scientist, whose constantly pestering him for more resources. Has talked about this well. Peter Pyatt, facetime video, so I got on the phone. He's now the director of the prestigious London, School of Hygiene and tropical medicine and I asked him if he felt at all responsible for writing. Out of his history of Ebola I think that's a comment, but my book less not an attempt to write than that's history of Boll and sold more. My personal experience is more biographies that sense. Was this kind of like an awkward conversation to have ater. Yeah I mean especially because he's Belgian and Belgium was the colonial power in Congo. Ultimately, he looks at it with a little bit of distant. That at the time African scientists they were simply excluded and white scientists parachuted in they took samples, wrote papers that were published in the West and they took all the credit he so he actually said he did. In that actually surprised me and I think. Part of the reason. I feel that he so comfortable. Talking about this is because he's in an academic setting. I think in universities across the world. Students are talking about privilege, so he seems like he is very comfortable having this conversation right now. I mean there's there's something very weird kind of about that coming from him right as a person who has admitted to taking part in exploitative science, absolutely and one of the good things is that he says that things are changing. We mbappe for example has received several international awards just recently for pioneering. The first effective treatment for Ebola reflects our stinky you. Say the politicians in global health in science, General. So okay. I want to ask you about the treatment in a minute, but to put it very bluntly. Have there actually been any concrete steps to try to change this power dynamic in the global health field? Because this is certainly not one of you know two stories. This is one of many many stories. There is I mean look. NBA has made a decision that many thought unthinkable leaving just a few years ago, he decided that all of the blood samples collected during this most recent Ebola. Epidemic will stay in Congo, so if anyone wants to study this outbreak, they will have to come to his institute. I bet that has ruffled some feathers though. I have I've heard from some American scientists. Who have privately expressed frustrations in the are really the ones who have led the way in studying Ebola, but peanut understands that decision when you think about how African scientists have been historically treated, and he says that Western scientists should just get over it. We have to wake up key things one. The world is changing too much endless Nah it's so weird to hear him say a matter of fairness, ater matter of fairness. Okay, so before we move on, tell me about the treatment that Mugabe worked on. So this is the thing that makes him smile right. We embiid calls it the most important achievement of his life, and it goes back to one thousand, nine, hundred, five during another equal outbreak in Congo. Eighty one percent of people infected with Ebola in this village were dying, and he wondered if antibodies developed bipolar survivors could be siphoned from their blood and used to treat new cases, so he gave sick patients transfusions of blood from a bowl of survivors. Too He injected Ebola patients with the blood of survivors. It vision. And seven survive, he says the medical establishment brought him off because he didn't have a control group. That's what they told him. But if this idea was accepted by scientists. We see a lot of life. Okay I mean to be fair. That is a really small group with no control among some other stuff. But on the other hand, it doesn't mean that he was wrong. You know that it should be totally dismissed, and maybe if more scientists looked into, it collaborated with him, maybe tried to replicate that data in some way, they could have learned something with him right because we now know that he was in fact correct about the antibodies. Yeah, I mean that's right in the context is important because I think what really eat set him. Is that maybe lots and lots of people could have been saved during the West. West Africa outbreak, which happened from two thousand, thirteen to two, thousand sixteen, and look just this year that science became the foundation of what is now proven to be the first effective treatment against the Bulla that is saving seventy percent of the people who are treated with amazing. Is He getting credit for that? At this point, he is yeah, absolutely okay, so how does look back on all of this week? What's what's his view on this is so he's he seventy seven, so he's obviously thinking about his legacy. One of the things that he told me is that he's always dreamed that big science could come out of Congo, and partly because of him, that's more likely happen. He got a commitment from Japan to build a state of the art research facility in Kinshasa and in the lab, just a few feet from his office where we talked US scientists were using advanced machines to sequence DNA of the Bulla samples that have to stay here in Congo Okay so moon bay, doctor and scientists who started in the Congo with no lab has a lab and is soon getting an even better one to do his work. Yeah, exactly, yeah, now I have my share. In. So I have my I have. A good subculture will bring joy. But he also has vice rate with micro biologist without Nice, I, asked myself that every day. And, so you know what he says, his biggest legacy won't be that. He helped to discovery or cure for it. It'll be if another young Congolese. Scientist finds himself with an interesting blood sample. He'll be able to investigate it

Ebola Congo Kinshasa Scientist Google Belgium John Jack Mugabe Fever Epidemic NPR Typhoid United States Dr John Jack Ater Kenya Mattie Dr John Africa Peralta
'Terrified' South Africa nears lockdown; cases almost 1,000

The World

00:24 sec | 1 year ago

'Terrified' South Africa nears lockdown; cases almost 1,000

"The south African security forces are about to start enforcing a three week nationwide lockdown the country has recorded over nine hundred coronavirus infections the highest in Africa one of Africa's biggest cities the Congolese capital Kinshasa has announced an intermittent shut down from south today all residents apart from essential workers will have to stay at home for three

Africa Kinshasa
Fat Tuesday Favorite: Chicago's Paczki reigns supreme in the Region

WGN Radio Theatre with Carl Amari and Lisa Wolf

07:39 min | 1 year ago

Fat Tuesday Favorite: Chicago's Paczki reigns supreme in the Region

"All right local pastries will be kicking off at Tuesday with amazing friends he's a Polish tradition they're also breaking other sugary sweet Chicago Chicago police police police officers officers officers and and and their their their families families families bakeries bakeries bakeries located located located at at at fifty fifty fifty nine nine nine twenty twenty twenty seven seven seven west west Lawrence Lawrence Avenue Avenue they're they're selling selling area area shaped shaped like like hearts hearts and and Chicago Chicago flag flag all all falling falling off off in in blue blue line team at the proceeds from all the cookie sales will go to Chicago police memorial foundation which aids families of officers who were killed or wounded in the line of duty the owner of the billions ski is the owner and the chef of delightful pastries in Chicago and she joins us tonight welcome in Dover good evening how are you I am great I am great first let's talk about the bakery generators separate celebrating twenty years which is very cool thank you and what I love about what you are committed to you is you are putting V. best ingredients into everything that you do you know what that that's a real commitment on my end because I really believe I should have quality ingredients in my products I don't think you should have a PhD in chemistry to read my labels I believe in butter flour sugar eggs yeah I think if we have good ingredients that go into the product we have a great product and then we feel good afterwards I think a lot of the times of people take short cuts because they want to have a fast monetary gain but people don't support those kind of places so I think it's very important that people that come to delightful pastries say we have Nielsen Massey vanilla which is the best vanilla in all of United States made right here in Waukegan by this wonderful family for three generations now so it's and you know we use all butter from Wisconsin thank you Wisconsin you know my flowers from Ohio and from Minnesota you know just a lot of local ingredients a lot of great ingredients I just think you know butter should be the foundation of an fresh eggs should be the foundation for a honey cakes we use real honey you know so it's just it's just you wanted to have deliciousness you know people's people said your did your punch you made me we put you know thank you thank you you know it's funny you say that is there was a bakery that was around I won't say what it is for fifty sixty years and I got taken over by for the first time by another family they changed all the recipes they kind of cheap in the the goodness of what they were doing and they were gone in six months so knowing that you know this is gonna create nice legacy for for you and your family you know what I th I am I'm hoping one of my daughters will take up the mantle after after I'm you know after I'm ready to retire I don't know when that will be you know my mom my mom started this business so it was we started that in naming in nineteen ninety eight and my mom just retired last year and finally she gave me the recipe for punch you so as to get issues given that herself he was getting into like once I retire you'll have it but not nothing until then and you know what's what people are like what makes punch you punch you wait what what's what's so different about it so a real punch I could that's one pump check many punch keys so I'm teaching you guys Polish has been like that and so you know you will you put rom in the dough we put orange oil and that that would put lemon oil in the W's milk we use barter and you know when you eat upon check in with you know like a Krispy Kreme donut it flattens into pancake yeah well up upon check the dough springs back and holds itself yet yeah and you really did it for the dough mostly you don't really you did for the filling like American donuts have this much filling in and it's just like you can really taste the dough and that's kind of sad because the the the beauty of it is the doe how delicious how delicate you know it's fluffy it's crunch on the outside deliciously moist and goodness on the inside and I love coming up with wonderful tart fillings like Weezer long potter we use nice I make passion fruit jam is a thing that's a Polish thing hello Mister he's thing I grew up with yeah Tom is a Polish thing we love our heart to heart fillings pulls people do not like sweet pastries we you know when we post people come and I'm there like I wanna see desert that's not sweet enough that's the first thing that comes out of the mouth and yet we believe in having something rich pottery full of group Belgian chocolate and walnuts and nuts and lots of beers in a post poll should point towards you know like there's one walnut poppy toward that I make that I literally one liter of vodka goes into the entire thing while because it's that busy but then it has to sit for four days before you can eat it so all that lot of that stuff veterans but the flavor is still there so lot of Polish pastries like our have tons and tons of alcohol and actually European pastries have tons and tons sure think of tiramisu think about fruit fruit cake think of a Kinshasa toward a black forest torte absolutely all have you know somebody said oh you're just you're just you know to contributing to the delinquency of minors I first of all if you don't want rid of them in one day that's pretty when you're cooking the stuff it yeah the potency is is gone by that time now there's you've got the traditional but you've also got some really cool gourmet flavors as well let's talk about some of the traditional ones that you have so the traditional ones are plum butter which we've mentioned before Polish people are crazy about plan which I'm not a guy that brings food and booze into the studio because listeners can't see they can't taste what what I'm doing in here but I will describe this the best they can and you were so kind to bring daughters your big highlight that's that's that's my favorite then rose petal jelly that's very very traditional very Polish and we use real raspberry preserves a local company here that makes the boss raspberry preserves there's just sugar packed in lemon juice and raspberries and if nothing else that plan has a beautiful flavor you know it's a great little tart but I'm I'm chasing sweet because of what you put into the dough surrounding it so I'm getting a little bit of both it is coming in and out that's really cool thank you thank we we try really hard and then some of the other it's nice and tight is good yeah yeah it's it's you know it's it's that's the whole point about plans you kind of want to make the jam kind of to reflect the fruit when you eat fresh plums they're not sugary sweet they have that little bit of sweet and tartness and that's exactly how the jam as the crazy flavors as I call them we have German chocolate we have Jameson whiskey chocolate okay yes you got these drunken get a which I love so Jamison's here Davis is in chocolate custard I'd add that can't wait to taste that when I'm a busy guy but given the low beam yeah but you got this moonshine and lemon and that's what we've got here tell me about the moonshine so the story is I have a my packaging guy bought a house in Kentucky and I said listen Simon when you go over there can you just bring me some moonshine and he when he was getting his house built he asked everybody for moonshine and and everybody would get so upset him there's no moon shining in talking the plumbers electricians that window guys the dark eyes everybody yeah and finally he built his house is sitting on his porch and some guy pulls up right to his to his front stop and he's it's are you the guy looking for moonshiners like yeah he brings out this carton of more of these Mason jars full of money it is like a hundred Bucks the drop that often like drives right off like it was it was like a transaction and have a little remote brings it back you say's Dover I found your moon shine so I said what flavor it would be really good for punchy with moonshine enacted lemon card will make this delicious lemon curd from scratch yeah with lemon juice and butter and eggs and sugar together then we think I spy to it like a little sharpness even yes yeah

Chicago
Your Favorite EarBuds Episodes

Feedback with EarBuds

02:45 min | 1 year ago

Your Favorite EarBuds Episodes

"We've been sending out this podcast recommendation newsletter for three years now throughout that time we've sent out one hundred fifty six emails one every Sunday Day and we recommended more than seven hundred. Eighty individual podcast episodes. Here are the episodes from within the newsletter that were the most popular among our subscribers measuring this by the links that were clicked. Most here are the podcasts and episodes chosen by me. Monday's episode comes from the Knowledge Project. Worked with Shane Parrish and is called Navarro. Ravi Kant the angel philosopher. It's one hundred twenty minutes long. This episode initially came from our how to improve ourselves list list curated by Jonathan Santiago in this episode Navarro Ravi Kant is the CEO and Co founder of Angel Est.. He's invested in more than one hundred companies including Uber Twitter. Yarmur and many others Tuesday's episode comes from you're wrong about and it's called. Yoko Ono broke up the Beatles. It's forty seven minutes long. This episode initially came from our explore the human psyche theme curated by Kevin Allison in this episode. Mike Tell Sarah about how the myth of meddling wives serves to exonerate. Terrible husbands digression include fifty shades of Grey Marie Antoinette and the end of the nineteen sixties this episode. We're sorry to say contains descriptions of domestic abuse. Wednesday's episode comes from the quote of the day show and is called Brian Doyle. People don't know we appreciate. She ate them unless we show it. It's ten minutes long. This episode initially came from our cultivate and attitude of gratitude. Week curated by Stephen Miller in this episode owed Brian. Doyle makes his debut for Thanksgiving episode. Brian reminds us that we don't need a special day to express our gratitude for the people and things we're thankful for and how important it it is to let the people around us know that we appreciate them Thursday's episode comes from just the beginning and it's called science fiction gets real. It's thirty two minutes. It's long this episode initially came from our object as subject newsletter. curated by Lindsey kilbride in this episode meet creators making work that explores the gap gap between science fiction and reality. Friday's episode comes from love me and is called falling. It's seventeen minutes long. This episode so initially appeared in our happy crying newsletter. curated by Taylor Zabloski in this episode after a whirlwind romance. Brian and Vanessa get married and moved to Kinshasa asa everything is going. Well until she shows up. It's a love triangle between the most unlikely trio plus a mother wrestles with feelings of resentment towards her newborn baby. Maybe those are the podcast recommendations chosen by me for this week's theme. Your favorite ear buds

Brian Doyle Navarro Ravi Kant Grey Marie Antoinette Lindsey Kilbride Yoko Ono Kevin Allison Kinshasa Shane Parrish Knowledge Project Stephen Miller Yarmur Jonathan Santiago Taylor Zabloski Ceo And Co Mike Vanessa Sarah Founder
The Congolese Doctor Who Discovered Ebola

Short Wave

05:20 min | 1 year ago

The Congolese Doctor Who Discovered Ebola

"Safai here with none other than NPR east. Africa correspondent eight Peralta to. Hey there ater. Hey mattie thank you so much for talking to us all the way from Kenya. I know there's like an eight hour time difference. I am thrilled but I want to open with a quick question who discovered Ebola and Google. It first of all. How dare you asked me a a question? I should definitely know the answer to and don't and yeah I already. Google bet came up was a Belgian. Microbiologist I but I think you're about to tell me there's more to the story there absolutely there always is right so I mean you cheated. Yeah what you probably saw is a bunch of White Westerners like Dr John Jack. Mugambi does not. Yeah he was not one of the people that came up yes so he's Congolese doctor and today he's doing really important work heading up the response to the current Ebola outbreak in Congo. But back in nineteen seventy six. We we emberg he was the first doctor to collect any bola sample. His crucial role in discovering Bolla is often just a footnote. A lot of history has been written without your name. Yes but you on this Yes it is it not correct did not quite so today on the show correcting the record on a bola the story of Dr John Jock Mugabe and what he's doing now to ensure African scientists are part of writing its future to some in the medical community. It's a controversial move. Okay ater so we're talking talking about a Congolese Dr Jacques in his role in discovering Abullah. When do we begin? So when I sat down with him at his office in Kinshasa south he said we should start in nineteen seventy three. We had just gotten his PhD in microbiology at the Institute in Belgium and and he could have stayed in Europe but he decided to come back to Congo. But when I arrive here The condition of work were not I. I had no lab. I have no mice for experimentation so it was very difficult to work here. Yeah it's tough to do lab work without a lab you now. He said without a library to instead he took a job as a field epidemiologist and just a couple of years later in Nineteen nineteen seventy six we sent from Kinshasa the capital of Congo to the village of Yambuku to investigate a mysterious outbreak It's the first recorded outbreak of Ebola. But no one knew that at the time they thought maybe it was typhoid or yellow fever and he goes to this local hospital but he says he finds it completely empty was nobody there. Local residents thought the hospital was the source of the infection and and people had died there but in the morning when they heard was sent from capitol. They thought he had medicine till they started to come back to the hospital and we started seeing patients. So so what's he seeing. When the patients come in he was seeing people who were very weak with fever they had headaches? I started it to him to make the physical time but at that time. have no gloves you know gloves. And of course he had to draw blood but when I removed they're the city which Blood continued to spread out. It was the first time from two CDs momentum and also my fingers so with a bow. Wow Yeah so he says he he would wash his hands a lot but really really he says it was just luck that he didn't catchable. Yeah definitely I mean. That's amazing that he's in there and there's gloves and there's patients and they don't really know what's going on and he was able to not get it and at this point we MP. He was startled but then three nurses died that night and a Belgian nun who was working in the village also got sick with a fever all the nuns had been vaccinated against typhoid and yellow fever. So at this point I was like. Oh it's probably not those things. Thanks yeah I mean in the severity to the deaths with this outbreak. He started to realize that this was something different. So he convinced one none to go back to Kinshasa with him so what happens next. She died at a hospital a couple of days later but he took blood samples and he sent them to Belgium for testing and the guy on the other end. That was Peter. Piot who at the time was with the Institute for Tropical Medicine in Belgium. Aw The guy who turned up from Google Search. Yeah that's right. And so he and other scientists start working to identify the culprit the CDC in the US US gets involved and they realize this is a new virus that caused hemorragic

Fever Kinshasa Dr John Jack Congo Google Blood Peralta Typhoid Dr Jacques NPR Belgium Kenya Mattie Dr John Jock Mugabe Africa Ebola Mugambi Bolla Institute For Tropical Medicin United States
More than two dozen killed in Congo plane crash

BBC World Service

03:04 min | 1 year ago

More than two dozen killed in Congo plane crash

"But we're gonna go to the Democratic Republic of Congo now an update you on a major story from that dozens of people have died following a plane crash in the eastern part of the country a small passenger plane apparently crush says soon after take off and the BBC's guys co any joins us now from Kinshasa I just tell us the story what information do we have to take the of the number of casualties in who was on board guys well the the number of casualties in this plane crash actually depends on who you talk to the ministry of transport stock a boat twenty six people who died as a result of this crash however the office of the mayor in Goma was talking about twenty nine to you still around the same number and another thing we know about this this crash is that the blame the owner on technical fault that is a very vague term but he doesn't see exactly what went wrong if there was a human error are involved or eve it's a hundred percent Regis fault too those are questions that still need to be answered and the minister of transport in in Kinshasa you'll see that the they will start an investigation and we are expecting to hear from them in the coming days the thing with no easy also yes no no no go on please tell us to tell us more yeah the other thing we know also is that the reason and the ministry of talked about survivor will who apparently did not die is from from the the the plane crash sue this is one good news at least about this plane crash however it's something that has left the walled town of Goma traumatized people with very Saad yesterday of course more widely is there as always is in the background a wider discussion about airline safety how much of an issue is that and TLC unfortunately something that is a always talked about when the reserve a plane crash one thing worth noting is that most of I mean the Congolese for example airline most of an airline companies from DR see a note a load to fly in the in the European species or even in the the you American space espys and that's because of safety issues the don't try the these governments don't trust and the quality of the flight that I've been using that the planes are very old and usually he poorly maintained so those are some issues that have always been there in DRC and we are waiting to see if this will push the government to to do something concrete or if things would continue the way they have always been cast as a many thanks indeed cosco waiting joining us from the capital of DLC

BBC Kinshasa Goma Saad DRC Democratic Republic Of Congo Regis Hundred Percent
Africa And Seventy Percent discussed on All Things Considered

All Things Considered

03:42 min | 2 years ago

Africa And Seventy Percent discussed on All Things Considered

"Let's go now to the center of Africa to a place we rarely hear from Goma is a sprawling border city of two million in Democratic Republic of Congo it's trying to keep at bay what's become the second largest Ebola outbreak in history and Paris either Peralta is they're welcome hater hello Sir give us some context here because I understand this Ebola outbreak has basically remained in two provinces in Congo at least up until now but it's clearly spreading to Goma there been four cases what is gonna doing take to keep Ebola from spreading even further well lots and that's really important because this is a major transit hub and you notice it as soon as you land before coming into the airport you're asked to wash your hands with the bleach water solution and the nurse will take your temperature restaurants banks cellphone shops the squeeze hand sanitizer as you walk in and this is a country where three kisses are the norm and people are taking precautions they're giving what is known as the a bold look reading which means you tap your elbows to say hello and shaking hands are giving kisses and of course health authorities have vaccinated more than one thousand people in this city who they believe may have come in contact with the fires and I understand it to the people who survived the virus single member treated with new drugs what are these new drugs can tell us anything about them yeah I mean this is huge they are the first time that scientists have identified clearly effective treatments for people who have Ebola and these are two regiments which help the immune system fights the virus in the were in trials down here in Congo they were able to save about seventy percent of the people who were given the treatment you mentioned that health workers are trying to vaccinate more people but since Ebola was detected in Congo last year there has been difficulty getting more and more people vaccinated why that is in security there are more than one hundred armed groups in this part of Congo any bowler respond there's have been attacked and that is fueled by a lot of mistrust and conspiracy theories that westerners and the government have created Ebola to try and kill people here in in in Congo so how concerned do people seem in Goma right now about these most recent cases the whole tone is feeling the effects you can't move without seeing medical trucks and tents but I was in the neighborhood today were people they have set up roadblocks because one of their neighbors had been robbed in two of that neighbors children had been shot by police and they kept telling you look so much money is being poured into a bowl up but nothing is being done about the everyday skin security that we face I spoke to Fidel Buffy Limbaugh an activist here and he thinks this simple outbreak offers the chance for the world to look at how it has continually filled Congo one of the things that he points at is that the U. N. has its biggest peacekeeping mission in the world here and yet Congolese are still being killed all the time let's listen to a bit of what he told me I think we had come to a point where we realize in very high poultry see racism Hey true way of from the western wall to become less people this has been so since the first ever raw white man's cities sleeps on the Congress soil and it's never too people here in Goma they feel abandoned they have been betrayed again and again not just by their government in Kinshasa but by the world so she doesn't blame them for thinking that the people trying to help with the beloved are actually trying to

Africa Seventy Percent
New emergency Ebola response chief in DR Congo promises more listening, to end frequent interruptions in fightback

UN News

08:57 min | 2 years ago

New emergency Ebola response chief in DR Congo promises more listening, to end frequent interruptions in fightback

"Newly appointed UN Ebola response chief in the Democratic Republic of the Congo DRC has promised to listen more to the fears and concerns of local people in a bid to end frequent interruptions, hampering the fight against the deadly virus response coordinator, David Gresley, who's also deputy, head of u n stabilization mission in the DRC Manisco told you a news that violence by numerous armed groups protests and demonstrations together with political mistrust had adversely affected the government and World Health Organization, led response, one thousand two hundred eighty died in the country's worst ever outbreak. Mr. Gresley is heading to the epicenter pretend bow to work closely with partners and local leaders to finally contain the outbreak. He spoke to you and uses Christina Silveira, it's a very serious situation on the ground were quite worried about the situation is continued for now. Ten months in terms of the response. But the democ has been circulating for over a year now. And one of the key problems that we've seen on the ground is that there have been frequent interruptions in the response, which gives a virus a chance to multiply and usually tend to days to two weeks later. We see a sharp increase after these interruptions, due to sometimes protests, sometimes attacks, physical attacks and demonstrations, override things that have disrupted the the response, and it's important to understand why the, the attacks are happening. Why protests are happening at cetera so that we can find a way to sustain a response in a way that it's not interrupted. And so that we can bring it to, to, to close. The virus doesn't care. We cannot just use a technical approach to the response to be eight show, a ministry of health in particular have the skills for that. They have the means on the ground for that. But it's not enough by itself. And you need a larger response, they deals with the issues that I've described of security, and resistance. If you're going to finally put an end to this epidemic. So B U N has announced that it's strengthening its operations and its strategy. You've been appointed coordinator for the urgent response against Bola. What are the changes that are going to be made on the ground? Is it just a merely of positions? No, that's not the intent at all the, the, the intent is to strengthen the broader support the technical response led by the ministry of health supported by WHO will certainly continue. But what will be put in place is a reinforced structure that will be looking at the security issues, the resistance issues more closely, and that will require a much closer work with a local population. He'll communities traditional leaders to understand where their concerns are why there might be resistance and build the confidence of the community and the support most importantly, so that we can create an environment allows the responders to do their job. And to bring this thing to an end. It's also a question of, of making sure that the people who may have been in contact with victims of, of Ebola are dente, fide and monitored in terms of their own health, and if they become ill that they can receive treatment that's, that's the key to actually breaking the transmission of Ebola. But when that is disrupted, and are those the and that tracking is lost, then the virus will continue to circulate we're fortunate that. It has not gone outside of the immediate area. It's not even covering the whole province. And I think there we have to think the very good efforts for vaccination has gone on that has helped contain it amongst some of the changes, you will be moving the decision making center, the operation center to Timbo the current epicenter, we will be moving the operational decision making to the center of the. Can timbo? I will go there myself, we will build a team around that to reinforce the team that are already there. There are senior UN and, and, and, and ministry of health personnel to ground already. I think we have to recognize that. So this is a compliment to what's already there, but was important is that we have rapid decision making on the ground that's not held up by bureaucracies of various organizations. And that's why the decision was taken to put senior leisurely ground who can take those decisions based upon what they see on a day-to-day basis strategic guidance will stay in concerto regional operations will be based in Goma that does not change, but the day to day response, and the, the adapting to each circumstances, that arise can only be done locally. What are you expecting these changes to mean on the ground concrete concretely for the population for the health workers? And for the attackers, obviously, we wanted to bring the Potomac to close as quickly as possible. But in order to do that. I think what the local community should expect is a much closer engagement on our part with them to understand their fears their expectations to provide clear information about how the epidemic is how it spreads. And how it can be treated and contained these are all extremely important that, that work be accelerated on the ground to, to build that confidence lifting. It'd be listening to the population. That's it. That is exactly it you have to listen to the population. They have to tell us what they're thinking. That's what that engagement means. You don't learn much by talking. You'll learn by by listening. So I think that's extremely important. I think people have been frustrated by the lack of, of being listened to, and, and it's important to overcome that. So that's extremely important. Do you have an idea of what is going on? Why there is so much mistrust, the situation. There is a bit complex of there's been conflict going on. For over twenty years. It's an area of political opposition, historically to, to the government in Incan Shasha. So there's a bit of a version of people coming in from the outside. Secondly, you, you when you see a situation where you have a massive response for one, one issue in this case of Bulla where other issues have been neglected for twenty years, people, ask questions, it's just a natural human thing. And that's some of the things that need to be talked through, and there may be -tunities to address other issues while addressing the ability issue talking about the issue of tax when there's a strong community acceptance and, and, and actual desire for something that, too can help on the security side. He started getting it from. Nation that tells you what, what may or may not happen, and how you may want to operate when that positive relationship is established. And as you as you rightly said earlier, you do that by listening to what people are thinking and feeling then you have the basis to move forward and constructive way. So we need to do this, it takes its own time to do this. We don't have a lot of times we have to find a way to structure that in, in an effective way and have an open door policy that allows that information and that exchange to take place as frequently as required for this to be resolved. You mentioned demonstrations before and political climate, which is usually contentious, or seize Kinshasa as other this area wasn't allowed to participate in the recent elections. Is that that is well they were able to, but only after the three months too late and. And that was a problem because when the announcement was made for the delay in the election in, in, in this in the territories around Binion boot Timbo, it was the reason cited by the, the electoral commission was the -able outbreak, which created a perception that bring me this as a political issue, and not a health issue those relations have now taken place. So that's less of an issue today. But that's only happened at the end of March. So that time period between did create that that perception, and it was unfortunate because I think it contributed to some of the delays and interruptions described.

Coordinator David Gresley DRC World Health Organization Congo Drc Christina Silveira Kinshasa Goma Incan Shasha Manisco UN Binion Bola Twenty Years Three Months Ten Months Two Weeks
Violence rife as Congo Ebola outbreak surges

1A

02:43 min | 2 years ago

Violence rife as Congo Ebola outbreak surges

"The Ebola outbreak in the Democratic Republic of Congo has reached a new record more than a thousand people have died since the outbreak began in August. There's been widespread community mistrust violence against healthcare workers by armed rebel glue. Br armed rebel groups. Do we know how that outbreak began back in August? Yes. The outbreak began with a single woman who had a funeral. She died of the abo- virus. Her funeral was held in a very small village called Mandela from there. It spread to a large town of about a quarter million people called Benny, it has since shifted south to to sort of twin cities that collectively have nearly a million residents, and this is a very transient region. And this is this is why this virus is spread across the area. It's a place where people commonly trade not only between villages and between sort of regional hubs. But also across international borders this region in the. Democratic Republic of the Congo borders. Uganda Rwanda, south Sudan all places that are susceptible to abolish itself. Why are armed groups attacking the healthcare worker? So this is a an area that has been beset by tribal violence and ethnic strife for decades, if not centuries, and they are very disconnected from the federal government in Kinshasa, the the they don't trust outsiders, basically because they are more connected to their own local tribal units than they are to anybody else. And the what we've seen in recent days is an increase in the mistrust between the communities that are suffering from the Abella virus, and these outsiders who are coming in trying to help them. You can imagine that. It's probably pretty scary. If somebody shows up in a spacesuit talking about a virus, you've never heard of him, by the way, you can't see with a needle that they want to inject you with with vaccine if you trust them that is that that's something that can stop an outbreak. But a lot of people don't trust outsiders, especially not those who come in in. Scary looking spacesuit. So based on what these outsiders are doing an offering if in fact, they're doing enough and offering enough we looking more in a best case scenario or a worst case scenario for this outbreak. This is getting closer to the worst case scenario, and that worst case scenario is one in which the virus becomes endemic to the region and continues to spread without hope of actually stopping the outbreak. We've never seen that happen in the past even in the west Africa outbreak few years ago, you know, more than twenty eight thousand people were infected more than eleven thousand died, but the good news is the virus was stopped in in west Africa. We haven't gotten to that scale yet in Congo. But this is an area that presents basically, the most difficult operating environment that public health responders have ever had to deal

Democratic Republic Of Congo Congo Ebola Kinshasa West Africa Abella Sudan ABO Mandela Benny Uganda Rwanda
"kinshasa" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

12:11 min | 2 years ago

"kinshasa" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Addis Ababa. Six months since the latest outbreak in the Democratic Republic of Congo broke out have been something like seven hundred confirmed cases, making it the second largest outbreak in history response efforts continue to be hampered by insecurity and community resistance from the capital Kinshasa, the BBC's guys Cohen any joins us live six months in and given the previous outbreaks in the I in recent years have been contained very quickly. Are people starting to be quite concerned about this one? Well, it depends on who we are talking to and where these people are for example in the Benue region Benny and timber region word able outbreak is rather Jing some people don't believe that Ebola Israel, some of them believe that it's some sort of come for the government to to to get money from the international community or its partners. Or maybe they think it's a political thing that is done to to to prevent them from injuring their political rights, however in other parts of the world country. They take you seriously, and people are worried you will see for example, some offices. They have places where someone can go and wash their hands before you get in in many places. Now, they're taking temperature of people to check if they have Ebola or not. So it is taken seriously, but some members of the community in Benny and Bhutan. They don't believe that people as real. And the difficulty was that Secaucus is the the the difficult areas to operate because of rebel groups in in and around Benny. And so on it's not that easy to go out is it to certain places and convince people that yes voter is real. It's not that easy. Really to know. How many people have got the disease? It's it's not really easy, for example in in bay in timbale. NBC actually, some members of their of their response team have been attacked by community people who thought that oh these guys just coming to joke with us and not do anything. Right. They have been attacked. So there's a lot of work now being involved being put into sensitizing people. But also in rebel areas. It's quite hard to send people we know that they may be kidnapped by armed dribbles. So it's making things hard for the response team. Usually in cases, like these local officials foreign aid groups, and so on say that they're not getting the resources, they need they need greater resources. Let's say to deal with an outbreak on this scale is that the case here as well. So far, we have inherited the ministry of health or even the other members of the response team complain about resources, so far the two things they're complaining about is community resistance, and and insecurity and. That's those are only the two things we've had them complain about. But not really about finances. But the scale of the outbreaks about four hundred and fifty people dead. I mean, that's pretty shocking, isn't it? It is it is. And it's the most devastating actually outbreak. We've had in DRC dear democratic probably go ahead and had ten outbreaks since nineteen seventy six, and this is the most devastating one. Of course, if you look at this level rate, for example, you we see thirty seven percent is not the lowest survival rate. But the thing is fifty seven percent of seven hundred you have more people dead done sixty three percent of thirty five for example. So you can see that it is the most devastating guys reporting to his life from Kinshasa capsule, the Democratic Republic of Congo. You're listening to news stay on the BBC World Service with adding Kasuga in Addis Ababa James cardinal in London. Our main story right now the United States says it's prepared to make concessions to secure the denuclearization of Korean peninsula. But it's still demanding that North Korea's food. Details of its nuclear arsenal. And now with the latest sports news. Matthew kenyon. Good morning. Good morning to you. We're going to talk about the Asian Cup final. It's Japan against Qatar in the UAE in a few hours time, but it's just under twenty four hours since the Asian football. Confederation confirmed that they'd been an official complaint from the host nation about the eligibility of two players who seem certain to feature in that final few as time and we've still had no word from the authorities. Remember Qatar knocked out the UA in the semifinal with thumping four nil victory. Let's talk to the BBC's many jazz may who's been covering the turnament throughout many. What is the latest on? This say we haven't heard anything official was the last thing that we had simply confirmation of that complaint. Yes, I'm getting nothing from the AFC. They the tone of the messages back to me AS Roma's rather exhaust me asking the same questions all the time. I understand that the categories are calm about this. It's all it's all speculation. What the AFC disciplinary an ethics code says is that if a team fails United enjoyable player, then they will forfeit that the matching which they filled it them if they dean to fielded them after competition, then they could be suspended for the next day AFC competition. So the US is a last gasp effort by them to try and get into the final. But the trouble is, of course, that Catta have beaten six teams already with both of these players in in almost every every match and the the question is the nationality eligibility both of these players were born abroad. There's no question about that. But my understanding is that they registered with the AFC on the basis that their mothers were born in Qatar. And that is the point of dispute. You a website has published documents which it says proves that they were born in Iraq and Sudan respectively. But it's it's unclear we still don't know what the AFC we'll do about his appeal. We'll wait and say as I say only a few as till the final Ashim he catchall make you onto the pitch later on today. Many you would expect would you not Japan to come out winners the softening? Well, I don't think it's a foregone conclusion not at all. I mean, Japan, far less impressive and cata. They peaked superbly in the semifinal after being very scratchy in the early stages, but cats have the leading goalscorer who's one of these plays alley. They haven't conceded. A single goal yet. They have the leading assist provider all of the stats are in that favor. And they will ready beaten three previous champions on the way to the final. Where they'll meet a force fantastic. Many. Jasmine, however, it pans out of the failed on the failed. Manny will be keeping us up to date later on. Here on the BBC sport today is on your radio nine hundred thousand thirty GMT and world football presented by Manny is available now at BBC World, Service dot com. A couple of other football lines for you. In fact, it's almost all football this morning on the pitch carrying Benjamin scored twice to move up to six in rail Madrid all time top goalscorers list, his Girona to reach the Coppa del Rey. Semifinals in h Lee last year beat into Milan they needed a penalty. Shoot-out though to set up a two legged copper Italia semifinal with AC melon a few lines from the end of the European transfer window English Premier League side, Crystal Palace signed Chelsea striker Michigan bat Choi on loan until the end of the season Senegal's address. Sergei is staying put Everton despite a late bid from Perry sangoma, but his colleague Ganic Belleci, the DRC international has moved to and alleged online Swansea's Ivorian style. Wilfried bony has gone to Qatari club alligator had on loan and Burnley have signed. The thirty eight year old former England striker Peter crouch that will be his seventh English primarily club. Let's hope for a sold in Germany Borussia Dortmund have confirmed that midfielders Shinji Kagawa has been loaned to test in Turkey and Barcelona agreed to sign twenty year old Brazilian Emerson from athletic amino for twelve million euros thirty million dollars. He'll join the club in July. Bacelona also added to the women's squad yesterday with Nigeria's ASI Chateau Oshawa going there on loan from her Chinese side Deliang khanjian, it's the off season in China at the moment and Schaller is came to keep in shape to compete for the super falcons at the women's World Cup later on this year, and in the NBA a winning return for LeBron James who played more than forty minutes in his first action after a seventeen game injury lay-off for the L Lakers. They beat local rivals here clippers one hundred and twenty three to one hundred and twenty after overtime. Lebron afterwards called it the toughest stretch of his career Natalie. Thank you. Now we used to hearing. That Russia is trying to influence world events on social media. Now, it's there on Facebook is closed down nearly eight hundred pages and the number of groups and accounts apparently linked to Iran that describing them as inauthentic accounts aimed at influencing opinion in more than twenty countries. So as Facebook now taking tougher action against those believed to deliberately use it to influence elections or undermine democracy. Cybersecurity expert and the presence of secure mental and also author of advanced persistent security, IRA Winkler told me more what Facebook has done has been deleted accounts that have been tied to Iranian actors. And what these accounts have done was to space simulate create fake news sites that have been purported to put out real news. But really they were putting out prop Iranian propaganda along the lines of Russia, say or. The accusation against Russia and Russian linked organizations is they're very actively trying to change elections. For example, is not the case here was this more just pushing an Iranian view on the world. I think it's a little bit of both a lot of the propaganda, frankly is anti Donald Trump because Donald Trump has been going against the US intelligence services on his own, for example, and saying that Iran is still attempting to produce nuclear weapons, which was the exact opposite conclusion of the intelligence community. So they've been kind of focusing on that type of information simultaneously. They also want to change public perception of Iran as not necessarily an enemy of the United States. They also put out pro Palestinian propaganda as well as any of the other interests in the Middle East that they've been trying to push for their own interests in the region. So. All of that sounds like depending on your political perspective true, but not necessarily. Illegal or immoral to try and put those views out there. What what then was the specific problem with the accounts pretending to be something. They weren't. That's exactly the problem. They were pretending to be legitimate local news sources within the United States, like every, you know, every city of any size in the United States tends to have a television station, a radio station or something, and they and a lot of people trust the local stations more than they might trust like an international or national station like the equivalent of a BBC, and they think that the local news is more real than national news. So they try to give that fake impression that their local news is recording these incidents, like it's a fact frankly, either way, whether it's a legal or not these people are pretending to be somebody else on the internet and they're doing so four not good reasons..

BBC United States AFC Japan Democratic Republic of Congo Kinshasa Iran Qatar Benny football DRC Addis Ababa Facebook LeBron James Ebola Russia official Middle East Donald Trump North Korea
Congo election postponed for one week amid political turmoil

Bloomberg Daybreak: Europe

00:22 sec | 2 years ago

Congo election postponed for one week amid political turmoil

"Underground, the Democratic Republic of Congo electoral authority has postponed Sunday's election. By a week. Already two years overdue and extends president Joseph Kabila's nearly eighteen year rule. The announcement triggered clashes in the capital Kinshasa between the police and supporters of one of the two main opposition presidential

Democratic Republic Of Congo E Kinshasa Joseph Kabila President Trump Eighteen Year Two Years
Delayed Congo poll offers slim hope for change

FT News

09:52 min | 2 years ago

Delayed Congo poll offers slim hope for change

"Elections on Sunday were set to herald the country's first transition of power by the ballot box with President Joseph Kabila stepping down after seventeen years in office. But an explosion of violence has caused the polls to be postponed. All the Ryan discusses what happened and why it matters with the F T Africa editor David pilling. David how much violence has been in the run-up to the polls and who's behind it wouldn't immediate run up to this election. There's been a gradual build up a violence. A number of opposition rallies have been broken up by security forces. There have been people shot dead and numbers a quite hard to come by. There was a rally there was supposed to have taken place earlier this week in Concetta by the opposition leading candidate Martin for you, which was broken up by tear gas, in fact, never took place, but one has to go even further back because this election is really been rumbling on for years. It was meant to have taken place in two thousand and sixteen and if you count the election violence, the protests against the election, not taking place and the authorities reaction to that. Then there have been dozens indeed hundreds of deaths that this election has already been responsible for as to who takes blame for this violence. A lot of it is security forces of the. Administration of the state, which is really not permitted opposition rallies, which has overreacted to demonstrations people being very frustrated at the slow pace of these elections. And now, of course, the further postponing of the poll from Sunday because that postponement is not only because of this violence is also an Ebola outbreak in the east of the country. There's voting machines which went up in flames allegedly anyway, and the electoral commission has used this as somewhat say an excuse or pretext to push the elections out a further week until December the thirtieth who are the main candidates in. What are the prospects? There are really three candidates. First of all, you have a man code Emmanuel shoddy who is running really as the proxy of Joseph Kabila, the man who's been in power for seventeen years his prospects. Most observers of Congo thing that he will win by hook. Oh by crook because the regime that's been. Power wants him to win and Kabila has shown no sign of really wanting to relinquish power. And that this is his chance to hold onto power by using what the Congolese are calling a dolphin. The opposition had briefly United on the one candidate Martin for ULA who's an oil executive who has the backing of two other politicians who would have run for the presidency. But for one reason or another worthy not allowed into the country or not allowed to run those struck down by a constitutional court. So in a sense, he's also a proxy for them. Unfortunately for the opposition the opposition split just a couple of days after agreeing to put up a United candidates, and there's another candidate called Phoenix Tshisekedi who represents in a sense, his father who for years and years and years was the official opposition who ran against not only Kabila, but Joseph Kabila's father, Lauren Kabila and bef-. For him even against Mabuza cisa cycle. He died before this election was able to take place. And so now Felix who has really the name recognition is also running can you tell us a little bit more let Mr. Sharara, then what kind of person is he well, he's not very well known in the country. He was the interior minister. And he was the interior minister at a period of some volatility when there were demonstrations in the streets of Kinshasa, December two thousand sixteen that was the first time that does Kabila at effectively refused to hold an election as he ought to have done because the constitution dictated that. And then the Kasai region also erupted into violence, and there was a very brutal security crackdown as a result of that should Dary is now the subject of European sanctions. Because inefficient he's been blamed as the head of the interior ministry for these crackdowns, which involve many, many deaths apart from that he is thought to be very loyal to Kabila. That's why Kabila chose him. The assumption is that he will do Kabila's bidding, what's at stake in this election. Why is it so important? Well, the DRC the Democratic Republic of Congo is a huge nation in the center of Africa in the Great Lakes region. It's a nearly European sized nation covered in rainforest. Very poor communications it can be impossible to get from one part of the country to another. They're very few roads. But what it does have is huge minora resources, for example, cobalt which is needed for a mobile phones, and which is needed for electric car batteries and really the green revolution. That were also expectantly awaiting in the west is really cannot happen without the resources pouring out of conga, but congress has been very poorly run to put it mildly. It's a state in a kind of near state of collapse. The somehow been held together by Joseph Kabila sort of patched together. So who runs this country? It is important for the outside world. And I would argue more importantly is very important for eighty million Congolese who despite sitting on all this huge wealth have been so poorly governed there among the poorest people in Africa with really terrible statistics. If you look at the health statistics life expectancy to disticts access to education access to hospitals and access to anything. They've really been let down by leadership has acted more as a kind of an extractive leadership to extract wealth from them than as a leadership. That's really there to serve them. So the hope for anyone is that at the very least Joseph Kabila who has been in power for seventeen years has agreed to step down. And although he is certainly trying to control the situation via his proxy, Emmanuel Chaudhary, maybe it'll get out of hand. Maybe he won't be able to control the system, and may be this in this, very messy difficult complicated. Way is one step towards a more Representative damore. Crecy given the way that you described Congo and electro system, there is this really likely to be a free election. Who's monitoring the poll it's not like to be free election tool. It's being monitored by civil society by the Catholic church by the African Union, but that doesn't have a great record in calling out elections and decisively saying that election has been stolen the expectation is that as long as the violence is not egregious as long as the theft of the poll is not obvious, then they'll be enough constituents, even including western diplomats and western representatives who will say look look stability of this country is more important than plunging it into a kind of post electoral crisis. So the expectation is that even if the process is as unfair as many people expect it to be that somehow enough people turn a blind is who it and the country. Will stumble on citizens effectively looked like the status quo continue with Mr Kabila remaining in power behind the same. That's what I think is not exactly the status quo because once you've stepped down you stepped down the president of the country. Does have a lot of constitutional powers should area said to be an absolute stalwart of Joseph Kabila. But who knows we've seen in neighboring Angola? When president does Santos gave up power after I think, it was thirty seven years in office and chose his successor gel. Lorenzo suddenly, and so has turned on the dos Angeles family as clamped down on a lot of the structures that had been set up over the previous nearly four decades, and we're seeing real change there. So I think once you relinquish the levers of power, you may try to hold onto them, and you may be successful in doing that. But we don't know what about the people on the street. Do you think they accept the result of medical Bilas choice whims? I think some will. But they'll be whole areas that weren't Kinshasa is an opposition stronghold. They've never liked Kabila who kind of holds up in the presidential palace playing. Jio games and on his farm driving around in his motorbike, very rarely appears in public even when the country descends into its near perennial crises. He's a kind of an invisible figure in the capital. And there are a whole other regions is the Kasai region, which is a huge region in the center of the country, which certainly belongs to the opposition then going to happily accept Kabila's nomination being elected. And then there's the whole east of the country a thousand miles away from Kinshasa very hard to reach the only way you can reach. It really is by plane or by boat along the Congo river. Maybe by motorbike all the way across the country. There you have minora resources, you have dozens and dozens of militia groups rebels. It's a very volatile part of the country and part of the world. And who knows what they're going to make this election. You've talked a lot about Congo's vast wealth. What do you think businesses will be heading for from this election? I think businesses really hope for some measure of style. Ability. I mean, there's a lot of rhetoric about paying tax in about being there for the good of the Congolese people about adding to the Congolese, national wealth. But if you look at the history of the Congo right from the time when it was the property of king Leopold than a Belgian colony and then in the post, colonial period, it really is a story of exploitation where these kind of minerals wealth rubber before that pours out of this vast country. But almost everybody in the country is left impoverished. Thank you very

President Joseph Kabila Kinshasa Congo Emmanuel Chaudhary Martin Kasai Power David Pilling Congo River Africa Concetta Ebola Ryan F T Africa Editor DRC
"kinshasa" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:49 min | 2 years ago

"kinshasa" Discussed on KCRW

"Kinshasa the capital of Democratic Republic of Congo. Heavier. Thanks, always a pleasure. Thank you. It's morning edition from NPR news. I'm David green. And I'm Steve Inskeep. And you're listening to morning edition on KCRW ahead on morning edition trial is scheduled to start next month in California's lawsuit against the Trump administration plan to add citizenship question to the twenty twenty census as KCRW Steve. To your tickets reports. The case is moving closer to the courtroom. After a federal judge refused to throw out a challenge last week. It was the US Justice department and asked the judge to decide the case in its favor before trial. Now, the Trump administration has maintained that the question is needed to help enforce laws on voting rights, but documents show that it was the US commerce secretary, not the Justice department who had requested the question months earlier. Judge Richard seaboard ruled on Friday that the state had presented enough evidence to support its thirty to challenge the plan. And there was what he called a material dispute of fact over whether the question would affect the final population count. Now the state. In California says the question would discourage immigrants from participating resulting in an undercount and fewer people reporting that they live in California could cost the state federal funding. The pays for a whole lot of things. The last time. There was a citizenship question on the census form was nineteen fifty for KCRW. I'm Steve is a spokeswoman for the Justice department did not immediately have comment a trial in a separate lawsuit over the citizenship question in federal court in New York ended last month and a ruling is.

US Justice department KCRW Steve Inskeep California Steve Judge Richard seaboard Democratic Republic of Congo Kinshasa David green NPR US New York
Sri Lanka's president reinstates prime minister he sacked

BBC World Service

00:25 sec | 2 years ago

Sri Lanka's president reinstates prime minister he sacked

"And the Japanese city who has released a map of a hundred hot spas or Anson, which will welcome tourists with tattoos during next year's rugby World Cup tattoos have become widespread in the western part of traditional culture in countries such as New Zealand who will be taking part, but in Japan there associated with Uku organized crime gangs and many bonds prohibit people with tattoos from entering Beppu describes itself as the onset capital of Japan. And that's the latest BBC news. This is from our own correspondent here on the BBC World Service. I'm PASCAL harder. Hello and welcome to the program that takes you to places others. Just don't reach in this edition. We've visit an elegant well established face of Catalan politics now behind bars and facing charges of rebellion. We also take a trip on a wooden canoe to see how the Democratic Republic of Congo is preparing for elections next weekend and for some lighthearted fun. We'll go axe throwing in Canada. Larry, apparently, it's a thing sweeping the nation. But our first stop is Iraq to meet some extraordinary women. There have been protests in Iraq recently calling on perpetrators of violence against women to be punished and calling for the state to create the conditions in which women can go about their lives without fear. This is partly as a result of some recent high profile killings. An Iraqi social media star was murdered by men on motorbikes in broad daylight in the center of Baghdad a female human rights activists was shot dead in Basra. But it's also in protest at scores of Iraqi women being murdered every month the justification that they were being immoral disobeying. Their husbands all bringing disgrace to their families shaima halio met some women willing to risk their own lives to protect other women and girls from this violence Doma is one of Iraq's most famous dishes. It's also one of my favorites. It reminds me. Of the stuffed vegetables. I eat back home in Egypt where I grew up, but it's much spicier Bessemer is a bit of an expert on Doma and during the last seven years, she's taken to cooking as a hobby, and as a coping mechanism takes my mind off things she tells me as she peels the onions, all my fear, my anxiety, my sadness. I turn this energy into cooking. Vessel lives with seven other women in a big modestly. Furnished home in a quite Baghdad neighborhood. Some of them are helping in the kitchen cutting vegetables, and washing rice, others, sit in a corner sorting beads to make bracelets necklaces a couple of children are running around. But this busy household filled with noise and laughter and the smell of home cooked meals is also a secret shelter for women who've survived domestic abuse. You're not Mohammed has agreed to show me around. But only after a lot of negotiation. She's the president of the organization of. Women's freedom in Iraq, an NGO which runs ten underground shelters. Only my producer a woman, of course, an I are allowed to visit. And we have to change cars on route to avoid being followed. The government refuses to give the shelters official status and can read them any time if they find them, but that's not the only threat in our in her organization face we shelter women from honor killing from trafficking and from abusive families. She tells me the shelters have to be secret because the abusers will follow the women and tried to kidnap them from us or even kill them. When I asked Basma why she's here her mood changes. And she tilts her head down. I was thirteen playing in the streets. When he took me dress me up and told me I was going to another house to get married. She says, I didn't know what was happening. I thought we were just visiting someone that I would come home the next day for the next three years. Best male was repeat. Tiddly abused by the man, she was forced to marry and by his family, then her story gets even more horrendous and surreal a man spotted her in the market one day and kidnapped her he said he was in love with me. And he was going to take me away from my husband's family. She says looking at the floor fidgeting with her bracelet. But her kidnappers father refused to keep her and best male was sent far away to a brothel in Iraqi Kurdistan. When I realized what was happening. I beg the women there to spare me she says. I couldn't do what they were asking me to do. I told them L beg on the streets. But not this. They let her go best managed to get a job in a cafe nearby. And after a few months, it's owner helped her get back to back debt to her family to safety or so she thought they said I had dishonoured them because I'd left my husband, and they didn't know what the other man had done with me. That's my says, I was just there. Waiting listening to their conversations about my fate. Even when I fought. My father's soften a little the men from our tribe would pressure him and say you have to kill her. It's the only way so one day with the help of a friend. I ran away. She says she was only sixteen seven years on best must still in hiding. But she now runs the shelter. She calls home. Yes. Of course. I get scared. She admits we're on the same boat here. That's why I helped them I have to protect them. You're not Mohammed tells me that across Iraq are fifty two women living in the NGOs shelters just a tiny fraction of those in need of help. She looks at her phone and shows me a message from a woman in muscle. If you don't get here soon. It says I'll be dead despite the challenges are remains optimistic and is proud of the women. She's helped many of whom have gone on to help other victims of violence, but best Ma is less. Hopeful she tells me she's come a long way she's married with two young daughters. I fear for them every single day. I don't want them to go through what I went through. All I wanted was to normal child. I asked about her girls futures. My biggest hope is that they leave. She says that they grow up outside Iraq. Only. Then will I feel that they're safe shaima halio next to the Democratic Republic of Congo? If you're Congolese the democratic base is sort of a joke. That's never been very funny and all the Congolese people I've known have tended to be pretty eager to laugh about most things Congo has a history of political strongman and multi-player wars next weekend. Though elections are due to be held Congo is also a vast country crisscrossed by rivers rather than roads with forty million voters living widely dispersed. So how'd you manage an election under those circumstances? Our correspondent Louise west has been following one man's determined voyage to bring democracy to his people a father and son paddling wooden canoe carrying a large black box as they pushed through the rainforest the some stops to take care of his father. Other next to that Congo an electronic voting machine. It's come all the way from South Korea. The man who works for the electoral commission is taking it to isolate villages to demonstrate how it works. The machines are supposed to make voting cheaper and quicker. But critics say they're vulnerable to vote rigging and worry about the congress on reliable power supply this journey along. The river is testament the challenge of organizing elections in this impenetrable landscape and in a country practically the size of western Europe. I was curious to find out more about Uber by Dan, his mission tracking down his phone number his colleagues from the electoral commission warned me, not sure you'll be able to get him reception is very poor over there. He's based thousands of kilometers from the capital Kinshasa where I am you there. Bindi is a forty seven year old computer engineer. He lives in Vasan Kusa at the conference of the Lapore and marine rivers to have the congress tributaries. It's the last. Sports before the wilderness of the Lapore base and the town has a traumatic history during colonial times, it was one of the first trading post where locals with forced into the brutal Robert trade down a Fonzie phone line tells me the story behind the photo I had managed to get a place on a boat belonging to friends of the bonobos. It's a local conservation group here trying to protect endangered apes. They were also heading to combat low. So they agreed to take my son and me, but when we ride the boat was already full, you bet laughs. You know, our geography makes it very difficult to reach voters. So we have to adopt to find solutions they pay to local fishermen ten thousand Congolese francs around six US dollars to bar. His canoe nearly three times the average daily income.

Iraq Congo Baghdad Mohammed Electoral Commission BBC Bbc World Service Japan Axe Throwing Congress Rugby Beppu Doma Canada Larry New Zealand Kinshasa Lapore UKU United States
Ecuador, Venezuela and BBC discussed on BBC World Service

BBC World Service

00:50 sec | 3 years ago

Ecuador, Venezuela and BBC discussed on BBC World Service

"Border controls coming into force in Peru to limit the influx of migrants fleeing the economic crisis in Venezuela similar restrictions, were introduced in Ecuador last week but they've been overturned by a court Katie Watson has. More? Details in the past few days Ecuador's laid on dozens of buses to move Venezuelans through the country. Trying to get as many as possible to the Peruvian border before the new restrictions come in it's been referred to as a humanitarian Cardo but there's another motivation. To it's not an Ecuador's interests have thousands of Venezuelans stranded in the country with nowhere to, go and, as judge's ruling on does Ecuador's efforts. To, stem the flow of people coming through the economic situation is worse Listening and more and more. People are leaving Venezuela every day and what's being referred to as Latin America's worst migrant crisis in its history

Ecuador Venezuela BBC Catholic Church Pope Francis Kinshasa Pacific Ocean Ireland Buenos Aires Cristina Fernande President Trump Cristina Fernandez Eileen Mccue Bashir United States Democratic Republic Of Congo Schnur Harbin James Cook Hanan Ashrawi Hawaii
"kinshasa" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:26 min | 3 years ago

"kinshasa" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Mission with this record as much as an album can have any kind of mission is not just expression of of a, moment Was to bridge a gap between Africa and the world what do you mean Well the thing is there's this idea of of Africa of music in Africa that people will always imagine. People dancing in the, jungle and, be playing, drums in those gotta stop by and and there's also you know in, Africa there's contemporary music companies who has been. There for a very long time and he has evolved for very long time but I also wanted you have this since I was born in Kinshasa and I was born into the colonies. Roomba and then move out of Kinshasa and came to live here in Canada I've learned so much about music the coming year and does many genre music that inspires me and I wanted to have all of that put together just to make it easier, for someone like me who have spent is half of his life in Africa have. Of his life overseas Can feel. Oh does something that something that resembles me is this something that is talking to me I love the way you said that that there's this perception of African music in western investors also like I just can't believe we we say like African music as, if it's not a gigantic Continent People in different regions and different political. Backgrounds they go wherever it leads me to something that I'm so happy you're talking, about which is the term world music What what are. You here when that word music that's nonsense we need to stop with it because, what is world music you know I can imagine when whenever we, talk about? With music you can have someone doing classical music from India? For example Being in that category, with someone doing the music that I. Do that doesn't make any sense you can be. Making classical music from India and it should be in? Classical music, it shouldn't be in some category name road music what is the word that we. Putting into that box you know, it doesn't make any. Sense with an other ring of everything that's not western. Exactly so it doesn't help with raise, doesn't help with anything so we need to stop, putting things in the box, and if someone is doing. Pop music whether he sings in French inning gallery in English if it is, pop music just call it pop music I believe I'm making.

Africa Kinshasa India Canada
BBC, Argentina and Mr. Beatty discussed on A Public Affair

A Public Affair

00:14 sec | 3 years ago

BBC, Argentina and Mr. Beatty discussed on A Public Affair

"Just the other, day Funny Good

BBC Argentina Mr. Beatty Zimbabwe President Trump Russia Joseph Kabila Utah Congolese Emmanuel Sha Dari Kinshasa Ann Mr Hun Tendai Biti Wisconsin Emmanuel Sherry Academy Awards European Union Permanent Secretary Madison
"kinshasa" Discussed on BBC Radio 4

BBC Radio 4

02:22 min | 3 years ago

"kinshasa" Discussed on BBC Radio 4

"Of practice for employers if a company breaks that code the commission says any employment tribunal payouts should be twenty five percent higher the woman who acted as a mentor for the parson's green bomber in the year before his attack says he had not agreed to work with prevent the government's deregulation program kate cable told bbc news that she believed armored hassan's lack of consent meant he wasn't properly engaged with the program he was found guilty last week of attempted murder for leaving a bomb on a tube drain injuring more than fifty people a home affairs correspondent jim kelly reports kate cable mentored art met hasaan on a voluntary basis for year before his attack she wasn't working for the prevent deregulation program she's told the bbc that while preventative officials in sorry while having meetings about hasaan she was concerned that he hadn't agreed to take part in the program sorry county council is now knowledge that it didn't seek hassans consent but it said star from prevent agencies met him on many occasions and gave him support in a brief statement the metropolitan police insisted that hasaan was engaged in prevent the speculation that the north korean leader kim jong un is about to make a visit to china if confirmed it would mark mr kim's first trip abroad since taking office in twenty eleven beijing is sent to be under tight security with a heavy police presence at a guest house where north korean leaders have previously stayed the british government has warned of a horrifying escalation of violence in the democratic republic of congo the international development secretary penny morton told bbc news the congolese authorities had to allow free and fair elections to take place later this year if the crisis is to be tackled from the capital kinshasa are africa editor fergal keane reports and speaking of a horrifying escalation of violence the international development secretary is echoing the concerns of the wider donor community conflicts in several provinces have led to the displacement of millions with the latest crisis affecting the northeastern region of a tory in recent days i saw tens of thousands of displaced people there and met survivors of massacres there is an atmosphere of deep uncertainty about this country's political future the intervention by the.

british government fergal keane editor africa china jim kelly secretary kinshasa penny morton beijing mr kim kim jong un hasaan bbc hassan kate cable twenty five percent
"kinshasa" Discussed on Channel 955

Channel 955

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"kinshasa" Discussed on Channel 955

"It's a woman trying to whining oh jeez lives and not somebody causing higher both save vessels girls or just people girlfriends then became the mothers and it's just now is just the thing to do really the worldwide situation and uh terrorism and other things you know he has to won't be a running out to act of military even though it's a fun thing as a friendly thing but it puts them on edge anna it could be a danger i thought that that was the case now is a thought that you with you know the way that things have been going over the years these these soldiers probably don't wanna be put into a position where they don't wanna now i don't think about anything to do with that i mean it's an innocent kiss on the cheek to leave lipstick it's been i mean it's gone on forever like they since the civil war since 18 24 every day saying it's been generated under run out in kinshasa soldiers and leave some lipstick on their cheeks and it's only recently they're worried more about you know people harming the soldiers in a train table right and and the military doesn't want it to happen we don't want it to happen and are just do the right like you don't want somebody run out there in addition your wife or your model so treat them as i am way no i like when people kissed my momma zone targets skinny genes are causing injuries do you guys by your genes that target nearly thirty thousand of these genes have been pulled from their stock off their shelves because the girl genes reportedly have been cutting their customers the kids like they're they're studs there there's like lena dunham rain yup these pieces from the blink of come off and actually cut some of via the customers would jeez so the the people who have these are i tell you could have reacted target for a full refund at in your time up the been dazzling i thought you meant like they restricted blood flow that us oh skinny yeah but they're actually causing blood flow on a sex shop opening up in the san francisco airport so if you're on a two or three hour delay got some time to kill the sex shop may come to san francisco's airport it would be a pop up shop.

kinshasa san francisco three hour
"kinshasa" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"kinshasa" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Is my view account pre hutu deserve today more than ever it to be in peace these my sincere hope that now the current authorities present kabila will take bold measure approved shoul how much he loves discount pre diaz but when you put your concerns when when you were in kinshasa and you put the kinds of concerns you've just aired here to people in authority to people in government are they recognize the scale of the problem they did and there at that time the prime minister even committee that day will make every effort to organize peace farham so as to promote reconciliation among the people in the kasai and that has been off course some measures backed yet as i say we need to do more you will work is on the prevention of genocide how do you convince people who have developed such an irrational hatred for another group that they shouldn't carry out the kinds of atrocities that your trying to prevent where we need first and foremost to promote inclusive societies when you see what is happening indoors countries around the world who shot facing conflict where appleseed crimes by which i defer genocide crimes against humanity were gums are being committee it is the result of lung discrimination it is the result of exclusion when you see people being excluded from access.

kabila kinshasa prime minister
"kinshasa" Discussed on Bigmouth

Bigmouth

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"kinshasa" Discussed on Bigmouth

"Routes that look like they've not been redeveloped a massive amounts of money out incident as the piste region as soon as well as so like a kitchen of that fiber jerry area just the something about the mfi chin sorta meltdown in there if that early '90s catch hasn't been done things that that read i he i was can avi rica thinking yelling platelets kinshasa's imprinted with what i loved about it was the fact that it is you know it's it's truthful about t that ventured that like that makes bledel you know they're feces that consensus via has now it's no landings kind of hate each other around they desired they'll they'll drop each other in it at the drop of a hostel for trade for anything it's all college gas it well i mean i've not been are vital els is pretty out of date now but i ask but i did be a key really captured the mad boredom of being a t h at the after the fact that you're in the middle of a of a of a sectarian civil war is almost incidental spring it's like which is every crisis is ninety percent boredom for the people involved in in an inconvenient inconvenient inconvenient tedious and so that that the kills was a fantastic performances really particularly erin says sasha monica jackson's our they'd like the kind of insofar as a central karditsa and it's a really tomase already adult performance it's like ludicrously said called expressive kind the top really really as facial expressions of brilliant what she thought isn't by limits experts a teenage years that's what teenage girls ally over the top every think big dale i have is this early i get dale yeah.

kinshasa civil war erin sasha monica jackson t ninety percent
"kinshasa" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:46 min | 3 years ago

"kinshasa" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The well done don't it though though done well done build it oh no 2017 album by the american born lithuanian based singer violinist and luper abraham brody his album is called from the rich dark earth and that track is called yao oust almost ruza it's all ready dawn that's all abraham live by the way all the voices of all the violins the looping station allows him to do that he did it for us here in our studio in 2017 one of the other things that happened here that last year is that we started doing live sessions on facebook so that you could actually watch what's happening in addition to hearing it and and we did a facebook session with abraham brody and a couple of other musicians really terrific record number five on my top ten list for a 2017 at number four is a soundtrack now there's a story here as you might expect because soundtrack goes to a movie in the movie tells the story of felicite that's the title of the movie the character felisa today is a single mother trying to make her way in the bustling city of kinshasa in congo and the way she does that her day job is actually a night job she is the singer for a band one of those congo tron ix style bands where they've taken the role sounds of the traditional thumb piano and married it to this jury rig highly distorted sound system the the style noticed cargo trot x has produced a couple of bans that have gone on to tour the world one of them is the kasai allstars and in fact they play a kind of a version of themselves in the film so this character of the lisa today is essentially their lead singer in the movie the soundtrack is called around felicite at it includes some of these songs that the kasai allstars recorded for the film on on it also includes a number of works by the estonian composer arvo paired performed by the local chorus and the local orchestra in kinshasa neither of.

abraham brody facebook kinshasa congo
"kinshasa" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"kinshasa" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Let's music from the danish composer boo halted the last of his grundvik mo tat's there are five of these mo tat's named for the gruntvig church in copenhagen and that we began that said actually with the first of the five which as you could probably tell shares a lot of musical material you've got the oregon drone in the in the background in the the ascending set of of cords from the chorus ours nova is the name of the choir that performed this music by blue halten we've heard them performa quite a few of his pieces over the years in between the two gruntvig motete spy bul hilton we heard one of the seven magnificant enter farms by the estonian composer arvo perished oh emanuel was the particular add to fawn we heard sung by this chorus from the city of kinshasa the symphony orchestra their associated with is the key mbongi sta symphony orchestra this is the chorus that comes from the same kind of communitybased music program there in kinshasa and although neither the chorus nor the orchestra has much infrastructure behind the of their own of a great concert hall in in the case of the orchestra and a lot of quality in from its they still make make it musical you know they're just they're committed and really great performances uh this is from uh the film score to the movie felicite them film score is called a round felicite also features the congo traumatic sound of the kasai allstars which we've heard on new sounds in the past on this edition of new sounds though we are focusing on voices and in a moment we'll hear from the american composer francis white her piece is for chorus and electronics so stay with us for that as we continue with new.

copenhagen emanuel kinshasa oregon congo
"kinshasa" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:21 min | 4 years ago

"kinshasa" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Ooh let's actually to bans in one from kinshasa the capital of congo we heard the ah the band called bone wanna star with their guests members of their fellow contrast the band can no no number one who were a big splash on the world music scene back in the first decade of the century with their thumb pianos in their weird kind of amplifier systems made out of car parts and stuff very distinctive sound that among us star uses to good effect in that song called molokai before that fraud burkina fasso landlocked country in west africa we heard from baba commandant not his real name and the mandingo banned baba commandants sings and plays the ongoing either traditional hunters guitar of west africa and that we heard a song from their albums yuegui up you'll notice i'm not attempting that song title again i think i hurt myself the first time round we began that sat in mali with the guitarist hub kwok day and featuring the molly in rapper master sue me the song was called ballantyne on which means football and we're listening on this edition of new sounds to some music from western and central africa but especially to contemporary music with kind of a modern sound or modern gloss to it but that still uses traditional instruments we've already heard things like the balaphone which is these lila phone mike instrument the core which is the west african harp is coming up in this next piece you'll hear lots of interesting string instruments and percussion as we head through the hour but right now an instrumental track from the guitarist boubacar traore a veteran molly and musician writes a lot of songs does the fair amount of singing but does occasionally give you these beautiful little instrumental tracks this one is called seen a musso djougou and it features it sounds like two tracks of guitar and one of the core which blends beautifully in with the sound of the acoustic guitar here's boubacar trowel ray on new sounds.

kinshasa congo car parts mali ballantyne africa fraud west africa baba commandants musso
"kinshasa" Discussed on Science in Action

Science in Action

01:43 min | 4 years ago

"kinshasa" Discussed on Science in Action

"I'm not anywhere near much can fire now at the point about the icpm front will pit away from that and b five why would kim jongun heffer luke the united states i mean the end of him at the end of his regime however one could spent the entire war on the korean peninsula and what i've been trying to promote is is that i'll president and a small fees to north korea to talk to kinshasa on and and cause people to make sure that we should step back from the nuclear precipice that we have been using tools particularly in these last seven eight months geoghegan knows only talking to plant of the more united since he's institute in london it's interesting that these amendments are unfolding on the brink of the anniversary of the nonproliferation treaty fifty years ago intended to avoid justice gone to instability well enough absorbs that's to into ploughshares as in the technology to feed ourselves now that more than half of us live in cities divorced from the farms fields and ponds of agriculture that's pressure to bring food production to our busy streets and high above the crowded streets of greenwich whom to the meridian line on the roof of the university this greenhouse which combines acquaculture fishfarming in vegetable patty's with hydro pornick's soil this fruit and veg grown in water tanks benz cops in was there to welcome me to his vision of the future global akwa pornick's according to the greenhouse effect.

united states north korea geoghegan food production greenwich kim jongun president kinshasa london seven eight months fifty years
"kinshasa" Discussed on Mentoring Moments

Mentoring Moments

01:37 min | 4 years ago

"kinshasa" Discussed on Mentoring Moments

"There's no question i've gotten much better at accepting that and knowing that every time that in my mind that i think that i failed i've had huge growth spurts after that and i know a lot of people would see the same thing but it certainly true of me uncertainty scares me and uncertainty in a security since i love uncertainty in terms of my day part of what really appeal to me about the fbi is that nothing would be the same and so in that sense i thrive on uncertainty and things changing all the time but the times that i can think of that i was most afraid was when i was in certain situations overseas in a in a country that was in conflict or war there was a lack of good rule of law institutions and knowing that if something happened to me the chances of it being handled appropriately were remote like the first time i went to kinshasa in the democratic republic of the congo days before i got in there in italian woman who worked for the italian red cross had been ripped out of her car at an intersection that i was going through every day between my hotel and the embassy and she had been taken in an gangraped by more than two dozen men and and tossed on the side of the road and that scared me because first of all the diseases she would have had which he went through the trauma as a victim in second because even though i was there and i had partners and i had to trust them to a certain degree the sense that that could happen to me.

fbi kinshasa congo
"kinshasa" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

WFAN Sports Radio_FM

02:15 min | 4 years ago

"kinshasa" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

"Tanaka is back in the dugout after warming up and here comes jordan zimmerman so we are about to get underway fora brad house mrs detroit tigers in kinshasa were laid off at ubs they think it's over for them be alert home team be alert they know how to win that's all i'm saying and you know how the baseball playoffs are this has a little bit more to do than just what the cubs it can get tricky in the post season and they don't have to be a wild card if they win that central you're not do what the coin flip unlike the american league sleeper that i have this sleepers going to jump out bite somebody it is adam hawks seattle mariners that's right he is a key was did he what i told of this is my sleeper pick in the american league just two games about five hundred right now but only a game and a half out of that wildcard spot they been red hot they won four straight several of the last hand this team kid hit the baseball and they give to hide behind the shadow of the houston astros all season astra's are running away from it you know the seattle mariners no they're playing for a cardi's they've known that since early may so there is actually less pressure on them this team does not pitch extraordinary in the first antigod and that's the starting pitching put the bullpen is nails and that lineup when kyle segers like dare your fifthbest hitter yeah i that's pretty dangerous don't do not sleep on the seattle mariners because there by sleeper the american lee cubs at or good stuff there that's right sleepless in seattle though it sleeping in seattle a don't do it on the mariners they're dangerous long absolutely dangerous are you know what else is dangerous getting a little weight year old age and believe me i could write a couple of cookbooks about it at have right i know i know fact at the story that came out in sports with the great kobe bryant ends people try to fat chair name for a picture with him on vacation i believe in italy actually i believe that's where.

Tanaka jordan zimmerman kinshasa cubs adam hawks american league baseball houston astros astra seattle mariners kyle segers seattle kobe bryant italy
"kinshasa" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:40 min | 4 years ago

"kinshasa" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The takes us all the way from the violence afflicting the streets of kinshasa in the congo yvonne musk's tesla factories in nevada we consider this gas mineral that could be threatening the transition to electric cars worldwide going to have to reduce individual or rubbing you'll be no more individuals and one kurt busch litter screen world that's all the government business daily from the bbc yesterday's story is complex and intriguing and it does say a lot about the problems of globalised industry these days it's so complex that you're going to have to bear with me then start though in africa in the democratic republic of congo it's a country that long been mired adding bitter fighting with rival warlords competing for control of its huge mineral resources today the violence is done to deteriorate the problem this year is largely focused on the government's failure to set a date for elections elections were originally meant to take place in the country last december according to the un the opposition and a variety of campaign groups there is no legitimate reason for this delay mennea calling it a straightforward powergrab by the government of joseph kabila new research from the campaign group global witness adjusts the people close to the government could be involved in massive wholesale theft of the country's tax revenues nathaniel dial off global witness explains the drc revenues primarily from mining whether that's culpa cobalt all gold is the vast majority of its export earnings what we found in our is the little six percent of the total value of the aussies mining exports end up in the national treasury to be use on a central public services right so the tax code d on that export money on on those exports is not ending up buildings schools and hospitals and building the roads that the country desperately needs some tax does get through and we have seen some marginal improvement parts the main results allow research has being that's we're seeing huge gaps seven hundred and fifty million dollars worth of mining revenues which should end up in the national treasury on on ending up their term android and fifty million dollars who has got the.

kinshasa yvonne musk nevada bbc africa theft public services tesla kurt busch joseph kabila tax revenues drc android fifty million dollars six percent
"kinshasa" Discussed on Business Daily

Business Daily

01:47 min | 4 years ago

"kinshasa" Discussed on Business Daily

"Hello i'm ed butler and welcomed the business daily from the bbc today fascinating and a complex tail for you one the takes us all the way from the violence afflicted streets of kinshasa in the congo to leedle musk's tesla factories in nevada we consider this gas mineral that could be threatening the transition to electric cars worldwide grew going to have to dramatically reduce individual ownership and driving you'll be no more individuals in one card poster extremely wealthy battle to come in business daily from the bbc yes today's story is complex and intriguing and it does say a lot about the problems of globalised industry these days it's so complex that you're going to have to bear with me let's stop coke in africa in the democratic republic of congo it's a country that long been mired in bitter fighting with rival warlords competing for control of its huge mineral resources today the violence is starting to deteriorate the problem this year is largely focused on the government's failure to set a date for elections elections were originally meant to take place in the country last december according to the un the opposition and a variety of campaign groups there is no legitimate reason to this delay mennea calling it a straightforward powergrab by the government of joseph kabila you research from the campaign group global witness adjusts the people close to the government could be involved in massive wholesale theft of the country's tax revenues.

ed butler bbc kinshasa musk nevada joseph kabila theft tax revenues tesla africa
"kinshasa" Discussed on The ONE Thing

The ONE Thing

02:06 min | 4 years ago

"kinshasa" Discussed on The ONE Thing

"But why our idea about growing your business rapidly was very simple let's being groups of people all day long instead of one person at a time and that way we thought we could build our business a lot quicker and uh it works and uh and the first year we ended up being number nine in the board became number one number one right after that so that let us that all that hard work during the day when kids are in school lead us to have a lotta evenings free and because the work that was being done with significant and it was how we were spending our time it wasn't more time it was how we were spending our time will you probably also had to say a really powerful to letter word a lot um called no which i think a lot of people struggle with because opportunities you're out there you were intentional you were working at eur forming relationships it's not like just because you in groups of people throughout the day while your kids were at school that a five or six o'clock people stopped asking you to do things talk to me about vat mindset because that's where people struggle it's true but it goes right back to the original comment about mindset now what your mind said about their their people there lovely deep warren people that may be need will help or just want to talk or whatever and all that lovely but i have a limited amount of time and i need suspended in the way that i can get what i want my wife's to be and you got a really good in kinshasa about that so to this day is very hard for people to get in front of me you know if you are i mean people would meet me and realize i'm growing business and you know they want to sell me i don't know you know couzy cups or you know promotional flyers or whatever people want to sell me stuff you start to succeed in business big or so you start a very simple answer come on the phone super league may i say no you can email me some information buksich bartica service if i mentioned at all follow up with the facts.

kinshasa
"kinshasa" Discussed on Go Time

Go Time

01:59 min | 4 years ago

"kinshasa" Discussed on Go Time

"Above poolside think are very worthwhile reads in other words she's a amazing person really hard worker i don't think she gets enough recognition in i wanna make sure we recognize her today we all love jb delayed she put some really great blog post and stuff to a guy i've learned a lot from her over the years kinshasa was on the show on just one of the most show is on the show own episode to twenty two did you know that my heart adieu look it up and take it up i voted l because i think there was an episode were you called out and absurd number somebody was on without looking at up and i was shocked i'm showers shocks to vote once it's like we two episodes ago may be i forget like i know it was just a few episodes ago who how 'bout you johnny for myself of been using this so devoting he bugging aide whole q are they also court from our komo arm project at originally from on on the pipeline community but um um i'm see why oh sorry on your sorry henman get hub how can puzzling um but he he's i think he reported that over of curious basically if better um formed primetass basically are other than that i don't use a debater leica you know if you're familiar with delvoie like that i'm not not a big fan of the voters are a more of the old school you know printed out log it out in in your house you i am in the programme coming in from me um using q has sort of been a better experience for that so typically the way it works is that you'd have you'd have a missio terminal on console pin and you just run qq in that what that does is a stream that starts to a output time in a really nice formatted away.

jb kinshasa henman