25 Burst results for "King Lear"

"king lear" Discussed on Ideas

Ideas

03:09 min | Last month

"king lear" Discussed on Ideas

"How <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Silence> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> much <Speech_Female> agency <Speech_Female> do your characters. <Speech_Female> Especially the women <Speech_Female> have <Speech_Female> to shape. The world's <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> jane then pretty. <Speech_Female> I think <Speech_Female> jenny would say <Speech_Female> she can shave <Silence> her own world. <Speech_Female> But <Speech_Female> i don't think she <Speech_Female> would say <Speech_Female> that she could shape <Silence> the larger world. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> But i think she would <Speech_Female> say that she can <Speech_Female> communicate <Speech_Female> to <Silence> her nieces. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> What <SpeakerChange> is actually <Silence> true. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> And then that's going to <Speech_Female> shape <Speech_Female> the way they <Speech_Female> enter <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> their world <Speech_Female> keno. <Speech_Female> My book <Speech_Female> really very <Speech_Female> follows very <Speech_Female> closely <Speech_Female> structure <Speech_Female> of lear and <Speech_Female> I <Speech_Female> don't think i'm supporting <Speech_Female> the end. Full <Speech_Female> everyone <SpeakerChange> this thing. <Speech_Female> I told you that <Speech_Female> because survive. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Everybody's dead <Speech_Female> exact same way <Speech_Female> or mr <Speech_Female> saturday. <Speech_Female> Don't have that but <Speech_Female> for me. <Speech_Female> This is a play <Speech_Female> wire. It <Speech_Female> does it <Speech_Female> does show us in. Cope <Speech_Female> is audience <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Female> I think <Speech_Female> office <Speech_Female> this these characters <Speech_Female> who try to <Speech_Female> new worlds and trying <Speech_Female> to make a difference <Speech_Female> trying to make do something <Speech_Female> different make changes <Speech_Female> to themselves but they called <Speech_Female> kosinski pulled <Speech_Female> going around <Speech_Female> and when you <Speech_Female> get to the end of <Speech_Female> a young that exact same <Speech_Female> sense of <Speech_Female> you can shop noble <Speech_Female> but you cannot <Speech_Female> stay the same <Speech_Female> cousins <Speech_Female> come down. <Speech_Female> Put your popcorn pack <Speech_Female> in the been. Go home <Speech_Female> and carry <Speech_Female> on with your life. That's <Speech_Female> not what i think <Speech_Female> watching a <Speech_Female> really good <Speech_Female> Production <SpeakerChange> of lear <Speech_Female> allows us to do. <Speech_Female> And you know <Speech_Female> when you read <Speech_Female> a young you get <Speech_Female> to the end of the novel <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> you. It's time <Silence> to begin. <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> It's time to begin <Silence> something different. <Speech_Female> <Silence> And that's on the radio <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Female> to me what you think. Audiences <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> are best to take away <Speech_Female> from <Speech_Female> the retailing's <Speech_Female> from the original shakespeare <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> kicking. <Speech_Male> Lear <Speech_Male> will idea that keeps <Speech_Male> on coming up <Speech_Male> is to see <Speech_Male> feelingly <Speech_Male> to <Speech_Male> see not only with <Speech_Male> your eyes <Speech_Male> but your heart <Speech_Male> and to <Speech_Male> put yourself <Speech_Male> in the other person's <Speech_Male> a place and you <Speech_Male> know we we <Speech_Male> don't know what's really <Speech_Male> going on in other people's <Speech_Male> families we <Speech_Male> don't really know <Speech_Music_Male> what's going on in other <Speech_Male> people's minds <Speech_Male> and we <Speech_Male> to give each other the benefit <Speech_Male> of the doubt. We have to <Speech_Male> have some compassion. <Speech_Male> We're all vulnerable. <Speech_Male> And <Speech_Male> so this idea <Speech_Male> of being able to see <Speech_Male> with compassion <Speech_Male> something uniquely. <Speech_Male> I think <Speech_Male> that the arts <Speech_Male> can give our world <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> and so whether it's <Speech_Male> novels or plays <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> It's a way for us <Speech_Male> to begin <Speech_Male> to breakdown. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> The isolation of our <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> own egos. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> Thank you <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> all three of your for your <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> wonderful insights. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Another <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> great <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> this a lot of fun <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> on <Speech_Female> ideas. You've <Speech_Female> been listening to shakespeare's <Speech_Female> novels <Speech_Female> king. Lear <Speech_Female> a collaboration <Speech_Female> with the stratford <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> festival to explore <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> themes in <Speech_Female> shakespeare's plays <Speech_Female> that show <Speech_Music_Female> up in contemporary <Speech_Music_Female> fiction. <Speech_Female> The two novels <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> are a thousand <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> acres by jane <Speech_Music_Female> smiley and <Speech_Female> we. That are <Speech_Music_Female> young. By pre <Speech_Female> taneja <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> jane smiley <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> and pretty taneja <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> were <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> joined on our virtual <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> stage by <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> stretford artistic <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> director <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> antony chin <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> molina. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> The program was <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> produced by philip. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Coulter and pauline <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> holdsworth. <Speech_Female>

jenny Lear shakespeare molina philip
"king lear" Discussed on Ideas

Ideas

05:49 min | Last month

"king lear" Discussed on Ideas

"Tell me what i can do. And what i can't do baron or rose stood like a fence post straight unmoved. Her arms crossed over her chest. We didn't ask for what you gave us. We never ask for what you gave us that. Maybe it was high time. We got some reward for what we gave you now. He looked at me again. You hear she talks to me worse than you do now. He sounded almost concilitory as if he could divide and conquer. I step back said daddy if you think this is bad then you'd be amazed at what you really deserve. You don't deserve even the care we give you. As far as i'm concerned from now on your on your own daddy said. How can you treat your father like this. I flatter do. And i called you a bitch. What do you want to reduce me to. I'll stop this building a get this land back. I'll show you whores off the space. You'll learn what it means to treat your father like this. I curse you. you'll never have children ginny. You haven't got a hope and your children are going to laugh when you die. Rose pulled me into the house. Slamming the door behind us. Daddy was now staggering down. The road tight crept align a little ways behind him..

baron rose ginny Rose
"king lear" Discussed on Ideas

Ideas

04:09 min | Last month

"king lear" Discussed on Ideas

"It's from lear's point of view. The good daughter is the obedient daughter and also the pretty daughter and so from his point of view. I think all is most of his adult life. He has preferred cordelia because she's the youngest and the prettiest and so i think in a lot of families especially in former generations when fathers and mothers basically did what they want wanted and they had pets and they had children that they didn't like and they had children that they worked to death. They had children that they spoiled. So that that's another aspect of the play. That i thought was interesting and i wanted to explore on the novel was the complexities family life. If i might jump in it so interesting that you say that what you said about duty on service and 'obedient and all these. Things is just so entangled in women's role inside a family Depending on which member of the family she is on the question really is in lear. I think which you Explosive beautifully. I think in we young is say that. What do we owe each other. What do we owe the environment. What we owe ourselves and daughters trying to come to terms with who they are themselves to themselves inside all of that. And i think there's a tragedy that that is quite heartbreaking. Antony wants to jump in. I just want to say that cordelia is the preferred one. He says that openly they all know that and yet she's the one. That's kind of the most like lear. Sense that either. She has been privileged to feeling safe to say no or she is just strong willed as he has and difficult and says no throughout this piece. What you're saying pretty about service in duty as soon as everybody leaves ghana roll. Says her younger sister. You know you have judy scattered let you didn't do your your job. You didn't fulfil that service duty comes up a lot in this play and so does and we'll get to this..

lear cordelia Antony ghana judy
"king lear" Discussed on Ideas

Ideas

05:32 min | Last month

"king lear" Discussed on Ideas

"Chaplaincy thought your last but not least says devraj. Doesn't stunned property music which naval nine. She says she holds up empty hands. There is nothing but a in between father. I don't want to say anything come on dumpy. Shy be strong stand up. Be soldier says diverge bubba say sita. I love doing whatever you ask can need the diamond economist and environmentalist. No one loss. You don't say no to me. Say steph raj madame. Could though save girl. Are you sure you have nothing to say. Your wedding gift is in my hands. Speak not speak. No daddy sika says you should know better. How can you even call it. Dowry it's illegal it's outdated don't you know me at all you're listening to ideas on. Cbc radio one. In canada. Across north america on sirius. Xm in australia on abc radio national and around the world at cbc dot ca slash ideas. I'm nola i add. You know you're smart funny friends. Who always seem to have the best celebrity gossip. I'm talking about the ones who always know. We should be watching or reading or listening to what if you could pick their brains every week. Pop chat is a brand new podcast but does exactly that and feels like spending time with your best friends. So join me. L. levin mood and a panel of the smartest culture critics that i know as we dissect the discourse but also have a great time doing it power. Lust revenge madness. Shakespeare has them. All and king. Lear has all of them in spades today on ideas. The first of a series we call ideas at stratford produced in association with ontario stratford festival programs exploring themes in shakespeare's plays that. Illuminate our lives today. This program is called shakespeare's novels all about contemporary fiction. That's inspired by shakespeare play. We're exploring to retailing's of king lear. One set on a family farm in iowa. The other in contemporary india novelists jane smiley and pretty taneja are joined on our virtual stage by stratford festival. Artistic director antony. Tim alina antony.

devraj steph raj madame abc radio sita sika bubba L. levin nola Xm Cbc cbc north america stratford canada australia Lear Shakespeare shakespeare ontario
"king lear" Discussed on Ideas

Ideas

04:08 min | Last month

"king lear" Discussed on Ideas

"Which is the legal framework is hiding socialistic. Very very cool. To hinduism's idea of how women in society should be organized. And so for me bringing those things together on exploring really through the young people's point of view which was web. I found my own entry point in looking at this book and thinking i know what it feels like to be ause to perform something that might set me against my sister to say no come downstairs and perform the the gathered guests. You're twelve times table or something and see some you know promptly trick as it. Were you know. This is not unusual in asia. Indian families to to do this especially with autism to say. Look you know this one. She's doing so much better. Something like that. Yeah exactly for this kind of divide and rule which sets us as women. assistance against each other Was really important to me and to capture and then somebody said to me reading needed title for this book. Can i immediately thought. I'm picking up from the last line of play a young. That's five young people. India has the world's largest fastest growing population onto twenty five. Something like fifty percent of the population is that young. It's huge on. So you know this order. Be ideas just came together in the book night and i decided to do it from the perspective of will five. Fm one by one. Jane at wanna talk about the point of view issue near novel. At at one point when you're narrator ginny thinks when my father asserted his point of view mind vanished. Not even i could remember it. How challenging was it to find into excavate the elder daughter's perspective on the play which is so centered around lear. Well what into..

autism asia India Jane ginny
"king lear" Discussed on Ideas

Ideas

04:40 min | Last month

"king lear" Discussed on Ideas

"Ideas never left me until i was at my teeth and i was financially stable enough to give out some time to write a bit antony. We're we're hearing already answers to the question about to ask you what what is it. That gives king. Lear it staying power even today first of all it's a pre revolutionary play. Duke of cornwall and the duke of albany and in shakespeare's time they would have been the first and second son of the king so there is a sense of a country. That is worried about the future. How will this go. There was also time of units the beginning of the modern world so the economics were really punitive for the poor. The the common lands had been taken away. The monasteries used to help you know social servants as they were all gone. It became a very hard knock you know. Survival of the fittest society growing homelessness. Also a time of a lot of skepticism about everything one hundred years of catholic killing protestants. And what god could want that. So it's sadly play for every age and jane. We heard pretty talk about why why. This texas is helpful and understanding india. Why did you want to retell the story in iowa. Like what did you want to explore about life in the midwestern united states. Well it was more about the nature of farming. When i was thinking about it there was a big crisis in the in. The farm farming industry in the us and things had been to productive surprises had gone down. A lot of farmers were heavily indebted. Lot of farmers went bankrupt. And i thought that was quite interesting but the other thing was that this particular area in northern iowa was actually a marshland and about seventy five years or in late nineteen. Hundreds farmers came from eastern england. Who were familiar with marsh land and they dug drainage wells and the drainage wells drained marshland and they left a soil that basically was twelve twelve feet thick incredibly fertile..

Lear cornwall albany shakespeare Duke iowa jane texas us india england
"king lear" Discussed on Ideas

Ideas

04:49 min | Last month

"king lear" Discussed on Ideas

"Is set in possibly the most fertile farm country in the united states which is north central iowa. It's about a man who is becoming demented and he wants to avoid paying taxes by dividing the farm between his three daughters in incorporating it. The younger daughter is a lawyer. She's not sure about it. And as soon as she expresses her doubt he kicks her out. And then there are subsequent revelations and conflicts between all three of the daughters and the father. I tried very much to follow the play as closely as i could. There is no war at the end though because they don't do that myla but my main goal was to tell the story from ghana roles point of view. I read named her ginny. Because i felt that in the play daughters couldn't be understood because their point of view was hardly ever expressed and said so i wrote it in the first person point of view of what are they loved was who who point of view for both of these novels because the gun rose last line in the play has asked me not what i know and it was like the entire novel that jane wrote was about gone rolled telling us what she knows and on the other hand has each of the five young people that we talked about getting a chapter so we really get the point of view of a we. That are young. It's fascinating how both of those decisions really informed the novels absolutely and we'll get to to discussing that in a moment. But i am curious since the starting point was king. Lear jane and preachy. If you could just briefly talk about what it was when you first read king lear. Was that struck you about the play when you when you read it jane. Maybe we'll start with you. Well i i was assigned to read king lear pretty much over and over in high school college and graduate school. And what always struck me was. What a schmuck. Lear was i came from..

myla iowa ghana united states Lear jane jane king lear Lear
Casting and Location Update for the Film "My Son Hunter"

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:03 min | 2 months ago

Casting and Location Update for the Film "My Son Hunter"

"Falem this film. You said it's awesome powers meets king. Lear meets house of cards. You're not kidding. I mean it kind of crosses genres you and an wrote the script when you mentioned king lear. Suddenly it gives it pathos because this is a true story. It's horrifying it's fascinating if you raise the money. When would the film being able to Would you be able to shoot the film. And will i have a principal role. Well we're going to be shitting. We're going to start shooting either. The eighteenth of october twenty. Fifth tober in serbia. Like it's happening and we're gonna film. It ends serbia because that'll double as the ukrainian Yeah you mentioned. King lear again me branching king lear save did end up wandering piece in senility. Did you see joe biden. Come off their the helicopter last recently on get confused with which way to get into the white house experience shakespearean moment king lear crack year hurricane. I believe was what he meant to say. So in this film you have. It's the story of of hunter biden. Have you cast hunter. Have you cast joe biden. How does that work no. We're literally this close to cathy. Nam or very close stocks. Then you have a chance you know look we. We look closely You know your your schedule is just too full for us. you know. i also well. Well-known people people also assume associated with intellectualism and integrity and. I just don't think that you can make the leap people longer associated with these things. Thankfully so. I think i still have a chance to play hunter or joe Depending on i can do a lot of things with my hair. We're going to we're going to really. We're going to have fun shooting this together. My son hunter dot com.

King Lear Fifth Tober Serbia Lear Joe Biden Hunter Biden White House Hunter Hurricane Cathy JOE
"My Son Hunter" Is a Tale of Familial Tensions Between the Biden Sons

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:41 min | 2 months ago

"My Son Hunter" Is a Tale of Familial Tensions Between the Biden Sons

"For people who don't remember king lear. How is it related to king lear. Well king lear. What was a powerful mom. He was the king on. He decided just to flex his muscles and divides he divided his kingdom parity d- as a kind of sense of powerful omni and he said to his daughter. Do you love the dollar. Had approved a loved them. One dollars said. I'm not an art. It's a fight familial. Tensions and joe biden never liked hunter. Hundred beau biden was always the favorite song. The perfect son hunter was always struggling. I'm you know by the way i want. Joe biden was struggling. Drug addict son. He made him the mom for his corruption. Yes so so. I don't recall this. So you're you're right. Beau biden and of course died a few years ago very prematurely horribly. But so how is this when you talk about king lear. Did you get into this in the film. And the script this idea. The tension between these The sons of this powerful father. Totally totally take some ways extended its dot and greed is the driving force of the trash. You know You know it's it's hunter trying to please. That's why he's getting all this money. Obviously he is greeted of his ball. He's he's insatiably. Got an addict personality. But you know there's this familial drama played against this political drama a plan against complete far as

King Lear Beau Biden Joe Biden Hunter
"king lear" Discussed on Harvard Classics

Harvard Classics

04:20 min | 10 months ago

"king lear" Discussed on Harvard Classics

"He'll much deceived in nothing. I might change but in garments move but spoken. Come on sir. Here's the place standstill. How fearful dizzy to cast once is solo. The crows and chops that wing. The midway air shows gear so gross beatles half way down hangs one that gala sam flyer dreadful trade missing seems no bigger than his head to fishermen that walk along. The beach appear like mice and yawned tall. Anchoring bark diminished to her her cocoa boy almost two small foresight to murmuring surged at on the unnumbered. Idle pebble chafes cannot be heard so high. I look no more or less my brain. Turn and the deficient site toppled down headlong stretch. We were you stunned. Give me your hand. You know within a foot of the extreme verge for all beneath the moon. Would i not leave upright reservoir my hand friend. Now the pass in jul railway worth poor man's taking fatty sent god's prospered with the go further off bid me farewell and let me hear the going no failure. Well good sir seems to go with all my heart. Edgar aside why i do. Try full dose. This despair is stunned to curate. Who might kid. God's this world. I out at dig your sacks shake patially by great defec- should off. He i could bed gloag. And not fold the quarter with your upgrade to pose this wills by snuff at nova part of nature should bet itself out if edgar lou hit boo. The gone sir. Farewell gloucester leaps and falls along. And yet i know natale. Conceit may robbed the treasury of life when life itself yields to theft. Had he been where he thought by. This had sold been past alive or dead. Ho you sir friend. You sir speak. That's mighty pass indeed yet. He revives what are you sir. A die die head style been old but customer feathers air. So many follow them down. Precipitating doubts shivered like an egg but thou dust breathe has heavy substance. But it's not speak st- art sound ten mess said each make not the altea chewed which dow has perpendicularly fell by. Life is a miracle yet again. Have i fawn who from the dread summit of this chalky borne the height too shrill gorge slog so far can be seen or heard do but look up. I have no hi he should. I should deprive that benefit to add itself by death twice. Let's misery could guy titled rage and frustrated proud will give me your arm up. So how is it. Feed you your legs. You stand.

gala sam flyer gloag edgar lou Edgar natale treasury Ho
Ian Holm, 'Lord of the Rings' star, dead at 88

WBZ Afternoon News

00:43 sec | 1 year ago

Ian Holm, 'Lord of the Rings' star, dead at 88

"Actor Ian home has died from an illness related to Parkinson's CBS is Peter king takes a look back at his extraordinary career he was Bilbo Baggins in The Hobbit and lord of the rings I still have an ending for my book Ian Holm also had memorable roles in alien time bandits chariots of fire and as Skinner in the animated routed to a satellite calm dogs only smaller he's a really unpleasant looking little and I don't think he looks like me home was a stage actor it hard he won the Olivier award for his portrayal of King Lear he also won a Tony at the British Academy Awards night in nineteen ninety eight in the home was a Peter king CBS

Ian Home Parkinson CBS Bilbo Baggins Ian Holm Skinner King Lear Peter King British Academy
Is It Rolling, Bob? Talking Dylan: James Shapiro

Rock N Roll Archaeology

06:20 min | 1 year ago

Is It Rolling, Bob? Talking Dylan: James Shapiro

"And so going back to think twice you were talking about about more about the writing. Yeah and it's something that I didn't know enough about until I was invited onto your program. But what are the things that interest me about? Shakespeare is the fact that you know. He wrote thirty six so plays that we know of and almost none of them may be. The tempest may be midsummer. Night's dream are his original story but for the most part Shakespeare was not interested in creating a new story. He looked around at the stories others had told whether they were Italian. Novellas or English plays or history's any thought I understand what's slightly off for not really fulfilled in this version older version and he did what architects call a gut renovation. He kept the frame and he just cleared out the inside and made it is. Oh so when Dylan writes. Don't think twice. He knows Paul Clayton Song. Who's going to buy you ribbons? When I'm gone? He worked with Klay knew who sadly killed himself in in one thousand nine hundred sixty seven. Eight toward together collaborated a little bit and I'm sure that there is kind of cross pollination if you will between Clayton Song. And and don't think twice and dillon with a little techy from what. I've learned about that you know he said I steal the word a or the word so whether we're done you know Ed is a good question. Although he was a little defensive even steal those words but he is reaching into a tradition a tradition that goes further back than Clayton to. What I learned was an African American Song that circulated in Virginia. Who's GonNa Bring you chickens? So what we're talking about. Our traditions and Shakespeare comes out of traditions. Really in very similar ways. To how Dylan does and plagiarism is. A useless category the only useful category. Can you take something old and make it speak to the moment? In a way that makes people feel connected to that song ways. Nobody has ever felt connected to it in dealing did that for me. I think I'm right in saying and correct me. If I'm not the Sean Wilentz I think wrote a book called Bob Dylan and America. And he I believe explored this notion and said you know what it's Alchemy. What he's doing is he's taking base matters and is creating something new out of it that shines and I thought that was really damage. It is in trouble. Lens is A friend and a very smart guy and I think he wrote brilliantly about about Dylan. Christopher ricks did as well They're just a people recognize. That is work rises to the level of seriousness. And it is how chemical it is a transformation but for me. It's really the lack of thoughtfulness beyond the magic of the transformation and the thoughtfulness I suppose has to do with. I see what's not there. That's a hard thing to to grasp and Shakespeare was really good at it. Didn't create the story of Hamlet. He didn't create the story King. Lear those were all plays bouncing around in the stage. You probably acted in a spear holder when he was young. He's onstage they could. God I can write this great Soliloquy at this point or I could tweak it in this way. And maybe it's not occurring Bob Dylan in a cerebral way. But it's occurring to him in a way that lets them know. Yeah I. I know the folk he sang exists but that song is dead on arrival. Something has to be done to reanimated and I suppose it's as much Raising the data's alchemy. And where do you think Dylan? Shakespeare intersect particularly? I think oddly even though four hundred years or so separates their birth. They both products of a similar education system. You know it's it's remarkable if you listened to to Dylan's account of education in his Nobel lecture in two thousand Seventeen. He talks a lot of doubt grammar. School you know. He learned things in Grammar School. The devices techniques secret mysteries whatever. He's talking about. He talks about gullivers travel. Dickins Don Quixote all these stories and of course we know he had a great teacher in school. Who taught him the poetry John Donovan? The poetry plays of Shakespeare so shakespeare learn what he learned in Grammar School. I mean this is a Western tradition that span than in now and both of them sat there probably frustrated probably demise racing as they were exposed to this stuff and taking it all in and a decade later or or ten years later figuring out how to turn this into into gold if you will and I mean that both literally and figuratively because you have to make money as an artist or like pulled claim you can end up desperate and suicidal and both of them figured out how to do that. And if you think you know as a thought experiment Dylan or Shakespeare Been Born twenty years earlier or twenty years later whatever genius they had could not have been fully rely so yes. They were both remarkable artists but they had great luck in being born at what they recognize. Both of them were pivotal moments in in their culture in the arts in the possibilities that were now available to young

Bob Dylan Shakespeare Clayton Song Grammar School Christopher Ricks Sean Wilentz John Donovan Don Quixote ED Virginia Dillon Klay Lear America
Pop Music In The Age Of Covid

The Frame

03:14 min | 1 year ago

Pop Music In The Age Of Covid

"Atty drowned himself in wine. That song came out about a year ago. When you were curly obsessing over the crazy times we were living in then. What new meaning does a song like that have today? I was thinking about that. Actually I was like I. I like that song even more now but I I was really writing at. Moore's a political thing and now it's it's just a more universal thing I mean this is like the black plague sort of thing and people online. I've been reading like there's a theory that Shakespeare wrote Macbeth and King Lear under for like eighteen months or something and so there's certainly a lot of time for at least creative people to buckle down and try to make something new but yeah we could all use some peace of mind and you know I actually have been taking some time out of the day to find peace like meditate or try to meditate. I'm not very good at it but especially the first especially those first few days of no school as just like I need something and it's not as not drugs or drink and I just needed some quiet time Does even five minutes was helpful. The amount of news about Corona viruses. Absolutely crazy so it's it's nice to put the phone down sometimes so the viruses obviously changed how you can work with other people and how. You're kind of self isolated. Does it change your priorities as a storyteller and what you want to talk about and sing about yeah. I mean I don't know but as a storyteller yet I don't know if I've quite been like oh now I know what to write about but as a human being and I think a lot of people probably feel a bit of this is a human being you kind of understand life in a different way that we haven't had to deal with in this country like we've seen people in Syria waiting in long queues for rice from the back of a truck. And we've never really had to do that here at least in my lifetime so going to the grocery store the past few weeks has been eye opening for sure and realizing how good we had it and how good we still have. We Have Electricity Water Internet net flicks all that stuff. I mean. We're pretty comfortable here. Imagine if all that was wiped away yeah I mean. There's a bigger emphasis in my life on my family on joy. I guess whatever however you get joy but just making the most of life and I think this is you know teaching a lot of people lessons as to what is really important in their life and what they would spend their time doing. And that's the silver lining. I guess you could say be. Beeman is a singer and songwriter. You can find his music at Beeman DOT com. That's B. H. I. M. A. N. DOT COM B. S. We go out. I WANNA play another one of your songs because I think it's a good song for now it's called. Can't nobody stop us be? Thanks so much for coming on the show. Thank you John.

Beeman Dot Com Beeman Atty Plague Syria Corona King Lear Moore Shakespeare Macbeth B. H. I. M. A.
Harold Bloom: The Shadow of a Great Rock: A Literary Appreciation of the King James Bible

Bookworm

05:57 min | 2 years ago

Harold Bloom: The Shadow of a Great Rock: A Literary Appreciation of the King James Bible

"You know recently Harold Bloom died he was the figure of extrordinary controversy Oko Zinder other circumstances is he would have been just another professor but he was the professor who was defending the Western canon as he quoted which meant that he was talking about Shakespeare and Milton and of course his great of Shelley he studied how these writers in the Canon influenced each other he wrote a book called the Gang Society of influence he really became the writer of our time talking out that tradition now let's acknowledge that tradition is rarely taught in the university the way it was in the generation of Herald I had the pleasure and I would say the honor of talking to her world boom at his own apartment in New York I will say that I disagreed with him about many things things when we aired these interviews people wrote in Yes harold bloom was an elitist yes he was but we should have one of everything and there are leaders and there are populous and there are ever very kind of response that you can have two good richer this is harold boom from our conversation on bookworm unlike his book the Anatomy of influence literature is a way of life which seems a settled and masterful book the shadow of a great rock is audacious and I would like to say even dangerous which tells us that a great mind doesn't settle into somnolence or eternity it's always at work work and always making trouble this is the nature of the mind Harold Bloom my wife would appreciate how do you how do you feel you've spoken of the many controversies you've causes mentioned some of them in this book it's never going to see aw both well hated and well loved and particularly with I have to say about the New Testament here has already started Israel fury I've got nasty email nasty letters and even a couple of nasty anonymous phone calls you say that the ten handle translation of the old the New Testament is the breakthrough in Boston since they burned I mean he's both a great model a great writer and the Grand Bigot with that it's not full they were all bigots of goals they would all I'm very glad to see you and myself crucified angry anti-semites but it went with the territory as it were Tindale was martyred burned alive before he could finish his translation of what he called the Old Testament as you will notice throughout this look the shadow of a great rock I insist upon referring to it as the original testament Tomahawk the Hebrew Bible and what is called the New Testament by its proper name the belated testament which is also beginning to get into the usual difficulties but that's fun Tindale was burned alive before he could translate the prophets and most of the great writings and that's how a loss because tremendous writer in every way you compare to Shakespeare and Milton I would say that the greatest writer certain in English paps in any language I'm able to read is of course we shakespeare indeed have now reached a point where I've totally infuriated but I like doing that of course with them the horrible shakespeare establishment these dryers dust moldy fix calls by simply saying there is no God but God his name is William Shakes sure of course after Shakespeare you have to put chaucer stunning extraordinary writer without really Shakespeare did not have been possible then tindale and Milton I would say of almost equal imminence the English novel sales of Daniel Defoe and John Bunyan at its very beginning wouldn't have been possible without Tindale he was not a lyrical writer but a very great narrative genius I of course New Testament which was complete is the entire basis if the King James New Testament and is major writing is largely preserved in the Geneva Bible and subsequently in the King James Bible and various scholars who have said that it would be very difficult to think of the style of certain moments in King Lear without the Tim Daly an element in the Geneva Bible our I think basically justified you say that the two greatest works in the English language are composed really within a decade need

Harold Bloom Oko Zinder Milton
Tony Awards Preview

Popcorn with Peter Travers

12:40 min | 2 years ago

Tony Awards Preview

"Hi, everybody. It's Peter Travers than welcome to our special popcorn Tony award show. Now, I've gotta say, before we get into the nominees about who will win and who should win. This is been the most amazing year in Broadway history. It has made over two billion dollars at the box office that never happened. And why is it? I think it's Hollywood heat everybody from TV from movies from us. It wants to be on Broadway. They wanna be on that stage. You got this year. Kylo Ren and driver on Broadway. You have Walter, white Bryan, Cranston, there, Jeff Daniels who played Harry done in too, dumb and dumber movies. They're all fighting to be best, dramatic actor, what kind of stuff is happening on Broadway. Well, let's start with the major categories, and I'm gonna start with best musical the nominees are ain't too, proud the life and times of the temptations Beetlejuice remember that movie Haiti's town, the prom, and Tootsie. You remember that movie too? Well. I think the winner is Haiti's town. It's a rigid. It's basically the myth of Orpheus ritzy, but it's got a score by a woman named Naess Mitchell who doesn't come from Broadway, at all and kind of revolutionizes it. So what would happen what could spoil the fun? There's a little musical called the prom. It's really it's totally original. It's about these bunch of Broadway veterans, and they're really hard bitten, and they're not getting any press, and they decide to go to Indiana and help, a lesbian high school student take her girlfriend to the prom. That's it. How good is it? It's really good. And in terms of the Hollywood connection, Ryan Murphy, went to see it fell in love with it, and he's making a movie of it. So how about that? Then we have best play the Ferryman choirboy, Gary a sequel to Titus andronicus. What the constitution means to me an ink. I'm telling you people, the Ferryman is got to be a movie soon. It's an Irish play. It's about the troubles, and in on a stage. We get to see an entire family deal with violence deal with their own feuds. We've got babies onstage. We've got live alive goose. We have everything there's nothing like I don't think there's any competition for it at all except there was a snub, the most successful play in Broadway history. That's not a musical is to kill among bird, and for some reason, the Tony nominee said, let's not nominated what I want. Answer on that one best revival of a play. Arthur, Miller's all my sons the boys in the band, burn this torch song and the Waverley gallery. I think Arthur Miller's all my sons which brought a net. Bending back to Broadway is a show that he wrote in one thousand nine hundred forty seven a bout a guy who was manufacturing airplane, parts and was to rush to do it. And so the planes crashed and killed pilots during the war. We live in the world of Boeing. Now, how timely could this be? So I think that's really up there. And I in terms of seeing a show that by playwright Arthur Miller who says, let's deal with the world we live in this one really, really did it then we have bible of musical. This is easy, because there's only two there's Oklahoma Rogers and Hammerstein Oklahoma and kiss me. Kate. Of course, they were both movies. We saw Oklahoma with Gordon MacRae and Shirley Jones in the fifties. But kiss me, Kate is done in a traditional way. Kelli o'hara's in it, Oklahoma is directed by guide named Daniel fish who find darkness. We're Rogers and Hammerstein only found light. It's a revelation to watch this. It's not the Oklahoma you've ever remembered, and it sung in the kind of country western way, look, if you ever get to see this on Broadway or win a tours get there get there quick. Okay. Okay. Best actor in a musical. And so, we'll do alphabetically Brooks as Mantas in the prom, Derrick Baskin and ain't too, proud the life and times of the temptations Alex Brightman and Beetlejuice. Remember when Michael Keaton had their part, Damon down, oh in Rogers and Hammerstein, Oklahoma. And send Tino fun Tanna into okay? The favorite is Tino, Tanna who is playing the part that destined Hoffman immortalized in the movie in the nineteen eighties. But what Centeno Tanna doesn't remember him on TV in crazy ex girlfriend like I'm saying everybody's from TV, or he does so much more. He sings as a man sees a woman, he does physical comedy does everything but stand on his hat. And I say, you know, who's out there that can spoil the win for Santino Tanna. And my answer is no one because this is one of the great performances you'll ever see on a musical, comedy stage. He's the winner. Best actress in a play Benning in Arthur, Miller's all my sons, Laura, Donnelly, in the Ferryman. Elaine may in the Waverley gallery, Janet mcteer in Bernhardt hamlet, Laurie Metcalf in Hillary Clinton, and Heidi Shreck in what the constitution means to me. Okay. Elaine may doesn't win this Tony. You're going to hear from me. She's eighty seven years old. She's returned to Broadway. After decades to play the part of a woman fighting Alzheimer's, and everything is no perfect about what she's done. She started with Mike Nichols doing comedy. She was starring in movies of like the new leaf directed things like the heartbreak kid. She's just one of the best actors I've ever seen anywhere. And if she loses and, you know, I feel bad for an bending because if Elaine may wasn't here this year, I think she would be the winner, but come on. Attention must be paid people. And I also wanna talk about a snub how. How does Glenda Jackson who won the Tony last year for three women returned to Broadway as King Lear? We talk about the age of hashtag metoo and time's up Glenda. Jackson is playing king. Lear gets rave reviews and the Tony committee says we're not gonna nominate her now. No, we're paying attention. And we're gonna come back and get you our best actress in a musical. Stephanie, j block in the share show Caitlyn Kanoun in the prom Beth level, in the prom, Eva nobles, ADA in Haiti's town, and Kelley O'Hara and kiss me cake. Stephanie j block who is that theater veteran is playing share in a way that sometimes she's more share than share. You might think this is just an escapist show thing to know she finds the character of who she is share shows up at this show often does numbers with her, and pus share. There's who's a bigger Hollywood. Name who is coming to Broadway with the show about herself. It takes three actresses to play here. But Stephanie j block plays the central one. And she plays the hell out of it. So she has just got to win. I'm sorry, people. All right. Best featured actress in a play for new of Flanagan in the Ferryman seal, you keep. And Bolger into kill a Mockingbird. Christine Nelson, Gary a sequel to Titus andronicus Julie white and Gary sequel to Titus andronicus and Ruth Wilson and King Lear people if you see if you see to kill among bird, and you should seal, you Keenan Bolger is very controversial because she's playing scout scout in the book and in the movie remember is in eight or nine year old girl. A C Keenan Bolger is in her forties. And yet, what she finds in this character who grew up to be Harper who wrote this novel is the heart and soul of the peace. So I'm telling you people this, this has got to happen. See Keenan Bolger remember that name best featured actor in a play birdie Carville and ink, Robin to hasten boys in the band getting Glick into kill a monkey bird, Brandon your Ranna wits in burn this Benjamin Walker in Arthur Miller's. All my sons birdie, Carville in ink. Those of us, those of you who actually went to Broadway couple of years ago and saw of any kind of a musical where you were shocked at a man playing a woman, you saw birdie, Carville in Matilda, and he played this woman, this horrible headmistress, and now he's playing Rupert Murdoch. So every who in Hollywood, who in politics would anyone hasn't been in an Rupert Murdoch publication or paper and who hasn't been rolled over the coals in it that performance and in London when he played it in one and Olivia ward, he had to play it in front of Rupert Murdoch. It's just an incredible job. I wanna talk a little about the snubs in this category. The non nominees there isn't actor named Bengal Arghanab into Killa mugging bird who plays Tom Robinson. He is the black man who is on trial for raping a white woman, a crime never committed. And he's defended. By Jeff Daniels. Atticus Finch when Aaron Sorkin adapted Harper Lee's novel to the stage. He did it so that he could expand the role of the black characters as he did here. And again, the Tony committee, decided only to nominate the white actors from tequila, Mockingbird ignoring the two black actors who are just brilliant in their roles. You people you're going to get called on the carpet. You need to all right? Best featured actress in a musical, Lilli Cooper in Tootsie, amber, gray and Haiti's town Sarah, styles Tootsie, alley stroke, or in Rogers and Hammerstein Oklahoma and Mary, Testa in Rogers, and Hammerstein Oklahoma there, something totally remarkable that happened this year in stroke, and Oklahoma. This is a woman who when she was two years old was in an automobile crash, and was never able to walk again. And now on Broadway playing eight oh Anne who is like the sexual. Time bomb in Oklahoma, the one who sings, I can't say, no, the part went to Allie. Stroke, she plays it in a wheelchair and you would think that's inspiring enough. But when you watch her play at you, forget the wheelchair exists, and you're watching her take over the stage like Dolly Parton. She, it's just an amazing thing to watch and it works on so many levels. So I wanna be there when she wins that Tony, and I want to be standing up and applauding and going Bravo. She deserves all right. Best featured actor in a musical Andre shields in Haiti town and a groups Luccin. That's a good name into Patrick page in Haiti's town germy, pope in into proud the life and times of the temptations and Ephraim Sykes ain't too, proud the life and times of the temptations, the favorite, the one, I think will win is under the shields and Haiti's town. He's seventy three years old. He stands on that stage is the narrator in like a silver suit. In total control of body and every movement and pulls you in till you're memorized. Your mesmerizing you not take your eyes off of hundred shields. This is a veteran actor who needs to get this Tony. But what if he didn't who would go to there's a young actor named Jeremy pope who plays Eddie kendricks in the into proud the life and times of the temptations? And who does he's playing a difficult man. One of the most difficult of the temptations. But one of the most talented as well. He's also nominated this year as best actor in a in a play in choir, boy, this is to me, the brightest newcomer that you will see on the stage and you're going to see him everywhere, stage movies television. It's just the beginning. So if you get to see this, you're going to be able to tell your friends, I was there win. Okay. Best director of a play Rupert Gould for Inc. Sam Mendes for the Ferryman Bartlett. Fair for to kill a mocking bird Ivo von Hosver for network, and George C Wolfer Gary a sequel to Titus andronicus Sam Mendis in the Ferryman this play. Does a job on stage that equal to his first movie which was American Beauty, which you may remember won the best picture? Oscar and once Mendis the Oscar as best director.

Haiti Oklahoma Arthur Miller Hammerstein Oklahoma Hollywood King Lear Rogers Keenan Bolger Jeff Daniels Elaine Glenda Jackson Titus Andronicus Tony Award Rupert Murdoch Waverley Gallery Peter Travers Gary Harper Lee Centeno Tanna Stephanie J
"king lear" Discussed on From Scratch

From Scratch

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"king lear" Discussed on From Scratch

"In a new production of King Lear when of Shakespeare's greatest tragedies Jackson plays Lear giving her the opportunity to take on one of the most challenging and prestigious roles in theatre history. But it's a role that for obvious reasons. Always goes to a man near times theater critic Ben Brantley wrote, she is delivering a powerful. And deeply perceptive performance as the most royally demented of Shakespeare's monarchs unquote, King Lear opened on Broadway this month, but Jackson had already played Lear in a London production that opened in twenty sixteen at the old Vic last year. She wanted Tony for her performance in the Edward all be play. Three tall women. It's been an incredible return to acting after serving twenty three years as a member of parliament. She was elected in nineteen Ninety-two and step down in twenty fifteen her career before that included Oscar winning performances. In the nineteen sixty nine movie women in love and the nineteen Seventy-three romantic comedy a touch of class. She won two Emmys playing Queen Elizabeth the first in the nineteen seventy-one BBC series, Elizabeth r which was shown in the US as part of masterpiece theatre, let's start with a clip from the new Broadway. Production of King Lear Lear has decided that he's old and it's time to unburden himself of his responsibilities as king and divide his kingdom among his three daughters. No, we have divided in three Yala kingdom, and is our I intend to shake all cares and business from our converting them on youngest rates. Well, we I'm. Dead wrong who won deck. Glenda jackson. Welcome to fresh air. Thank you. The first thing people always seem to want to know is why is the woman playing King Lear, and what's it like to be a woman playing Lear?.

King Lear Lear Glenda jackson Shakespeare Ben Brantley Oscar Tony London US Elizabeth r BBC twenty three years
"king lear" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"king lear" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"In a new production of King Lear when of Shakespeare's greatest tragedies Jackson plays Lear giving her the opportunity to take on one of the most challenging and prestigious roles in theatre history. But it's a role that for obvious reasons. Always goes to a man near times theater critic Ben Brantley wrote, she is delivering a powerful. And deeply perceptive performance as the most royally demented of Shakespeare's monarchs unquote, King Lear opened on Broadway this month, but Jackson had already played Lear in a London production that opened in twenty sixteen at the old Vic last year. She wanted Tony for her performance in the Edward all be play. Three tall women. It's been an incredible return to acting after serving twenty three years as a member of parliament. She was elected in nineteen Ninety-two and step down in twenty fifteen her career before that included Oscar winning performances. In the nineteen sixty nine movie women in love and the nineteen Seventy-three romantic comedy a touch of class. She won two Emmys playing Queen Elizabeth the first in the nineteen seventy-one BBC series, Elizabeth r which was shown in the US as part of masterpiece theatre, let's start with a clip from the new Broadway. Production of King Lear Lear has decided that he's old and it's time to unburden himself of his responsibilities as king and divide his kingdom among his three daughters. No, we have divided in three Yala kingdom, and is our I intend to shake all cares and business from our converting them on youngest rates. Well, we I'm. Dead wrong who won deck. Glenda jackson. Welcome to fresh air. Thank you. The first thing people always seem to want to know is why is the woman playing King Lear, and what's it like to be a woman playing Lear?.

King Lear Lear Glenda jackson Shakespeare Ben Brantley Oscar Tony London US Elizabeth r BBC twenty three years
"king lear" Discussed on Believed

Believed

11:52 min | 2 years ago

"king lear" Discussed on Believed

"Best. Find out. More at nature's way dot com. That's get back to my interview with Glenda Jackson. She starring on Broadway in King Lear playing Lear it open last month, but she'd already played Lear in London in a different production that opened in twenty sixteen last year. She wanna Tony for her performance in Edward all bees play three tall. Women. These performances were her return to acting after spending twenty three years as a member of parliament in the labor party. Let's hear what you had to say in parliament after Margaret Thatcher died, and this was in twenty thirteen and there were many tributes made in parliament. And this was a day. I think when most of the labor members of parliament stayed away. And so conservative members were saying, you know, giving many tributes to Margaret Thatcher. And then used it up. Made a pretty scathing speech while conservative members of parliament, basically jeered you so let's hear what you had to say. We would told that everything I had been taught to regard as a vice. And I still regard them as vices under Thatcherism was in fact, a virtue greed, selfishness, no care for the weekend. Shop elbows shop needs they with the wave. Continue to hear things from home. The barriers condemn factors. The establishment that was destroyed comb taken. What we actually saw the land that has been settling around with stars around. It is that she creative an aspirational society. Aspired for things as indeed one of the former prime ministers who himself had been elevated to the house of lords spoke about selling off, the family, silver and people knowing under those years, the price of everything and the value of nothing. What concerns me is that? I am beginning to see possibly the re emergence of that total traducing what I regard as being the basis spiritual nature of this country, where we do care about society where we do believe in communities where we do not leave people to walk by on the other side that isn't happening now while. So did you expect that reaction when you decided to make those code? Yes. Of course, I may not up there in the chamber for several hours is one does for these kinds of events before. I was cold by the speaker. Yes, I'd be nice out there listening to her party rewriting history. As far as I was concerned the United Kingdom that they were describing under Thatcher was not the one I'd lived in. It wasn't one my constituents limit in. And it said he isn't the one that was there when she left so you step down from parliament in twenty fifteen so you've been gone for you know, a few years right now. Like the issue that is preoccupying England is of course, Brexit. I'm do you feel like England is falling apart during this period of paralysis and all the fears of the conserve. Quences could be if England leaves the u U E you, especially if at least without a deal. Well, I did feel that the country's falling about. But I sat in the think parliament has lost its reason. I just there smolt clips that one sees them the television here in New York, mostly prime minister's question times in the house of Commons. All MRs may yet again coming back from Europe with some ideas, and I sit there, and I look a lot of those faces. I know that people I know, and I think what in the name of all these holy. Are you doing they have simply lost it? And they have to get the heads back in shape and realized that we cannot crash out without a d just be disastrous, and they are going to have to at some point set aside. What seems to be I the. Party political vicissitudes all their own personal view of staying or leaving and concentrate on what is best for the country. And what is best for the country's deal? We had a referendum Yukon argue until the cows come home that should never been a referendum on that issue. I would probably argue for that. Because I would like is this day, but the country's democratic decision was to leave and parliaments bounden duty. It seems to me is to deliver that for the country, but deliver it to the best possible means for the country after out. I'm not doing that. At the moment. I can tell you would you like to see a new referendum some people say, oh, no. What is the point in that? I mean, we have the referendum so say you have a second preference. What's to stop somebody saying, okay? Then let's have a third or the best in five fifteen or twenty five the. Country made a decision. The argument is being put forward by seventh amendment is the country made decision out to total ignorance of what I mean. That was its decision. We count roll the crock back we have to roll it forward. Did you miss acting while you were in parliament? Oh, no, no acting exist when you do it. So if if you're not doing it. There's nothing demands wait a minute. I miss things. I'm not doing. Like what I've my miss seeing friends. You know, I I mean, we all miss things that we're not doing and we miss them because we're not doing them. So but the doing is dependent on so much mold than telephoning, your friend. I mean, she's a process outside of which you all I mean, the the creation of fort, hopefully, someone will suggest you do is outside you'll re-met. And so that's why I say unless you're doing it. There's nothing to miss. Okay. Let me rephrase this did you ever miss the process of getting into character learning the role thinking about the role thinking about the intentions of the character and interacting with other actors on a set or on stage to create a scene to create a movie or a play. Well, that would presuppose I had nothing to do of than think about I had nothing to do. But I do show you being a constituency member of Paula. Is is twenty four seven job, and what comes through the mail off the computer via the phone? I mean, they can't be transfixed thing. Okay. Let me ask this one. See the errors fund. This do you now that you're acting again? Do you miss being a member of parliament not at the present time because of the Brexit quagmire, oh is managed to put this in? But I do miss my constituency. Yes. And I miss the people, you know, that I knew that it was if it was a really interesting constituencies represent. So it seems like you thought about the possibility of serving in parliament or doing some kind of public service where back in the seventies. I'm gonna play an excerpt of nineteen seventy six interview you were interviewed by Colin Grimshaw. This excerpt starts with him asking you about what was then your latest film nasty habits based on a novel by mural sparks. New initiative before it was sent to me with the idea of of it making a very good film and making a very good film with lots of good women's parts in it, which is while you're waving the flag for women's left because they're all women waving ain't now poke it in your eye. When you think work on stage. You get enough nervous always on why? Because it just. Because I think the lonely at the more you realize you don't know and the possibilities for making the wrong choices much greater than the probabilities of making the right ones and. That sorta fairy something that you probably learned to control that. But it doesn't have any less seven the pasta. Jim I'd give up acting and take up social would you do this? Yes. Because I mean, certainly the life of an actress in films he's very short and in the theater, there's a terrible trough when the Renault parts with playing I mean until you sort of hit about sixty few. So the cracking character part, and I really don't see myself hanging around for twenty years waiting to play an obedient something, and I certainly don't see myself sitting at home, just, you know, polishing the phone into coming back to acting not really, no. Okay. The one thing that sounds wrong in that is that you did come back to acting. But everything you say, and that sounds like so contemporary the shortage of roles for women, especially at certain ages, the deal that is an absolute that has not changed during Mike experience in acting. So in that interview clip, you obviously feel strongly about the women's movement or women's lib as he as he called it how no watch I really really feel strongly about. And I wish I could come up with the reason for it is why contemporary dramatists find women so boring. They are rarely if ever the driving dramatic engine of of a play or film of you, you know, and identify that is I mean, we are by no means equal as a gender of Sydney, not worldwide. But that have been major improvements doors have opened for women that were firmly. Locked many decades ago, why don't contemporary dramatists find as interesting, but they don't let's take a short break here. And then we'll talk some more. If you're just joining us. My guest is Glenda Jackson, and she's now starring on Broadway as. King Lear in King Lear. We'll be right back. This is fresh air support for this podcast and the following message. Come from Exxon Mobil, the company that believes that carbon capture technologies are critical for lowering global CO two emissions and more and more. Scientists agree as a leader and capturing emissions in its own perations. Exxon Mobil is working on ways to make this technology. More efficient and affordable for other industries as well. That's the unexpected energy of Exxon Mobil. Find out more at energy factor dot com. Movie season is here and pop culture. Happy hour hasn't been covered for a guide for the blockbusters. You know about an surprise bright spots. You might not we'll tell you what we are looking forward to what were secretly dreading, and what might sneak up on us. Listen, now, and subscribe. You grew up

King Lear Margaret Thatcher Exxon Mobil Glenda Jackson England Europe Tony London United Kingdom Edward Paula New York preoccupying England prime minister Quences Brexit lords
"king lear" Discussed on Rough Translation

Rough Translation

11:52 min | 2 years ago

"king lear" Discussed on Rough Translation

"Best. Find out. More at nature's way dot com. That's get back to my interview with Glenda Jackson. She starring on Broadway in King Lear playing Lear it open last month, but she'd already played Lear in London in a different production that opened in twenty sixteen last year. She wanna Tony for her performance in Edward all bees play three tall. Women. These performances were her return to acting after spending twenty three years as a member of parliament in the labor party. Let's hear what you had to say in parliament after Margaret Thatcher died, and this was in twenty thirteen and there were many tributes made in parliament. And this was a day. I think when most of the labor members of parliament stayed away. And so conservative members were saying, you know, giving many tributes to Margaret Thatcher. And then used it up. Made a pretty scathing speech while conservative members of parliament, basically jeered you so let's hear what you had to say. We would told that everything I had been taught to regard as a vice. And I still regard them as vices under Thatcherism was in fact, a virtue greed, selfishness, no care for the weekend. Shop elbows shop needs they with the wave. Continue to hear things from home. The barriers condemn factors. The establishment that was destroyed comb taken. What we actually saw the land that has been settling around with stars around. It is that she creative an aspirational society. Aspired for things as indeed one of the former prime ministers who himself had been elevated to the house of lords spoke about selling off, the family, silver and people knowing under those years, the price of everything and the value of nothing. What concerns me is that? I am beginning to see possibly the re emergence of that total traducing what I regard as being the basis spiritual nature of this country, where we do care about society where we do believe in communities where we do not leave people to walk by on the other side that isn't happening now while. So did you expect that reaction when you decided to make those code? Yes. Of course, I may not up there in the chamber for several hours is one does for these kinds of events before. I was cold by the speaker. Yes, I'd be nice out there listening to her party rewriting history. As far as I was concerned the United Kingdom that they were describing under Thatcher was not the one I'd lived in. It wasn't one my constituents limit in. And it said he isn't the one that was there when she left so you step down from parliament in twenty fifteen so you've been gone for you know, a few years right now. Like the issue that is preoccupying England is of course, Brexit. I'm do you feel like England is falling apart during this period of paralysis and all the fears of the conserve. Quences could be if England leaves the u U E you, especially if at least without a deal. Well, I did feel that the country's falling about. But I sat in the think parliament has lost its reason. I just there smolt clips that one sees them the television here in New York, mostly prime minister's question times in the house of Commons. All MRs may yet again coming back from Europe with some ideas, and I sit there, and I look a lot of those faces. I know that people I know, and I think what in the name of all these holy. Are you doing they have simply lost it? And they have to get the heads back in shape and realized that we cannot crash out without a d just be disastrous, and they are going to have to at some point set aside. What seems to be I the. Party political vicissitudes all their own personal view of staying or leaving and concentrate on what is best for the country. And what is best for the country's deal? We had a referendum Yukon argue until the cows come home that should never been a referendum on that issue. I would probably argue for that. Because I would like is this day, but the country's democratic decision was to leave and parliaments bounden duty. It seems to me is to deliver that for the country, but deliver it to the best possible means for the country after out. I'm not doing that. At the moment. I can tell you would you like to see a new referendum some people say, oh, no. What is the point in that? I mean, we have the referendum so say you have a second preference. What's to stop somebody saying, okay? Then let's have a third or the best in five fifteen or twenty five the. Country made a decision. The argument is being put forward by seventh amendment is the country made decision out to total ignorance of what I mean. That was its decision. We count roll the crock back we have to roll it forward. Did you miss acting while you were in parliament? Oh, no, no acting exist when you do it. So if if you're not doing it. There's nothing demands wait a minute. I miss things. I'm not doing. Like what I've my miss seeing friends. You know, I I mean, we all miss things that we're not doing and we miss them because we're not doing them. So but the doing is dependent on so much mold than telephoning, your friend. I mean, she's a process outside of which you all I mean, the the creation of fort, hopefully, someone will suggest you do is outside you'll re-met. And so that's why I say unless you're doing it. There's nothing to miss. Okay. Let me rephrase this did you ever miss the process of getting into character learning the role thinking about the role thinking about the intentions of the character and interacting with other actors on a set or on stage to create a scene to create a movie or a play. Well, that would presuppose I had nothing to do of than think about I had nothing to do. But I do show you being a constituency member of Paula. Is is twenty four seven job, and what comes through the mail off the computer via the phone? I mean, they can't be transfixed thing. Okay. Let me ask this one. See the errors fund. This do you now that you're acting again? Do you miss being a member of parliament not at the present time because of the Brexit quagmire, oh is managed to put this in? But I do miss my constituency. Yes. And I miss the people, you know, that I knew that it was if it was a really interesting constituencies represent. So it seems like you thought about the possibility of serving in parliament or doing some kind of public service where back in the seventies. I'm gonna play an excerpt of nineteen seventy six interview you were interviewed by Colin Grimshaw. This excerpt starts with him asking you about what was then your latest film nasty habits based on a novel by mural sparks. New initiative before it was sent to me with the idea of of it making a very good film and making a very good film with lots of good women's parts in it, which is while you're waving the flag for women's left because they're all women waving ain't now poke it in your eye. When you think work on stage. You get enough nervous always on why? Because it just. Because I think the lonely at the more you realize you don't know and the possibilities for making the wrong choices much greater than the probabilities of making the right ones and. That sorta fairy something that you probably learned to control that. But it doesn't have any less seven the pasta. Jim I'd give up acting and take up social would you do this? Yes. Because I mean, certainly the life of an actress in films he's very short and in the theater, there's a terrible trough when the Renault parts with playing I mean until you sort of hit about sixty few. So the cracking character part, and I really don't see myself hanging around for twenty years waiting to play an obedient something, and I certainly don't see myself sitting at home, just, you know, polishing the phone into coming back to acting not really, no. Okay. The one thing that sounds wrong in that is that you did come back to acting. But everything you say, and that sounds like so contemporary the shortage of roles for women, especially at certain ages, the deal that is an absolute that has not changed during Mike experience in acting. So in that interview clip, you obviously feel strongly about the women's movement or women's lib as he as he called it how no watch I really really feel strongly about. And I wish I could come up with the reason for it is why contemporary dramatists find women so boring. They are rarely if ever the driving dramatic engine of of a play or film of you, you know, and identify that is I mean, we are by no means equal as a gender of Sydney, not worldwide. But that have been major improvements doors have opened for women that were firmly. Locked many decades ago, why don't contemporary dramatists find as interesting, but they don't let's take a short break here. And then we'll talk some more. If you're just joining us. My guest is Glenda Jackson, and she's now starring on Broadway as. King Lear in King Lear. We'll be right back. This is fresh air support for this podcast and the following message. Come from Exxon Mobil, the company that believes that carbon capture technologies are critical for lowering global CO two emissions and more and more. Scientists agree as a leader and capturing emissions in its own perations. Exxon Mobil is working on ways to make this technology. More efficient and affordable for other industries as well. That's the unexpected energy of Exxon Mobil. Find out more at energy factor dot com. Movie season is here and pop culture. Happy hour hasn't been covered for a guide for the blockbusters. You know about an surprise bright spots. You might not we'll tell you what we are looking forward to what were secretly dreading, and what might sneak up on us. Listen, now, and subscribe. You grew up

King Lear Margaret Thatcher Exxon Mobil Glenda Jackson England Europe Tony London United Kingdom Edward Paula New York preoccupying England prime minister Quences Brexit lords
"king lear" Discussed on Rough Translation

Rough Translation

08:19 min | 2 years ago

"king lear" Discussed on Rough Translation

"Anyone. There was a scene from Elizabeth are with my guest. Glenda jackson. So we've heard you as King Lear. We've heard you as Queen Elizabeth having played. You know, fictional king and portrayed an actual Queen. Did it make you think of gender differences between kings and queens, oh of remote? So because setting the as far as Elizabeth was consent. And I mean, that's face it. She'd had the most tumultuous upbringing heaven. She I mean, HAMAs head was chopped off when she Elizabeth. I think was three she had all these various stepmother's ofter couple of whom also went the wave over flesh. The hands of her father has system who took of the throne with notes particularly in favor of and there was always this pressure upon one she did become Queen to marry to ensure that had line continued. And one of her extraordinary strengths. It seems to me having read the histories, and one thing another was that had great strength was that she didn't make. A fast decision, which is in marked contrast to what lead us she would vacillate. She would put things out. She would delay stuff. And then if something happened like, for example, the trial of Mary Queen of Scots and Harris Q, she would blame everybody around having done something that she claims she didn't want to happen. Now, she wasn't lying when she said she didn't want to happen. She didn't want it to happen. And yet there must have been part of the new that they tapped to happen. But of course, it was taking away the divine right of kings. Even though that time the ruling was a Queen. So you've played kings. And queens you've served in parliament you were elected to parliament in nineteen Ninety-two. You've laid powerful people and you've had political power not king low. Really? No, no, no, no backbenches. I I cannot stress strongly enough for me one of. The most humbling experience is was being a member of parliament. I mean, I give you I mean, obviously, I think it's amazing that somebody puts an x next to your name. It's not just you of ghost. I mean, they obviously support your party, and hopefully that party's manifesto, but or members of parliament Hoed will we cold advice surgeries, and you hold them in the constituency and any constituent can come in. And they would and in some instances, they put no in the really serious ones. They sort of lay that life out on the table in front of you. You don't know them. They don't really know you and not infrequently their lives tragic or disastrous through no fault of their own and they come to their member of parliament. Because then member of parliament is that port of last resort. You can get response to let people will ring you on the phone in my. My experience. I didn't always get the result that might constituent wanted. But without exception. Whether I did or whether I didn't they always said, thank you. And that is very very humbling, and it is a great privilege to be elected to be a member of parliament. And that kind of responsibility is something that really makes you realize who you are. And you're pretty damn small. Yes. Okay. I can see what you're saying you're helping people with constituent services and things like that. But you also stood up against the Iraq war when Tony Blair joined with President, George George W Bush. So like you use up to power in a way that's different from, you know, being an actor. I mean, sure you might want to stand stand up and object to direction that you're getting. But it's different than standing up to a prime minister who wants to. Take your country to war will as I've had occasion to say. It was the fist time in my experience of being a member of parliament have I had voted against my party's policy, and I presume raw the light murder. Once you do it for the first. Why did you want to serve in parliament anything? I could have done. I mean, I was member. A who was voted labour? I been all by the party to do various things for them raise money. I wanted the worst party political broadcast ever things of that nature, and I'd been approached by various constituency parties to consider standing as a prospective parliamentary candidates and in ninety two the election was looming. And I think it was in nineteen eighty nine I was approached by Hamson hike eight which did indeed become I constituency anything I could have done that was legal the got Margaret Thatcher. And her government out of office. I was to have a go out. I didn't expect to be selected. I don't think I really expected to win. But we did win that seat. We didn't win the majority. Put into government until Ninety-seven. But yet, that's why what made you this woman. This woman who said what had the Suffragettes ever done for her that questioned. Whether there was such a thing as Scientology that had destroyed local government in many ways, which before her power seat. If that's what it was. You know was responsible for delivering services to people in local environments every school in what became my constituency spent the teachers parents not infrequently the pupils spent spare time trying to raise money to buy things like paper pencils? And now it sounds ridiculous. But that was the case books you go into school library. I mean, they were these books that were falling apart or they were being held together. It was by bit of wallpaper. The teacher dropped it in and. Stuck down with zella tape. The Jess was being attempted to be restructured, the national health servants, absolutely. As a woman who feels strongly about women's equality. An I assume you consider yourself a feminist was disappointing to you. They're finally a woman becomes prime minister. And she's she's so conservative and stands for so many things that you are against well, I mean, the overwhelming disappointment actually was that my party didn't win. I mean, general the main even I mean at that time, but it was just that she seemed to me to be so out of touch with with what were the realities of life of the majority of people in my country. And yes, of course, it was a disappointment that the first woman elected as prime minister was her. But I think rob the more at the time. It was that she was a conservative. It was enemy of the years. When Seoul what with a me disastrous policies re kings stem 'age. My guest is Glenda Jackson. She starring on Broadway in a new production of King Lear in the role of Lear after a break will hear how she was jeered and parliament for her comments after prime minister, Margaret Thatcher died, I'm Terry gross. And this is fresh air. We'd like to take a moment to thank and share a message from our sponsor nature's way offering quality herbal supplements since nineteen sixty nine they believe that nature knows best which is why it has always been their mission to seek out. The best herbs the earth has to give nature's way is committed to going to any continent or country to find where herbs grow best.

Queen Elizabeth prime minister King Lear Glenda jackson parliament Hoed Margaret Thatcher HAMAs Mary Queen Seoul Iraq George George W Bush murder Tony Blair Terry gross Hamson Jess President
"king lear" Discussed on Believed

Believed

08:19 min | 2 years ago

"king lear" Discussed on Believed

"Anyone. There was a scene from Elizabeth are with my guest. Glenda jackson. So we've heard you as King Lear. We've heard you as Queen Elizabeth having played. You know, fictional king and portrayed an actual Queen. Did it make you think of gender differences between kings and queens, oh of remote? So because setting the as far as Elizabeth was consent. And I mean, that's face it. She'd had the most tumultuous upbringing heaven. She I mean, HAMAs head was chopped off when she Elizabeth. I think was three she had all these various stepmother's ofter couple of whom also went the wave over flesh. The hands of her father has system who took of the throne with notes particularly in favor of and there was always this pressure upon one she did become Queen to marry to ensure that had line continued. And one of her extraordinary strengths. It seems to me having read the histories, and one thing another was that had great strength was that she didn't make. A fast decision, which is in marked contrast to what lead us she would vacillate. She would put things out. She would delay stuff. And then if something happened like, for example, the trial of Mary Queen of Scots and Harris Q, she would blame everybody around having done something that she claims she didn't want to happen. Now, she wasn't lying when she said she didn't want to happen. She didn't want it to happen. And yet there must have been part of the new that they tapped to happen. But of course, it was taking away the divine right of kings. Even though that time the ruling was a Queen. So you've played kings. And queens you've served in parliament you were elected to parliament in nineteen Ninety-two. You've laid powerful people and you've had political power not king low. Really? No, no, no, no backbenches. I I cannot stress strongly enough for me one of. The most humbling experience is was being a member of parliament. I mean, I give you I mean, obviously, I think it's amazing that somebody puts an x next to your name. It's not just you of ghost. I mean, they obviously support your party, and hopefully that party's manifesto, but or members of parliament Hoed will we cold advice surgeries, and you hold them in the constituency and any constituent can come in. And they would and in some instances, they put no in the really serious ones. They sort of lay that life out on the table in front of you. You don't know them. They don't really know you and not infrequently their lives tragic or disastrous through no fault of their own and they come to their member of parliament. Because then member of parliament is that port of last resort. You can get response to let people will ring you on the phone in my. My experience. I didn't always get the result that might constituent wanted. But without exception. Whether I did or whether I didn't they always said, thank you. And that is very very humbling, and it is a great privilege to be elected to be a member of parliament. And that kind of responsibility is something that really makes you realize who you are. And you're pretty damn small. Yes. Okay. I can see what you're saying you're helping people with constituent services and things like that. But you also stood up against the Iraq war when Tony Blair joined with President, George George W Bush. So like you use up to power in a way that's different from, you know, being an actor. I mean, sure you might want to stand stand up and object to direction that you're getting. But it's different than standing up to a prime minister who wants to. Take your country to war will as I've had occasion to say. It was the fist time in my experience of being a member of parliament have I had voted against my party's policy, and I presume raw the light murder. Once you do it for the first. Why did you want to serve in parliament anything? I could have done. I mean, I was member. A who was voted labour? I been all by the party to do various things for them raise money. I wanted the worst party political broadcast ever things of that nature, and I'd been approached by various constituency parties to consider standing as a prospective parliamentary candidates and in ninety two the election was looming. And I think it was in nineteen eighty nine I was approached by Hamson hike eight which did indeed become I constituency anything I could have done that was legal the got Margaret Thatcher. And her government out of office. I was to have a go out. I didn't expect to be selected. I don't think I really expected to win. But we did win that seat. We didn't win the majority. Put into government until Ninety-seven. But yet, that's why what made you this woman. This woman who said what had the Suffragettes ever done for her that questioned. Whether there was such a thing as Scientology that had destroyed local government in many ways, which before her power seat. If that's what it was. You know was responsible for delivering services to people in local environments every school in what became my constituency spent the teachers parents not infrequently the pupils spent spare time trying to raise money to buy things like paper pencils? And now it sounds ridiculous. But that was the case books you go into school library. I mean, they were these books that were falling apart or they were being held together. It was by bit of wallpaper. The teacher dropped it in and. Stuck down with zella tape. The Jess was being attempted to be restructured, the national health servants, absolutely. As a woman who feels strongly about women's equality. An I assume you consider yourself a feminist was disappointing to you. They're finally a woman becomes prime minister. And she's she's so conservative and stands for so many things that you are against well, I mean, the overwhelming disappointment actually was that my party didn't win. I mean, general the main even I mean at that time, but it was just that she seemed to me to be so out of touch with with what were the realities of life of the majority of people in my country. And yes, of course, it was a disappointment that the first woman elected as prime minister was her. But I think rob the more at the time. It was that she was a conservative. It was enemy of the years. When Seoul what with a me disastrous policies re kings stem 'age. My guest is Glenda Jackson. She starring on Broadway in a new production of King Lear in the role of Lear after a break will hear how she was jeered and parliament for her comments after prime minister, Margaret Thatcher died, I'm Terry gross. And this is fresh air. We'd like to take a moment to thank and share a message from our sponsor nature's way offering quality herbal supplements since nineteen sixty nine they believe that nature knows best which is why it has always been their mission to seek out. The best herbs the earth has to give nature's way is committed to going to any continent or country to find where herbs grow best.

Queen Elizabeth prime minister King Lear Glenda jackson parliament Hoed Margaret Thatcher HAMAs Mary Queen Seoul Iraq George George W Bush murder Tony Blair Terry gross Hamson Jess President
"king lear" Discussed on Rough Translation

Rough Translation

13:10 min | 2 years ago

"king lear" Discussed on Rough Translation

"From WHYY in Philadelphia interior gross with fresh air today. Glenda Jackson, she's on Broadway in a new production of King Lear, starring as Lear. She finds it unremarkable that she's playing the role of a man as we get older. Those absolute barriers that define Genda begin to crack. Jackson took a twenty three year break from acting while she served as a member of parliament in the labor party. Sometimes she was controversial when prime minister Margaret Thatcher died Jackson was jeered by conservatives. As she spoke in parliament about the values. She thought defined Thatcherism greed, selfishness, no cat the week shop elbows shop needs. They the way. Jackson has won two Oscars. Two Emmys and won a Tony last year. My guest. Glenda Jackson is starring on Broadway in a new production of King Lear when her Shakespeare's greatest tragedies Jackson plays Lear giving her the opportunity to take on one of the most challenging and prestigious roles in theatre history. But it's a role that for obvious reasons. Always goes to a man near times theater critic Ben Brantley wrote, she is delivering a powerful. And deeply perceptive performance as the most royally demented of Shakespeare's monarchs unquote, King Lear opened on Broadway this month, but Jackson had already played Lear in a London production that opened in twenty sixteen at the old Vic last year. She wanted Tony for her performance in the Edward all be play. Three tall women. It's been an incredible return to acting after serving twenty three years as a member of parliament. She was elected in nineteen Ninety-two and stepped down in twenty fifteen her career before that and. -cluded Oscar winning performances in the nineteen sixty nine movie women in love and the nineteen Seventy-three romantic comedy a touch of class. She won two Emmys playing Queen Elizabeth the first in the nineteen seventy-one BBC series, Elizabeth r which was shown in the US as part of masterpiece theatre, let's start with a clip from the new Broadway. Production of King Lear Lear has decided that he's old and it's time to unburden himself of his responsibilities as king and divided his kingdom among his three daughters. No, we have divided in three hour kingdom and desire. I intend to shake all cares and business from our converting them on youngest rates while we I'm bed. Who was on deck? Glenda jackson. Welcome to fresh air. Thank you. The first thing people always seem to want to know is why as a woman playing King Lear, and what's it like to be a woman playing Lear? So you I played him in two thousand sixteen at the old Vic in London. Why did you want to play Lear who would refuse the opportunity to work in the play of that stature? I mean is such an extraordinary play like, oh, let Shakespeare essentially he owned the asks three questions who are we what are we wildly and this particular blades, just astonishing human nature is immutable. And so in the sense, it is the most contemporary play around the minute. We in England had been engaged in the kind of gender bend wall. Really? And the marvelous company that was created and succeeded in winning. Those battles. They did all of Shakespeare's histories with over women costs. And so in the sense that battle was over. And what was really into one of the really interesting things for me playing. It was that nobody ever mentioned the fact that I was woman playing ma'am having seen the play. And also the other interesting thing I found in doing it. When I was a member of parliament part of my duties was to visit out people's homes day centers things of that nature, and as we get older. Those absolute barriers that define Genda begin to crack they begin to get a little bit foggy and break up. And if you think about it, I mean when we're born we teach babies don't we girls as we get older we begin to explore. I think rob the more the alternatives to are defined gender. And that certainly for Leary's quite useful. I want to. Elaborate a little bit on how you see gender boundaries blurring or falling away with age and to apply to your own life as well. If you find it applicable will, I think I'm a bit of a cheat. Because when things tough and kind of direct way in my real life. I don't have any qualms about playing the old car. Do you know what I mean? I mean setting as far as underground is concerned young people do get up and and of me as seat the first time it happened. I felt absolutely mortified. I now I'm beginning to get the stage where expected in the mortified if it doesn't happen but nine times out of ten thousand, but indirect reference to the play the things that he kicks out being, you know, he's a guy no one during his entire life. And these eighty is in this play has ever said no to him. And suddenly, someone does say note him. And it all begins to crack for him not in that immediate moment. But that's the story of the play. And so those aspects of him which were overtly masculine because that was the era in which he lived the environment in which he lived begin to move from absolute, I'm rights and everybody else's wrong. That's a simplistic way of putting it don't actually evaluate whether he was always, right. And he begins doubted, and that's very interesting. Are there lines from Lear that have the most meaning to you either? Personally, or that you find most powerful or dramatic to say as an actor. I tried to avoid that I try to observe the world through the characters is but people who see the play do point out lines that a particularly meaningful to them. I was rather regret that they do that. Because then it gets kinda stuck in my head. And I have to find another way of finding first time. If you see what I mean, I think I do that. You don't want to sound like a famous line. You want it to sound like like, it's ease of it. It's you know, it's direct thought. I mean, it's it arises out of the scene that Joe trying to create with the other actors on on the stage. Yeah. But I mean, you know in one's own time. There are lines that sort of reverberation echo. Yeah. Psychiatrists have tried to diagnose Lear like like is this dementia related to age is at some other kind of like cognitive disorder is at manic, depression, you can read all kinds of things at psychiatrists have said. I know you try to be inside the character not outside the character. Nevertheless, do you think what he's experiencing is the onset of age related dementia. I would think it was somewhat unlikely given the time in which it was written. I have you know, I mean, gosh Shakespeare is in my view, the most contemporary writer there is, but I think. At the time. The play was written people living to the age of eighty would have been a fairly rare occurrence, but nonetheless, it is undoubtedly the case that as I've said I've seen it as we get older those kind of gender barriers begin to crack. But also, people must've experienced walked we are experiencing now as we all living too much greater age of the mixture of what is physical and mental decay. And it is in fact, I think a big backhoe most western democracies? How are we going to cope with this the cassette? And if I look at my own country, we now have a much larger nonworking by virtue of age in retirement population than a working population. How we can look after elderly if we are all gonna go down. That road. I know we're not going to go down that road. And they will be I have no doubt advances in bed decode science, but you know, it is something that I think was still tending to think it'll be alright ilmenite and deigned. So the there's the language, of course, is as written but in the production that you're in. Now, you've spent part of the play wearing a tuxedo as do other male characters. The the the costumes are pretty contemporary the furniture is kind of contemporary. So you have this mix of the original hundreds of years old text, and you know, contemporary updating that we physically see there's also music by Philip glass, who is you know, a a very twentieth and twenty first century composer. How do you feel about that coming together of you know, the old tax with aspects? Or you say the otx forgive me in drafting you, but there was a celebration of you years ago. Remember what it was either Shakespeare tho- shakes his death. I contra member. A my grandson school that there from the age of three and till eleven, but I think they about seven when they did this the school celebration of Shakespeare in that way, the teachers went round with their mobile phones, you know, with the cameras on and each class had to had give were given specific Leah line from Shakespeare to say into the camera, and this was compiled into a film, which was delightful, those children had absolutely no difficulty saying any of those lines because the majority of the apartment Postle everyday language now, I mean, just think of the stuff that he wrote and how we use it. I mean within the play I'm transferring it around forget and forgive her prices fallen I mean. That guy was just incredible. So we've been talking about you playing King Lear. Let's hear you as Queen. Elizabeth I in an extra EMMY award winning performance in the BBC series, Elizabeth r which came to the US as part of masterpiece theater. So in this scene, you're the new Queen. You're twenty five years old and unmarried and your council is trying to pressure you to marry quickly. A member of your council challenges you to accept a suitor in front of a Hocquart. And by the end of the scene. Everyone around you is kneeling, and here's my guest. Glenda Jackson with actor as midnight. The Archduke Charles will be most happy to come to England your majesty, and I shall be most happy to see him. But if he comes he will come here as your future husband last to that anything else would come in Qabail, I have often to the imperial ambassador. The imperial ambassador doesn't tell your majesty as well as. I do. But he knows how to listen. The two ambassador magistate listens to what he's meant. And not only to what is said. Then I will say again and meet it the Archduke Charles may come to England as our guest guest and as the husband to build choice. I have not said that to have invited yachts two chows to your call. I have said he is welcome. A very welcome your majesty. I hope welcome as any other guest would be. I'm glad to hear it. I ride to king Philip and tell him that you have invited the Archduke Charles to England. And that he comes here as future husband, if he comes on those terms he had best not come at all. Your highness. He said he was to come here. I have never invited him. I have never said I would marry him. I have never said I would marry anyone.

King Lear Glenda Jackson Shakespeare King Lear Lear Archduke Charles England London Philip glass US Elizabeth r Ben Brantley WHYY Margaret Thatcher prime minister Philadelphia Tony BBC Oscar Leary
"king lear" Discussed on Believed

Believed

13:10 min | 2 years ago

"king lear" Discussed on Believed

"From WHYY in Philadelphia interior gross with fresh air today. Glenda Jackson, she's on Broadway in a new production of King Lear, starring as Lear. She finds it unremarkable that she's playing the role of a man as we get older. Those absolute barriers that define Genda begin to crack. Jackson took a twenty three year break from acting while she served as a member of parliament in the labor party. Sometimes she was controversial when prime minister Margaret Thatcher died Jackson was jeered by conservatives. As she spoke in parliament about the values. She thought defined Thatcherism greed, selfishness, no cat the week shop elbows shop needs. They the way. Jackson has won two Oscars. Two Emmys and won a Tony last year. My guest. Glenda Jackson is starring on Broadway in a new production of King Lear when her Shakespeare's greatest tragedies Jackson plays Lear giving her the opportunity to take on one of the most challenging and prestigious roles in theatre history. But it's a role that for obvious reasons. Always goes to a man near times theater critic Ben Brantley wrote, she is delivering a powerful. And deeply perceptive performance as the most royally demented of Shakespeare's monarchs unquote, King Lear opened on Broadway this month, but Jackson had already played Lear in a London production that opened in twenty sixteen at the old Vic last year. She wanted Tony for her performance in the Edward all be play. Three tall women. It's been an incredible return to acting after serving twenty three years as a member of parliament. She was elected in nineteen Ninety-two and stepped down in twenty fifteen her career before that and. -cluded Oscar winning performances in the nineteen sixty nine movie women in love and the nineteen Seventy-three romantic comedy a touch of class. She won two Emmys playing Queen Elizabeth the first in the nineteen seventy-one BBC series, Elizabeth r which was shown in the US as part of masterpiece theatre, let's start with a clip from the new Broadway. Production of King Lear Lear has decided that he's old and it's time to unburden himself of his responsibilities as king and divided his kingdom among his three daughters. No, we have divided in three hour kingdom and desire. I intend to shake all cares and business from our converting them on youngest rates while we I'm bed. Who was on deck? Glenda jackson. Welcome to fresh air. Thank you. The first thing people always seem to want to know is why as a woman playing King Lear, and what's it like to be a woman playing Lear? So you I played him in two thousand sixteen at the old Vic in London. Why did you want to play Lear who would refuse the opportunity to work in the play of that stature? I mean is such an extraordinary play like, oh, let Shakespeare essentially he owned the asks three questions who are we what are we wildly and this particular blades, just astonishing human nature is immutable. And so in the sense, it is the most contemporary play around the minute. We in England had been engaged in the kind of gender bend wall. Really? And the marvelous company that was created and succeeded in winning. Those battles. They did all of Shakespeare's histories with over women costs. And so in the sense that battle was over. And what was really into one of the really interesting things for me playing. It was that nobody ever mentioned the fact that I was woman playing ma'am having seen the play. And also the other interesting thing I found in doing it. When I was a member of parliament part of my duties was to visit out people's homes day centers things of that nature, and as we get older. Those absolute barriers that define Genda begin to crack they begin to get a little bit foggy and break up. And if you think about it, I mean when we're born we teach babies don't we girls as we get older we begin to explore. I think rob the more the alternatives to are defined gender. And that certainly for Leary's quite useful. I want to. Elaborate a little bit on how you see gender boundaries blurring or falling away with age and to apply to your own life as well. If you find it applicable will, I think I'm a bit of a cheat. Because when things tough and kind of direct way in my real life. I don't have any qualms about playing the old car. Do you know what I mean? I mean setting as far as underground is concerned young people do get up and and of me as seat the first time it happened. I felt absolutely mortified. I now I'm beginning to get the stage where expected in the mortified if it doesn't happen but nine times out of ten thousand, but indirect reference to the play the things that he kicks out being, you know, he's a guy no one during his entire life. And these eighty is in this play has ever said no to him. And suddenly, someone does say note him. And it all begins to crack for him not in that immediate moment. But that's the story of the play. And so those aspects of him which were overtly masculine because that was the era in which he lived the environment in which he lived begin to move from absolute, I'm rights and everybody else's wrong. That's a simplistic way of putting it don't actually evaluate whether he was always, right. And he begins doubted, and that's very interesting. Are there lines from Lear that have the most meaning to you either? Personally, or that you find most powerful or dramatic to say as an actor. I tried to avoid that I try to observe the world through the characters is but people who see the play do point out lines that a particularly meaningful to them. I was rather regret that they do that. Because then it gets kinda stuck in my head. And I have to find another way of finding first time. If you see what I mean, I think I do that. You don't want to sound like a famous line. You want it to sound like like, it's ease of it. It's you know, it's direct thought. I mean, it's it arises out of the scene that Joe trying to create with the other actors on on the stage. Yeah. But I mean, you know in one's own time. There are lines that sort of reverberation echo. Yeah. Psychiatrists have tried to diagnose Lear like like is this dementia related to age is at some other kind of like cognitive disorder is at manic, depression, you can read all kinds of things at psychiatrists have said. I know you try to be inside the character not outside the character. Nevertheless, do you think what he's experiencing is the onset of age related dementia. I would think it was somewhat unlikely given the time in which it was written. I have you know, I mean, gosh Shakespeare is in my view, the most contemporary writer there is, but I think. At the time. The play was written people living to the age of eighty would have been a fairly rare occurrence, but nonetheless, it is undoubtedly the case that as I've said I've seen it as we get older those kind of gender barriers begin to crack. But also, people must've experienced walked we are experiencing now as we all living too much greater age of the mixture of what is physical and mental decay. And it is in fact, I think a big backhoe most western democracies? How are we going to cope with this the cassette? And if I look at my own country, we now have a much larger nonworking by virtue of age in retirement population than a working population. How we can look after elderly if we are all gonna go down. That road. I know we're not going to go down that road. And they will be I have no doubt advances in bed decode science, but you know, it is something that I think was still tending to think it'll be alright ilmenite and deigned. So the there's the language, of course, is as written but in the production that you're in. Now, you've spent part of the play wearing a tuxedo as do other male characters. The the the costumes are pretty contemporary the furniture is kind of contemporary. So you have this mix of the original hundreds of years old text, and you know, contemporary updating that we physically see there's also music by Philip glass, who is you know, a a very twentieth and twenty first century composer. How do you feel about that coming together of you know, the old tax with aspects? Or you say the otx forgive me in drafting you, but there was a celebration of you years ago. Remember what it was either Shakespeare tho- shakes his death. I contra member. A my grandson school that there from the age of three and till eleven, but I think they about seven when they did this the school celebration of Shakespeare in that way, the teachers went round with their mobile phones, you know, with the cameras on and each class had to had give were given specific Leah line from Shakespeare to say into the camera, and this was compiled into a film, which was delightful, those children had absolutely no difficulty saying any of those lines because the majority of the apartment Postle everyday language now, I mean, just think of the stuff that he wrote and how we use it. I mean within the play I'm transferring it around forget and forgive her prices fallen I mean. That guy was just incredible. So we've been talking about you playing King Lear. Let's hear you as Queen. Elizabeth I in an extra EMMY award winning performance in the BBC series, Elizabeth r which came to the US as part of masterpiece theater. So in this scene, you're the new Queen. You're twenty five years old and unmarried and your council is trying to pressure you to marry quickly. A member of your council challenges you to accept a suitor in front of a Hocquart. And by the end of the scene. Everyone around you is kneeling, and here's my guest. Glenda Jackson with actor as midnight. The Archduke Charles will be most happy to come to England your majesty, and I shall be most happy to see him. But if he comes he will come here as your future husband last to that anything else would come in Qabail, I have often to the imperial ambassador. The imperial ambassador doesn't tell your majesty as well as. I do. But he knows how to listen. The two ambassador magistate listens to what he's meant. And not only to what is said. Then I will say again and meet it the Archduke Charles may come to England as our guest guest and as the husband to build choice. I have not said that to have invited yachts two chows to your call. I have said he is welcome. A very welcome your majesty. I hope welcome as any other guest would be. I'm glad to hear it. I ride to king Philip and tell him that you have invited the Archduke Charles to England. And that he comes here as future husband, if he comes on those terms he had best not come at all. Your highness. He said he was to come here. I have never invited him. I have never said I would marry him. I have never said I would marry anyone.

King Lear Glenda Jackson Shakespeare King Lear Lear Archduke Charles England London Philip glass US Elizabeth r Ben Brantley WHYY Margaret Thatcher prime minister Philadelphia Tony BBC Oscar Leary
"king lear" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"king lear" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Was a scene from Elizabeth are with my guest. Glenda jackson. So we've heard you as King Lear. We've heard you as Queen Elizabeth having played. You know, fictional king and portrayed an actual Queen. Did it make you think of gender differences between kings and queens. Oh, very much. So because setting as far as Elizabeth was concerned. I mean, that's facing she'd had the most tumultuous upbringing hadn't she I mean of head was chopped off when she Lisbeth I think was three she had all these various stepmother's ofter couple of whom also went the wave over flesh, the hands of her father has sister who took of the throne was known, particularly in favor of and there was always this pressure upon her one she did become Queen to marry to ensure that line continued and one of her extraordinary strengths. It seems to me having read the histories, and one thing another was this great strength was that. She didn't make a fuss decision, which is in marked contrast. What leads she would vacillate? She would put things out. She would do. Delay stuff. And then if something happened like, for example, the trial of Mary Queen of Scots inherits accusing she would blame everybody around having done something that she claimed she didn't want to happen. Now, she wasn't lying when she said she didn't want to happen. Gee, didn't want it to happen. And yet there must have been part of the new that they'd have to happen. But of course, it was taking away the divine right of kings. Even though at that time. The ruling was a Queen. We need to take a short break here. And then we'll talk some more. If you're just joining us. My guest is Glenda Jackson. She's now starring on Broadway as King Lear in King Lear. We'll be right back. This is fresh air..

Queen Elizabeth Mary Queen King Lear Glenda jackson Lisbeth Gee Broadway Scots
Writer, Football and Ralph Rousseau discussed on 24 Hour News

24 Hour News

02:26 min | 3 years ago

Writer, Football and Ralph Rousseau discussed on 24 Hour News

"Public safety foundation by donating point one three percent every purchase tv show roseanne went down in flames after its star posted a racist tweet but ap entertainment editor oscar wells gabriel reports there's a chance that star could rise from the ashes with an emmy nomination roseanne barr show was cut from the abc schedule after her racist tweet got her fired the show was not caught from the list of shows up for consideration for emmy nominations and there's a chance that the show and its cast including bar herself could end up being nominated though it is a tv show it could make for some interesting political theater bar has complained that us a trump supporter in real life she has been unfairly treated for comparing a former obama administration official to an ape and some of her online followers agree i'm oscar wells gabriel oscar winning actor geoffrey rush has pulled out of a shakespeare stage production in australia the australian actors suing the daily telegraph newspaper for defamation of her articles published in december that accused him of inappropriate behavior toward an actress during the sydney theater company's production of king lear in two thousand fifteen the artistic director of the melbourne theatre company says he received a statement from the actor withdrawing from the role of malvolio in a seven week season of twelfth night which began november twelfth rush who's denied the allegations says he must withdraw from the upcoming project due to his current circumstances and medical advice sarah palin says she was duped by british comedian sasha baron cohen during an interview ap correspondent juliet walker says it was for his upcoming showtime series in a facebook post the former republican vice presidential candidate roach she and one of her daughter's traveled across the country for what sarah palin thought was a legitimate interview but she says sasha baron cohen had heavily disguised himself as a disabled us veteran in a wheelchair palin says she sat through what she called a long interview full of hollywood 'isms disrespect and sarcasm before she walked out she's challenging the comedian end showtime to donate proceeds from the show to a veteran's charity i'm julie walker hi i'm ralph rousseau ap college football writer and host of the ap.

Writer Football Ralph Rousseau Julie Walker Facebook AP Melbourne Theatre Company Australia Obama Administration Roseanne Barr Emmy Editor Palin Sarah Palin Juliet Walker Sasha Baron Cohen Director King Lear Sydney Theater Company Geoffrey Rush