27 Burst results for "King Leopold"

"king leopold" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

Democracy Now! Audio

08:20 min | Last month

"king leopold" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

"Democracy now. Democracy now dot org. The quarantine report I'm Amy Goodman with nermeen shape. The black lives matter uprising in the United States has catalyzed reckoning about racism and colonialism across the globe, including Belgium where growing movement is demanding Belgium address systemic racism make amends for its brutal colonial legacy protests have rocked Belgium as demonstrators demand the removal of statues of King, Leopold the second who became king and eighteen, sixty five and ruled what is now the Democratic Republic of Congo as his own personal colony until one thousand, nine, hundred eight in a reign of terror that killed up to ten million people. In the eighteen eighties leopold to seize land in Central Africa, seventy six times the size of Belgium he ran the region for his own profit, commanding private army that included Congolese. And draining the land of its resources, including rubber and ivory under his command, millions of Congolese people were enslaved and separated from their families. His troops were ordered to collect the hands of victims and to shoot those who resisted slave labor. He also imported. Congolese people for a human zoo in Belgium. Leopold to was forced to give up. Congo is private fiefdom in one, thousand, nine, hundred eight, but remained under Belgian rule until nineteen, sixty one Congo one. Minutes now sixty years later, Belgium is hardly reckoned with. It's bloody past statues of Leopold, too can be seen in cities across Belgium in Brussels last month. Activists climbed a statue of Leopold the second, and chanted murderer while waving the flag of the Democratic Republic of Congo meanwhile thirties in the city of gent removed separate statue of Leopold on Congo's Independence Day June thirtieth. The move came after protesters doused with red paint to symbolize the blood of murdered Congolese a leopold statue was also removed an Antwerp this reckoning led King Philippe of Belgium to issue an unprecedented statement expressing regret for Belgium's colonial rule in a letter to DRC President Felix USA Academy. The Belgian parliament has also agreed to form a new truth and Reconciliation Commission to address the legacy of its genocidal rule and Congo the soul comes amidst growing demand for reparations for more. We're joined by a descendant of King Leopold to WHO's joining the protesters and demanding a reckoning about his brutal legacy. Princess Miranda is the great grand niece of Belgium's leopold the second. She's the aunt of the current king. Philippe of Belgium, and the daughter of the former king leopold the third. She's joining us from London and Brussels were also joined by Jia. The Congolese Belgian activists and founder of Cafe Congo in Brussels welcome you both to democracy now. Jia. We. Let's begin with you. You are Congolese living in Belgium you run the Congo cafe. Can you talk about the legacy of Leopold the second and what it means so often? In now hearing the story of the king who considered Congo his personal fiefdom, we think of the cutting off of hands. Ten million people died under his rule. Explain this history or at least describe it to us. Yes I'm not a historian, but I'm a journalist Amick, belgacom journalists, and that lied to we to study the construction of the bedroom, national narratives and now served how systematically they reasonably division they. Wizar- of the Congo's contribution in the construction of the Belgium identity, that's why coming from starting from King Leopold to who was the king of Belgium, but also a builder, also the heads of the. tweet state of Congo he had duties and responsibilities, and that continue Taylor that colonial continue to you know after we had the Belgian Congo and then. Today with the systematic discrimination and I can confirm that under foods of this. Shared history between Belgium and Congo, but it is a it's a denial. HISTORY IS A. History Eastern. That's why you know starting from my point of view from experience. I think is really important. You know to testimony an also to anchor these observations and Easter Easter facts because we have our cars, we facts. We have evidence of this crimes of couldn't crimes under King Leopold to an under Belgian Congo. It's important to frame directly link directly to the demands of the new generation today that the colonial continuum. That's why now we arrived in a moment. It starts from King. Leopold to and you know the demands do negotiations to remove. These statues of King Leopold to ask the head of the free states, but you know if you keep on the. Reflection it's it goes further and we. We would like to work now on material in memorial repuation because it has an impact to the earth on the new generation on the after this generation, it means for example the ceiling Lhasa. Feeling. Las- The discrimination, the sickening systematic nickel phobia. That's why we are really aware, and we really in that kind of momentum with the internationally. You know we've on occasions. But Princess as I want to ask you about the Belgian government's response a so far. To this history between a Belgium and colonial Belgium and Congo In recent years, the Belgian government has issued apologies for some aspects of its relationship to Congo. Including the separation of mixed race children from their Congolese mothers as well as for Belgium's role in the assassination of Congo's I post colonial Prime Minister Patrice Lumumba. Even, though many including the UN have called for Belgium to apologize for its brutal rule, King Philippe, and in the letter that we mentioned earlier, and he sent to the DRC president, he only expressed the deepest regret a for what Belgium had done acts of violence and cruelty as he said. Now many have said that that letter quite apart from not containing an apology is almost entirely irrelevant, because the king a does not represent the viewpoint of the Belgian government since he's not formerly a member. And and then the question of why it is that Belgium has apologized for certain aspects of its rule. But not for its overall brutality in the region to could you talk about that? And whether you think these protests might produce apology. Now. Where you're absolutely right, I mean there was there was also always some mixed message. There was some apologies for some things, but there were other people at a minister, saying no, we should not apologize. We cannot agrees history. So I think honesty dispersed the que- the king, saying that he expressed deep regrets unjustly doesn't go far out, but it's a first step. It's quite. He's still in our country. That's chief upstate. Waco Kanye's acknowledges the problem of the US on this lead. We have to go much further, and the parliament has voted for Commission of Truth and reconciliation, and I really hope that this will. will expose the past..

King Leopold Belgium Congo Belgian Congo leopold Congo cafe Cafe Congo King Philippe Belgian government United States Amy Goodman DRC Brussels Central Africa president Reconciliation Commission Jia
Belgium takes down statue, king regrets colonial violence

WBZ Afternoon News

00:44 sec | Last month

Belgium takes down statue, king regrets colonial violence

"Is expressing regret for violence by the former colonial power. When it ruled over what is now Congo. In a letter to the company's president, Belgium's King Philippe stop short of issuing a formal apology to convey his deepest regrets for the acts of violence and cruelty and suffering and humiliation inflicted on Belgian Congo. The letter was published on the 60th anniversary of the African countries. Independence Phillips Letter is sent mean growing demands The Belgium takes responsibility trust is committed by former King Leopold. The second A bust of Leopold is expected to be taken down from display later Tuesday in the city of Gwent following a decision from local authorities. I'm Charles. The latest five

Congo King Leopold Belgium King Philippe Independence Phillips Gwent President Trump
"king leopold" Discussed on AP News

AP News

13:50 min | Last month

"king leopold" Discussed on AP News

"For the first time in Belgium's history a reigning king has expressed his regret for the violence carried out by the former colonial power when it ruled over what is now Congo in Africa in a letter to the Congolese president Belgium's king Philippe stopped short of issuing a formal apology who conveyed his deepest regrets for the acts of violence and cruelty around the suffering and humiliation inflicted on Belgian Congo the letter was published on the sixtieth anniversary of the African country's independence Phillips letter is sent I mean going to mom's the Belgium takes responsibility for the atrocities committed by former king Leopold the second a bust of the apple is expected to be taken down from displayed later Tuesday in the city of glens following a decision from local authorities I'm Charles the last month

Belgium Congo Africa president Philippe apple Charles Phillips king Leopold
Belgian king expresses regret for violence in colonial rule

AP News Radio

00:49 sec | Last month

Belgian king expresses regret for violence in colonial rule

"For the first time in Belgium's history a reigning king has expressed his regret for the violence carried out by the former colonial power when it ruled over what is now Congo in Africa in a letter to the Congolese president Belgium's king Philippe stopped short of issuing a formal apology who conveyed his deepest regrets for the acts of violence and cruelty around the suffering and humiliation inflicted on Belgian Congo the letter was published on the sixtieth anniversary of the African country's independence Phillips letter is sent I mean going to mom's the Belgium takes responsibility for the atrocities committed by former king Leopold the second a bust of the apple is expected to be taken down from displayed later Tuesday in the city of glens following a decision from local authorities I'm Charles the last month

Belgium Congo Africa President Trump Philippe Apple Charles Phillips King Leopold
Pulling down statues of racists? Africa's done it for years

News and Perspective with Tom Hutyler

00:43 sec | 2 months ago

Pulling down statues of racists? Africa's done it for years

"News new campaigns in the U. S. and Europe now following Africa's lead on colonial era statues as we hear from Charles de Ledesma Queen Victoria Cecil Rhodes king Leopold statues honoring these leaders of colonial rule have been pulled down over the years in Africa often countries won independence all new generations said racist relics had to go examples include a boisterous a student led campaign pressed by the university of Cape Town to remove a statue of roads and one of the statute of Britain's Queen Victoria not downtown beheaded in twenty fifteen but on the bundles in Nairobi Kenya now they have to step two lies next to explode in a downtown

Europe Africa Cape Town Britain Queen Victoria Kenya Charles De Ledesma Queen Victo
Pulling down statues of racists? Africa's done it for years

Mike Gallagher

00:45 sec | 2 months ago

Pulling down statues of racists? Africa's done it for years

"New campaigns in the US and Europe following after his lead on colonial era monument street Victoria Cecil Rhodes king Leopold statues honoring these leaders of colonial rule have been pulled down over the years in Africa often countries won independence all new generations said racist relics had to go examples include a boisterous a student led campaign pressed by the university of Cape Town to remove a statue of roads and one of the statute of Britain's Queen Victoria not downtown beheaded in twenty fifteen but on the bundles in Nairobi Kenya now the headless statue lies next to explode in a downtown square

United States Europe Africa Cape Town Britain Queen Victoria Kenya Victoria Cecil Rhodes
"king leopold" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

02:09 min | 2 months ago

"king leopold" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"Activism to pull down monuments across the country and the globe the campaign to remove Confederate monuments has intensified effort that's extended to statues of slave traders imperialist explores globally protests and sometimes act of vandalism have been taking place in cities Boston New York Paris Brussels Oxford scholars are divided over whether it amounts to a racing history updating it the targets of recent protests include statues of Christopher Columbus British imperialist Cecil Rhodes and Belgium's king Leopold who profited from brutal regime in Congo with the names of military bases don't matter then why not change that the trump administration spokesperson says the names don't matter but the president still wants to keep them as is a Kaylee McEntee was asked Thursday about bases named for Confederate generals after Democrats and others want changed a matter of because if you change the name what you are saying to the men and women who left those boards who died for this country in many cases you're telling them that the institution they laughed was fundamentally and inherently racist because of the name that is on if the president doesn't stand for the proposition on he wants to respect our military on and that's where you stand so this made it very clear yesterday several individuals three and for all American soldiers the basis of race the it was a bad idea this there are people like the general where the president.

vandalism Cecil Rhodes Belgium king Leopold Congo president Kaylee McEntee Boston New York Paris Brussels Oxford Christopher Columbus trump
Controversial statues toppled in cities around the world

1A

05:38 min | 2 months ago

Controversial statues toppled in cities around the world

"Since the death of George Floyd Confederate monuments are coming down in states across America some are removed quietly in the dead of night others are ripped from their pedestals in broad daylight and it's not just here in the US either protesters overseas are toppling monuments to slavers and colonizers as the protests over police racism and brutality rumbled across European cities some activists targeted that own country's colonial history in Belgium demonstrates a spray painted a statue of king Leopold the second Wallenstein U. K. statue of seventeenth century slave trader Edward Colston was toppled and thrown into a rhythm can the push for justice move forward without first looking back maybe the best way to reckon with our racist history is to dump it in the river we're going across America and abroad today as part of our one A. across America project it's a partnership with six public radio stations in various parts of the country we're joined now by someone who once said a great nation does not hide its history it faces its flaws and it corrects them which Landrieu is the former mayor of New Orleans and author of the book in the shadow of statues a white southerner confronts history welcome back to the show image thank you so much exactly also joining us is only a haci nada she's a writer and organizer of black lives matter U. K. black lives matter U. K. has compiled a list of sixty statues that it wants removed because they celebrate slavery Ali I joins us from London welcome hi Larry thanks for having me Mitch you brought down a number of Confederate monuments while your mail it may or you did that legally I wonder what do you make of protests in various cities that are taking down statues and monuments illegally well it again do it up myself and I wasn't the first one to talk about it it's been a long history of people who were leaders in New Orleans who tried to take those monuments down they all legal processes for doing it and there are the process used to do on it a peaceful protest you know the important thing is is that people now are beginning to understand how insidious those monuments are the ones that was specifically put up to celebrate those individuals who've spent their lives protecting slavery and so that's what the Confederate monuments are in the United States of America I can't speak to the ones because I don't know enough about them in other parts of the in the south in the United States of America there are three thousand monuments that will place up with the state and direct purpose of revering and honoring individuals who fought to split the United States and have all the calls of preserving slavery and that's just on the civil war or the confederacy was on the wrong side of that war they were on the wrong side of history and the last thing that we should be doing is honoring what's called a lost cause which is meant that somehow of the confederacy was a noble cause when in fact it was not in these monuments will put in places of public places yeah man on on public on public land and with and will put up with the specific purpose of Riviera the person I general Robert E. Lee Jefferson Davis PGT Beauregard and their whole host of others whose mission it was was to preserve slavery yeah and I felt very strongly being the mayor of a multi cultural city that is historically always prided itself on its diversity as an essential part of who we are as people to have those monuments in public places that was sending messages to people of color that they still want welcome here after all those years and so I couldn't be more thrilled that they're coming down you know we can get we can get kind of caught up in how they coming down and whether we should have long conversations a short conversations but essentially we're all finished with us if you just take the monument down and you don't get to the root of why they were put up in the first place or the ideas that they were trying to perpetuate that manifest themselves in institutions Holly and police and etcetera etcetera then we would have made some progress but not nearly as much progress as we should have this is clearly a hot topic of date debate in the US Stephen wrote on Facebook this is needed and long overdue Tommy wrote on Facebook I assume sarcastically by all means a race history get rid of it that will fix everything and then sailed sailor apes tweeted I say pull them down melt them and resign them to the garbage bin where the losers of history tip Oakley wind up yeah what do you make of this issue of whether a statue comes down legally or illegally doesn't matter in the end to a to a movement I think in my personal opinion whether it comes down legally or illegally is not the conversation we should be hopping Bob why is it being taken down and debated in the first place I think if we get into the legality and illegality over we then can get into a very polarizing conversation of good and bad it wouldn't really that's not what any of this is trying to do is really trying to have a conversation around what to be glorified in these countries and what do we put public money towards glorifying because these statues these plaques all of these things that glorify the slave owners these colonizers all paid for out of the tax pay is pocket and given that we've had two years of austerity I think there are a couple other ways that we might be able to spend this money instead of glorifying

America George Floyd
As protests grow, Belgium faces its racist colonial past

The Frame

03:03 min | 2 months ago

As protests grow, Belgium faces its racist colonial past

"As the protests over police racism and brutality rumbled across European cities some activists targeted that own country's colonial history in Belgium demonstrates a spray painted a statue of king Leopold the second Wallenstein U. K. statue of seventeenth century slave trader Edward Colston was toppled and thrown into a rhythm can the push for justice move forward without first looking back maybe the best way to reckon with our racist history is to dump it in the river we're going across America and abroad today as part of our one A. across America project it's a partnership with six public radio stations in various parts of the country we're joined now by someone who once said a great nation does not hide its history it faces its flaws and it corrects them Mitch Landrieu is the former mayor of New Orleans and author of the book in the shadow of statues a white southerner confronts history welcome back to the show image thank you so much I haven't also joining us is only a haci nada she's a writer and organizer of black lives matter U. K. black lives matter U. K. has compiled a list of sixty statues that it wants removed because they celebrate slavery Aaliyah joins us from London welcome hi thanks for having me Mitch you brought down a number of Confederate monuments while you are male you may or you did that legally I wonder what do you make of protests in various cities that are taking down statues and monuments illegally well it I need to involve myself and I wasn't the first one to talk about it it's been a long history of people who were leaders in New Orleans who tried to take those monuments down they all legal processes for doing it and there are the process used to doing it a peaceful protest you know the important thing is is that people now are beginning to understand how insidious those monuments are the ones that was specifically put up to celebrate those individuals who've spent their lives protecting slavery and so that's what the Confederate monuments are in the United States of America I can't speak to the ones because I don't know enough about them in other parts of the in the south in the United States of America there are three thousand monuments that will play stop for the distinct indirect purpose of revering and honoring individuals who fought to split the United States and hand over the cause of preserving slavery and that's just about the civil war of the confederacy was on the wrong side of that war they were on the wrong side of history and the last thing that we should be doing is honoring what's called a lost cause which is meant that somehow of the confederacy was a noble cause when in fact it was not in these monuments will put in places of all public places yeah they got the money and on on public on public land and with and will put up with the specific purpose of Riviera the person by general Robert E. Lee Jefferson Davis PGT Beauregard and there a whole host of others whose mission it was was to preserve

London mayor orders review of tributes to Britain's imperial past

Newell Normand

00:43 sec | 2 months ago

London mayor orders review of tributes to Britain's imperial past

"The removal of controversy all statues in the United States is being felt around the world foreign leaders are reviewing their own monuments and acknowledging checkered pasts CBS's Ian Lee reports from London in response to recent protests the mayor of London ordered a review of the city statues and street names I'm quite glad we shouldn't be memorializing we shouldn't be commemoration celebrations I columns people who are slavers the U. K. isn't the only country confronting its past Brussels is removing statues of king Leopold the second whose prosperity in Belgium came at the cost of millions of deaths in the Congo and in Kenya a former British colony people want monuments to their former overlords gone

United States CBS Ian Lee London Brussels Belgium Congo Kenya King Leopold
Statue of Leopold II, Belgian King Who Brutalized Congo, Is Removed in Antwerp

Rush Limbaugh

00:30 sec | 2 months ago

Statue of Leopold II, Belgian King Who Brutalized Congo, Is Removed in Antwerp

"They're at it the statue of Belgium's king Leopold the second the world's worst imperialist he ran the Congo with slave labor uses family disgusting and totally incompetent imperialist and his statue is now being removed and and twelve today the king king Leopold the second statue has now been taken down all over the world everything now is being seen through the prism of George

Belgium Leopold Congo George
Eating the Wild: from the lost primeval forests of Europe to Robin Hood

Gastropod

08:10 min | 3 months ago

Eating the Wild: from the lost primeval forests of Europe to Robin Hood

"Used to be covered in these dense wet deciduous forests which is very different from what we see today where really hardly any of this primeval force exists anymore for her book feasting. Wild jeanneret actually visited one of the last tiny slivers of European primeval forest. It's in Poland. And it really is just a shadow of its former. Self Europe's forests were so vast that actually we think that the root of the word wilderness came from descriptions of these places the roots of the words wild and wilderness. I'll go back to untamed animals. The forest was a place. Teeming WITH ANIMALS UNGOVERNED BY HUMAN HANDS UNGOVERNED BUT NOT UNTOUCHED FOR THOUSANDS OF YEARS. Europeans would go into the forest to find dinner day all kinds of animals wild boar venison there is something called the RMC which is the precursor to domesticated cattle. There was for a spice in moves the animals so abundant here. That really there was no form of hunting restriction it was abundant but it was also really valued killing a huge wild animal and then being able to share it was a sign of how wealthy and powerful you are. King said to have lots of wild game. At all their banquets. Animals would be breezed in rosewater and spices. Sometimes they would be covered in gold leaf and brought to the table hole and kind of carved up in front of the guests so while it was very much a form of status for kings so by the Middle Ages Those Morris. Were already starting to shrink between one thousand. Ad and thirteen hundred thirteen hundred. Europe's population grew by about fifty million people and all of those people needed to eat so there was increasing. Need to cut down the forests in order to grow grain and various crops and then also would was used for everything it was used for building houses and making carts by the fourteen and fifteen hundred. Europeans began sailing around the world. They first set forth to trade and then to stake their claim on foreign lands is colonialism spread across the globe. There was demand for very large old growth trees to create the ship. Masts that were needed and as early as the eleventh century The demand for wood was really threatening the forest where these kings went out and hunted the game meat that was so important to their diets and their status. Gina races that originally European forests had mostly being treated as common land. Anyone could hunt there. But as far back as ancient Rome the elite had sat down laws saying yes anyone could hunt but only as long as they weren't trespassing sort of by Default European kings and noblemen were the ultimate owners of the forest so as European king started to see their game meat being threatened by the need for Forest Land Day set out some very similar conservation measures whereby the king really restricted access to hunting in his forest. This is really the beginning of modern conservation lives whereby people were kept out of the forests. It's weird to think of royalty preserving their hunting grounds and keeping out the poor folk as the blueprint for the conservation movement. But jeanneret says these laws were really some of the earliest forms of environmental legislation forests. Were no longer for everyone to use as they pleased they were just for the Kings. They had very large administrative networks to manage this for so the forest wardens would they would hand out hunting licenses. They would make sure that game. Animals didn't starve winter or in times of drought. Sometimes they would prepare the venison for royal feasts and they would mete out. Punishments punishments were usually for poaching and they were definitely not just a slap on the wrist. If you ignored the game laws you could have a trial by hot iron and if you were found guilty then your eyes would be torn out or you were castrated. So poaching really big deal. The kings went to great lengths to prevent people from poaching and this had an impact on how people related to the natural world around them. The forest said always been wild in earlier centuries in Europe. They'd even been places of spirituality. But at this point the forests started to become scary rather than sacred. The authorities deliberately painted a picture of forests filled with outlaws and rebels dangerous rule breakers people who posed a threat to society with the stories. The authorities told a violent outlaws in the forest. Some of those were based on reality. There were people breaking the rules in the forest but they were breaking them because they thought the rules were unfair and they were hungry for poor people. This was one former getting food. And any time there was an economic downturn hunting would rise poaching would rise in the forests and so people did find it as an active resistance against the sort of forms of power and some of the rebels who broke the rules and hunted in the forest. They actually became folk. Heroes like Robin Hood and his band of Merry men. So Robin Hood was stealing from the rich and giving to the poor but this also came out of this idea that the force were not necessarily landscapes that poor people were allowed to access or use the resources of and so it wasn't active resistance to go in there and to get in game animals and feed yourself on one level. This is a story of power who could hunt and eat the wild game and wendling European forests and who couldn't that it's also the story of the impact that split between rich hunters and bore poachers had on how Europeans thought of wild food and the whole concept of the wild and wilderness. This is a very particular way of thinking of wild meat. As game to be hunted for sport by the elites and otherwise off limits and this is a template that the Europeans took with them as they colonized countries around the world so when the first European colonists arrived in the Congo Basin they sort of carried this cultural baggage of seeing forest as these dark empty wastelands without people so even though there were a long history of human habitation and numerous groups living in the Congo Basin forests. The European comments kind of didn't see them and there was this real sense of Europeans thought of this landscape as Darkest Africa. Take David Livingston. He was a Scottish missionary and explorer. Who is obsessed with finding the source of the Nile? He did a an exploratory expedition across the Congo wilderness. And he described Congress for us as suffocating wilderness and people waste that seem to have an oppressive silence so in May of eighteen eighty five. The you know quote unquote international community. Which is England France Germany Belgium and Italy? They recognize King Leopold the second of Belgium as having a sovereign claim over much of the Congo and five years later these same countries created what was effectively the first international conservation law this lowest passed in the early nineteen hundreds and it was called the Convention for the preservation of wild animals birds and fish in Africa. Local people couldn't hunt or trap or fish in certain areas of the country. The law was modeled. After the way European forests had become protected game reserves for rich people rich people in particular but of course just like in Europe the forests in Africa weren't actually pristine empty wildernesses before there were plenty of people who depended on them. There were a lot of different groups. Living in the Congo forest somewhere. More nomadic hunter-gatherers others were farming communities living within the rain forest but for all of these groups wild meat provided a very essential source of food. So there were all kinds of animals being eaten everything from various kinds of antelope to forest buffalo wild boar monkeys. You know just hundreds of different animals that communities ate in the forest there were cultural. Taboos around eating certain species particularly ones that were long lived and slow to reproduce like elephants which could and did occasionally provide a lot of meat was considered a sacred act to kill an elephant similar with eating bonobos which are great ape. That's very similar to us. There were beliefs that there is a direct link to that ancestral spirit world so all of these cultural beliefs had an ecological basis to really help conserve animals that had large social complex social groupings or were slow growing and thus thunderbolts over

Kings Europe Congo Forest Robin Hood King Leopold Congo Congo Basin Poland Africa Rome Jeanneret RMC Darkest Africa David Livingston Gina England France Germany Belgium Belgium Congress
"king leopold" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

04:10 min | 1 year ago

"king leopold" Discussed on PRI's The World

"It's a tradition that goes back hundreds of years. It was even put on the intangible cultural heritage list by unesco the u._n.'s cultural agency. The festival includes a parade with twenty two characters riding on floats each one representing some type of historical or religious figure enter the controversy. One of these characters is called the savage and there's a campaign hey to have him removed the world. Sarah birnbaum has more smoke that looks like a shift snakes through through the streets and a white guy in black face and full body. Black makeup is chained to the bow. This is the the savage and the makeup is only the half of it. He has a ring through his nose. A feather headdress a loincloth and shackles he he strains against the chains and cries out crowd the parade goes back to heal times but the savage character was introduced in the eighteen seventies just before belgium's king leopold late claimed claim to the congo and began a long and brutal colonial era mahendra gift is the spokesperson for the antiracism group brussels panthers. He says the savage is hard to watch. It's just horrible. Reduce group sent a letter to unesco asking them to revoke the festival's special designation. Seven activists and academics have signed on receive says they're still waiting for an answer but the whole tradition of the savage needs to go french is blocked living living in at and it happened to her that she is working in the streets and she meets couple laura mom with her kids and one of the kid starts starts crying because he sees her and she's black and the she reminds him of the surge or asked her. Can i have a savage kiss. This marine debris song is a historian on the tourism board in the town of oth- he says the savage isn't supposed to be racist <hes> simone oh crystal clear policy. We were very surprised by the controversy. I'm clipper think we're racist but we don't have the impression that we are at all dubuisson. If we saw says sure the character started in colonial times but it has evolved since then it usually laputa show that today okay when the people of off look at the character. They don't see an african or a foreigner. The savage is the star of their festival and he's a pretend character who can evoke lots of different from countries and origins black faces actually pretty common in belgium. It's part of a popular christmas time tradition. You'll see it at festivals a couple of years ago. Oh the belgian foreign minister who's the equivalent of their secretary of state dressed up in black face at a rally and this month the country's africa-museum hosted posted a party and some guests showed up in black face but the difference between now and let's say ten years ago is that now there's a public debate around it. Laura send you is an activist and artist. She says children of immigrants are leading the way she herself is belgian of rwandan descent zandt so me and my parents for example. They came to belgium with a different mindset. They were there for work and they wanted to go back but the the following generation we were born there fully belgian we feel let entitled but we just have the rights to to be considered fully fully part of this society i think and therefore she says it's time to put an offensive tradition like the savage to rest for the world. I'm sarah birnbaum. Margot women president trump says says american jews who don't vote republican are disloyal that sparked debate about anti semitism the question is do jews feel safe in your country.

belgium Sarah birnbaum brussels panthers laura zandt u._n. congo king leopold president trump ten years
"king leopold" Discussed on Suicide Buddies

Suicide Buddies

03:48 min | 1 year ago

"king leopold" Discussed on Suicide Buddies

"The biggest like no one gives belts. No one gives it hit this king. Leopold the second. This is the dude, he is a quivalent to Hitler right level of people, he killed an Africa. It's fucking insane right directly, because he Belgium had like ownership of the Congo, and then they were like, oh, my God rubber is really important. This is all pre World War One and it's just like rubbers such a huge industry and the whole thing was like, we buy a militia we kill your village, and the rubber, like take the workers, and they go get the rubber like everything. It's just like we just own you just taking everything. So this dude is like a genocidal maniac king Leopold, the second. Well, it's so funny to think too, like it's, it's not it's not funny. The fact that any of that happened in the way it happened at all. Don't get me wrong. But it is it's always. Been really interesting to me, the thing, the those awful things what they're done in the name of like it's already fucked up enough to do it in the name of religion of a God. I guess that probably makes less sense than this. But to we're gonna kill everyone for rubber is really like what kind of fucking assholes are we as a species that we need to make things out of rubber that bad at that point, it really is just like capitalism. Well, the rubber industry needs to make money rubber spices walk and diamonds diamonds are literally just for looking at. Yeah. Completely worth which fucked up about that, too, is the diamonds are actually great for like they're like a hard material. Everyone knows that, but that's not why people want them they want them for looking at alone locate, and the rubber industry. This actually predates, the diamond industry because the diamond industry hasn't really taken off just yet. And they're doing the exact same shed like hobbling, people writing off limbs. Right. All of the most horrific practices of just like I cried on this podcast before I don't think I have. But I might. Who better to talk about colonialization than to Deutz white. Men as do I knew going into this, that it was going to be heavy. And I you know what I didn't mention this the reason I've, I've like tried not to talk about this one, but fans of our show. Keep suggesting this, this guy, this has been like six suggestion. We have a lot of Nazi fans. Like. I mean it's like a it's like type of thing we should talk about now. It's actually it's a lot of this stuff. I didn't even know was happening. And I think that's why it's fucking talking to anyone who ever. I mean, if you like listen to our podcast, I'll bet you that it's not a large percentage of people listener podcast. But there are some people that are like these guys are comedians who love stupid comedy and talking about mental health and I'm here for that. Why are they so God damn liberal? You know what I mean? And it's like I I'll bet you. It's not that many people, and even those people don't hate it. But I have heard people say, like web bring politics into it at all. And I do think that I don't know man. This is like, when politics just reaches that level where you're like, no, we're talking about genocide, especially nowadays, the argument that people that are anti talking about politics. Make is something to the effect of like, but it's so much better than. It used to be we're like past racism. It's the same people that are, that are just, like I think black people should shut up now because we're not even racists where the same. So it's five..

king Leopold Congo Hitler Belgium Africa
"king leopold" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:21 min | 1 year ago

"king leopold" Discussed on KQED Radio

"In Jemison. Fully in the first place as a group that said this museum can never be transformed that it must be destroyed and looted objects return. We have a second group that says we must empty this museum, the adverts an open another museum, and then days the third group that is the one that says we will work with the museum. So that the Belgian and international public understand what happened together. We'll judge the future this museum. But laura. Nba an architect and artist who'd been asked by the museum to share ideas and assessments about the renovation thinks the African diaspora has waited long enough in NBA says while she was enthusiastic about helping in the renovation at first she soon concluded the planners were only interested in maintaining the status quo. It's a colonial propaganda two point. Oh, it's like they got specialized in. Way to to make any mention of the other is just the way the cosmetic chains. The power dynamics. Still very patriarchal instinct thought it would be strong symbolism for the new museum to display one of her own works of art and ice sculpture of king Leopold on a horse melting away like the colonialist views she hoped would vanish from the reopened site. She said the whole concept was harshly criticized by museum staff publicly and in the press. She went ahead with a display on her own. Feels the renovation was a missed opportunity to help heal wounds of the past that for her are now, even more painful Teri Schultz d-w Trevor in Belgium and Keith Walker in Bonn, Germany. You're listening to inside Europe. As.

laura Nba Jemison Teri Schultz Keith Walker Europe Bonn Leopold Belgium Germany
"king leopold" Discussed on Inside Europe

Inside Europe

05:06 min | 1 year ago

"king leopold" Discussed on Inside Europe

"Your book club has just raise more than thirty thousand euros for homeless charity. That is just fantastic. Yeah. Wasn't expecting that. We started this off a little over four weeks ago. I wanted to do something because we we've been a huge homelessness crisis happening in particularly in Dublin at the moment. I wanted to raise some funds for the Peter MC very trust. They are wonderful charity that to incredible work in the area of homelessness. I thought if I could raise five thousand euro by Christmas, I would have done a wonderful job. We raised five thousand euro in the first thirty six hours, we raised ten thousand in the first four days, and we did just pass thirty thousand euro, very recently. So it's open until December thirty first. And I if I can make as much money as I can for that showers at all goes towards them every phone classic. Great stuff. Ricochet great talking to you. Thanks for coming on inside Europe. Not at all. My pleasure. That's Ricca shea from the Rick O'Shea book club in Ireland. This is inside Europe. And I'm Keith Walker in Bonn, Germany, Belgium's Africa museum long propaganda tool for the Royal family's. Colonialization of Congo has just reopened after a five year renovation of both structure and message. But as Teri Schultz report, some members of Belgium's, African diaspora are less than impressed. With the attempt in a tranquil park on the outskirts of Brussels. Belgium's revamped Africa museum is trying to make amends. But some say this ground is poisoned forever by memories of the past. Hugh. Inside the museum project director, cookie classes, gestures out one of the ground windows, where behind the massive building a lake and sprawling grounds. Classes describes what it looks like there in eighteen ninety seven when king Leopold the second now infamous for his brutal conquest of Congo was creating this propaganda palace. Full of looted treasures and primitive depictions of Africans complete with a human zoo, and that's to tweak Congolese villages constricted. Exactly like they were in the Google two hundred sixty seven people were fluent in to perform they had to exhibit and euros incredible. Because you had little signs who said don't feet the people. These don't feed the people who were forced to recreate their daily routines from home behind fences, while visitor stared seven of them died of pneumonia. Soviet zone decide but there are far more shadows than that over this institution. Which before the renovation had frequently been called the last colonial museum in the world due to its unswerving mission of lauding king Leopold twos. Conquest in Congo, which ruthlessly killed an estimated ten million. People museum director leaguer Zales is open about the slow recognition Belgium that king Leopold's governance of Congo. Devastated. That country to enrich his own GRA sell says, the museums view now is that colonialism is a form of governance was wrong. He expects very mixed reaction from visitors. Always say that we will far far enough. I think that African communities will be critical and saying that really you should set the step further in declaws Asian process and push which other on the on the violence at the same time. Grenell's expects other Belgians to feel fended that genuine efforts to help people in central Africa are now tainted with a little people with with the idealism Oviously. There's been thousands of doctors who went to work very difficult to dishes, you know, vaccinating children helping women to deliver building hospitals and dispensaries Yuka really say that they were racist sore there with the negative mission. They've done their best as part of the revamp some museum items portraying Africans, particularly primitive will now be relegated to the lowest floor in a new exhibit, titled sidelined, but elsewhere gilded statue still depict Belgium's role in its colonies as nothing but benevolent and SC. Johnston. The soaring rotunda a missionary with two nearly naked Congolese youth is titled Belgium, bring civilization to Congo. But now these statues have competition for the viewer's gaze a massive head to picked it. A speaking Congolese artists and bonus is he was intrigued by the offer to create a piece to stand defiantly in front of king Leopold, self glorifying sculptures paintings and pundit calls his creation new breath. Good good shake delegate, the manip- pissed. Just to something create Delo so that these colonial era pieces become secondary. This piece Connecticut them on the message is done towards the future, which should invite others to collaborate together. But in punt is optimism isn't universally shared throughout Belgium's fractious African diaspora Billy kalani heads a committee..

Belgium Congo king Leopold Africa museum Europe director People museum Peter MC Dublin Keith Walker Google Teri Schultz pneumonia Ricca shea Connecticut Bonn Brussels Hugh Rick O'Shea
Delayed Congo poll offers slim hope for change

FT News

09:52 min | 1 year ago

Delayed Congo poll offers slim hope for change

"Elections on Sunday were set to herald the country's first transition of power by the ballot box with President Joseph Kabila stepping down after seventeen years in office. But an explosion of violence has caused the polls to be postponed. All the Ryan discusses what happened and why it matters with the F T Africa editor David pilling. David how much violence has been in the run-up to the polls and who's behind it wouldn't immediate run up to this election. There's been a gradual build up a violence. A number of opposition rallies have been broken up by security forces. There have been people shot dead and numbers a quite hard to come by. There was a rally there was supposed to have taken place earlier this week in Concetta by the opposition leading candidate Martin for you, which was broken up by tear gas, in fact, never took place, but one has to go even further back because this election is really been rumbling on for years. It was meant to have taken place in two thousand and sixteen and if you count the election violence, the protests against the election, not taking place and the authorities reaction to that. Then there have been dozens indeed hundreds of deaths that this election has already been responsible for as to who takes blame for this violence. A lot of it is security forces of the. Administration of the state, which is really not permitted opposition rallies, which has overreacted to demonstrations people being very frustrated at the slow pace of these elections. And now, of course, the further postponing of the poll from Sunday because that postponement is not only because of this violence is also an Ebola outbreak in the east of the country. There's voting machines which went up in flames allegedly anyway, and the electoral commission has used this as somewhat say an excuse or pretext to push the elections out a further week until December the thirtieth who are the main candidates in. What are the prospects? There are really three candidates. First of all, you have a man code Emmanuel shoddy who is running really as the proxy of Joseph Kabila, the man who's been in power for seventeen years his prospects. Most observers of Congo thing that he will win by hook. Oh by crook because the regime that's been. Power wants him to win and Kabila has shown no sign of really wanting to relinquish power. And that this is his chance to hold onto power by using what the Congolese are calling a dolphin. The opposition had briefly United on the one candidate Martin for ULA who's an oil executive who has the backing of two other politicians who would have run for the presidency. But for one reason or another worthy not allowed into the country or not allowed to run those struck down by a constitutional court. So in a sense, he's also a proxy for them. Unfortunately for the opposition the opposition split just a couple of days after agreeing to put up a United candidates, and there's another candidate called Phoenix Tshisekedi who represents in a sense, his father who for years and years and years was the official opposition who ran against not only Kabila, but Joseph Kabila's father, Lauren Kabila and bef-. For him even against Mabuza cisa cycle. He died before this election was able to take place. And so now Felix who has really the name recognition is also running can you tell us a little bit more let Mr. Sharara, then what kind of person is he well, he's not very well known in the country. He was the interior minister. And he was the interior minister at a period of some volatility when there were demonstrations in the streets of Kinshasa, December two thousand sixteen that was the first time that does Kabila at effectively refused to hold an election as he ought to have done because the constitution dictated that. And then the Kasai region also erupted into violence, and there was a very brutal security crackdown as a result of that should Dary is now the subject of European sanctions. Because inefficient he's been blamed as the head of the interior ministry for these crackdowns, which involve many, many deaths apart from that he is thought to be very loyal to Kabila. That's why Kabila chose him. The assumption is that he will do Kabila's bidding, what's at stake in this election. Why is it so important? Well, the DRC the Democratic Republic of Congo is a huge nation in the center of Africa in the Great Lakes region. It's a nearly European sized nation covered in rainforest. Very poor communications it can be impossible to get from one part of the country to another. They're very few roads. But what it does have is huge minora resources, for example, cobalt which is needed for a mobile phones, and which is needed for electric car batteries and really the green revolution. That were also expectantly awaiting in the west is really cannot happen without the resources pouring out of conga, but congress has been very poorly run to put it mildly. It's a state in a kind of near state of collapse. The somehow been held together by Joseph Kabila sort of patched together. So who runs this country? It is important for the outside world. And I would argue more importantly is very important for eighty million Congolese who despite sitting on all this huge wealth have been so poorly governed there among the poorest people in Africa with really terrible statistics. If you look at the health statistics life expectancy to disticts access to education access to hospitals and access to anything. They've really been let down by leadership has acted more as a kind of an extractive leadership to extract wealth from them than as a leadership. That's really there to serve them. So the hope for anyone is that at the very least Joseph Kabila who has been in power for seventeen years has agreed to step down. And although he is certainly trying to control the situation via his proxy, Emmanuel Chaudhary, maybe it'll get out of hand. Maybe he won't be able to control the system, and may be this in this, very messy difficult complicated. Way is one step towards a more Representative damore. Crecy given the way that you described Congo and electro system, there is this really likely to be a free election. Who's monitoring the poll it's not like to be free election tool. It's being monitored by civil society by the Catholic church by the African Union, but that doesn't have a great record in calling out elections and decisively saying that election has been stolen the expectation is that as long as the violence is not egregious as long as the theft of the poll is not obvious, then they'll be enough constituents, even including western diplomats and western representatives who will say look look stability of this country is more important than plunging it into a kind of post electoral crisis. So the expectation is that even if the process is as unfair as many people expect it to be that somehow enough people turn a blind is who it and the country. Will stumble on citizens effectively looked like the status quo continue with Mr Kabila remaining in power behind the same. That's what I think is not exactly the status quo because once you've stepped down you stepped down the president of the country. Does have a lot of constitutional powers should area said to be an absolute stalwart of Joseph Kabila. But who knows we've seen in neighboring Angola? When president does Santos gave up power after I think, it was thirty seven years in office and chose his successor gel. Lorenzo suddenly, and so has turned on the dos Angeles family as clamped down on a lot of the structures that had been set up over the previous nearly four decades, and we're seeing real change there. So I think once you relinquish the levers of power, you may try to hold onto them, and you may be successful in doing that. But we don't know what about the people on the street. Do you think they accept the result of medical Bilas choice whims? I think some will. But they'll be whole areas that weren't Kinshasa is an opposition stronghold. They've never liked Kabila who kind of holds up in the presidential palace playing. Jio games and on his farm driving around in his motorbike, very rarely appears in public even when the country descends into its near perennial crises. He's a kind of an invisible figure in the capital. And there are a whole other regions is the Kasai region, which is a huge region in the center of the country, which certainly belongs to the opposition then going to happily accept Kabila's nomination being elected. And then there's the whole east of the country a thousand miles away from Kinshasa very hard to reach the only way you can reach. It really is by plane or by boat along the Congo river. Maybe by motorbike all the way across the country. There you have minora resources, you have dozens and dozens of militia groups rebels. It's a very volatile part of the country and part of the world. And who knows what they're going to make this election. You've talked a lot about Congo's vast wealth. What do you think businesses will be heading for from this election? I think businesses really hope for some measure of style. Ability. I mean, there's a lot of rhetoric about paying tax in about being there for the good of the Congolese people about adding to the Congolese, national wealth. But if you look at the history of the Congo right from the time when it was the property of king Leopold than a Belgian colony and then in the post, colonial period, it really is a story of exploitation where these kind of minerals wealth rubber before that pours out of this vast country. But almost everybody in the country is left impoverished. Thank you very

President Joseph Kabila Kinshasa Congo Emmanuel Chaudhary Martin Kasai Power David Pilling Congo River Africa Concetta Ebola Ryan F T Africa Editor DRC
"king leopold" Discussed on News & Talk 1380 WAOK

News & Talk 1380 WAOK

09:39 min | 1 year ago

"king leopold" Discussed on News & Talk 1380 WAOK

"You can either follow. Will make. Just take. Say. Apply. Foaming company sack of run the whole cuts of read. That's right. Good afternoon. Atlanta listening to news and talk thirteen eighty w eight okay. The voice of the community calling four four eight nine three. Another edition of people pass and politics on this Philly November morning, happy Veterans Day weekend or all of our veterans. Remember, those different women Veterans Day Memorial Day. But if you see a veteran out at about by them breakfast today by the munch if you're at a bar, buy them a drink by them coffee. They appreciate it. They deserve it for all they have done because guess, what would you may dislike anything or be have issues with America? You rather be here than most other places because if you wanted to be somewhere else, you will be there by mail big show today. One thing I think we have to discuss this. We're talking about the hundred year anniversary of the armistice the end of World War One and also the the midterm elections. I'm gonna give you odd historical correlation and bring it all together at the end. Gimme a couple of minutes on this. But it reminds me of king Leopold the second of Belgium. Remember king Leopold was king of Belgium from eighteen sixty five up until nineteen. Oh eight I think someone to check me on that. But he ran the Belgian Free State of the Congo from eighteen eighty five till nineteen o six which is after the the conference of Berlin. And during his rule of the Belgian Free State of the Congo. He committed one of the most massive genocide in human history between four and ten million Congolese were murdered by king Leopold. You don't hear about it? At the time. You had the beginnings of the of the auto industry, you know, Mercedes-Benz have been founded dime. Lawyer had been founded need a rubber for the tires in Congo. Had one of the largest rubber tree at the time rubber all was natural one of the largest Robert free concentrations on earth, which is a very labor intensive harvesting process. King Leopold did was thin thir- Henry Morton Stanley to the Congo to help colonize it. So in order to fill facilitate his colonization he wants to the chieftains of the community. And he told them that white men were magical. I'm not making this up. And approve the white men were magical. What he did was he had a electron device a hydraulic glove, and he will shake the chieftains hands in nearly bright them because he had a mechanical grip on it. And then he would do things like take a magnifying glass and use the heat of the sun to light a cigar and tell them the white men had power over the sun itself. At one point. He gave one of the chieftains a gun and told him to fire it at himself, the chieftain fired the gun, Mr. Stanley doubled over fell to the ground and then stood up. He took off his shoe and drop the bullet up the bottom, and he told them the white men were impervious to bullets because they were gods. What he really did was take the bullet out beforehand and just leave a blank and beer. But because of this many of the chieftains in the Congo believed in the divinity of white men. Before you. Degrade or think badly of our ancestors in the Congo. Think to yourself right now if an alien spaceship landed, and they showed us from technology you had ever seen before they demonstrated feats of acrobatics magic that you had never seen before. Would you not believe that they had some sort of divine powers that you simply couldn't understand. So what Henry Morton Stanley was able to do is have the Congolese chieftains signed contracts. Will clearly they couldn't read. Giving dominion over the Congo to king Leopold the second. The Leopold went around Europe in recruited an army. Belgians French Germans people from the Netherlands. The Dutch the towns and brought them down and had them subjugate. The people of the Congo in the name of spreading Christianity in Christendom to the populace. And what they would do the these small Europeans were so intimidated by these Africans whether these Congolese. The day will take the tallest and strongest warriors of the village. And slice off their genitalia. Hang them on ropes in dry them. And then wear them. As necklaces to show their domination over them. They will take the strongest warriors and have them hold down their wives and daughters whi while the white Europeans raped them. They would send off. These warriors deep into the jungles to harvest the the rubber and they say that you need to come back with fifteen kilograms of rubber. And if you don't your wife will be killed your daughter will be killed, and they were order the anybody who failed to do. So be murdered by another Congolese conscripted soldier. And they were so brutal. They required. They kill these other Congolese with one shot. They didn't want you to waste bullets. And so they require for every person that you killed you bring a hand not wanting to be in trouble. So what you have to do with understand. Did they will cut off the hands of innocent people of living people just to ensure that they would not the murdered by these Europeans? It's a wolf that. We understand how you had these subjugation the Congo until finally information came out showing. That what the king Leopold was doing? Now, how does this relate to what we're doing? Now. How does it relate to the the elections and so on and so forth currently? Well, the reason that this has some import is because right now the reason of white supremacy continues to exist. As because many in our community have been convinced of the divinity of these white, folks. Many of us have been convinced through magic and witchcraft. Then we have to pledge allegiance to them that we cannot do anything without them that we have no power or no agency to control their own futures. What out them? Instead what we do with stand around and think. Well, either you have to be a Republican or democrat. You have to be a liberal, Arkansas. -servative you have to have some sort of allegiance not to yourself not to your own community, not to your own family, but to them because well, you know, we we can't come out to strongly for African American issues because that's going to cost us votes in the mid west. We can't talk about reparations right now. You know, we get ninety seven percent of our votes from black women because if we did that what will that do to the soccer moms and smell Ville? What's that going to do down in in South, Georgia, north, Florida? We come out to strongly for an African American agenda. We decide because we believe in the divinity these other individuals in the of the groups that we will put our own political social economic and family interest to the wayside in order to hold up that system. And that is simply put untenable whereas you may want to criticize our ancestors for their. Acquiescence and allowing these colonists to come in. Let's understand that. We've allowed these same colonists to come into our communities. Look at your streets. Look at your rolls. Your neighborhoods. Look at the population of your cities and think to yourself why is it that we're not getting our allocation of government resources? We are thrilled to be in charge. Why are willing small number of colonists? Come in a control what we do in our environments. And then say who was the king Leopold of today who are the colonist of.

Congo king Leopold Henry Morton Stanley Philly Belgium Atlanta Mercedes-Benz Netherlands soccer America Europe Berlin Arkansas. South Georgia Florida ninety seven percent
"king leopold" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:07 min | 2 years ago

"king leopold" Discussed on KQED Radio

"In a documentary based, on his book, king Leopold's coast, author Adam Hoge shelled describes what it was like. For the Congolese on display when Leopold heard that some of. Them were getting sick because of candy there eating was tossed to them by the crowd he put up the equivalent of. Adult feed the animals sign at zoo saying. The blacks are fed by the organizing committee seven Congolese died of pneumonia and influenza. At this human zoo Belgium built another mock African village at the nineteen fifty eight Brussels world fair not Tamala is a historian at the museum he says Europeans crowded around the. Fenced-in Congolese they were being by Burma and appeal to. Them and the Congolese protested against that they wanted to, be respected and be seen as animal In June attitudes did. Change but the museum remained stuck in the nineteen fifties so it was faced with. The decision stay the same or tell the whole story Dido GRA seals was brought in to make that decision they brought me here. To just reform in Novi Asli colonial past is, something that we have. To deal there are ex colonialists in their seventies and eighties who believe they helped Congo they. Learned local languages and married Congolese Belgian, diplomat rainier Nickens represents them they felt like. A father what to take good care of kids and the kid would grow and when the kids, will be adult he will fly zone wings and. Go away and they had the sense, that it was a normal course of history The, Congolese living in Belgium are appalled by this. Paternalism some want to close king Leopold's museum or cut him out altogether Was madman colonization is bad more art curator says. How games did not to Bolya works with a nonprofit that records oral histories from the Congolese low salt is on this She switches to French and insists that the museum can not decolonize endless Congolese in charge of it In the end there. Was compromise it took five years, and cost nearly ninety million dollars but the. Renovation is almost finished some of the old exhibits remain but they. Come with explanations about Leopold's brutality there's a new building that includes exhibits on Congolese history and culture this gallery, will be about the language of music in Africa museum director Gita reseal shows me around the galleries so he'll be able to bring their. Own memories and archives bay themselves fulfill up the old colonial statutes are no longer front and center contemporary African art is everywhere Which brings us back to the Congolese visual artist encouraged him to. Participate walk Monday does implement I didn't want to I didn't think it would do any good. But then I was told about a competition to replace king Leopold statue with an original work I'm AM won, the competition with a monumental sculpture of a human rising. From roots and looking to the, sky it's called Congo new breath and. When the museum reopened. At the end of this year it will be the main statue visitors see for NPR news I'm. Joanna kakissis interpreted culture This weekend edition from NPR news Lulu Garcia Navarro will be back next week I'm, Melissa block, join, us for another hour of weekend edition. Sunday along with a Sunday puzzle and we do Sunday morning newscast a.

king Leopold NPR Adam Hoge zoo Belgium Dido GRA Burma Novi Asli Belgium rainier Nickens Lulu Garcia Navarro Melissa block Tamala pneumonia Joanna kakissis Congo influenza Bolya Brussels Africa director
"king leopold" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:28 min | 2 years ago

"king leopold" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Belgium is confronting a legacy. Of colonialism and racism in the nineteenth century, king Leopold appropriated Congo is. His, personal colony millions of, Africans were killed enslaved or died of disease. The Royal museum of central Africa outside. Brussels long hid that ugly history now after a massive renovation the Congolese. Will finally tell their own stories here's Joanna kakissis. With this weekend long listen Nearly every evening Congolese novelists cartoonists and singers. Gather at India a restaurant in a Brussels, neighbourhood called Matanga it's a. Neighborhood, settled by Congolese emigrants, and it's worth forty nine year old visual. Artists on may find inspiration for his. Work With my work asks, a lot of questions about the memory of. Colonialism I want to know my identity and my real history. Campanis history and his art will play a part in the story He grew up in Congo but in high school he learned, history from a teacher who used Belgian textbooks was up We were taught king. Leopold was honorable and important we were told we were descended from the Gauls that, they were our kings was skeptical then he moved to Belgium. In one thousand nine hundred ninety four to study art and he wanted, to know how the Belgians saw the Congolese he found the Royal museum of central Africa in a village near Brussels altered vetted inside where statues depicting the. King and European missionaries as, heroes Africans were shown, as savages or as children clinging to the robes of white men Do not memoir locator it struck me that, our history has been confiscated that when our children come here they would not see a positive image of themselves he, didn't get no the whole ugly story Growing up in Belgium even the museum's director Guito Gril seals didn't. Know it we went to school a lot of. Our teachers were former missionary so did occasion that we got was that Belgium brought civilization to kogo, that we did nothing but good things go up the, king Leopold was the founder of the Congo they didn't know the whole truth. Because the king burn most of its. Colonial documents over the years journalists and historians piece together damning accounts from other sources at least. Four million Congolese died under Leopold's rule from violence disease and starvation I'm AM read, the accounts with whore he thought about the Newseum. Filled with statues depicting, her roic white men I thought to myself they believe. This is normal I was shocked that people could think this was normal The Royal museum. Of central Africa began as a temporary exhibition in eighteen. Ninety seven on the woods of Leopold country estate the, most talked about portion was a mock. African village the king, displayed two hundred and sixty. Seven Congolese men women and children there behind a fence.

king Leopold Royal museum of central Africa Belgium Brussels Congo Leopold country estate King Joanna kakissis Africa The Royal museum India Guito Gril founder director forty nine year
"king leopold" Discussed on Omnibus

Omnibus

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"king leopold" Discussed on Omnibus

"Right he instead drove to sudan to deliver her fonda streams right which is which is always what makes amazing children if you give everything they want sure that's what charlie talker factory but without that there wouldn't have been the the band for route assault so that's true good and bad there should be four other bands named for the other children i would listen to mike tv on the radio don't do it rest this is what happened the last time when you talked about a to will what happened when i talked to well you created the nation of beer to will almost certainly this guy heard about it by reading your column in parade magazine this is the angel of moles say this is all kinds of fictional journalism about there being a possible country here actually turning into a real country i don't think i was to blame anybody could look at an atlas and say hey what's this weird trapezoid but anyone now could listen to this podcast and start a band called mike tv criticized for that not just but not just being a parent for being a bad person for being about white person a colonial right like a colonizer as they would say in black panther like that guy flew across the ocean to some little bit of land in africa right you know to which he held no rightful claim but what he did have a lovely flag fancy flag and a permit to travel because he paid somebody off he's got cash and a flag and now he can say he's the king of north sudan and this is not hypothetical for many of those people who were descendants of tribes who had to work for king leopold of belgium in his what was he.

assault mike tv parade magazine sudan king leopold belgium africa
"king leopold" Discussed on EconTalk

EconTalk

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"king leopold" Discussed on EconTalk

"And king leopold belgium he pointed out was below was blood d in belgium for a lot of reforms he made and in social policies he'd not so popular in the belgian congo was the instrument of murdering murdering i think certainly hundreds of thousands millions of people in in the belgian congo he had a free hand it was his colony belgians colony at home he was constrained by the parliament and bruce's question was which was the real can leopold the one who was sort of moderate social reformer or the murderer so you'd wanna look at berea the freehand and your point really is what we're all king leopold when we have free hand we're all dangerous we're all come with that same hardwired viewing and and this idea that somehow but we're so civilized now we don't have to worry about america becoming tyranny are you crazy we're so which were educated and it just a total misunderstanding to me of education human nature and even today the left which is horrified at president trump i don't think i think they just want to get a better guy in and i just wanna get less power in the presidency i think that's exactly right at two two quick points on this one is i've problems with the way people use lord atkin's quote about power corrupts absolutely but in the sense why what you well i think it's true and i was just about the explain why but but historically my understanding and i wrote about this in my last book is that his relevant to this discussion in a lotta ways is that.

leopold belgium parliament bruce king leopold america lord atkin president
"king leopold" Discussed on WBT Charlotte News Talk

WBT Charlotte News Talk

02:41 min | 2 years ago

"king leopold" Discussed on WBT Charlotte News Talk

"Is this is why because this is what we're doing in church were plotting people and i'm not saying we should be throwing stones at the guy i'm glad he made a confession here how 'bout morning how 'bout sobbing public going up in in great embracing the man king we forgive you we love you this is scary folks but this is part of the cult worship the takes place in the average mega church and it's not just megachurches everything is built around the pastor so is it a surprise that this is very familiar to people in the political world no because this is what people are familiar with can those of us who say we're christian do some selfexamination here that's has we look at the world and we see it's broken this can we look in the mirror first in recognize our own and our own desire and our own need to aspire to something much better not just given to the spirit of the age and the culture doesn't mean you have to reject people let's love people but less reject certain behaviors in attitudes joe in charlotte good morning but what about prayer how you doing doing well signal a g a great i know i've got thirty seconds go out just uh you know a few points the president has been uh understood to use the term s if holding four uh the countries that have been described and we we novi comments wale and i did not want to get out rate did not want to get i don't wanna do some research blood cool after we sources of god the african continent uh oil gas coal copper diamonds timber uranium uh so many resources it's amazing to me how you can click a continent like africa in such a place that oh wait probably probably because in the seventeen hungry we end the uh uh king leopold of belgium and european countries and america i'll came down in africa and rain lead the we saw literally quit now hope resources almost quit the the the african elephant out of existence force cuts and other resources so they have the to the.

president king leopold belgium charlotte africa america thirty seconds
"king leopold" Discussed on Podcast – The Pan-African Alliance

Podcast – The Pan-African Alliance

01:59 min | 2 years ago

"king leopold" Discussed on Podcast – The Pan-African Alliance

"Belgian sovereign fund was fuelled by their expansion into the congo and we all know about king leopold is a great documentary ominous suggest the family it's called red rubber black death and it talks about how belgium claimed the congo as its own colony exploited the people in no what i would i guess i call that the congolese holocaust 10 because right now we're in three point o uh there have been several periods where a dictators have come in exploiters have come in enslave the people are raped the land of its wealth for their own benefit and leaving death and destruction in their wake that's what's going on in the congo right now six million men women and children being raped being killed being enslaved digging out minds with their bed bare hands let's look at what's going on over ah um men more and bangladesh right there is a group of people called the hingis traditionally muslim and while there are many dark skin would you all would call indians warm a sri lankan's there are also a number of blacks who had been killed exploited raped swimming across sees grounding in the process only to wash up on shores where again they're exploited let's look at what's happened in the past in liberia during the liberian civil war thirteen year old boys who served as road guards for charles taylor who was the dictator and madmen that was running that part of the world at the time they were service his militia they would services rhode guard and they would take bets on women walking up the street who were pregnant and those bits would be what the sex of the child in her stomach would be now would they find out they would shoot the woman cutter belly open and then trade money off of the winner of that bet leaving both bodies just bleeding out in the streets that's what's going on in the rest of the diet asper we got nothing to complain about here white supremacy is still at work but here were actually in a position to do something about it and if you think that's not come into these shores.

congo king leopold belgium sri lankan liberia civil war charles taylor bangladesh thirteen year
"king leopold" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

02:53 min | 2 years ago

"king leopold" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"I i'm actually up in santa in my hometown seattle right now okay so yeah on your mind i i was very moved by your interview with the uh in the end tom the greenpeace a directors and i urge everyone rely out there to get involved with greenpeace it's such a great organization so uh helped support the reweighting of greenpeace uh all over the fifty fifty nations it's amazing but i was calling to point out also the the she met and he mentioned the conflict zone hitting the congo and i don't know if you're you maybe you haven't discussion the past about this but people have to remember that there's upwards of ten million people who are greater than the holocaust world war two that have died in eastern congo on off a mainly in large part for the mining us elements that without which cell phones to add wireless devices tone operate a tactical and then columbite that she's noticed coal ten and uh uh just just people need to realize that there's a there's a a a on the people in africa it's been going on for several decades now and may win though it's been going on for several centuries now pardon me it's been going on for several centuries now i mean read king leopold to go skinny of the seal story the belgian congo colt had i'm sorry yup yeah i agree i thought there were upwards of some some historians are now saying they were a hundred million people africans have died in the uh in the middle passage during the atlantic slave trade yeah just toss over over the into the sea or left to abandon the tight up being chains tied and left in a in a in an abandoned sinking ship on it's the the horror that have been going on nature people need to ideology and and move forward um maybe there's some alternatives to getting colts have somewhere else have i believe you can get it in other countries but um people need to know just just to ignore we could simply say to the companies in this country the buy these products from these these uh fairly outrageous you know conflict places that uh actually one option would be to me just wanted to deal with it at the level that actually republicans libertarians would probably agree with i mean they wouldn't agree with the.

santa seattle tom greenpeace congo world war king leopold wireless devices africa
"king leopold" Discussed on KSKA 91.1 FM

KSKA 91.1 FM

02:20 min | 3 years ago

"king leopold" Discussed on KSKA 91.1 FM

"To serve the congolese that it would spread give license to this kind of rampant destruction throughout the planet eve ensler learned the nation's traumatic history the slave trade once ravaged and terrorise the population in the 19th century belgians infamous king leopold murdered ten million people half the population in pursuit of colonial fortunes made from rubber despite gaining its independence and 1960 the country remained upon of geopolitical power struggles over its wealth sometimes called the resource curse propped up by western interests brutal dictatorships ruled with violence and terror beginning in the 1990s the congolese civil wars inflamed much of africa lee eating to millions more deaths most of which were from disease malnutrition and unsanitary conditions today the nation continues to be riven with violence and privation and especially with extreme violence against women eve ensler listened to women of congo and responded to their needs the congolese women said they wanted a national movement that would allow them to come forward to tell their stories and break the silence vday helped launch a campaign called stop raping our greatest resource they committed to hold accountable the perpetrators who had so far enjoyed complete impunity out of that campaign grew in other vision to provide a refuge for women and girls who were survivors of rape where they could recover he'll and become leaders in their communities what the women said they wanted more than anything was the place where they could heal where they could learn where they transform their ain't power and where they could become the next leaders who could transform on the congo and end the war and allow the congo to be a place which was owned and determined by police which has never happened in so many years and years and years of history and what the women imagine undreamed out with this place called city of joy via play said they would own that they would direct they would determine and it would be there is so much what happens in the congo is imported from external ngos and internationals and what happens.

king leopold congo vday rape africa
"king leopold" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:11 min | 3 years ago

"king leopold" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"It we do it if you had enough money to buy this house should also have the axe fifty million dollars just retailer in the belgian king king it it well he he got fifty years i think king leopold at a maybe a little bit less than an end and then there magnier family bought it as many as in grant money and actually that it goes the legend goes that they discovered the orange flavor for grand magnier from some of the our inches in a in the homes ground so if you live there and you need to borrow a cup of sugar from a neighbor who you might as neighbours day i think paul allen has a house right next him yes and also andrew lloyd webber that can i was there is right nearby cave you can see the ocean from the roof and you can see the alps from the other side i mean it's really spectacular to why they putting on the market so grin magnier was bought by campari in 2016 and sell campari look this is part of the deal basically this is state and campari looked at give value of that was like area or sign is right now percent of annually with a real estate agent seville and so you know they're hoping to get around what they've put it up for but i think it's going to be lay us there is that it was gained to pull around two billion near yeah that's not true and actually even the real estate agents that we spoke she said that this price tag of four hundred ten million will be a little bit high aspirational i think i mean he's going to go for a lot if say isaiah naming now that quite that much who might buy is this an we we don't know we actually tried to find out like other people interested in oh yeah there are people maybe from arab countries are there are some people for the united states but they were very hushhush in terms of who is going to actually buy it but it does seem like it was a specific buyer like a a family who had by it not necessarily i mean another company wouldn't i just want one of the terraces i just wanna cut morning coffee out there so listen for those who can't afford mansion the.

paul allen magnier the deal real estate agents isaiah united states king leopold andrew lloyd webber campari real estate agent fifty million dollars fifty years