35 Burst results for "King's College"

"king college" Discussed on Shutdown Fullcast

Shutdown Fullcast

06:49 min | 3 months ago

"king college" Discussed on Shutdown Fullcast

"A field goal and I distinctly remember turning to you before you and see Florida state and saying Max GonNa Hang Fifty on these people. Like I. I can't remember the last time I thought game was going to be this much of a blow out in one direction and I was wrong in the other direction. Okay. So take straight up turnovers one. Right it wasn't like there was a huge advantage, their penalties like fifty, eight, nine yards. There's not a massive number of penalty. Thinking about this because I thought, you was going to blow their breaks off UNC outgained them by over one hundred yards. They had eleven more first downs a Sam Hal had a pretty good gay man like this looks claim cycle. A lot of it is that Florida jumped out to twenty four point lead twenty, four, zero lead and they obviously didn't. Score a lot more as the game went on but they they did to some extent kind of park the bus they also had some dumb like both of the field goals they mess for like thirty, three, thirty, five yards, something like that. But like. If you go back and look through this game every time there was like that little thing where it's like, okay. If you can just do that if they can just convert this like four and one or if they can just pick up this. Third and three though continue the drive and get the touchdown that will sort of like opened the floodgates and every time they hit one of those points pretty much until the end of the game when they started come back. It went terribly wrong. They went over three on fourth down in this game and the like the last one was the last their last player on offense, but the other two were like. Short Short yardage situations where they could of converted they were fucking terrible on third down on third down, they converted third and one and a third to, and that was it. That was the only offensive conversions they had on third down all night. Day like an and like I'm saying when when they didn't convert, it wasn't just like up thirty five turning completion. It was up third and five got sacked and lost fifteen yards like. This was such a such a like in the margins game and like. You it's like, have you ever seen somebody just go on terrible streak at blackjack where you're just like every every time every you play every hand, right? Yeah exactly. You've played every hand right but just the dealer kept kicking your ass that was kind of what happened to UNC right right I think you're statistical analysis. This is this is good. This is informative but I think the if I could pick out a single number from this box score that I think would would spell victory here. F issue through nineteen passes, and that is almost half as many as UNC through. As we've learned passing is bad. Bad. Stupid. If you do it if issue managed to avoid it in fact, she really didn't do anything on offense. It looks like they didn't even have the ball like UNC through thirty six passes ran forty five times. FSU Ran Thirty six times in past nineteen times. So do you have all the entire time nothing happened? Make a mistake on offense if you don't have the ball. SMART. Play smarter not harder also. Also the knowles. Every time the got the ball they broke a big play, fifty, four, Fifty, eight, thirty, nine, thirty, six. Get Ball. Do something with it. Whereas you in just one thing just do one thing with it. That's it. You don't get to do more than one thing and get your defense back on the field. Yeah? Yeah so so so so they can take a long time to get the ball away from the offense. Stuff on the go to for twelve on third down. Yeah. That is bad blackjack man that's nasty between between this game and Notre Dame Louisville, which I will only I will only remark upon by saying the winning team. Notre. Dame scored twelve points. I have a very hard time seeing how like anybody else in this conference is going to be a meaningful threat to Clemson who I don't even think we've talked about. Clemson much on the show. The season at all clemson continues to look like. Like. An, absolute murder machine and I just don't. You know they've already they already beat Miami and that didn't look that hard. I don't see how anybody else left on the schedule or in the conference championship game is like even going to slow them down at this point. Like, they what the punter came in and started throwing passes on Georgia tech to daboh sons Davos Song. This week they are forty four and a half point favorites against Syracuse Scott and I'm. Not sure that number that doesn't have to numbers not attractive. Really. Can You? Can you like big numbers? Clock. Why do we need to do this? Is there a single reason we need to play this game? No for guessing Simpson's punter. Could use some more throwing reps sure clemson. At one point they swapped out there extra point kicker for their backup. Extra point kicker. They had. This other dude like three extra points. Like Why are we doing this? That's that's very gracious of you Devo Oh good Lord, and it's funny because people reflexively were like who didn't clearly didn't watch the like seventy, three seventy ran up the score and it's like, no, they really tried to if of you had driven to the game and said, Hey can I play? They probably would have put you in for a few snaps at linebacker for different bathroom pass. Ten ran the ball. I'm not even GonNa Count, but it looks like fifteen caught passes including two difference winnings. I didn't even know they were. Winnie's I didn't know there were two on the team. He's not even a relative. We took them because of the name is I like this kid, Amway? Not. Merciful It looks like the backup punter got rip. Oh. No Oh. I. See what happened here? The backup kicker is also the backup punter. Great. Yes. Yeah. My God can I give you the Clemson did something that is a rarity but what if my favorite? You're about this life moments. In this. This would they told Georgia tech that you were not about his life and texts like no no, we are not no. No. We would like to get to the end of this agreed not claim to be..

UNC Clemson Florida Sam Hal Notre Dame Louisville clemson Georgia tech Max Amway Notre Syracuse FSU Dame murder Georgia Miami Simpson Winnie Scott
"king college" Discussed on Shutdown Fullcast

Shutdown Fullcast

08:28 min | 3 months ago

"king college" Discussed on Shutdown Fullcast

"Seven. Kentucky. Thirty four Tennessee seven. Because his four turnovers on the Tennessee side the same teams. They're not dissimilar. It's worse if you don't wear your headphones, I promised my headphones and then I could hear you louder. The problems I put him back on thirty four seven Kentucky is by far my favorite team in the SEC right now because Kentucky has mastered the art of trying less. They're just what are they? GonNa do. They're GONNA play defense they're gonNA put Terry Wilkes out there Terry. Wilson's GonNa do a quarterback. Thing. Enough, that's not. He's not going to throw forty something times. That's for sure. That's right. Now I'm leaning firmly towards your quarterback throwing war is bad in my old age I'm becoming like you know what happens when you pass the ball you're not Kentucky that's what happens. This is Eddie Eddie grants the macgyver of Kentucky of offensive coordinator's because somebody gave him a paper clip some chewing gum three batteries and some string, and he's gotTa make an airplane out of it. He's going to do it. Because Somehow Kentucky keeps winning games despite having. What I would charitably call less than nothing. On offense. They also by the way dropped like two TV's in this game. So it could have been worse well, also within the first twenty minutes, Kentucky's defense had outscored Tennessee's offense for the entire game. So really at that point like I don't know what you need to do on offense. We need to do we need to get to five o'clock boys. Get to five o'clock. Do. We have to go take twenty minutes in the bathroom while we check our phone, it's what we're going to have to do. Maybe we league in the copy room. A little longer than we have to no problem. Does lunch creep over a little bit. Yeah. Are we gonNA play Games on our phone at our desk share. But we're going to get to five o'clock. We're GONNA make it through. S Kentucky Man I just shot to Davis by the way for copying open container on a bus. Somebody said when somebody asked Mark Stoops few happy about the when he said Yeah I'm going to go on the bus and drink a glass of Bourbon that I'm going to go home and smoke a cigar. techy hell when you're cracking open a bottle on the bus which going to do about it cop. Are. We sure that's illegal in Kentucky though. I really don't know only if you don't share. Did you bring enough for the whole bus. You did you are from Kentucky. Like literally tapping a barrel with a straw, that's what I'm doing. I. Yolk Up. Get you a ladle the discourage. It was not that long ago. That Tennessee was was contending with Georgia by it wasn't. This is the meanest football team in the world's to its fans just the mean tell y'all just the meanest. That's the other thing is that holly almost called the final margin game try. All. Can I tell you although holly has gotten so good about bailing on the game And knowing exactly into bail on the game. To with a frightening degree of accuracy. Lots of practice you didn't even it didn't even take a turnover like I think just something happened you go. Out about it was it was zero zero when I quit and went back to. It was zero zero when I went back to my room to watch Baylor West Virginia and I had a lovely Saturday I don't know about the rest you ask the right choice you may feel. You mean you mean Kansas West, Virginia, because I just want to emphasize that. West Virginia playing against somebody I just want to go ahead and emphasize that Gus Johnson got to call a Kansas football game ha I'm going to say something it was it was actually a really great defensive game by West. Virginia to a lot of fun and a lot of different ways. You the best game I watched this week. Like the best. Like. Look bar none by by far. No way of preventing you up about to. Georgia State Arkansas State dammit. Thursday night fifty, nine, fifty, two. Absolute lunacy on both sides of the ball. Yeah. was absolutely phenomenal I. Know Our beloved Georgia State Panthers. Could could not pull out the win against the red walls but Damn if the sunbelt been the most entertaining like second. Second. West Coast Carolina but damn state didn't get like all of Arkansas states coaches fired. Arkansas states out here dropping co defensive coordinators because of what the Panthers did. Yeah. Let's say you're a good football team you get people fired even when you beat them. That's amazing. But yeah, Sun Sun belt by the way. That's it. Twenty twenty it's taught us. That The sun belt is by far the best value by college football because I haven't watched many bad Santa Keeps I've watched bad SEC games. NON-COMPETITIVE SEC Games. But I don't think I've watched a bad Sunday game this year. That's an amazing steal. It is, but it's completely accurate. I I have no issue with it. Can We? We don't have to do this long I promise I do feel like we are obligated to talk about the knowles the I think. So yeah, that's fair. There are those that's a football team that is correct and that we just saw recently in a in a homefield apparel drop data correct as well. Here is my take away from four to state up setting number five UNC. For their first win against an FBI team this year. Florida State didn't actually look that good in this game. They didn't win the turnover battle that was tied. They didn't win the penalty battle. They lost that pretty easily the only completed forty, two percent of their passes. They weren't very good on third down they were like pretty so so in the red zone, they only scored seventeen points on five trips. They have like an up and down special teams night missed two field goals. They did block a punt. And they still wine and I think like even though everything I just said sounds like negative or depressing or whatever I think that's actually a good thing because for Florida state to be able to turn in. A. Inconsistent not by no means was this like, wow, Florida state firing on all cylinders on both sides of the ball they they'd play pretty well defensively, I will say. And to get a win against a team that whether it makes sense or not. Was undefeated and ranked very highly like that's actually probably a more meaningful first step for Florida state starting to rebuild or starting to turn around then coming out and doing the everything went according to plan because like. It's can't rely on that if you are FSU right now at this point to play that game every week so you should probably be happy with some things improved and the football gods didn't hate us for once they hated you and they really hated UNC at the end of that game. I'm I don't really understand like I. Did Not Watch this game. Yeah. Looking at the numbers I do not understand how this happened I was which part I'm. I'm really glad to hear you say that because. I called the Tennessee Kentucky Gay ended within a field goal and I distinctly remember turning to you before you and see Florida state and saying Max GonNa Hang Fifty on these people. Like I. I can't remember the last time I thought game was going to be this much of a blow out in one direction and I was wrong in the other direction. Okay. So take straight up turnovers.

Kentucky Tennessee Florida football Arkansas SEC Tennessee Kentucky Gay Georgia Terry Wilkes Georgia State Panthers Wilson Virginia Mark Stoops West Virginia Baylor West Virginia Eddie Eddie Kansas West FBI holly
"king college" Discussed on Shutdown Fullcast

Shutdown Fullcast

07:57 min | 3 months ago

"king college" Discussed on Shutdown Fullcast

"So we think the Cincinnati ranking which like, yeah the computers are like fifteen. This is like their second best ranking ever Ryan. I. Think it is all misdirected midwestern energy like we gotta go vote for somebody from the Mid West who has done something and it's I wonder if we could see, I would love to see like a geographical data breakdown of this and I would love for one of these to bump out like Ohio state at the end link. Ohio State lost to purdue. So not real sure whether we can put you ahead of Byu or cincy. So my question is this by by having the season be staggered as it has. And giving sp like essentially giving space for the voters to put good group of five teams like Coastal Carolina. In. The rankings where they previously would not like they just wouldn't have gotten in or they would have had to go like eight now instead of four and five and to get in. Is that GONNA create like an inertia of sorts where? It's already in people's minds that like Cincinnati's nine and so yeah, maybe I can drop them a spotter to below that but I like have the. Have they gotten a foothold that will pay off down the road where we're going to see like at the end of the year like Oh. Shit. There are like three group of five teams in the top fifteen. What the Hell is going on see that'd be really stupid. So I say yes. To predict but I mean like since natty they. Did drop since last week. Because of Nexus Am's victory over the team that doesn't run. So like it could be sort of shifting a little bit like UNC lost in Cincinnati still move down yeah. It's just weird shit happening. So it could go either way. The Fun one will be if we make it to college football playoff rankings because they actually don't give a shit about what the says. And like every year there's like the big correction when the AP just kind of like Oh. Okay I. Guess we'll cheat off that test. Now you know like the the answers are here. Let's align with that. So like this year it could be big Lake I. It could just be big jumps all over the place like Oklahoma state number six. Don't get used to that police. Now you're twelve. You did nothing wrong too bad. I mean honestly the biggest like the biggest aberration on here might be Byu in the teens like based on everything we've seen this is an easy top team so far. All right so that that was the weird thing I notice. Here's the funny thing. The Big Ten has more teams in the top twenty five in the SEC does right now. That's it. That's. That's the whole joke. I, think the takeaway here is never play football. No. It's bad free the the theme across the board by the way is just try less I also like to. On the official page. Coastal Carolina their new here. You know the. All these teams have links and logos except for Coastal Carolina because brand new here never been ranked before it's very exciting. Also. NC. State. Up Because they're not really fair all that often they might have needed one ever since the Internet was. Exciting names all throughout the. Five. This is what I'm waiting for by the way, which is the SEC has managed to fall behind the big ten in total number of place teams based on. Their actual of life. Oh, you're playing football. Let's see what that looks like you. Know. Let's let's keep these other teams that we have magically put in with some kind of the buoyancy of forgetting that we've forgotten that your actual football teams. I cannot wait for the big ten to come in and Salter in and go. All right you really big. Big Football now and Illinois like. Take the field and go oh God it's Illinois. or I forgot how bad this looked. So this time around. Ohio state moved up Penn State moved Wisconsin Michigan, and Minnesota all moved up Minnesota leapt a healthy three spots. Because of. Awful. What Mama? The the PAC twelve. There's only team in the top twenty Oregon went down. This Oregon is plummeting and Wisconsin will overtake them at this rate. This gets to my next step in this grand plan, which is this year. Ryen. I think there will be some stickiness. There's going to be over speculation in this particular market, big ten futures, and by the time the PAC twelve starts playing football they're going to look so heinous unprepared and sloppy that there will not be a ranked like we could see a situation where there might be one ranked PAC twelve team at the top twenty five at the end of the season just because everybody's Gone Oh God we're likely by the time we're talking. How yeah. Yeah. Yeah. No. By the time, this happens the PAC twelve will look so bad that we will want football season to end Oregon state versus cow. Late late at night. Or at night in the morning, whatever it happens. By the time that happens we'll all be so appalled we'll be the season should end. We shouldn't be doing this. Awful. Overs they're only five PAC twelve teams getting votes in the poll right now. A poll that is. That is slow giving Tennessee. Votes I told them not to do that at the beginning of the year, and maybe now you will listen to watch the Washington huskies in the Utah utes fairly successful programs in recent times are behind liberty. Yes. By the way I am still going to go ahead and say that in the apocalypse here. That Utah football going to thrive because they tried less and one more than any like in terms of ambition in terms of what they're going to do on the field right? What you do we, we throw rock. Oh I found my favorite win. So Indiana, when the big ten rejoined the polls like three weeks ago, Indiana had no votes last week they had one vote. Shit yes. Indiana had one vote now. Indiana has moved up to four votes exponential growth babies next thing. So sixteen right and then sixty four. And then further math next thing you know they're in the top fifteen let's go cove Indian people all my God Ryan. There this this this week's Indiana. Fever. This week's Indiana team that just appeared with one vote. Is a little school by the name of Texas they're just hanging on it's a basketball team. People people treating their votes like their investment dollars in a really hostile investment environment. Go where's a safe place? I can put my vote I'll get hell I. Don't know put a couple dollars today. I. Over speculate on Indiana state I see it like a relent like a rule at betting table where people are like, yeah. Sure. Put put five dollars on liberty what I will say it is a very special indictment of Syracuse football at this point and they they have injuries. There are reasons for it Cetera et CETERA. Liberty Went Syracuse beat NASC- team on the road and is still like nine spots back for being. A year in a year where the polls have room for grouper five teams, liberty cannot sniff the poll. I appreciate. potus. I do appreciate you using the phrase of very special indictment when talking about..

football Indiana PAC Cincinnati Byu Ohio State Oregon SEC Utah Coastal Carolina Mid West Wisconsin Ryan Oklahoma Syracuse Football purdue Liberty
"king college" Discussed on Shutdown Fullcast

Shutdown Fullcast

02:48 min | 3 months ago

"king college" Discussed on Shutdown Fullcast

"Good Lord. We could talk about Bonex would love to I would just like to put this rather talk about jet packs in your mind. If you were up fifteen thousand feet, a jet pack there is no way you're your mind's going to be right. Because you're going to go I I've gone far too high. In a vehicle supported only by right by rocket boots and what I would like I know this is what it actually runs out but I just imagined that if you're an uncle jetpack, it's running off a couple of propane tanks that you got the gas station. Right and do you really know if they're actually full? They felt ful but I can't. No. Income. That's exactly. That is such a dad responsible. They felt full. Yeah to. Any sort of defense the up there in the air and be like, Oh, I really wish I hadn't made burgers with these before. So so really could use that little extra around fifteen thousand feet is when oxygen is only about fifty percent of excellent. Here. Like. Completion rate. It's it's a solid fifty four. But yeah around there your your. Thoughts your brain. So we've got his work twice as hard. All right. So uncles with impaired judgment have taken to our nation's skies I. I can't imagine into the year monarch butterflies can fly eleven thousand feet. Are you GonNa let a fucking butterfly. Wow Out. Sore you that's in calling out the rocket pack community. Love to hear it. That's what's going to happen. Some guys. Are you know Bichir Butterfly go higher net and at fifteen thousand feet? You're so far away you can't see South Carolina beat Auburn. It just like a little spectrum their. Argument. I'm just saying if you had to say what what kind of Fan. Is is going to La accent firing up jetpack for fun disgruntled, Auburn Fan feels very on brand I. Don't know. Ryan, they have the Bagel jumbotron Jordan, her stadium make. Space now if they were losing at home South Carolina of course, they lost in the other place but. In about seventy years yeah they'll get their revenge chance injured stadium first time but not the last time Auburn, fans are GONNA lose in that other place in their lifetime. You're you're descending from fifteen thousand feet you come down through the clouds and behold the glory and majesty is Our blessed mother. Earth. And yet the first thing you see is a stadium full of fans the faint sounds of sandstorm wafting up from here. Chicken chicken. Chicken you the. Jet Pacman..

Auburn South Carolina Bichir Butterfly Auburn Fan Bonex Ryan La
These doctors got COVID-19, now they're suffering the serious, mysterious symptoms of 'long COVID'

Science Friction

08:15 min | 3 months ago

These doctors got COVID-19, now they're suffering the serious, mysterious symptoms of 'long COVID'

"Hi It's Natasha. Mitchell with science friction. I'll be the first admit that as a GP price all of I was pretty skeptical of things. I certainly had sympathy for for conditions like FIBROMYALGIA. But I didn't have the empathy that I have now. I didn't understand it I. Really didn't get it. And Gosh if I could go back and speak to myself as a GP prior to all of this, I know that I would have been much better doctor then and I will hopefully be a much stop to now. As Corona virus cases explode again in the you kind across Europe today three doctors from the UK share confronting personal experiences of what's being called long covert. I have seen too many cases on nine of people not being heard not being Nessin to. That symptoms and their concerns not being validated. I've seen heartbreaking stories of people just being dismissed of seeing heartbreaking stories of people losing their jobs. And I am very lucky that I have a platform where I can speak up and try and get long covert recognizes melnace. The term long covert is being used to describe a whole cluster of symptoms and afflictions many extremely disturbing and disabling that lingering on some people after they've been infected with the SARS Cov to virus thousands across the world are now finding solidarity on social media and in virtual support groups that are popping up and long covert. To not discriminate healthy people young people, people who apparently had a mild case of covid nineteen. And every system in their bodies can be affected up until the last a week or two. The concept of long caved has been dismissed by quite a lot of people even in the medical sphere many my colleagues have been unwell since March and have really struggled to get any kind of medical inputs until the last couple of months those weren't hospitalized with the illness would just sort of left to get on with it. It's the classic thing a suspect. It might even be a bloke thing do not for long enough it will go away. Yeah. Diminish it ignore it hope it's not their. Own I another thing to worry about uh, suspect always going through people's minds and that will include medics politicians policies such as civil servants, everybody. But they will be left with the long term consequences and in terms of the total health burden that will weigh exceed whatever acute covid to us by the time of comes on. So we facing another pandemic this one silent confusing and hard to diagnose knows a pandemic of long coverted. I'm Dr Amy Small I'm thirty nine and I'm Jay P in Lothian in Scotland a gorgeous part of the world in the Scottish lowlands and before the pandemic Dr smalls life was a when I think back it was busy and chaotic and getting up at six thirty every morning and out house by seventh day and yet as a family, we were very active and very busy but it work back in February and March. I'm in colleagues were on high alert the sense of impending doom that we felt on those first few weeks moore seeing reports of huge numbers of people dying in. Italy. In just thinking gosh you know. Is that coming away at it was just really really scary I'm Dr Natalie Mcdermott I'm an academic clinical electra at King's College London and she specializes in Pediatric Infectious Diseases Dr McDermott is no stranger to deadly infections Ebola cholera now coronavirus she's been on the front line of the Mall I was working in Liberia in in the capital Monrovia in July twenty fourteen as as cases of started spread very rapidly our more queseda flowing because we had so many dead bodies but we didn't have sevices coming to pick them up so the burial teams weren't Well. They were trying their best, but they were limited as well at during that time two of my colleagues one of whom was on medical director for treatment facility they became infected with. I saw a space about thirty percent of my patients that died in those first few weeks. I was in Liberia that he percent of them were health coworkers what Natalie witnessed firsthand was hellish but going is her as a doctor she went on to do a PhD, investigating the genetics of asa sipped ability to a bowl avars disease. And when Covid nineteen heat I was working in Pediatric Infectious Diseases at Great Ormond Street Hospital. When we started to see a surge of cases of what we now who multi-system inflammatory syndrome children previously healthy children started falling very ill they come in generally unwell but looking okay and then within a few hours sometimes but maybe you set me within twenty four hours. Many of them would suddenly drop their blood pressure and they and become very touchy. It said it heart rate would become very fast at that stage it was thought children were only mildly affected by. Covid nineteen and on the whole, it seems they are but the Natalie and colleagues found all lot of them did test positive in terms of the throat swaps full cave nineteen they tested positive for antibodies to cave in nineteen either actually at the beginning of that onus or at some point Jerry net illness doctrine failing on consulting genetic pathologists to Saint Mark's hospital in Harrow in London and Sinn. Vincent's Hospital in Dublin Ireland in filing is a practicing doctor and later in the genetics of bail and related cancers collaborating with colleagues around the world including here in Australia. At the beginning of the pandemic back in March whiles looked pretty safe or think. To identify, cases in Wales. H. One about forty kilometers outside of me. So eastern West. So you get the impression whereas almost none of it about. So the odds of you catching, it must be next to nothing.

Dr Natalie Mcdermott Covid Liberia Fibromyalgia Mitchell Europe Great Ormond Street Hospital UK Medical Director Dr Amy Small Dr Smalls Wales Moore Monrovia ASA Italy Scotland
The Life of Christina Rossetti

5 Minutes in Church History

04:16 min | 6 months ago

The Life of Christina Rossetti

"On this episode of five minutes in Church history, let's talk about a poet. Christina Rosetti she was born in eighteen thirty, and she died in eighteen, ninety four. She was born into an Italian family in London. This was a very artistic family to her. Brothers were painters, and she was a poet. Her father was a poet, and he taught at King's College. He was a political exile from Italy and spent his final decades in London and in England and of course. Course Christina Rosetti would spend her entire life in England. And as she was turning twenty, she became engaged, but it was broken off when he converted to Roman Catholicism. She would remain single the rest of her life. Since the age of twelve, she wrote poetry that was eighteen, forty two. This was the era of Tennyson and Dickens and the Bronte's in Elizabeth Barrett Browning, this was the era of Victorian literature, and into that Pantheon is the poet, the Anglican poet Christina Rosetti. Her First Book of poetry was published in eighteen, forty seven. She was seventeen years old. It was published by her grandfather. Her first commercially published book of poetry was published the next year in eighteen, forty eight. It was later in eighteen, sixty, two that her book, the Goblin market and other poems was published. That was probably one of her most famous poems in the book that sort of put her on the map so to speak. She wants wrote. How beautiful are the arms which have embraced Christ the hands which have touched Christ? The is which have gazed upon Christ, the lips which have spoken of Christ. The feet which have followed Christ Christina Rosetti followed Christ as a poet. She loved to use Simi's in her poems. You know what a simile is a simile comparison using Laker as in her poem birthday. She uses a whole string of them. She says my heart is like a singing bird whose nest is in a watered shoot. My heart is like an apple tree, whose bows are bent with thickset fruit. My heart is like a rainbow shell that paddles and Halcion see. My heart is gladder then all these because my love is come to me, so she used the similarly in another poem eight better resurrection. She uses to similarities to talk about herself. She says my life is like a faded leaf. My harvest dwindled to a Husk. Truly my life is void and brief. And tedious and the Baron Dusk. My life is like a frozen thing, nobod-, nor greenest can I see yet rise it's Xiao the sap of spring oh Jesus Reisen me. She then follows. My Life is like a broken bowl, a broken bowl the cannot hold one drop of water for my soul or cordial and the searching cold. CAST in the fire, the parish thing melt and remold it till it be a Royal Cup for him, my King Oh Jesus drink of me well, she wrote many poems. She wrote to Christmas carols. She wrote books of non fiction. And in eighteen ninety two. She wrote a commentary on the book of revelation. That same year. She had surgery for cancer. And two years later in eighteen, ninety four, she died in London. Well. Let's go back to that poem in here it again. My Life is like a broken bowl, a broken bowl that cannot hold one drop of water for my soul or cordial in the searching cold cast in the fire, the parish thing melt and it till it be a Royal Cup for him my king. JESUS DRINK OF

Christina Rosetti London Halcion King's College Elizabeth Barrett Browning England Baron Dusk Simi Italy Xiao Tennyson Dickens
Will China change its policy on dams?

Glenn Beck

02:37 min | 6 months ago

Will China change its policy on dams?

"There's an article that I'd like you to check out its on glennbeck dot com and it is all about the floods in China, and I know you got a lot of things to do. You're like floods in China. Why would I even care about the floods in China? The flood waters are up. It's monsoon season and they're up. Over 200% now. Ah, and because of the three gorgeous Ah, damn! This is the damn that they built. How many years ago Studio? They open this thing up like five years ago? No, it wasn't and I India's they understood And then they updated it think about five or six years ago. Okay, but it is. It has been updated and made very powerful and when they when they opened it up again, it actually slowed the rotation of the Earth for a short period of time. Ah, and it is. It's remarkable on DH. They need all of the water. And this one of the reasons why we have such a shortage of sand is because of these dams. Well, Unfortunately, because of these monsoons, the reservoir system has passed the flood stage six weeks ago. And is now classified by China. So you know you're getting the truth there as a Category Category two. two. It It it it they've they've already already had had to to destroy destroy two two dozen dozen other other dams dams to to try try to to relieve relieve pressure, pressure, But But our our satellites satellites are are showing showing that that this this dam dam is is about about to to buckle. buckle. In In fact, fact, if if you you look look at at the the look look at at the the story story in AH, England King's College in London just issued a dire warning, saying, We're looking at the satellite pictures and this thing is buckling and about to blow. Give that blows. Ah, Food security all over the globe is going to be wildly affected. Please read this article at glennbeck dot com. As you read about wars and rumors of wars and floods and famines. This's a really key thing to pay attention to, because everybody else is concentrating on on nonsense. nonsense. This This is is really, really, really really important. And it ends with what should you do about it? So check it out now at glennbeck dot

China Glennbeck Dot India England King's College London
The Brain-Boosting Benefits of Exercise with Ryan Glatt

Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

07:19 min | 6 months ago

The Brain-Boosting Benefits of Exercise with Ryan Glatt

"Welcome to the broken brain podcast I'm your host. Droop ruin and each week by team, and I bring on a new guest who rethink can help you improve your brain help feel better and most importantly live more. This week's guest is Ryan. Ryan is a personal trainer and brain health coach with over a decade of experience in the health and fitness industries. He currently works alongside clinicians and researchers to study the facts of cognitively. Enhanced and comprehensive exercise plants at the Pacific Brain Health Center, here in Lovely Santa Monica California Ryan constantly seeks to learn about the health neuroscience, research and Practical Strategies both health coaching and personal training in context, which is why we brought him here, Ryan has pursued education from aiming clinks the brain I training institute, the Neuroscience Academy that Kaddoumi for brain, health and performance and many other places. He's currently enrolled in. In a Master's applied neuroscience program at King's College of London, he actively consults with companies who leverage exercise for brain health and educates and fitness professionals with the first course to comprehensively address exercise and brain health called the brain health trainer, course talk more about that later on in which he's educated over a thousand health and fitness Professionals Ryan welcome to the brain podcasts. Thanks for having me drew and you also. And people really loved it. That's we've set the intention. We did a documentary by the way. If anybody hasn't hasn't watched that documentary before a broken bring to. Click on the show notes. We'll make it available for anybody who hasn't seen, and you can sign up and check it out and see some of Ryan's recommendations. rebuilt on today's conversation so. We set out the intention when we first did that interview that we wanted to do an interview for the podcast. I'm glad it happened at the first interview that I'm doing in person in the world of. Semi Corentin and social distancing so Thank you for coming into the office. It's an honor. Thanks for having me so I wanNA start off with something which is I want to talk about dance? DANCE REVOLUTION So tell US anybody who doesn't know what it is. Tell us what it is, and why he became passionate about. Yeah, so dance dance. Revolution is a video game. It's an extra game. Extra Games are things that incorporate. And Gaming And or active video games it was followed by the success of like Nintendo. We for instance that became very popular dance dance. Revolution's interesting because it was popularized when I was a kid. Probably before that I think in the eighties and nineties, and it's essentially a game where you're controller is a pad that you stand on in the middle is you're standing place? You have an Arrow pointing forward pointing backwards to left and went to the right. There's arrows coming up from the bottom of the screen, and you have this answer key at the top. Top with those different directionally facing arrows, and it's to music, and it was a Japanese video game developed by Nami, and it was super popular in Arcades at home on the playstation, two and I grew up as a very overweight sedentary kid I had a pretty severe concussion in preschool, and so that created some concussion induced adhd so I was addicted to video games, and I think I would then have met the criteria for video game addiction now, which is like it wasn't every day, but it was like four hours a day of video gaming. into early call of duty before it was like an e sports thing so if I kept on it, I could probably been pretty well right now. Playing golf duty but I actually came across the home version of dance dance revolution when I was a kid in high school, actually no middle school early middle school and I lost a lot of weight playing that in my living room and it got me into. That got me to lose weight and it was motivating had all the elements we might talk about being important for an exercise program that is sensitive to brain health. And then it got me into the gym, and when I was in high school I joined a gym across from my high school, started weightlifting, watching personal trainers, we can go into that later, but essentially kick-started my personal health, an interest in fitness, and with that fitness that is cognitively enhanced meaning that I wasn't on an exercise bike, watching the news or staring into space I was cognitively engaged in that program since then dance dance revolution has been present. Among a lot of research context and neuro rehabilitation in older adults. It's not really that accessible anymore. You can't just get it off the shelf as much as you could. Previously, but it's really paved the way for a whole industry of active video gaming extra gaming. And it has spun off also clinical or serious extra gaming games that are used for health and clinical contexts such as some of the solutions. We use it the Pacific Brain Health Center. For the listeners who are like way, why are we starting the conversation video game? This all make sense so you know in reading about your story and getting a chance to get to know you over the last year, or so as we've been introduced by our mutual friend, Dr Shawn Patel who's a regenerative medicine doctor here in Los Angeles who's been on the podcasts before linked to that. I got a chance to see how your struggle as child especially with weight fitness and being sedentary. You found something you found something that created joy inside of you, and that's actually really related to a big part of what you teach right now we'll start off with the basics and we'll talk about what brain health coaches and some of the science of it, but you found something passionate that you that got you excited to move. Move something that you enjoyed and I. think that such an important thing as simple as it sounds. This video game was the thing that got started. That was ultimately the thing that starting your journey down this pathway of understanding the power of really what exercise can do for the brain, so let's start there. Let's start off with the basics you know. We've done so many episodes on the power of exercise, but as a refresher. Tell US why exercise is so important and what it does for the brain. Yeah, and there's been an explosion of research and media coverage about this I. Like to say that the mainstream popularity around exercise. The brain was really kick started by the book spark by Dr John Radi ever grateful for the work. He's done in popularizing that and twenty eighteen, the second most popular Ted Talk. In that year was Dr Wendy Suzuki talking about exercise in the brain and a lot of mainstream coverage, and you know in New, York Times and medium covering on boosting these posts on exercising, the brain has become very popular, and that's amazing, because it's also jumping on the kind of. The coattails of neural plasticity research showing that the brain can change. I think this audience has been very well presented that information right we to our brains were fixed. We were taught in high school. They have a certain amount of brain cells. Will Never. It's all downhill from there and it turns out. That's not true exactly. Neuro plasticity, so the brain's ability to functionally or structurally change. In response to experiences,

Pacific Brain Health Center Ryan Nintendo Neuroscience Academy Golf Lovely Santa Monica King's College Of London Adhd Ted Talk Dr Shawn Patel Dr John Radi Nami Los Angeles Dr Wendy Suzuki York Times
Researchers Throw Cold Water on the Panic Around COVID-19’s Alleged Short-Lived Immunity

Coronavirus Daily Briefing

04:56 min | 6 months ago

Researchers Throw Cold Water on the Panic Around COVID-19’s Alleged Short-Lived Immunity

"There was a study put out by King's College in London a few weeks ago, which found that covid nineteen antibodies in people who had been infected largely disappeared after two months. The headlines about covid nineteen immunity being temporary were all over the place with more than a few implying that this means will never have a truly effective vaccine and never truly defeat the coronavirus. It's all terrifying so I wanted to share some insight from Derek. Thompson over at the Atlantic spoke with a number of experts to get a deeper understanding of the study and inject some good news into all of the headline fearmongering. Now I'm not going to tell you that. The study was totally wrong and that we're all going to be completely fine nothing about covid nineteen is completely good news, but as Shane Crotty of urologist at the La Hoya Institute for -Nology told the Atlantic actually looking at the data. I feel okay about it. Quoting further from the Atlantic acquired immunity is. Memory when our bodies fight off infection, we want our immune systems to remember how to defeat it again like a person who, after solving a big jigsaw puzzle recognizes and remembers how to set the pieces the next time. The whole point of vaccination is to teach the immune system those same puzzle solving lessons without exposing it to the full virus. This is why Casey L. study initially seemed so dreadful it. It found that the number of certain active antibodies called neutralizing antibodies declined significantly between tests especially in patients with mild or no symptoms. Antibody levels are one proxy for the Immune System's memory. If they plunged quickly, that might mean that our immune system can't remember how to solve covid nineteen for more than a few months at a time do minus to start from square one with each new exposure end quotes. Now while those findings from the King's college study are definitely concerning, there are three main reasons to be skeptical about the study and therefore hopeful for futures. I, the study only looked at one part of our immune system, our vast mysterious immune system about which there remain many unknowns quoting again when a new pathogen enters, the body are adaptive immune system calls up a team of BCL's with produce antibodies and t cells to over simplify the B. Cells antibodies intercept and bind to invading molecules and the killer t cells seek and destroy infected cells, Evaluating Immune Response Without A. T cells is like inventory, national air force, but leaving out the bomber jets, and in the case of covid nineteen, those bomber jets could make the biggest difference. A growing collection of evidence suggests that t cells provide the strongest and longest lasting immunity cove in nineteen, but this study didn't measure them at all end quote, further study and a Francis Strasbourg university hospital found that patients recovering from covid nineteen had strong t cell responses, despite not having any detectable antibodies. Now second decline in antibodies that unusual Shane Crotty the Varela gist from the Loy. Institute for Immunology. said quote it unusual to have feeding antibody response after several months the off. Isn't that surprising when you look at something like the smallpox vaccine easy the antibody responses down about seventy five percent after six months, but that's a vaccine that works for decades. We need a study like this to look at Cova patients six months after infection to really know what we're dealing with and quote. And third, and finally it's possible that even these low levels of antibodies could trigger a larger immune response in the future like if the individual is exposed to SARS Cov to again, this goes back to the immunological memory. It's like the memories and that strong when it's not confronted, but win the trigger of the virus returns, so does the memory. Even beyond the critiques of this one study that caused so much panic in the news, there remain many other reasons to be hopeful. Vaccine Research continues to steamroll along at an unprecedented pace. Several studies on monkeys have shown strong long lasting immune response and a new study shows that patients who recovered from SARS East Asia indeed have long lasting t cell immunity. Plus Journalists Noah. Smith shared on twitter, pointing to research from immunologist professor. Akiko, it was sake. This news about antibodies doesn't necessarily mean the vaccine would be ineffective because quoting Sake, vaccines can elicit stronger immune response than natural. Those covid nineteen vaccines can and should induce more robust and durable protection than natural infection end quote. As no Smith sums it all up quote. One antimony bunnies aren't the only thing that can give you. Immunity to your body can probably remember how to make new antibodies and three vaccines can potentially give you longer lasting immunity than you'd get from actually getting covid end quote.

Covid Atlantic Shane Crotty King Derek Thompson Smith London Francis Strasbourg University East Asia La Hoya Institute Casey L. Cova Akiko Institute For Immunology. Twitter BCL LOY
"king college" Discussed on WBBM Newsradio

WBBM Newsradio

01:48 min | 7 months ago

"king college" Discussed on WBBM Newsradio

"At Kennedy king college each mobile testing site will have the capacity to test up to five hundred people a day chance of a few scattered showers for a while then partly cloudy through the night with a low of sixty it's eight minutes past the hour what a great price on oil change car X. tire and auto has full service oil changes starting in eighteen ninety nine including a free tire rotation full service oil changes from only eighteen ninety nine now it car X. tire and auto location C. manager for details we know things are anything but normal right now and your main focus is on keeping yourself and your family safe finishing Chicago dot com's contractors are still out on job sites using PP ended hearing to social distancing practices if you have the need for finishing contractors we're here for you Chicago's winter is taking its usual coal on the exterior of properties are properly applied exterior coatings create barriers against cracks chips and peeling entries for destructive moisture spring is the time for finishing Chicago dot com's highly skilled contractors to assess your property for warning signs coating failures their commercial and industrial painters prepare a building surface to accept the industry's top coatings insuring your biggest asset is protected from the harsh rains and son visit finishing Chicago dot com for a free list of finishing contractors specialize painting wall covering glass systems drywall finishing and signage for a great finish start with finishing Chicago dot com it is lunch continues a thirty five year old man from the Rockford area was missing since may twenty ninth now it's already say his body has been found in the little Calumet river in blue island and that he was murdered mesquite seldom to be.

Chicago little Calumet river blue island Kennedy king college Rockford
Australia cyber attacks: PM Morrison warns of 'sophisticated' state hack

Monocle 24: The Globalist

05:35 min | 7 months ago

Australia cyber attacks: PM Morrison warns of 'sophisticated' state hack

"Joining me today is Alessio Pessolano professor at King's College London an expert on Asian. Defense welcome back Alexia good to have you on the program. Let's begin with the story that we've had in the news headlines Today. This continued state based cyber attack on Australia. Good morning and not yes, quite, so what is remarkable is that. The Prime Minister himself and held a press conference in which he wanted to alert. Is the broader public in Australia. The general trends in terms of cyber attacks against the country's. Government and business institutions warm anti. We're becoming a much more sort of like Numa feature live and and these. Situations new normal was not necessarily just a matter of hackers trying to make a prank, but actually these were very sophisticated advance. state-sponsored. Cyber based. Activities, so this is quite a strong statement, and in a way it's sort of lifts a bail from something that that it was well known it was certainly understood to be the case I think the key point that he was trying to dress was to emphasize the fact that the normal Australia seems to be they are receiving. End were very sophisticated cyber offensive and end your opinion of the security services technical branches wars. This is unlikely to change in the foreseeable future, giving his launching these attacks. Yes, that was the other thing I was waiting for you question actually and to give a little bit of suspense and the the. He didn't mention it directly. But, sources familiar with Kay's from within the government confirmed to Australian media that. It was China that it was referring to and certainly walls. Notable attacks are Chinese. Certainly the point that was made if you want to between the informal chatting after the press conference ended in the press conference, Inter clearly portrays pick shot, and in which district in government is Beijing. There is very worried that China's attacks are increasingly number, sophistication and Daddy. This is unlikely to go away in something that Australians need to use nets ends. Let's move onto to another story, which is unlikely to go away anytime soon. Which is the origins of the COVID nineteen outbreak? We had claims that The original outbreak came from a wet mock in Wuhan. Now we have the latest outbreak in Beijing and fingers are being pointed once again at wet markets. Absolutely so, what is interesting about it? Is that the second time, but because it's opening in Beijing and it's the capital in Jinping and the the the sort of like the. The public information machinery in in China had been very keen to identify as it had been indeed the case for most of the cases over the last couple of months that these were imported cases, and if you remember the beginning of the outbreak in Beijing, things were pointed to woods this sound. The dead seemingly had been imported. From Europe. So was not just sort of individuals coming from your rooms, believe in food, come from Europe was responsible whole for otherwise would have been an impeccable solution found the problem. Now where we understand now is that and that is probably not necessarily the case there is increasing downs and immunologists in. In in China looking at the case, suggesting vantage original samples of devised the found on this chopping board. In reality where passed on by by individuals and what they couldn't really quite understand is how or the southern you find yourself in the middle of over significant crisis and data the moment. This is really the important piece of news that came out Lusk. Day You sir is that the conditions of the markets particularly the fact that they are kept at low temperature, high conditions of humidity very much impression to have been. Important contributing factors. In the way, in which if you want and this second wave, the one in Beijing spread out there, so the conditions are certainly becoming clear on as to why became a police over second outbreak? If you want him, why connected to wet knock? Less clear is whether the origin actually is. In boarded as he were. This article that you've been focusing on comes from the Straits, times in Singapore. There is at emphasis now that. Not, just what is happening elsewhere, but what lessons can be learned from elsewhere to protect the rest of the world. Absolutely right now Singapore is reopening for business, so and the enduring these easing of the restrictions as restaurants. And shops are all being reopened and as a result. Is. Clear attention in trying to understand what exactly is. That is going on, Ebay

Beijing China Australia Nets Singapore Lusk Alessio Pessolano Europe Woods Ebay Prime Minister King's College Professor KAY Jinping Wuhan
"king college" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

AM 970 The Answer

02:09 min | 7 months ago

"king college" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

"The king's college and while I get to talk to a particular professor at king's college I like to do that today I have my friend Paul later he's a professor of journalism media and entrepreneurship at the king's college also the director of the John McCandless Philip such journalism institute Paul welcome the program thanks Sir great to be here you know it's such a funny thing when something gets named after someone who was a friend of yours John McCandless Phillips the institute that you direct he was a very dear friend and he was one of the great journalists are of the twentieth century and I I want people to know that that the king's college in New York City are valued him he was a reporter for The New York Times in the fifties and sixties mostly a little bit before they became became activists journalists but we don't need to talk about that ball you were a staff writer for the Wall Street journal for ten years and you're now involved with something called the media project in religion unplugged where you wrote an article so wish we start first there's a lot to talk about yeah well you know maybe a mention of McCandless Phillips who we you and I know it's a person who encouraged young people to go into journalism and who believed in the you know the truth a state high standards and ethics in journalism and practice those and was an exemplar of those so we are I'm honored that we have an institute in his honor and that we have programs at the king's college through our institute that are growing this summer academy for high school students well actually I don't want to forget about that this summer Adam me that's this summer so people listening right now if they're interested in journalism whatever they're in high school what what it just let's start there so people don't miss that because this is a great opportunity for somebody looking you know to sort of see what New York is like to see what journalism might be like tell us about that please you're right so we've done this for several summers this summer we instead.

professor director Paul John McCandless Phillips New York City reporter The New York Times staff writer the Wall Street journal Adam New York king professor of journalism John McCandless Philip
Study warns of poverty surge to over 1 billion due to coronavirus

John Rothmann

00:19 sec | 8 months ago

Study warns of poverty surge to over 1 billion due to coronavirus

"The global poverty is set to surge by some four hundred million people to over one billion people as a result of the corona virus pandemic the research by king's college London and the Australian National University points to poverty increasing dramatically in middle income developing countries where millions of people live just above the

King London Australian National University
UK doctors to trial ibuprofen in COVID-19 patients with breathing difficulties

BBC Newshour

04:01 min | 8 months ago

UK doctors to trial ibuprofen in COVID-19 patients with breathing difficulties

"Now now we we know know there there are are many many scientists scientists all all around around the the world world working working on on a a vaccine vaccine for for corona corona virus virus and and we we also also know know there there is is no no single single proven proven treatment treatment for for it it so so there there will will be be a a loss loss of of interest interest in in news news that that a a U. U. K. K. clinical clinical trial trial is is looking looking at at whether whether ibuprofen ibuprofen could could work work the the anti anti inflammatory inflammatory drug drug which which has has shown shown great great promise promise in in initial initial tests tests on on animals animals will will be be administered administered to to those those with with breathing breathing difficulties difficulties that that speak speak to to professor professor metalsmith metalsmith who who is is director director of of king's king's college college London London center center for for invasive invasive therapeutics therapeutics that's that's one one of of the the bodies bodies working working on on the the trial trial welcome welcome to to the the program program I'm I'm sorry sorry but but just just getting getting you you to to outline outline for for us us whiny whiny should should be be there there were were fears fears that that ibuprofen ibuprofen could could actually actually be be detrimental detrimental in in the the treatment treatment for for corona corona virus virus hi hi good good afternoon afternoon yes yes there there were were some some initial initial concerns concerns raised raised we we have have concerns concerns rise rise from from from from the the French French health health ministry ministry and and there there was was an an article article published published as as well well which which which which really really laid laid out out the the theoretical theoretical concerns concerns and and you you know know it it it it is is important important to to consider consider however however what what happens happens afterwards afterwards was was that that there there was was a a review review of of the the evidence evidence including including a a review review of of studies studies that that looked looked at at earlier earlier infectious infectious diseases diseases like like birds birds I'm I'm the the first first Sauls Sauls was was what what is is the the current current head head that that make make and and they they concluded concluded there there was was no no evidence evidence that that this this drug drug could could increase increase the the chance chance of of an an infection infection taking taking hold hold was was sind sind symptoms symptoms and and this this yeah yeah there there are are statements statements released released from from the the World World Health Health Organization Organization the the European European medicines medicines agency agency and and also also the the U. U. K. K. commercial commercial medicines medicines also also released released a statement a statement saying saying that that there's there's no no evidence evidence of of of of home home here here okay okay so so tell tell us us then then walked walked there there is is that that suggests suggests that that type type of of pricing pricing could could reduce reduce inflammation inflammation and and in in the the lungs lungs trolls trolls so so well well there's there's no no there's there's no no evidence evidence of of home home in in order order to to demonstrate demonstrate benefit benefit we we have have to to do do a a trial trial so so why why do do we we think think that that this this trial trial is is important important well well I'll I'll be be pricing pricing has has been been suggested suggested as as a a treatment treatment for for the the respiratory respiratory distress distress that that you you can can get get with with carpet carpet nineteen nineteen disease disease for for a a long long time time in in fact fact prescription prescription dress dress distress distress in in general general but but can can come come from from other other infections infections and and other other lung lung diseases diseases as as well well coming coming all all the the way way back back to to the the nineteen nineteen eighties eighties and and this this is is mostly mostly in in animal animal models models now now they're they're all all concerns concerns with with all all of of your your preference preference side side effects effects you you know know it's it's not not super super tolerated tolerated drug drug if if for for example example you you have have ulcers ulcers we we don't don't risk risk of of gastric gastric bleeding bleeding so so this this particular particular formulation formulation on on record record from from where where you you sit sit is is a a lot lot safer safer and and you you also also have have a a better better buyer buyer distribution distribution in in the the body body so so it it can can enter enter the the immune immune system system S. S. as as well well and and in in the the animal animal models models which which of of my my struggles struggles of of acute acute respiratory respiratory distress distress syndrome syndrome the the survival survival in in the the months months goes goes up up dramatically dramatically when when a a given given this this unique unique formulation formulation of of ibuprofen ibuprofen okay okay I'm I'm what what I'm I'm what what that that will will do do it it would would be be a a formulation formulation be be given given once once it's it's established established that that you you have have covert covert nineteen nineteen Sir Sir do do you you know know this this is is this this is is very very important important so so this this is is not not something something that's that's going going to to prevent prevent you you from from getting getting the the disease disease a a toll toll and and in in fact fact this this is is specifically specifically targeted targeted at at certain certain symptoms symptoms which which we we think think are are in in the the mid mid disease disease stage stage so so we're we're really really looking looking at at patients patients who who are are hospitalized hospitalized and and the the way way they they would would receive receive the the drug drug is is actually actually very very simple simple to to just just be be in in capsules capsules is is warm warm truck truck so so we're we're all all used used to to argue argue pricing pricing is is not not like like that that but but it's it's toward toward drug drug okay okay well well we we wish wish you you all all the the best best with with the the at at the the trial trial professor professor Mifsud Mifsud messa messa a a director director of of king's king's college college London London center center for for innovative innovative therapeutics therapeutics one one of of the the bodies bodies working working on on that that U. U. K. K. trial trial to see if I'd be profane can be amongst the treatments being given for patients who are suffering with credit nineteen

Coronavirus: Ibuprofen tested as a treatment

BBC Newshour

03:52 min | 8 months ago

Coronavirus: Ibuprofen tested as a treatment

"Now we know there are many scientists all around the world working on a vaccine for corona virus and we also know there is no single proven treatment for it so there will be a loss of interest in news that a U. K. clinical trial is looking at whether ibuprofen could work the anti inflammatory drug which has shown great promise in initial tests on animals will be administered to those with breathing difficulties that speak to professor metalsmith who is director of king's college London center for invasive therapeutics that's one of the bodies working on the trial welcome to the program I'm sorry but just getting you to outline for us whiny should be there were fears that ibuprofen could actually be detrimental in the treatment for corona virus hi good afternoon yes there were some initial concerns raised we have concerns rise from from the French health ministry and there was an article published as well which which really laid out the theoretical concerns and you know it it is important to consider however what happens afterwards was that there was a review of the evidence including a review of studies that looked at earlier infectious diseases like birds I'm the first Sauls was what is the current head that make and they concluded there was no evidence that this drug could increase the chance of an infection taking hold was sind symptoms and this yeah there are statements released from the World Health Organization the European medicines agency and also the U. K. commercial medicines also released a statement saying that there's no evidence of of home here okay so tell us then walked there is that suggests that type of pricing could reduce inflammation and in the lungs trolls so well there's no there's no evidence of home in order to demonstrate benefit we have to do a trial so why do we think that this trial is important well I'll be pricing has been suggested as a treatment for the respiratory distress that you can get with carpet nineteen disease for a long time in fact prescription dress distress in general but can come from other infections and other lung diseases as well coming all the way back to the nineteen eighties and this is mostly in animal models now they're all concerns with all of your preference side effects you know it's not super tolerated drug if for example you have ulcers we don't risk of gastric bleeding so this particular formulation on record from where you sit is a lot safer and you also have a better buyer distribution in the body so it can enter the immune system S. as well and in the animal models which of my struggles of acute respiratory distress syndrome the survival in the months goes up dramatically when a given this unique formulation of ibuprofen okay I'm what I'm what that will do it would be a formulation be given once it's established that you have covert nineteen Sir do you know this is this is very important so this is not something that's going to prevent you from getting the disease a toll and in fact this is specifically targeted at certain symptoms which we think are in the mid disease stage so we're really looking at patients who are hospitalized and the way they would receive the drug is actually very simple to just be in capsules is warm truck so we're all used to argue pricing is not like that but it's toward drug okay well we wish you all the best with the at the trial professor Mifsud messa a director of king's college London center for innovative therapeutics one of the bodies working on that U. K. trial

Coronavirus: Ibuprofen tested as treatment to reduce COVID-19 symptoms

BBC Newshour

03:59 min | 8 months ago

Coronavirus: Ibuprofen tested as treatment to reduce COVID-19 symptoms

"Now we know there are many scientists all around the world working on a vaccine for corona virus and we also know there is no single proven treatment for it so there will be a loss of interest in news that a U. K. clinical trial is looking at whether ibuprofen could work the anti inflammatory drug which has shown great promise in initial tests on animals will be administered to those with breathing difficulties that speak to professor metalsmith who is director of king's college London center for invasive therapeutics that's one of the bodies working on the trial welcome to the program I'm sorry but just getting you to outline for us whiny should be there were fears that ibuprofen could actually be detrimental in the treatment for corona virus hi good afternoon yes there were some initial concerns raised we have concerns rise from from the French health ministry and there was an article published as well which which really laid out the theoretical concerns and you know it it is important to consider however what happens afterwards was that there was a review of the evidence including a review of studies that looked at earlier infectious diseases like birds I'm the first Sauls was what is the current head that make and they concluded there was no evidence that this drug could increase the chance of an infection taking hold was sind symptoms and this yeah there are statements released from the World Health Organization the European medicines agency and also the U. K. commercial medicines also released a statement saying that there's no evidence of of home here okay so tell us then walked there is that suggests that type of pricing could reduce inflammation and in the lungs trolls so well there's no there's no evidence of home in order to demonstrate benefit we have to do a trial so why do we think that this trial is important well I'll be pricing has been suggested as a treatment for the respiratory distress that you can get with carpet nineteen disease for a long time in fact prescription dress distress in general but can come from other infections and other lung diseases as well coming all the way back to the nineteen eighties and this is mostly in animal models now they're all concerns with all of your preference side effects you know it's not super tolerated drug if for example you have ulcers we don't risk of gastric bleeding so this particular formulation on record from where you sit is a lot safer and you also have a better buyer distribution in the body so it can enter the immune system S. as well and in the animal models which of my struggles of acute respiratory distress syndrome the survival in the months goes up dramatically when a given this unique formulation of ibuprofen okay I'm what I'm what that will do it would be a formulation be given once it's established that you have covert nineteen Sir do you know this is this is very important so this is not something that's going to prevent you from getting the disease a toll and in fact this is specifically targeted at certain symptoms which we think are in the mid disease stage so we're really looking at patients who are hospitalized and the way they would receive the drug is actually very simple to just be in capsules is warm truck so we're all used to argue pricing is not like that but it's toward drug okay well we wish you all the best with the at the trial professor Mifsud messa a director of king's college London center for innovative therapeutics one of the bodies working on that U. K. trial to see if I'd be profane can be amongst the treatments being given for patients

Woman plays violin to guide doctors during her brain own surgery

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:41 sec | 1 year ago

Woman plays violin to guide doctors during her brain own surgery

"Surgeons at king's college hospital in London removed a tumor from a woman's brain mark Turner was leading neurosurgeon Keogh Mars option on no by playing the violin the active areas of the brain that controls her delicate hand movements on the left hand for example somebody who's playing of audience thanks of the string pressure on the street all those fast movements moving between one issue throughout their arch con says they removed almost all the tumor including all the areas suspicious of aggressive activity while retaining full function in her left hand allowing Turner to continue playing the violin this is what I do in my spare time Turner plays an aisle of white symphony orchestra

London King Mark Turner Keogh
Woman plays violin to guide doctors during brain surgery

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:28 sec | 1 year ago

Woman plays violin to guide doctors during brain surgery

"From London wanna hear something absolutely incredible we got the story about these doctors listening to violin music while performing brain surgery and the violinist you ready for this happened to be the person they were actually operating on a old listen to this take a listen to violinist Dagmar Turner all surgeons at king's college hospital in London were literally inside her brain who plays with the Isle of Wight symphony

Dagmar Turner London King Isle Of Wight
Woman plays violin to guide doctors during brain surgery

KYW 24 Hour News

00:34 sec | 1 year ago

Woman plays violin to guide doctors during brain surgery

"During surgery a violinist played well surgeons at king's college hospital in London removed her brain tumor doctors for violinist Albert Turner mapped her brain before the surgery to identify areas that were active when he played the instrument those responsible for controlling language of movement doctors than Walker mid procedure so she could play that was done to make sure they did not damaged areas of the brain that controls her hand movements

London Albert Turner King Walker
Violinist plays as surgeons operate to remove brain tumour

Newsradio 950 WWJ 24 Hour News

00:34 sec | 1 year ago

Violinist plays as surgeons operate to remove brain tumour

"Hi there this is out of a violinist who played while surgeons at king's college hospital in London removed her brain tumor doctors for a violinist Dagmar Turner of map to brain to identify areas that were active when she played the instrument than those responsible for controlling language a movement doctors then woke her med procedure to play this is done to make sure they didn't damage areas of the brain that control the violinist hand movements neurosurgeon say they manage to remove over ninety percent of the tumor while

London Dagmar Turner King
This Day in History: Sarojini Naidu Born February 13, 1879

This Day in History Class

03:38 min | 1 year ago

This Day in History: Sarojini Naidu Born February 13, 1879

"Find US This Day in history. Class is a production of iheartradio. Hey y'all I'm Eve's welcome to this day in history class a show where we one day ship nuggets of history straight to your brain. Your ear hole today is February thirteenth. Twenty twenty the day was February. Thirteen eighteen seventy nine Indian poet and activist fair. Jamie I do with born. Naidoo was also the first Indian woman to be president of the Indian National Congress. Her poetry earned her the nickname. The Nightingale of India do was born in Hyderabad India. Her mother was a poet and her father was a scientist and philosopher. She was the oldest of eight children and some of her siblings were activists and poets. Naidoo spoke several languages and she began writing poetry at an early age. She began attending modulus university age. Twelve several years later she moved to to study at King's college and Girton College there. She became involved in the Campaign for women's suffrage when she returned to India in eighteen ninety eight she married a non brahmin doctor though he was from a different cast. The families approved of the marriage. The couple eventually had several children together. Her First Collection of poems the Golden Threshold was published in nineteen o five that same year the British partitioned Bengal which separated the majority Muslim eastern areas from the largely Hindu western areas. Having gained an interest in politics through her experiences and England. Naidoo turned her attention to the Indian National Congress and Ghandi's non cooperation movement. The Indian National Congress is a political party that formed in eighteen eighty five and was at the forefront of the Indian independence movement. The non cooperation movement was a nonviolent effort to get the British government to grant self governance to India. Naidoo joined the Indian National Congress in Nineteen Zero Five. She travelled around India. Speaking about women's education helping impoverished people nationalism. She met with social and political leaders and artists like Gopal Krishna. Go clea- robin threat. Takur in Sarala Debbie to drawn in one thousand nine. Seventeen Naidoo helped found the women's Indian Association along with Anne bessant Margaret cousins and others in the following years. She continued to argue for women's suffrage and speak out against issues like child marriage and Sati when Hindu widows would earn themselves to death on their deceased husbands funeral pyres

Seventeen Naidoo Indian National Congress Hyderabad India Indian Association EVE Girton College Sarala Debbie Jamie I Margaret Cousins Scientist England British Government Gopal Krishna Ghandi President Trump King Anne
23rd International Meeting of National Mine Action

UN News

13:21 min | 1 year ago

23rd International Meeting of National Mine Action

"So here we are at the urine stool in Geneva and we are speaking about the twenty thousand International Meeting of Mine Action National Directors and United Nations advisors so basically basically unmastered say the United Nations Mine Action Service in addition to Sarah Jerry. He's a researcher. From King's College in London has been looking at research approach into on the link between climate change and vulnerable populations affected by unexploded ordinance stuck in the ground and elsewhere. Welcome everybody body. I'm going to just dive in quickly. Going to Richard Baltimore's Program Manager for South Sudan with unmasks wretched. Tell me the main thrust of the meeting being here at the United Nations in Geneva what you can to achieve this week well simply putting the importance of mine action back on the map. Reminding people there's a problem exists exists around the world that is being addressed but it needs constant support to keep his going a mine-free world is achievable. We simply need to keep doing what we're doing. Just talk me through what the process. Who says you go into a community in south Sudan? Can you give me a particular example of an area is cleared recently. How you've held community? We're helping hundreds of communities Aziz every single day we're going into villages where mines were laid possibly thirty or forty years ago wet forests have grown up around them. People wonder into those forests in search of natural resources to cut wood together the forest vegetables and plan selves up working to render the ground safe and the the the reality is the poorest of the poor go into minefields knowing they all taking a risk. Studying Cambodia showed eighty five percent of mine victims victims. New they're in a minefield at the time. They had their accident but they also knew they were going to be hungry at night. So they take the wrist to go and get it and not not. de-mining is not an option. People will still take the risk and go into the minefields. We need clear those minds to make the land safe. Just start with a level playing field being out to grow awesome food. It is astonishing it comes down to having to live from day to day and Edwin fake money. If I can come to you know you were in Cambodia. Do you share richards. Experience experience. There is that what you were finding radio program officer unless now but you were working for a long time with U. N. D. P. The UN Development Program. Yes you actually see that people take risks risks. When they're hungry they will try to the forest to find food if they have piece of land contaminated? They will try to farm it so that they can grow the rice. It's basically subsistence isn't farming for everything there. And if they contact us the land and they will take measures to go in and see if they can actually get food. What's your message to the conference? Is this week. There is a need for us to address this theory's hope for example specifically for Kamalia. Two hundred twenty five is a goal for them. It can be achieved there to clear. All of known remaining landmines by twenty twenty-five how many we talking about. It's there still about nine hundred square kilometers of land mines but it was like a lot. I mean look look and you say twenty. twenty-five it is a lot but the government has actually committed themselves. You know Wait I left Komodo last year. They committed themselves that they will give ten percents counterpart funding to any international funds. Subtle coming for Mine Action and you be assumed that in the sense that last year we got ten percent of those about about two hundred thousand dollars last year from the Komo government which is a first big step for them taking responsibility for the problem that they have so there is progress and hopefully by two thousand twenty five and quickly back to Richard. You said that South Sudan continues to be contaminated by mines laid out decades ago but their goal is twenty twenty. He's seven four title Clearance Twenty Twenty Six if the current peace can hold if we can get access to all areas then. It's reasonable with current levels of funding as long as that maintained that we we will complete clearance by Twenty Twenty Six but ordinance will continue to appear for decades. There is still ordinance turning up across Western Europe that was fought over a hundred two years ago. Being ploughed up in the fields of Belgium reality of any conflict affected country but in the short term you need sustained funding to help South Sudan Dan. As many other countries need to decontaminate. You cannot come quickly to use Aruna Jerry from King's College London research only be looking at the link between climate the change and unexploded ordinance or nine months contamination. Can you tell me a bit about what you felt. I've been looking specifically at the conflict context. I've been looking at mine. Action in how they interrelate from post conflict peacebuilding framework and the climate. He's something that I've come into recently looking at how that is adding the levels. Abelson wonder ability because I was in Angola in September doing some work where they went national saint for Humanitarian De Mining on a research project. Nick and what we saw there was that once fields are cleared that the farmers there are grateful because clear and provide quite a lot of land. And what they're doing is resorting to the cotton slash methods of cultivation now. What that does the environment is? Just at the the time the fires in the Amazon on but in Angola there was second highest fires when the satellite team. It is dance so while we can clear and and the farmers were saying yes but the drought has impacted so yes. The farm has been returned to the farmers. But there are other you know beyond the mine in action and my take into that is can we incorporate as a sector. Can we bringing other lessons for these people when we out there with them saying once we've cleared the farm may be a certain sense of responsibility in the ways. We cultivate and all so integrating being innovative in our practice to dealing with communities to reduce their ability interesting. So what you're calling for really is for broader approach to helping communities once the areas made safe. So I don't know maybe I could turn to you. Seddon Threat Mitigation Officer with the Mine Action Service so he didn't a lot of work into be at the moment. I don't know how house access you have there. Because we've had talks recently here in Geneva for ongoing between opposing parties fighting outside Tripoli to the South how are you UH helping communities get safer and be free of this sort of scourge that must induce mentality among populations yes. There are two real issues to addressed. ICED firstly is that Libya has the world's largest uncontrolled ammunition stop palm. It is estimated that there were between one hundred fifty thousand two hundred thousand tonnes of uncontrolled control munitions across Libya. Also what we've seen recently in the fighting which broke out in southern Tripoli in April of last year is the expenditure ordinance and the threat posed by explosive remnants of war as increased and sadly many of the areas that were previously cleared of you exit have now been reconsolidated as a result. The current fighting some specific concerns that we've got amendment relates to some of the more complex munitions that The Libyan's require assistance to dispose off. And the previous Qaddafi regime for example bolts some quite complex missile systems that use talks ick propellants and these toxic propellants pose a very considerable threat to the environment went and also to the Libyan people which live close proximity to their storage depots so one of the projects that are mass. Lear initiated with support from the German government his to safely dispose of some of these very hazardous liquid propellants in Libya. Thank you Bob for that. Now I'm going to turn to leave because you're the Global Communications Honcho Four. Unless you could tell me how many countries on Mrs Operating in I'm what stays sort of information sharing between those officers who are involved in making community safe and and maybe what are the new ways that we using computers not officially intelligence to help us improve decontamination. Everywhere yeah the United Nations by action service we of nineteen programs in countries and territories around the world the UN as a whole is a little bit over thirty so the UN is. We're mine action. United Nations mine. Action has the Inter Agency Coordination Group for Mine Action which we helped to service and facilitate and that's really is an information exchange so and this meeting that we're at this week in Geneva Leyva where we have the national directors from all over the world from every mine affected country. I'm comes in. That's a big part of it is to share lessons learned best practices and the technology which is very important specifically with with improvised explosive devices. I mean we've been working for years in Afghanistan. We've seen a lot of devices that were used in Afghanistan that show up in other conflict zones specifically today's in Somalia we've seen stuff in Iraq. There's an innovation there. There's obviously on the dark web. People have access to figure out WHO's building. What and how are they building yet? What type of charges etc.? So you have to stay alert and you have to be following that. Obviously that's not something terribly new military out there in the world The United Nations. We don't don't particularly do intelligence service things but we are starting a database now in order to try to bring in academics and the governments that want to share that information in order that we make our people on the ground safer so that people would have some type of place to go to look at the type of devices I see they can do photos of directly and put it up in this database and then people can look at it from other parts of the world and say immediately. I've seen that. Don't touch that wire. I mean if you WanNa get it simple or this is probably how it is or the or the charter is going to be. You know. Two hundred meters. There's away or is that kind of thing and somebody mentioned earlier today when we were speaking about infrared Is that you know the technologies that exist out there. They are extremely deadly. It's a little bit different than a landmine. I'm where you're just using a metal detector and you're going along and something beeps and you're saying okay is that you know a pop top or is that something more dangerous when you deal with. ID's there three hundred sixty degrees so you don't know where they are And I mean there was just an attack recently in Afghanistan for example where somebody stuck a charge on the top of the roof of a car which killed the UN employees it was UNDP and that's an example of something which smit this new database that's going to be soft launch today at this is meeting with look into. So what specs do you need for your car roofs when the UN by vehicles because that's obviously a weakness right when a car sitting in traffic and somebody puts a bomb on the roof of of it and nobody thought about that but there are ways to know if there's devices on a car magnetic sensors that tell you. Something's been added this car and that's the kind of stuff that we need to know. The the United Nations need in order to keep all personnel. And all NGOs safe. It is frightening. You could be totally paranoid radio studio. They want to step foot outside. Because it's you know I've read the English patient I've read the some of the mindset of somebody who's laying mines encounters and things. I think my goodness this is just extraordinarily frightening writing and terrifying. And I'm Bob you're saying earlier the the threat of mines is not going away. Sadly the very effective asymmetric form of Attack Jack and the effectiveness of the ID as technology level is now very much understood by. The extremists are employing days. I mean sadly that knowledge is now the Leah's mentioned the information is disseminated now across the Internet. It is relatively easy now for people with no previous experience or training to acquire The knowledge from the web to make homemade explosives and to build quite sophisticated audience systems from scratch. You know with any external intervention. So so you're suggesting earlier Bob that it's not just a question of getting the minds out of the ground. It's a broader approach. Can you maybe explain what that means. Yes certainly insufficient really just to deal with the the explosive threat itself itself when one considers the threat posed by ideas. You really look at the the. ID system so it requires an effective whole of government approach. And that's very much based on not just the entity that's dealing with the explosive straight itself. But you got to look at the forensic organization that recovers evidence the analysis of that of the good police squirt this required to identify locate arrest and then process the perpetrators through the judicial system and Libya. This is happening. It is happening. Actually the The Mass Libya team has worked quite closely with Libyan authorities. And we've been trying to develop the forensic skills of the Criminal Investigation Department such that the Libyan police. I can do this themselves. Thank you very much. I think we've pretty much come to the end of this discussion very brief Look at what your and Mine Action Service is doing. It's been a delight to have you here but I'd love often any final messages or thoughts that you have before you plunge back into the dark recesses of the UN Pele here in Geneva and share information which is obviously why you're here simply that clearing clearing the wolves. Lamont problem is achievable. It's very very achievable. I started de-mining in nineteen ninety-three when the world talked about it being a thousand year problem problem now it down to single digits of years with realistic assessments. Credible Clarence methods. We're winning this fight. Unfortunately the fighters moved on on the problem is not being replaced by problem. The crux of this issue is ending grievances. If people want to find a way to kill each other's they will do so but in those countries where the wounds have healed such as Cambodia. We can go on and complete the Job Sarah Jerry Richard. Bulte Bob Seddon ugly really would yeah. Many things

The United Nations Geneva Bob Seddon Libya South Sudan Cambodia Clearance Twenty Twenty Six Twenty Twenty Six Afghanistan United Nations Un Development Program Tripoli Mine Action Service Sarah Jerry Richard Angola Richard Baltimore King Researcher Aziz
Human-to-human coronavirus transmission confirmed in China

AP News Radio

00:47 sec | 1 year ago

Human-to-human coronavirus transmission confirmed in China

"The Chinese government says human to human transmission has been confirmed in the outbreak of corona virus China's state media reports to people in Guangdong province caught the virus from family members there has been a sharp increase in the number of confirmed cases doctor Natalie McDermitt at king's college in London says it's no surprise this virus is spreading human to human we know of other coronaviruses that spread from one person to another such as Madison solves previously it just means that we have to address this in a different way from a public health perspective in terms of containing human cases of the disease Chinese president xi Ching paying said the outbreak must be taken seriously and government at all levels should put people's lives and health first I'm a Donahue

Chinese Government China Natalie Mcdermitt London Madison Donahue Guangdong President Trump Xi Ching
How To Look After Your Family's Relationship With Food

Healthy Eating For Kids

08:39 min | 1 year ago

How To Look After Your Family's Relationship With Food

"SOCI- to help the aged for kids. 'cause I'm delighted that you're joining US state and the way to hear more about you. Would you introduce yourself a tennis school. You are and what you do of course thank you very much for having me so my name is so thank you madeline and full disclosure the beginning I am an adult Dietitian. I have comedian thoughts moving congestion sites today I spent spent some years working in the NHL. So I did mainly specializing in adults. Who have Bob Wins then Dini associate five years as In beset shame initially at university and then at King's college and under about this time last ed I ended up quitting my job at kings. And now what myself so alongside magnetic Always done some private practices consultancy wack which Nov now. You're very passionate about helping people have people in difficult and challenging medical situations. And we've done a little bit onside. built uh-huh gradually when I came to London Gem yes Now to what myself I I do WanNa consultations and one of the reasons on today's contributed Id Women who have complex relationships with used because burials. Didn't I end up talking Stan coming to new because if thinking Samsung family and they want to deal with relationships with food before they have children because they worry about policy on Sunday keep exploring a bit more anxious to see those. The patients Having post surgery or passageway irradiating. Thanks idea Action about keeping to the things that I on good things. I'm joy in the things I on especially consultancy company so like design things like that which would probably went on to say and I say what Ah with reformer on the mini mealtimes mid week until show. That sounds really great being very busy. And you obviously an explosion a few different areas and congratulations and starting your creed Lonzo practice your boss in town. You think this area abandoned mother's relationship with food is really important one and I want talk with you about that today because I can see that and how it does affect families do with and I wanted to sort of introducing that concept so that if there are any munns listening in today they can start to recognize it and I know where to go for help if they are if they feel would likes support so and of course the as as you can see media especially Shauwie that would be city rates all on the rise and I know this knots contoversial conversations around that topic in itself. But how much do you think is perhaps linked to mother's own relationship with food so I think it's very complicated unless suppose there's an interesting vesting. Divine intensive is a bit of a wealth device may be as the right with pitching it or social. Divide in these kinds of things so I think that possibly talk talk of patients that you and I see it often activities. The most relationship with food might being more around restriction. Might be more around. A misconceptions about what's healthy healthy was not healthy. For example I might see patients who say will automatically getting my children hydrates hydrates snaky FIS lies and of course children hydrates Aquarius and serrated complicates to area. OJ things not getting children. Children processed food which they would include like you did not move this stuff children in the very very high fiber diets conscious about giving them the writings and avoiding shook Iran using toxic around children talking about food good food and bad food. So that's kind it at one end of this section of May and then of course the the other end of the spectrum of families what Hap- struggling to cook and eat healthy food because they never had the model to them perhaps they are struggling significantly can lead to get home in time to cook healthy hops. They didn't have the access to the knowledge of the resources in order to do that and Mike Fun believe that every parent during the past full that children and sometimes our best is not quite Difficult so I suppose we're talking about these things. I think. differentiate between his secrets and in his rules interesting to observe that quite often now flashing special and we have often have parents working fulltime children. Nasri route so the timing. Obviously that stuff's fine lovely but but it doesn't mean that when parents with children want to be the ones giving the treats getting when the nice things in kids do our tracks into your gene eight High Maya carbohydrate sugar and things and so I think there's a number of issues that can feed-in but primarily a style. I see a women who have complex relationships with themselves in they. All Yoga died in will ever much in going through detox. Dieting Damenich Maybe not happy with the body's trying to accept that their bodies to change your pregnancy so those kinds of women the ICS. Probably yes. And I couldn't agree. I I do ause Families do these reflective practice when a senior especially when they want to do some work around very severe fussy eaters and and is not necessarily for children with autism but situation who have just managed become Fussy ages that has been any input into either. There's always if they see a GPO nutrition sometimes it said it'd be towed. Look child is growing perfectly fine. Don't worry about it then outgrow it but of course was as as we know some Joan if you don't give them the right support and the experience journey in helping this is around that reflective practice on why might that China has become a fuzzy Egypt. And how about my own feeding practices so patterns. And how is that affecting the judge and that's very difficult very difficult experience and when parents make that realization I I guess I'd I'd love to know. What would you advise for a mother or father who might have realized that actually nineties nineties locked in the evening we don't eat particular food groups like hawks perhaps in the evening and you don't want to sitting there at the table without eating eighteen minutes foods we we understand is important to run road actually emotionally psychologically? That's difficult for me to do so I would encourage them to you. Speak to somebody about that. Relationship with food and think about the virus is ation what's going on in Difficult in women. We often get get to a stage where we finally cracks. If things that make up only spoke good to keep await. We want to see in all these things have a little passenger comes into the mix. You actually need you to do something different. And I think that It's about sitting down with with professional. Could be a mental health professional or it could be somebody alike may while we talk about relationships food what that means. What does it mean? If you got hydrates with your children what will happen the Behind that and trying to unpick some of those behaviors so that you can perhaps think more About ways around Doing things that would actually give you the outcome that he wants to get the want. Is that your child. Grows healthy happy and eat. All foods doesn't have enough about eating carbohydrates. These Chinese pushing kids love carbohydrates the rape. Need that done on. It should come from Hydra deprive but families. Sometimes it comes the surprise when essentially when actually there although you can serve up family neil their proportion of energy and Some of the food groups will be addict frontier. You and that comes as such a big

Soci NHL United States Tennis Adult Dietitian Madeline BOB Samsung King Rape Shauwie Stan HAP Dini Nasri Mike Fun Iran Joan Egypt China
"king college" Discussed on SOFREP Radio

SOFREP Radio

04:20 min | 1 year ago

"king college" Discussed on SOFREP Radio

"That am i a one life to give her my country there was a a big fire raged across like two thirds of manhattan destroyed everything and i i believe it also burned down king's college 'em anders it's very controversial even to this day who started that fire some people think goes nathan hale i probably wasn't both george washington in general how did neither one of them believed in like total war but they were both it's like no we should not scorched earth so it's very unlikely that they gave orders for anyone to do that 'em but nonetheless this fire did break out an a and then after the war king's college decided decided well we don't really wanna be named after king george anymore what's more suitable american name and they settled on christopher columbus and that's where columbia comes from loops yeah so how do they feel about i mean now if it's been around for for your troll appropriation you know i don't know i'm not about like white washing the past and trying to pretend it didn't happen and that's why i was totally against all those all those kids tearing down civil war statues and i knew i knew i was right after they did that after the civil war statue thing the next thing they're coming after jefferson they're coming after washington they're coming after columbus because these people who are of that whatever whatever you wanna call them social justice warriors or whatever they're trying to fill a hole inside themselves in that whole is so deep it can never be filled so they will not rest until they completely dismantle in troy v entire culture in all of our founding fathers have to go because so many of them were slave owners they were almost all of them are two thirds of more and we should not bullshit are sells about that jefferson own slaves a you know we should acknowledge that and learn from it and move on from that and like okay that was like a fucked up part of our history and you know we went through a very painful experience with civil war in a the civil rights movement went through a painful experience there and like we should acknowledge our own evolution as a society and embrace that at but while also embracing where we came from a i don't believe and all that that that revisionist history i'm with you a hundred percent you must just wanna hand them like an open book and be like here you you write and you guys tell you a story in will tell the truth well it's that howard zinn interpretation of history that that that marxist interpretation of american history a that is just all the horrible things we've done in some we have done some horrible things but what gets lost in that without howard zinn shit is that all the great positive things that we've done throughout history which completely overshadows in my eyes like the bad end the documents minutes an end the philosophy of john adams and thomas jefferson and what george washington fought for in the signing of our constitution was the framework that later on v african american community could lean on and say hey this document says freedom for all men this bill of rights you're were the fucker all rights are all men it gave them z v m philosophical an illegal scaffolding two point towards and say that this these these founding documents say we should be granted are freedoms great point a so yeah let's not throw out the baby with the bathwater here you know there's a lot to be said for our constitution and are bill of rights and the people who fought fought and died for it a one my i wanna end we we went down a dark road this is the fourth talking about strode on parasail a yet that that that there wasn't really that dark that was more than just a weird visual but i'm gonna give you another we're i'm for you i'm here for you as i'm gonna give you another individual 'cause 'em as i read your article and as you as you were you told it the thing for me is a i got a weird mind obviously an i pictured a like you're you you're telling all these these places are still named after what they are today so like you're talking about.

manhattan hundred percent
"king college" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

02:45 min | 1 year ago

"king college" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"He's forced in some fashion to leave your because of his unhappy marriage and his relationship with his earlier love, and it's all very romantic winds up in Chicago seeking sanctuary. Not as triumph in the irony of his life. Is that the country that embraced, most America? He regard. As just a place to hide. Absolutely right. He was not really very happy at any stage leaving in America. He become an Englishman. He would always been very happy. Particularly happy living in King's College alongside may not canes. That was the peak of his happiness. But as you say he had he was unhappy in love. He needed a divorce. He took briefly job in Arkansas, in order to get a quickie divorce, Arkansas, apparently provided that and then he got a job you wanted to be in Princeton, and it ended up being in Chicago where at least alongside a lot of people who very similarly to him in the economics department, and that way built the foundation for what would come to be known as the monitor's revolution. Of course. That's where move from Friedman walls, number of like minds there. They were prepared for the moment. When Keynesianism legend evidently too steep inflation, and the grinding to a whole economic growth, what we knew is. Stagflation. So by the Addy sedative to mid seventies, they were ready with an alternative, which was to say it actually wasn't particularly based upon Hayek's original Australian economics on the other hand, it was it was it came out of all of my own Perrin conversations, about exactly how to put a feasible replacement Keynesianism and do with mentoring amount of money that, that is in a system at any stage an economic system at any stage, Friedman said, if you ration it, and you make gradual than you will have a little bit of inflation, but not too much. And so it was actually Jimmy contra old, people much derided, Jimmy kasha, who appointed defendthem in Paul Volcker, who was the man, you undestood exactly, what Friedman, sending him and defectively deliberately brought about recession in order to pay the economy of inflation, and the country for the the between. Forty five and seventy five of the whole world was Keynesian between seventy five for the next six years. The whole world walls Friedman, I and Freeman being a month. Petrin. Sunol at least the donated son of Friedrich Hayek. And that's the way things turned Keynes Hayek. The clash that defined modern economics. Nncholas shot has put the flesh and the romance and the song to economics. I'm John Batchelor..

Friedman King Friedrich Hayek America Chicago Jimmy kasha John Batchelor Arkansas Nncholas Paul Volcker Freeman Perrin Princeton defectively six years
"king college" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

04:14 min | 2 years ago

"king college" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"To print industry review program. The stuck details on our website. From the last newspaper read it to the current newspaper review who this morning is unless you Solano professor at King's College London an expert on Asian maritime defense. Thanks for coming in. So we're going to with the t- this is about well slow down really in in investment for for for startups. Yes. So it's really interesting story because southbound the the Japanese company that. For those not familiar with that, it's a little bit long full definitive works into the communication is a major service provider in Japan is also a major investor into startups, lots of telecommunication companies do that, and they had from is to invest something in the region of sixteen billion dollas into we work which full anyone in London is now all New Yorkers started to become a relatively familiar faces odd sort, of course, sheds spaces, and it's it it belongs to the jury of this startups a little bit like you, burn and other bits and pieces of this kind. And what is interesting about? It is that SoftBank is just announced a massive reduction because from the original proposal of sixteen billion dollars. Now, they've decided to cut down to only two billion dollars investment from this vision. Funds which is a very large fund that was set up a size to invest in startups. And by the reason, this is happening. It's because the the shareholders investors are shares of of things of communist SoftBank at a bit of of of a bit of a problem. They are lowering Tim's of gains and their full investors are becoming a lot more cautious as to how one invests money where does invest the money. It's really interesting about this story is that here will go to ks of very significant case the high profile startup investor that actually is thinking again about doing it raising the question as to whether the world of a startup such going to slow down in the near future. And in fact, SoftBank share price fell because of its own newly listed Japanese mobile phone business not to nearly as well as expected. Exactly. And if you think about. You've a lot of the communists with it. His Samsung, and what is whether these while way for different reasons, and the old very big sort of telecommunication companies, which are the most money because everybody these days as moving it's lower. We're all moving our lives into mobile phones and supporting devices, and it does read is raise this question as to whether it's all going to be in the same sort of more cautious baseline assumption. What does that mean for start ups? What does that mean for for the tech comedy into start ups together as a bangle in in the future? So that's very interesting sort of toll about two names that are probably familiar to fewer than sort of mainstream jeans, but certainly something to keep an eye on insofar as the big Monday news is concerns -solutely said not all looking particularly healthy there for humans who. May not be healthy. It seems that they can utilize those mobile phones and get seen by a doctor on Skype precisely so I, you know, I think this is story. It's actually quite ironically is almost the opposite end of the angle because here we just talking about. We're just talking about how telecommunication and startups mind doing that whether the moment, but did a hint the prime minister just unveiled a new program about twenty billion pounds budget boost by twenty twenty three the eight. And the key element is basically revolutionize the Howdy NHA's Dazs..

SoftBank Solano King's College London Samsung professor prime minister Japan Tim Skype twenty twenty sixteen billion dollars twenty billion pounds two billion dollars
"king college" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

04:40 min | 2 years ago

"king college" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

"You're listening to the monocle daily time now to take a look at the Asian newspapers. We're joined once again, but eagle regalia from the China Institute King's College London ego workum back to the show we start with the Japan Times. Well, the headline sums it up nicely with on China coma. Japan unveils record defense budget. This is always a certain amount of convenient hypocrites involved in this way. Japan is concerned, of course, because it's not really supposed to have a military. Whereas actually it has an extremely impressive one. Yeah. The Japanese self defense full says it's officially called is. Of course, an army, but name what's interesting here. However is that since twenty twelve Japan has been steadily increasing its defense budget. So now it comes to five point six trillion yen, which is about forty seven billion dollars in terms of percentage of GDP. It's still fairly low. About one percent. But was interesting perhaps is where the money is going to be spent and one thing that everybody's looking at these to form a helicopter carriers, which will now be sort of redone to service as proper aircraft carriers. The problem here is of aircraft carriers considered an offensive mean? Well, indeed. So there's a picture accompanying this article of the cargo which is currently helicopter carrier, and as you say going to become an aircraft carrier. How delight to do imagine China is going to be by the prospects of craft carriers on the high seas beneath the Japanese flag, again, not that delighted so China has already said has urged Japan to stick to its defensive policy rather than introduce any kind of -fensive weaponry and platforms. And so on. Of course, China itself is developing its own aircraft carriers just recently completed the first sort of home built one the other being an old Soviet one. So of course, there is concern that some sort of OEMs raised developing in East Asia, but there are other reasons for Japan to increase defense spending as well, namely, the US has been pressuring Japan to shoulder its weight, but also to buy American equipment to reduce the trade deficit that the US has Japan. That's of course, a big thing for Trump wanna move along to another story. This one out of China being reported here by. Sixth one among others. I'm sure because this is this is quite weird. This is a well. As the headline says, I see of bark sharing company has been blacklisted from pretty much everything. What has he done wrong in Wisey being punished in this fashion? So if you look at just the the full Monty of the case so offer the company the bike sharing company that he is CEO of has a has been sued by a logistics company on the said that offer owed that money and the cool decided and the gist companies favor, and then imposed these sort of conditions punishment until ofo pays its debts. So on the surface. It just seems like a spat between two companies. But when you look at some of the details in terms of what what the CEO has been of what he will be punished with it becomes more interesting. I mean, it's things like he's been prevented from travelling in business class from. Spending money excessively at hotels golf courses. Taking high-speed trains, sending his children to private schools, and so on and so forth. It does roll the painter picture of the lifestyle has been enjoying doesn't it it. Does it? I mean, I is there something of a populist gesture there in banning in from doing these things it's the communist party wary of resentment among Chinese people of a few lucky tycoons plutocrats getting to live rather high on the HOGAN is fashion. I mean, it it might be I think, but also it's connected to to a general kind of feeling of unease between the party in the tech sector recently. I'm offers been getting some trouble in terms of it's financial position. And the sort of had problems returning the deposits that people pay on the bikes on the bike that they rent. So it is possible that the courts are sending a message that goes well beyond this particular case, I wanna move along to another story, which I was bit perplex pry because. It's it's very much a question of you'll perspective. And this this story is being reported in terms of recent birthrights in China being disappointing in the haven't actually been vetted. Well, everything's relative..

Japan China Japan Times CEO China Institute King communist party East Asia Trump US Wisey forty seven billion dollars one percent
"king college" Discussed on The Anthill

The Anthill

03:05 min | 2 years ago

"king college" Discussed on The Anthill

"That hot tent summer was filled with. People took to the streets outside the democratic national convention in Chicago, Columbia University students took over their campus, but all that heat that anger that rebellion nineteen sixty eight brought us some light to. We're going to bring you these stories from people who know them best. We're so deeply impacted by inventive that year. They made it their lives work to study them tune in starting August twenty eighth right here. It's heat and light. Definitely checkout heats in light. It's a great new Poku series from all colleagues over at the conversation US. Now, for all final of this episode, we turned to genetic inheritances facilities researches have been trying to understand whether a person's intelligence and how will they do at school is linked to the genes. It's a line of inquiry that has a controversial history and is being used the further racist and eugenic policies yet in more recent years, the search for the link between genes and intelligence has been boosted by new scientific advances which are revealing the complexity of the relationship between a person's genetics, their environments and their intelligence Jemma. We found out more. For the last few years, a steady stream of new research has been published on the links between genes and intelligence on whether how Wella kid doesn't school depends upon that DNA, genetic inheritance. One group of scientists at the forefront of this research is based at King's College London home to a study that has been following sets of identical and non identical twins for the last two decades in order to better understand the role that genes and environment play in our lives. Kylie r-enfield. A post doctoral research at king's has used data from this twins, early development study or Ted's to examine the link between genes and educational success. She shown that around two-thirds of the differences in school achievement between children can be explained by differences in their genes. Now, in a new study published in September Kylie and her colleagues found that what's called the heritage -bility of educational achievement isn't just a one off. If children who do at primary school continue to do one in secondary school that's also closely linked to the genes. We found that genetic differences between children, but the main contributor stability of education achievement of cross. The compulsory education really from ages seven to sixteen, explaining around seventy percent of the stability. It's worth taking a moment to to understand what's meant by the term heritage -bility. If you listen to episode back in June on twins, you'll remember how important to insert he's.

Kylie r-enfield King US Wella Chicago Columbia University Jemma College London Ted seventy percent two decades
"king college" Discussed on WBBM Newsradio

WBBM Newsradio

02:30 min | 2 years ago

"king college" Discussed on WBBM Newsradio

"Good morning I'm Felicia middlebrooks good. Morning I'm rob heart for Pat, Cassidy, that'd be a nice day today, sunny but we're expecting some shower activity perhaps some thunderstorms to south of. The city and northwest Indiana this afternoon. Our high eighty four degrees seventy seven now at o.'hare our top local story on NewsRadio WBZ 'em jury selection is scheduled to. Begin today for to your reputed street gang members charged with the high profile murder of the fifteen. Year old girl in two thousand thirteen the story. From WB m.'s Bernie to foia idea Pendleton was shot to death while she and some friends were gathered at harsh, park five and a half years. Ago the king college prep may dread Performed just the week, before President Obama's second inauguration. Now Michael ward the alleged gunman and Kenneth Williams. The alleged getaway driver. Go on. Trial it a video confession ward admitted shooting. Into the park claiming, Williams had threatened to kill him if he didn't Bernie, to foia NewsRadio on one five point nine FM. As part. Of the strategy. To prevent. A repeat of last weekend's gun. Violence Chicago police say they'll be, cracking, down on large unthank- shinned street, parties police superintendent Eddie Johnson says those kinds of gatherings were the scene. Of several shootings he adds he believes. Police have the manpower to handle tomorrow's bud Billiton parade and other events this weekend's staying here and tell you one hundred percent. Guaranteed is difficult to do what I will say to us we take all the precautions that we. Can you know you can't predict someone getting upset. In this household coming out in this fire indiscriminately you can't predict that but to the extent possible we will be, out there to protect the people Event that something does occur then we'll be prepared. To, handling police, say the focus on large street, parties will last at least a month. Chicago congressman Danny Davis says programs helping formerly jailed men and women find gainful employment can be one way to ease rampant gun violence there's a saying nothing, beats a bullet like a job and congressman Danny Davis says putting ex offenders even former. Gang members to work when they get out of jail should be part, of the. Anti violence efforts, here he says congress passed the so-called second chance act. If they help when they, come out that will have a big barren own whether or not. Or how soon they're back in and so we're very pleased that is moving along because not only as the grant. Money but many programs heavy mode congressman Danny..

Kenneth Williams Danny Davis congressman Danny Eddie Johnson Chicago Felicia middlebrooks Bernie congressman Indiana Michael ward bud Billiton foia Pendleton Pat king college murder President Obama Cassidy congress superintendent
"king college" Discussed on BBC Radio 4

BBC Radio 4

04:19 min | 2 years ago

"king college" Discussed on BBC Radio 4

"Such scrutiny and to new twenty orthodox spiritual writer antony blooms was a greater danger he lived in london and russia had just invaded czechoslovakia when he met a check reforms illusion who pleaded tell everyone not to hate are invaders for the verse those who hate the ones for the sake of the others give a free hand of the devil he knew it was td bloom that the real battle took place in the human heart between love and hatred light and darkness and that was still for the day with the reverend roy jenkins the time is eleven minutes to eight the good news i severe gibson is back at home she is the six year old girl who suffers from dravid syndrome it's an extreme form of epilepsy we talked to her mom daniel davis on wednesday about the license that she needed to be able to use medicinal cannabis at home that license of course was granted but in the next few weeks the home office is due to come up with a longer term plan that will affect other families and families in the future you want want to use medicinal cannabis and danielle davis is on the line in here in the studio dr amir angered who's a cannabis scientists researching psychosis studies at king's college london's institute of psychiatry morning to you both morning danielle first of all how is she she's doing well recovering at home and all of a sudden you because of cheese as events and severe ban on life support it's just gonna take quite a few days for her we bought eight to get back to normal and mentally i mean the trauma of it what what what what does she kind of what is she aware of in terms of what happened am severe has global development delay am so the whole understanding of everything m she wouldn't really recognize and she does look at her arms and our fate where they put they kanye la's and you know the penetration so she'll look at them and she'll say severe sec and so she knows something had happened but she knows now as well she's back at home yes and you must be so so relieved since we talked to you last this week has just been ups and downs and changed i i honestly was thinking hey i would you know potentially life with either and it's horrible to think that it could have been so different and i have been taylor and to hear that she did get ground a license i'm we're just so thankful once again sophia was able to battle through yeah and in the future now as we turn to the future not just for her but for other families as well and as i said at the beginning the home office thinking about what to do what what what would you say to them to the officials concerned first of all thank you westerfield is chaos and they are moving in the right direction and i know things do take time and but something needs to be done a lot quicker there needs to be a more robust system and am cannabis needs to be taken out of schedule one needs to be rescheduled 'em at the minute where it is and it's still classed as an unlicensed product and if they moved at if that schedule at would be an easier and i think for doctors themselves wanting tape ascribe and at what make the decision so difficult stay on the line let's talk to dr anglin is here in the studio for that to happen for the rescheduling to happen what do you think scientists need to be able to know and be able to save certain about the substance well for the rescheduling that's more of a political decision so that that would be something that will come from the government and the home office would decide on rescheduling now they do get advice from the acm advisory council misuse of drugs so that's kind of scientific input and recently sally davis the chief medical officer came out with a recommendation the socalled i review where she.

writer london eleven minutes six year
"king college" Discussed on The Science Hour

The Science Hour

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"king college" Discussed on The Science Hour

"In what else could be lying out there excellent now more good news on kansas an american woman judy pumpkins was reported to have a tunnel breast cancer fully queued lodge chimneys in her liver and breasts shrank and vanished meanwhile researches at the institute of cancer research and the royal marsden in london reported that new drugs have saved the lives of some men with advanced prostate cancer the things these stories have in common is that they both use new types of treatment that fall into the category of immuno therapies that experimental treatments that use and boost our immune system all own incredibly sophisticated self defenses against infection injury and disease adam rutherford spoke to experts about the development starting with sophie pappa clinical scientists and cancer specialist at king's college guy's hospital london with long lived animals on all body is constantly going through multiple rounds of cell division and our cells divide they make mistakes medics and our immune system has a role in protecting us from infection but will say protecting us from genetic abnormalities cell division that goes role now it's not the first line of defense against that is the last line of defense against that in the body has multiple mechanisms at a genetic level to stop itself for making mistakes but ultimately if those mistakes get through those checks and balances than you rely we rely on our immune system being able to constantly interrogate look at cells in the body find the ones that wrong who dangerous and eliminate them but it doesn't always work in many cancers by virtue of their errand nature consoles often acquire the ability to evade attack by our mean systems summer terrific is a cancer researcher and clinician the crick institute enroll marston hospital one in immune cell encounters a cancer cell the might recognize it as foreign and that can potentially lead to an immune response.

kansas judy pumpkins royal marsden london adam rutherford king researcher sophie pappa crick institute
"king college" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:18 min | 3 years ago

"king college" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"For hellenic studies at king's college london and tim judah british writer journalist and correspondent for the economist i'm going to talk to you first edith because you're due to travel to russia later this year you following this story and all the various fallout very much so personally invested i've been invited to talk at a very important conference in kazan in october which is very precisely designed to facilitate east west dialogue in the academy i don't particularly want to go with ernie british consuls all ambassadors and who knows at what point visas will not be revoked by the russians so i'm personally invested in it and following it closely tim de find it listening to that these comments from anna does it make sense to you that people are less interested in russia in this story than they are in the world cup while i think that's no not particularly but russia doesn't exactly have a sort of major thriving free press either either and the other thing is i'm she said that the more that russia is pressed and the more that people will believe putin but i have to say that having covered the conflict in ukraine in two thousand fourteen in two thousand fifteen i'd just like to remind everyone that the russia said that it's the little green men as they were called in crimea with nothing to do with them and that he didn't have troops in in in eastern ukraine neither both of which show turned out to be lies so i don't think that from the on the russian side that that mr putin the russian media has much credibility on on that score so view it's potentially useful to him if people are thinking about other things will it's useful certainly useful for him and it's also suppose it's useful for him it was useful for him to to annex crimea because that boosted his opinion his his boosted him in the opinion polls as well having said that crimea was a complete game changer in terms of international relations and russian western relations in general and these things are not cost free i want to turn to both of.

kazan russia ukraine crimea mr putin king tim judah writer
"king college" Discussed on The Science Hour

The Science Hour

02:41 min | 3 years ago

"king college" Discussed on The Science Hour

"King county in their frankness wilkins building at king's college can smell the food items mother spelling it for awhile it's lunchtime and safety mettlin hasn't t to to seventeen hours from seeing being so hungry everything i want everything sympathies a lecturer nutrition and diet tatics at king's college london she also gets hungry said was part of our mini experiment she agreed to go hungry and now she really wants to eat happy last night and to make a quick decision about what to eat against feed inside makes and beating agitated and safe he's not alone many students in the come team were feeling a little crappy to either garretta on him over cycads ernie fails a trusted aide now you'll feel as my right now are accused of it on my up on my sister carlo sorry already her authority had renounced critised fatigue at hungry yes i do i even then the chinese race for that what i'm really hungary right outside see you take villa token feeling agitated finding it hard to make decisions and not being able to concentrate lie called listener abby experiences these are all typical symptoms when you're feeling hungry so i'm just setting up the needle to britons finger and he might find that tusks you'll you still doing can become just that bit more difficult as sophie found out when she tried to take her blood sugar levels before love michelle i don't know why that is not doing anything surrey okay so why is a regular task harder now she's home gray well after a few attempts we got to blood sugar level reading and that helped explain says actually 27 were hit is below the normal range which probably explains why we've had so much trouble operating the brokers museum and probably wakes faith why i'm so hungry so blood glucose levels us the first clue as to why say fees feeling hungry there's not very much sugar floating around her bloodstream to fuel her brain and that can make us feel bad tempered the ony fuel your brain can use is glucose what's happening at the moment physiologically is that my body is tapping into my stored glucose from my muscles in from my liver and that could glycogen and the glycogen that we store there is a bit like about trees for energy why is it then that using those reserves might then made me feel.

King county carlo sophie lecturer king hungary seventeen hours
"king college" Discussed on BBC Radio 4

BBC Radio 4

01:57 min | 3 years ago

"king college" Discussed on BBC Radio 4

"The nhs millions of pounds the test developed at king's college london checks for protein which has released if the heart is damaged further studies will be needed before the tests can be used across the nhs the time is nine minutes past seven you wouldn't really expect a party to declare that it is ready for government any three months after losing a general election that is however have jeremy corbyn will present himself and his team when he closes the labour conference here in brighton later today the party of working people will also emphasize the challenge of automation for the jobs skills and training of the feature the chatham education sect jansher rain has already eased her conference speech to make pledges on early years and lifelong education she's with me now good morning bill monning too fast about the scale of the challenge of automation the bank of england's chief economist said it could be fifteen million jobs at risk in this country is he right well we know that this country will not look the same as it does today in in even a few years time let alone decades so we now that we have a big scale and jump on our hands to show that the economy works for everybody which is what we thought out in terms of the skills gap we know that businesses will need to be able to move where kozani two different types of occupational m platt that at jobs throughout their lives so what our national education service was about was equipped in people with those skills and transferable skills we know people need to be more resilient will need to learn new skills as automation does come online and new job the developed and you only have to look at young people today to know more about smart technology than they may be do about ordinary rate literature job patten what is a robot proof joel lengthy patent this different types of work no these always going to be human beings in in the mix so will always be quiet but it is about making sure that we also create industries of the future as well also we've got to look forward as well as looking at what's happening today and i think some of those call functional skills that britain's always been brilliant hence why we had the revolution.

nhs jeremy corbyn brighton chief economist patten britain king chatham education sect bank of england nine minutes three months