35 Burst results for "Kimberly Adams"

"kimberly adams" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

01:54 min | Last month

"kimberly adams" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

"And for your moment of economic context, another bit of data from CNBC, this time something that's getting cheaper. Sort of. Smartphones. Now, you're probably saying, wait, smartphones are getting more expensive. But the bureau of labor statistics, when calculating the CPI, likes to compare apples to apples. So when smartphones get better, but the price stays the same, the BLS basically treats it as going down in price, which maybe makes you feel a bit better when you're shelling out hundreds of dollars for a new phone, I guess. Our daily production team includes anais Amin Andy Corbin, Richard Cunningham, Nicolas giang, Maria hollenhorst, Sarah leeson, Sean mchenry and daisy palacios. I'm Kimberly Adams, we'll see you

bureau of labor statistics CNBC BLS anais Amin Andy Corbin Richard Cunningham Nicolas giang Maria hollenhorst Sarah leeson Sean mchenry daisy palacios Kimberly Adams
"kimberly adams" Discussed on Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

01:31 min | 2 months ago

"kimberly adams" Discussed on Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

"And now for some related links, malorie mentioned the potential splintering of the Internet. Part of that is due to the global digital divide between developed countries and countries that don't have comparable Internet infrastructures. We'll link to a recent article from brookings, exploring how that digital divide worsened during the COVID pandemic. But that splintering also has to do with worries over a global bifurcation of the Internet between states who have a more open Internet approach and those who prefer stricter, state control. We'll link to a piece from the center for strategic and international studies, explaining the context for those fears and why that debate played such a significant role in deciding who would lead the ITU. I'm Kimberly Adams, and that's marketplace tech. This is 8 p.m.. Earning unlimited 2% cash back is in your future, with the spark cash plus card from Capital One. With no preset spending limit, the spark cash plus card from Capital One adapts to meet your business needs and works for you. Imagine what the spark cash plus card from Capital One could do for your business. Find out more at Capital One dot com slash spark, cash plus. That's Capital One dot com slash spark, cash plus. Capital One. What's in your wallet? Terms and conditions apply.

Kimberly Adams center for strategic and inter ITU
"kimberly adams" Discussed on Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

01:56 min | 2 months ago

"kimberly adams" Discussed on Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

"Our research indicates really that the memes that come out of the far left, the progressive left, don't find their way up the chain in the same way to democratic politicians, and there's all sorts of reasons why. I mean, the right and the left media ecosystems are very, very different. The way that they interact with their constituents is very different. And the way their constituents react interact with them. I mean, meme users on the far right in particular are a lot more willing to come together around an idea that they think will be powerful whether they fully are on board with it or not. In a way that we do not observe on the left. A lot of far right extremist groups or individuals have been kicked out of these mainstream online spaces and content moderation is seemingly getting tighter. So how effective are meme wars in this more tightly controlled and monitored environment now? Content moderation has had an impact. However, the media ecosystem is so complex and consists of things like Twitter and the radio and the TV, but also places on the Internet that are forums that are not moderated. But having said that, it's still important to attempt to mitigate these things because a meme war is only successful if the people who have an agenda have a platform to reach a larger audience so that they can, as we put it draft those people into the memoirs sort of unwittingly by telling them something that outrages them that makes them so angry that they feel they must act on it. Emily Dreyfus, one of the authors of meme wars. I'm Kimberly Adams, and that's marketplace tech. This is 8 p.m.

Twitter Emily Dreyfus Kimberly Adams
"kimberly adams" Discussed on Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

05:59 min | 2 months ago

"kimberly adams" Discussed on Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

"When a power grid gets strained, how does it cool down? From American public media, this is marketplace tech. I'm Kimberly Adams. Last week, Californians were hit with a scorching heat wave. In some parts of the Golden State, temperatures soared as high as a 117°, and as households blasted their ACs in the afternoons to keep cool, it placed extreme stress on the state's power grid. So for the first time, Californians received an emergency text alert, asking citizens to conserve electricity to avoid blackouts, and it worked.

Kimberly Adams
"kimberly adams" Discussed on Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

01:40 min | 5 months ago

"kimberly adams" Discussed on Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

"That's less than a year after Fannie Mae rolled out a similar proposal. Those two government sponsored enterprises as they're called, guarantee most of the mortgages in the U.S.. Housing wire has an article on it, including the potential for Freddie Mac two, pluck, proof of payments, from apps like Zelle, Venmo, and PayPal. In case you pay your landlord on your phone rather than by check. Besides rent being added, most medical debt is being dropped from credit histories, CNBC reports the three credit bureaus are now allowing paid off medical debt to be removed. Those debts used to represent 58% of the debts in collections, and even lingered on credit reports for up to 7 years. With the change, some consumers could see their scores rise earlier than expected. And of course, our website also has the rest of our stories looking at the algorithms behind credit scores and how they can shape your financial life. I'm Kimberly Adams, and that's marketplace tech. This is 8 p.m.. Welcome to history is us. I'm doctor Eddie S glaude junior. Join me as we journey through history to face the ugly truths at the heart of the American story. Throughout this series, we explore who we are as a nation. Listen to history as us, our creation and presentation of shining city audio, a C 13 originals, and John meech and studio, available now for free, wherever you listen to your podcasts.

Zelle Venmo Fannie Mae Freddie Mac Kimberly Adams CNBC PayPal Eddie S glaude U.S. John meech
"kimberly adams" Discussed on Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

02:04 min | 7 months ago

"kimberly adams" Discussed on Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

"And now for some related links, one of the reasons the way Twitter deals with misinformation is such a big deal is because, as Emily pointed out to me, Twitter plays a big role in the spread of misinformation. In 2018, researchers at MIT tracked just how quickly false information spreads on the platform and found it moves much faster than real news by a pretty big margin. We'll link to a story from MIT explaining the study, which left the researchers quote somewhere between surprised and stunned. For more recent information on how misinformation spreads online, Emily references the shorenstein center's media manipulation case book will have a link to it on marketplace tech dot org. The online resource includes case studies, tracing the route viral, but fake, stories take online. It also includes a handy chart, explaining the various stages of medium manipulation. A big part of the process is using platforms like Twitter to influence journalists, activists, politicians, and industry leaders. You know, the kinds of people that probably spend way too much time on Twitter. I'm Kimberly Adams, and that's marketplace tech. This is APM. This episode is brought to you by data IQ. The only AI platform that connects data and doers through everyday AI. Every day, data IQ customers are turning complex data into tangible results. Fueling cases from the mundane to the moonshot because it's only data until you make it a business strategy or challenge an entire industry. Without you, it's just data. Visit data IQ dot com to learn more. That's da IKU dot com..

Twitter MIT Emily shorenstein center Kimberly Adams
"kimberly adams" Discussed on Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

04:39 min | 11 months ago

"kimberly adams" Discussed on Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

"From American public media, this is marketplace tech. I'm Kimberly Adams. The consumer electronics show just wrapped up in Las Vegas. This year, it was a hybrid conference due to the recent surge in COVID cases..

Kimberly Adams Las Vegas
"kimberly adams" Discussed on Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

02:30 min | 1 year ago

"kimberly adams" Discussed on Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

"And now for some related links, the full state of accessibility report from diamond lays out the exact methodology used to test the websites and apps, including checking whether someone could tab through a form to sign up for something rather than use a mouse, or if the page had meaningful alt text for images. We'll have a link to that report on our website, marketplace tech dot org. Joe also mentioned the web content accessibility guidelines. Those come from the World Wide Web consortium and set some digital standards for both websites and apps when it comes to accessibility. We'll have a link to those guidelines as well. Businesses can be sued if their websites aren't accessible, which is happening more and more in the U.S.. Fast company has a piece laying out 8 steps companies can take to improve their sites and apps, including regular testing for accessibility and providing multiple methods of user feedback, and the consequences for an inaccessible website can be severe, sometimes putting people's health at risk. Last week, the Department of Justice reached a settlement agreement with the grocery chain high V requiring it to make its COVID-19 vaccination portal, more accessible. According to DoJ, some people using screen readers or trying to use the tab key instead of a mouse were unable to book appointments on the site. This is the department's second settlement like this, right aid reached a similar settlement last month because its website also made it difficult if not impossible for people using assistive technology to sign up for vaccines. Under the settlements, both companies have to update their sites to meet those web content accessibility guidelines I mentioned earlier. Plus, regularly test for any problems and fix them right away. I'm Kimberly Adams, and that's marketplace tech. This is APM. We're looking for listeners who've never donated to marketplace before. Here's your chance to make your first donation go twice as far. For this week only, every new marketplace investor gets their gift matched dollar for dollar by the investors challenge fund. So take the next step, be a partner in our mission to make everyone smarter about the economy. Get your first donation doubled today at marketplace dot org slash give tech or click the link in the show notes..

DoJ Joe Kimberly Adams U.S.
"kimberly adams" Discussed on Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

02:16 min | 1 year ago

"kimberly adams" Discussed on Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

"And now for some related links, winterson focused a lot in her book on how AI and robots interact with us in our personal lives, but what about at work? A team at the university of Georgia is working with the U.S. Military on research looking at the best way to help robots and humans interact on teams, digging into questions like, how do you get humans to trust a robot when it comes to life and death decisions on the battlefield? We'll have a link to an article about this from psy tech daily on our website, marketplace tech org. And TechCrunch reports Facebook or now meta is working on building more sensitive robots, developing a new kind of artificial skin that will help robots of the future better replicate a sense of touch. Researchers hope that will make assistive robots more gentle in their physical responses, like not gripping someone's arm too tightly, or pressing too hard on a button. And in other Facebook news, the company says it's shutting down its facial recognition system and deleting more than a billion users data in the process. Privacy advocates have been complaining about this for years. Facebook is not, however, getting rid of the software that powered the system. I'm Kimberly Adams, and that's marketplace tech. This is APM. Hey, I'm Mariel Sierra, a senior reporter for marketplace. At marketplace, we often talk about how economic policies affect underrepresented groups. We tell stories that highlight the realities of people who are sometimes left out of the financial hierarchy. But there's a lot more work, media companies need to do to represent these communities. Marketplace is partnering with American public media group in a competition called the next challenge. The mission is to promote racial and gender equity in media. The competition will award $100,000 to groundbreaking startups that will reinvent the media landscape in the coming decade. Applications are due November 7th. To learn more, visit the next challenge dot com. Again, that's the next challenge dot com. Submit now to change the future of media..

winterson Facebook university of Georgia Kimberly Adams Mariel Sierra TechCrunch U.S. American public media group
"kimberly adams" Discussed on Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

04:26 min | 1 year ago

"kimberly adams" Discussed on Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

"Kimberly adams in for molly. Would.

"kimberly adams" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

05:38 min | 1 year ago

"kimberly adams" Discussed on KCRW

"3rd good to have you with us. We begin today with climate change a top priority in President Biden's administration. Ah, huge problem to tackle to be sure, but there is some low hanging fruit, some relatively easy fixes that do have bipartisan support. Case in point today, the Environmental Protection Agency released a proposed rule to phase down the use of HFCs hydrofluorocarbons. These are chemical refrigerants and products we use every day and they do a lot of damage to the climate. Marketplaces. Kimberly Adams gets us started. The EPA in line with the law, passed late last year, wants to reduce the production and importation of HFCS by about 85% before 2035 Dan Lashof is the U. S director of the World Resource is Institute HFCS, he says they're super pollutants used in refrigeration. Mostly that can have thousands of times the global warming impact of carbon dioxide and says Lashof, citing EPA is numbers. The net benefits of this rule are expected to be about $280 billion through 2050, and that's mostly from reducing global warming impacts. But some of those benefits are from improved efficiency of the new refrigerants and everyday things. David Doniger is with the natural resource is defense counsel HF Caesar and refrigerators air in the air conditioner of your car there inform installations that you might find in the wall. The House and Doniger says most consumers won't really notice the transition kind of like when we phased out CFC's chemicals that damage the ozone layer. We've gone through two generations of these refrigerant changes already, and you can't see the difference in the price of new air conditioners and the industry is on board knowing the plan, even if they'd like some tweaks allows them to plan Helen Walter Taryn Oni is with the Air conditioning, heating and refrigeration Institute. There's been an estimate of 39,000 jobs will be created with the face down of HFCs because all those systems will eventually need to be replaced. And someone has to manufacture the next generation refrigerants. I think that no matter which side of the coin, you look at it, it's kind of a win all around. And you know what? These days. Let's just take the win in Washington. I'm Kimberly Adams for marketplace. In the housing news. Mortgage delinquencies are way down as of last week, more than 91% of homeowners had made their April payment the largest share in any month during the pandemic so far That's the latest from mortgage data firm Black Knight. It's yet another sign of the improving economy and the impact of pandemic relief checks. But beneath the headline numbers are some stark disparities. Marketplaces. Amy Scott has more Back in November, Brooke Lauren and her husband paused their mortgage payments. She's a home school teacher and crypto currency trader and Colorado Springs. He'd been out of work for several months and then found a low paying job in HR. We're making late payments so rather than pay $50 a month Late fees every month. He just did it for barracks for three months. Then in March, just as therefore, Barents was about to expire. Their pandemic relief check arrived when her husband found a higher paying job that came in just at the right time. We're actually stood for doing pretty well because he's got two jobs and propels doing pretty well. Tooth Lauren Story is in some ways the story of the economy right now. Andy Waldon with Black Knight credits the combination of government stimulus, a stronger job market and a typical seasonal bump in people's pocketbooks from tax refunds and bonuses. Walden says two thirds of homeowners who were in for parents plans at some point over the past 12 months have now left them over 40% of those homeowners or re performing. Another 15% of paid off their mortgages go through selling their home or through refinancing their mortgage. That leaves more than two million mortgages still in for parents, and the improvement hasn't been equal. The Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia found that last month 11% of black homeowners were in for parents compared to just 4.5% of white homeowners. Leanne Adams is with Neighbor Works America, a nonprofit housing and community development group. She says black homeowners could be at higher risk of foreclosure when for parents protections expire. We know from the last crisis that black homeowners were really disproportionately impacted. And she says it took longer for them to recover. I may be Scott for marketplace. On Wall Street today. I'm not saying it's inflation. I'm on Lee, saying Rising prices are leading some companies to record profits. Good amount of green out there today. Details when we do the numbers News today that Verizon is selling Yahoo and AOL well to the private equity firm Apollo Global Management for $5 billion in cash and stocks. That's about four billion less than Verizon paid for those two companies. Not all.

Verizon Leanne Adams Brooke Lauren Andy Waldon Amy Scott David Doniger AOL Dan Lashof $50 Yahoo Kimberly Adams 11% Environmental Protection Agenc March Walden $5 billion Scott Lee Washington Lashof
New rules offer patient access to electronic health records

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

01:44 min | 1 year ago

New rules offer patient access to electronic health records

"A new federal rule takes effect today giving patients more access to their medical records for free many health records are already available electronically but it can be a hassle to get them. The new rule also changes. What kinds of information. Patients can request marketplace's. Kimberly adams has more. The rule makes it illegal for healthcare providers to engage in what's called information blocking with fines of up to a million dollars if they make it too hard for patients to get their records. Liz saw me as a senior strategist for the group open notes which advocates for transparency in medical records. She says if it weren't for the pandemic this concept of full transparency to everything on the record the notes the labs halogen boards would be the biggest story in healthcare. As of today patients should start being to access all of that information and share it with healthcare providers schools and workplaces even third party smartphone apps. Dr rachel stirrup is the health lead at the future of privacy forum and says once you get your records you the patient have control over where your health information goes then. It pretty much becomes a wild west because not all those apps or schools or even companies face the same privacy rules as traditional medical providers. Also right now. Many of those providers aren't ready to roll out all the changes. Dr jesse aaron failed is with the american medical association. There's a lot of confusion the legal requirements or complex and interfaces with Third parties data use agreements. Not the kind of stuff. They normally cover in med school

Kimberly Adams Dr Rachel Stirrup LIZ Dr Jesse Aaron American Medical Association Med School
Trump's new PAC raises over $30 million

Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

02:16 min | 1 year ago

Trump's new PAC raises over $30 million

"At the conservative. Political action conference in orlando over the weekend. Former president trump was clear. He will not start a new political party to make an end run around the grand old party. He drops strong hints. Though that he might like to run for president again there was interest. Also in rhonda. Santa's the governor of florida and the governor of south dakota kristi noem and trump is still very good at raising money. Marketplace's kimberly adams has that former. President trump never stopped raising money. I he pulled in cash from donors to fight his election loss and since then trump launched a leadership pac that raised over thirty million dollars in just a matter of months. Carl evers hellstrom monitors money in politics for open secrets dot org and he says politicians and groups who align themselves with trump are benefiting as well. The republican party is increasingly. Reliant on trump. actually raise money. so we've seen some. Corporate interests are not as interested in donating to them after the capital riot. Trump's supporters on the other hand still seem game to donate to the president and his allies. There were even rumors after the election. He might start a third political party and what he's done is actually a lot more interesting. Jennifer here. wig political sociologist at suny stony brook. He said okay. I have this kind of asset which is my a fundraising prowess and my donor or less than the ability to connect with people who maybe ordinarily wouldn't donate and so i'm going to use that and turn it into a formal organisation that the gop has to pay attention to and the republican party. Is we know that. President trump is still someone who was wildly popular and someone who was and is an effective fundraiser. Paris denard is a spokesperson for the republican national committee. We are optimistic. That he will continue to be the type of former president that engages in wants to help the rmc. A fundraise denied says trump has agreed to attend an r. n. c. donors event this spring in florida where republican leaders will be encouraging donors and the former president to support their efforts heading into the midterm elections in washington. I'm kimberly adams for marketplace

President Trump Donald Trump Kristi Noem Kimberly Adams Carl Evers Hellstrom Republican Party Rhonda Suny Stony Brook Orlando South Dakota Santa Florida Paris Denard Jennifer Republican National Committee Washington
Democrats’ relief bill would expand earned income tax credit

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

01:56 min | 1 year ago

Democrats’ relief bill would expand earned income tax credit

"Democrats big relief bill continues to make its slow but steady way through the house. It's going to pass friday. Maybe saturday there is a bunch of stuff in it. A proposed boost. The minimum wage. Told you about that yesterday. Also some tax policy changes geared to low income workers. Marketplace's kimberly adams has that one. This version of the relief. Bill would boost the earned income tax credit which reduces the tax bill or increases the refund for many low income workers mostly for those who live with kids. This bill would expand that to include more childless workers. Elaine mog as a principal research associate at the urban institute and a types of industries that people are in that would benefit the most from this policy. Change are those industries that have been most hard hit during the recent recession food service and nations. The credit typically has bipartisan support. Mog says some of those affected by the change could see their benefit. Triple from a max of about five hundred dollars to fifteen hundred sam. Washington is with the center on budget and policy priorities. The earned income tax credit expansion would benefit we estimate seventeen million people overall And doubt include the five point eight million child that's workers the changes would also include more older workers by removing the age of sixty five. The bill only seeks to change the rules for this year. Meaning the credit would show up on next year's returns. Eric york is an economist at the tax foundation. But oftentimes if something gets its foot in the door of the tax code. It doesn't go away. It gets extended it gets debated and eventually becomes more of a permanent policy. This round of covid relief legislation also includes an expansion of the child tax credit which some economists say could lift millions of children out of

Kimberly Adams Elaine Mog Urban Institute MOG Center On Budget And Policy Pr Bill Eric York SAM Washington Tax Foundation
"kimberly adams" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:24 min | 1 year ago

"kimberly adams" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"It is Thursday. Today, everybody the fourth of February. It is always to have you along. Couple of notes a couple of items as we get going here today, first of all, And it's kind of the absence of an item actually nothing new on talks about another virus relief plan for this economy. Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen went on. Good morning America this morning, said there what she has been saying everywhere for a while now gotta go big to stop it from being worse later. Worth a note on that vein that the benefits in the package that passed just before Christmas go away in March. Item number two and related. This is Thursday. So one hopes almost a year into this pandemic that all y'all know what that means. If somehow you haven't been paying attention, Thursdays we get first time claims for unemployment benefits. 779,000 people lost their jobs last week down from past couple of weeks. Yes. But still staggeringly high, which I feel like I have to say every week just to remind everybody how bad it actually is. And finally, in keeping with the policy of this program that we got to keep talking about this stuff, or we're going to stop talking about this stuff. The CEO of the pharmaceutical giant Merck Kenneth Fraser, is his name, he announced today He is going to be retiring Come June. Fraser is one of four count them four black CEOs at Fortune 500 companies. Which is to say that in June Gonna be three. We said yesterday on the program that we try real hard not to get too deep into the process Weeds of this economy That's never any fun but process can and often does lead to policy and so to this news Now that there is finally a power sharing agreement in the Senate of the United States, control of committees is changing hands, which means Democrats are now going to set the agenda forward gets talked about. And voted on. And that includes new bill using anti trust law overhaul. How the government regulates big companies. Marketplaces. Kimberly Adams has that one. The way it works now for the government to block a merger or acquisition or prosecuted company for being anti competitive. Regulators use something called the consumer welfare standard, says Christopher Casey, a partner at the law firm Duane Morris that generally focuses on Whether there will be an increase in prices or reduction output as a result of a combination or other action. That means the government has to prove it's bad for consumers, Casey says. That's a tough standard for regulators to meet. Especially now the economy has changed so dramatically in the past 10 years. You just look at the The dominance of the tech companies in American life. So this new legislation aims to make it easier to bring cases against big firms. Charlotte's Lehman is the competition policy director at the group public knowledge. So one of the things that this bill does is change those burdens of proof change those Presumptions so that We're hurrying more on the side of over enforcement rather than under enforcement. The bill would also provide more money to bring antitrust cases and bigger fines for companies that break the rules. Spencer Waller is a professor at Loyola University, Chicago School of Law. This is among the first time in decades that antitrust has become a political issue has been the subject of important legislation and hearings and reports. And there seems to be some bipartisan support to update antitrust rules not just in tech but also in highly consolidated industries like health care. Pharmaceuticals and defense in Washington. I'm Kimberly Adams for Marketplace Wall Street today on the way to the end of the first full week of February. Yeah, it's all good. I'll have the details went with you. The numbers touch real briefly on oil yesterday, a bump in prices that I'd missed higher on supply worries and hopes that Maybe soon ish. We're going to start driving and flying and going places again. But 2020.

Kenneth Fraser government Kimberly Adams Janet Yellen Christopher Casey CEO Senate America United States Charlotte Spencer Waller Washington Duane Morris Loyola University Lehman partner
"kimberly adams" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:41 min | 1 year ago

"kimberly adams" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I'm kind ridsdel it is Tuesday. Today, the second day of February. It is always to have you along everybody. We know what this economy is like right now, right, shaky in many parts uneven and who's recovering and who's not uncertain for both people and businesses. So the forecast we got yesterday from the Congressional Budget Office. It's guesses for this year for promising even without more federal relief. We're on track for the economy to be roughly backward was in the before times. By the middle of this year. Thank you. Vaccines. The labor market is going to take longer. But let's examine that baseline concept for a second here the idea of getting back to the pre penned Emmick economy. Because his marketplaces Kimberly Adams reports, even if the numbers do get back to where they used to be, the economy is probably going to look real different. Even though gross domestic product can kind of be a shorthand for how an economy is doing. GDP growth does not translate into equal growth off earnings and employment, Ari on Hegg of issues with the Institute for Women's Policy Research, she says the before times were kind of a perfect example of this. Unemployment was low but often significantly higher for some groups like black and Latino ex workers. Also, a lot of women worked in jobs where you even with four time year round Working. You could not treat yourself you still needed to have snap benefits, particularly if you had kids. Then came the pandemic where the economic fall out was far worse for women and people of color, particularly in the service sector. Emily next teaches labor economics at the USC Marshall School of Business and says all this will shape what the recovery looks like. If you come from a wealthier background, you bounced back a lot faster than if you come from a poor background, And so another concern we might have is that this pandemic is going to increase income inequality. The same logic applies for a small businesses. I think we need to define what is normal. Cherie's Conan and Johnson is the managing partner at the advisory firm next Street. How are we going? Tol make sure that the communities and small businesses that have been systemically left back pre pandemic are getting the systemic changes. I think that we need to make sure that they're successful, she says. For those communities returning to pre pandemic economic conditions might not be enough for an actual economic recovery. In Washington. I'm Kimberly Adams for Marketplace. A brief personnel note. Before we go on Jeff Bezos has kicked himself upstairs. Amazon announced this afternoon that its founder, is going to step down as CEO this summer to become executive chairman. So not totally giving up power and the jazz. He's going to be the new guy. He's been running a W s Amazon Web services. It's I'm the President, Cloud Computing division. Amazon shares didn't pick up a little bit after hours. Still, though, something like $3300 apiece update across the board for major indices will have the details when we do the numbers Come in. Senate Republicans and the White House continue their politicking about another.

Kimberly Adams Amazon Jeff Bezos Cherie Congressional Budget Office USC Marshall School of Busines Institute for Women's Policy R Washington Hegg Ari Senate Emily President White House managing partner executive chairman
"kimberly adams" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

03:32 min | 1 year ago

"kimberly adams" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Is like right now, right? Shaky and many parts uneven and who's recovering and who's not uncertain for both people and businesses. So the forecast we got yesterday from the Congressional Budget Office. It's guesses for this year. Promising even without more federal relief. We're on track for the economy to be roughly backward was in the before times by the middle of this year. Thank you. Vaccines. The labor market is going to take longer, but Let's examine that baseline concept for a second here the idea of getting back to the pre pandemic economy. Because his marketplaces Kimberly Adams reports. Even if the numbers do get back to where they used to be. The economy is probably gonna look real different. Even though gross domestic product can kind of be a shorthand for how an economy is doing. GDP growth does not translate into equal growth off earnings and employment. Sorry on Higa vicious with the Institute for Women's Policy research, she says. The before times or kind of a perfect example of this unemployment was low but often significantly higher for some groups like black and Latino ex workers. Also, a lot of women worked and jobs where you even with full time year round Working. You could not feed yourself. You still needed to have snap benefits, particularly if you had kids. Then came the pandemic where the economic fall out was far worse for women and people of color, particularly in the service sector. Emily next teaches labor economics at the USC Marshall School of Business and says all this will shape what the recovery looks like. If you come from a wealthier background, you bounced back a lot faster than if you come from a poor background, And so another concern we might have is that this pandemic is going to increase income inequality. The same logic applies for a small businesses. I think we need to define what is normal. Cherie's Conan and Johnson is the managing partner at the advisory firm next Street. How are we going? Tol make sure that the communities and small businesses that have been systemically left back pre pandemic are getting the systemic changes. I think that we need to make sure that they're successful. She says. For those communities returning to pre pandemic economic conditions might not be enough for an actual economic recovery in Washington. I'm Kimberly Adams for Marketplace. A brief personnel note. Before we go on. Jeff Bezos has kicked himself upstairs. Amazon announced this afternoon that its founder, is going to step down as CEO this summer to become executive chairman. So not totally giving up power and the jazz. He is going to be the new guy. He's been running a W s Amazon Web services. It's I'm the President, Cloud Computing Division. Amazon shares didn't pick up a little bit after hours. Still, though, something like $3300 apiece update across the board for major indices. We'll have the details when we do the numbers. Senate Republicans and the White House continue their politicking about.

Jeff Bezos Amazon Kimberly Adams Congressional Budget Office Cherie Higa vicious USC Marshall School of Busines Institute for Women's Policy Washington Cloud Computing Division Senate Emily President White House managing partner executive chairman CEO
"kimberly adams" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:42 min | 1 year ago

"kimberly adams" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I'm kind of riddle it is Tuesday. Today, the second day of February. It is always to have you along everybody. We know what this economy is like right now, right, shaky in many parts uneven and who's recovering and who's not uncertain for both people and businesses. So the forecast we got yesterday from the Congressional Budget Office. It's guesses for this year for promising even without more federal relief. We're on track for the economy to be roughly backward was in the before times. By the middle of this year. Thank you. Vaccines. The labor market is going to take longer. But let's examine that baseline concept for a second here the idea of getting back to the pre penned Emmick economy. Because his marketplaces Kimberly Adams reports, even if the numbers do get back to where they used to be, the economy is probably going to look real different. Even though gross domestic product can kind of be a shorthand for how an economy is doing. GDP growth does not translate into equal growth off earnings and employment Ari on Hegg a vicious with the Institute for Women's Policy Research, she says the before times were kind of a perfect example of this. Unemployment was low but often significantly higher for some groups like black and Latino ex workers. Also, a lot of women worked in jobs where you even with full time year round Working. You could not treat yourself you still needed to have snap benefits, particularly if you had kids. Then came the pandemic where the economic fall out was far worse for women and people of color, particularly in the service sector. Emily next teaches labor economics at the USC Marshall School of Business and says all this will shape what the recovery looks like. If you come from a wealthier background, you bounced back a lot faster than if you come from a poor background, And so another concern we might have is that this pandemic is going to increase income inequality. The same logic applies for a small businesses. I think we need to define what is normal. Cherie's codeine, and Johnson is the managing partner at the advisory firm next Street. How are we going? Tol make sure that the communities and small businesses that have been systemically left back pre pandemic are getting the systemic changes. I think that we need to make sure that they're successful, she says. For those communities returning to pre pandemic economic conditions might not be enough for an actual economic recovery in Washington. I'm Kimberly Adams for Marketplace. Brief personnel note. Before we go on. Jeff Bezos has kicked himself upstairs. Amazon announced this afternoon that its founder, is going to step down as CEO this summer to become executive chairman. So not totally giving up power and the jazz. He's going to be the new guy. He's been running a W s Amazon Web services. It's I'm the President, Cloud Computing division. Amazon shares didn't pick up a little bit after hours. Still, though, something like $3300 apiece update across the board for major indices will have the details when we do the numbers Senate Republicans and the White House continue their politicking about another round.

Kimberly Adams Jeff Bezos Amazon Cherie Congressional Budget Office USC Marshall School of Busines Institute for Women's Policy R Washington Hegg Ari Senate Emily President White House codeine managing partner
"kimberly adams" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:42 min | 1 year ago

"kimberly adams" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I'm Carl Riddle. It is Tuesday. Today, the second day of February. It is always to have you along, everybody. We know what this economy is like right now, right? Shaky and many parts uneven and who's recovering and who's not uncertain for both people and businesses. So the forecast we got yesterday from the Congressional Budget Office. It's guesses for this year. Promising even without more federal relief. We're on track for the economy to be roughly backward was in the before times by the middle of this year. Thank you. Vaccines. The labor market is going to take longer, but Let's examine that baseline concept for a second here the idea of getting back to the pre pandemic economy. Because his marketplaces Kimberly Adams reports. Even if the numbers do get back to where they used to be. The economy is probably gonna look real different. Even though gross domestic product can kind of be a shorthand for how an economy is doing. GDP growth does not translate into equal growth off earnings and employment. Sorry on Higa vicious with the Institute for Women's Policy research, she says. The before times were kind of a perfect example of this. Unemployment was low but often significantly higher for some groups like black and Latino ex workers, also and not of women worked and jobs where you even with full time year round Working. You could not feed yourself. You still needed to have snap benefits, particularly if you had kids. Then came the pandemic where the economic fall out was far worse for women and people of color, particularly in the service sector. Emily next teaches labor economics at the USC Marshall School of Business and says all this will shape what the recovery looks like. If you come from a wealthier background, you bounced back a lot faster than if you come from a poor background, And so another concern we might have is that this pandemic is going to increase income inequality. The same logic applies for small businesses. I think we need to define what is normal. Cherie's Conan and Johnson is a managing partner at the advisory firm Next Street. How are we going? Tol make sure that the communities and small businesses that have been systemically left back pre pandemic are getting the systemic changes. I think that we need to make sure that they're successful, she says. For those communities returning to pre pandemic economic conditions might not be enough for an actual economic recovery. In Washington. I'm Kimberly Adams for Marketplace. A brief personnel note. Before we go on Jeff Bezos has kicked himself upstairs. Amazon announced this afternoon that its founder, is going to step down as CEO this summer to become executive chairman. So not totally giving up power. Andy Jassy is going to be the new guy. He's been running AWS Amazon Web services. It's omnipresent Cloud computing division. Amazon shares picked up hiccupped a little bit after hours. Still something like $3300 apiece, though update across the board from major indices will have the details when we do the numbers Senate Republicans and the White House continue their politicking about.

Kimberly Adams Andy Jassy Amazon Jeff Bezos Congressional Budget Office Carl Riddle Higa vicious Cherie USC Marshall School of Busines Institute for Women's Policy Washington Senate Emily White House managing partner executive chairman
Getting back to the pre-pandemic economy

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

02:27 min | 1 year ago

Getting back to the pre-pandemic economy

"Know what this economies like right now right shaky in many parts uneven who is recovering and who's not uncertain for both people and businesses so the forecast we got yesterday from the congressional budget office. It's guesses for this year. Promising even without more federal relief we're on track for the economy to be roughly back where it was in the before times by the middle of this year. Thank you vaccines. The labor market is gonna take longer. But let's examine that baseline concept for a second here the idea of getting back to the pre pandemic economy because as marketplace's kimberly adams reports even if the numbers do get back to where they used to be the economy's probably gonna look real different even though gross domestic product can kinda be shorthand for how an economy is doing. Gdp growth does not translate into equal growth off earnings and employment ariane hege issues with the institute for women's policy research. She says the before times or kind of a perfect example of this unemployment was low but often significantly higher for some groups like black and latino ex-workers also and not of women worked in jobs. Where you even with full time year round working. You could not pick yourself. You still needed to snap benefits particularly if you have kids then came. The pandemic worthy economic fallout was far worse for women and people of color particularly in the service sector. Emily knicks teaches labor economics. At the usc marshall school of business and says all this will shape. What the recovery looks like. If you come from a wealthier background you bounce back a lot faster than if you come from a poor background and so another concern we might have is that this pandemic is going to increase income inequality this same logic applies for small businesses. I think we need to define what is normal cherise. Conan johnson is a managing partner at the advisory firm neck. St how are we going to make sure that the communities and small businesses that have been systemically left-back pre pandemic are getting systemic changes. I think that we need to make sure that they're successful. She says for those communities returning to pre pandemic economic conditions might not be enough for an actual economic

Kimberly Adams Ariane Hege Institute For Women's Policy R Congressional Budget Office Emily Knicks Usc Marshall School Of Busines Conan Johnson
"kimberly adams" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:42 min | 1 year ago

"kimberly adams" Discussed on KCRW

"I'm kind of riddle it is Tuesday. Today, the second day of February. It is always to have you along, everybody. We know what this economy is like right now, right? Shaky and many parts uneven and who's recovering and who's not uncertain for both people and businesses. So the forecast we got yesterday from the Congressional Budget Office. It's guesses for this year. Promising even without more federal relief. We're on track for the economy to be roughly backward was in the before times by the middle of this year. Thank you. Vaccines. The labor market is going to take longer, but Let's examine that baseline concept for a second here the idea of getting back to the pre pandemic economy. Because his marketplaces Kimberly Adams reports. Even if the numbers do get back to where they used to be. The economy is probably gonna look real different. Even though gross domestic product can kind of be a shorthand for how an economy is doing. GDP growth does not translate into equal growth off earnings and employment Ari on Hegg a vicious with the Institute for Women's Policy Research, she says the before times were kind of a perfect example of this. Unemployment was low but often significantly higher for some groups like black and Latino ex workers, also and not of women worked and jobs where you even with full time year round Working. You could not feed yourself. You still needed to have snap benefits, particularly if you had kids. Then came the pandemic where the economic fall out was far worse for women and people of color, particularly in the service sector. Emily next teaches labor economics at the USC Marshall School of Business and says all this will shape what the recovery looks like. If you come from a wealthier background, you bounced back a lot faster than if you come from a poor background, And so another concern we might have is that this pandemic is going to increase income inequality. The same logic applies for a small businesses. I think we need to define what is normal. Cherie's Conan and Johnson is a managing partner at the advisory firm Next Street. How are we going? Tol make sure that the communities and small businesses that have been systemically left back pre pandemic are getting the systemic changes. I think that we need to make sure that they're successful, she says. For those communities returning to pre pandemic economic conditions might not be enough for an actual economic recovery. In Washington. I'm Kimberly Adams for Marketplace. A brief personnel note. Before we go on Jeff Bezos has kicked himself upstairs. Amazon announced this afternoon that its founder, is going to step down as CEO this summer to become executive chairman. So not totally giving up power. Andy Jassy is going to be the new guy. He's been running AWS Amazon Web services. It's omnipresent Cloud computing division. Amazon shares hipped up pick up a little bit after hours still something like $3300 apiece, though update across the board from major indices will have the details when we do the numbers Senate Republicans and the White House continue their politicking about another round of help.

Kimberly Adams Andy Jassy Amazon Cherie Jeff Bezos Congressional Budget Office USC Marshall School of Busines Institute for Women's Policy R Hegg Ari Washington Emily White House Senate managing partner executive chairman
10,000 stores expected to close this year due to COVID-19

All Things Considered

01:35 min | 2 years ago

10,000 stores expected to close this year due to COVID-19

"Major retailers, the report says, are expected to close 10,000 stores this year that is up 14% from the year just ended. But at the same time more than 3300 new stores open last year, and course I predicts another 4000 will open this year. Marketplaces Kimberly Adams has that one. The types of stores that shut down in the pandemic include lots of footwear, clothing and accessory shops. According to course, I research the types of retail that opened discount outlets like Dollar stores. Industries that cater to certain pandemic needs also did all right. I believe the housewares category as all overall in the country has seen tremendous growth from New York to the West Coast. Natasha aim it runs the kitchen supply store Whisk in New York. Her business did better than she expected in 2020. Now as restrictions start to lift. I'm hopeful that people will will keep up their love for cooking and want to spend their money at a store like cars, businesses, small and large, are trying to game out which pandemic changes will be permanent. Constance Hunter, chief economist at KPMG says, at least for those who are on the upside of the case shaped recovery, and I do think this pent up savings is going to lead to higher consumption that we would normally expect. Once we get to the other side of the pandemic, and for businesses that can hold on. Until then, there could be a business boom. Nicole Markey owns Hip City Veg, a chain of fast casual restaurants around Philadelphia and Washington, D. C. By the

Kimberly Adams Natasha Aim Constance Hunter New York West Coast Kpmg Nicole Markey Hip City Veg Philadelphia Washington
Biden to propose bill to offer legal status to millions of immigrants

Morning Edition

01:04 min | 2 years ago

Biden to propose bill to offer legal status to millions of immigrants

"Beach and President elect Biden is just over an hour away from inauguration on the long list of Day One activities is sending a new Immigration overhaul bill to Congress marketplaces Kimberly Adams has more Button wants Congress to create a new pathway to citizenship for undocumented immigrants and general reworking of the immigration system. So for DACA recipients so called dreamers, certain farm workers and people with what's called temporary protected status, they would be eligible for green cards right away under the proposed legislation. For other people in the country illegally. The bill would allow them to apply for temporary legal status, then be eligible for green cards after five years if they meet requirements, like paying taxes and passing background checks, according to a fact sheet provided by the transition team. The new legislation would also increase funding for efforts to control cross border trafficking networks, as well as revamp policies for visas for highly skilled workers and their families. In Washington. I'm Kimberly

Kimberly Adams Daca Congress Biden Washington Kimberly
Get the money out now

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

04:57 min | 2 years ago

Get the money out now

"We didn't get any relief. Bill from the congress and i i want i want to tell me why i wish i knew. I mean honestly. There's been this ongoing stalemate for months and months and months and the need the scale of the need for a bill is just demonstrable at this point right if you look at the numbers for various measures of economic hardship things like hunger or housing insecurity on employment They're huge so it's not as if congress doesn't know that there's a huge amount of need urgent need for them to act particularly given the fact that something like two dozen additional programs that have been holding families together are about to expire around christmas. But there seems to be this logjam over what should actually go into the bill and you know what what tools would be acceptable to help these families and businesses for that matter sue journalists. Take that a little bit farther right. We've got a piece coming up from kimberly adams here in a minute on liability protections which mitch mcconnell wants the state the democrats want state and city Funding to help them through the squeeze Is it possible. Catherine says they can't not know. And i'm going to throw you the same question D- do they really not know. I don't know the answer to that is impossible. It's impossible to now. I mean. I think i think what's really interesting in what is going to continue to be. The core issue is that lawmakers on both sides recognize that there is a massive new. Do something you know. There's there's fairly broad consensus that. They need to come to an agreement that they need to do before christmas. That we can't just you know sort of any year in not not come up with a solution in. I think that's why it's so surprising. And so interesting that it's taken so long to get there and it does seem like it's really boiling under these two issues at this point that's the whole distance between them But you know these two issues could be enough to scupper it. do you think katherine that. It's possible that they go home for christmas. And nothing is done and they say know what biden's coming in in january and let the new congress in the new administration figure it out. Unfortunately i think it is. I think it's a terrible failure of leadership. If that happens. I mean it's been an unforgivable failure of leadership that they haven't come to some sort of deal by now But the idea that in the days after christmas you'll have tons of people who get evicted. Who lose their Their unemployment benefits who suddenly have to start paying their student loan bills again have to pay their their mortgage payments again. Things that were in forbearance I think that would be a terrible terrible outcome. But i would not. I would not put it beyond congress for that to happen. Unfortunately because again it's been months at this point and they don't seem to have Endured any sort of political retribution. For not acting and so. What's to keep them from doing that soon. I hope that they act. But i'm very concerned that they won't do. You know a quick turn to the federal reserve here as we talked about perhaps in this segment last time you were on but definitely on the program at some point in the last couple of weeks. treasury six year mnuchin As we all know has decided that the for some of the federal reserve beginning programs under the care act ought to end it. It's worth pointing out that. While they were undersubscribed they did add some stability here. And i think it's also worth pointing out that they were undersubscribed. bydesign right. They were they were created on terms. That were meant to be extra. And some of them were created to work in exactly the kind of environment that we're about to go into a situation in which things are getting worse credit availability. Use may be getting a little bit worse as a result and you know companies and municipalities need. Need that backup auction in our sort of taking away right right as it may be needed. So i'm gonna. I'm gonna go sooner than i anticipated to. The old standby On a friday on this program. What is jay. Powell thinking genus. Malik you get to go first. The fed meets next week. The chairman will a conference and there will be all kinds of questions but in in five words or less. What do we think is going through his mind right now. Going to get worse before it gets better. He told me that's like nine. But okay all right. i'll buy that catherine. What do you think. Get the money out. Now about it Well look it's the mantra. I think of a lot of economists at this point. Other economic policymakers powell among other federal reserve officials have said as much not in those exact not in that five word phrasing but that they want more fiscal relief. That the ball is really in congress's court at this point to get something done that. The fed will continue to use whatever tools it has available. Whatever their usual You know boilerplate his on that but really they need help from congress

Congress Kimberly Adams Mitch Mcconnell Federal Reserve Mnuchin Catherine Bill Biden Katherine Treasury Malik Powell JAY
It's a lot harder to get out the vote during a pandemic

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

04:12 min | 2 years ago

It's a lot harder to get out the vote during a pandemic

"They say meet the voters where they are especially if they're your friends on the Internet from American public media, this is marketplace tech I'm molly would. It's a lot harder to get out the vote. During a pandemic political strategist and organizers are trying to buy new ways to reach voters and potential voters, research shows that usually in person interactions are the most effective technique, but now organizers are turning to an old idea. A turnout captain, a local volunteer who whips up voting interest, but combined with targeted data and sometimes APPs, and they're finding that that combination can really work marketplace's Kimberly Adams covers money and politics and did some reporting on this for us. Things like knocking on the doors of strangers to be in their face about a candidate does not work in a pandemic, and there seems to be a shift among sort of the political strategists and the get out the vote folks to really look at something that's called relational organizing, and I spoke with her thick Balasubramaniam. He's at Howard. University works a lot with data and with campaigns on this idea of relational organizing and. And here's how he explains it. Essentially you make a list of your family members, friends and neighbors, and because of research we know that the Messenger really really matters way more effective than TV digital or radio is when you hear a pitch straight from someone that you'd know and trust, and that makes these things a lot more effective according to the research. We've seen so far right. Do apps like this exist now? Sort of this APP called turnout nation. The founder Mark Mullen was telling me that with this APP. Basically, it doesn't necessarily push people to you, but you just say hey I want to get more people out to vote. Here are ten of my friends and family that I am committing to help them get registered and help them turn out to vote, and whereas a traditional campaign method of saying, knocking on the doors of strangers can boost turn out by like two percent. Their method boosted turn out by about thirteen percent. And why is that because it's more personal? Not just because it's more personal, but with turn out nation for example and a lot of the ways that this sort of get out the vote tech is being deployed for relational organizing much of it is not associated with a particular campaign. Most up vote efforts are run by candidate campaign specifically they tend to sort of be focused on a huge amount of stranger to stranger contact, and the last maybe month or three weeks before the election, but there are a lot of people. People who want to increase turnout and do other things to support American democracy year round and A. They don't necessarily want to do it in the service of this or that candidate and they only want to do it just before before Elections Right so folks like Mullen who work on this say that not only are volunteers more likely to get involved when you strip out the politics, but they also say that people respond better as well when you're just saying. Hey, you should vote. To Hey, you should vote for this particular candidate so obviously like this is a unique moment because of the pandemic, but it sounds like if it's that effective, and if you know, events may become less popular or good old fashioned door. Knocking becomes less popular at. The groundwork for a different type of digital campaigning in the future I think there's going to have to be a different type of digital campaigning. Now you can imagine some hesitancy by campaigns to us. Sort of this turnout captain model that that Molin is highlighting because they don't necessarily want everyone to turn out to vote. They want the people who were going to vote for their candidate to turn out to vote and the individual campaigns are scrambling because our entire campaign infrastructure is built on sort of these face to face interaction. A lot of that is just out the window.

Mark Mullen Kimberly Adams Molin Founder
What it means to defund police

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

02:20 min | 2 years ago

What it means to defund police

"Conversation that we're having in this country right now about systemic economic racism. Turns today on three words, De Fund, the police. In Minneapolis where George Floyd was killed by police. A Super Majority of the city council there says it wants to dismantle its police force, and in part because that defined the police has become kind of a catch phrase for a really complicated problem, so marketplace's Kimberly. Adams spent her day today, talking to people about what it might mean, concepts like defunding or dismantling or even abolishing the police are a bit more nuance to then may come across a protest. Chant Christy Lopez is co director of the innovative policing program at Georgetown Law and used to work at the Department of Justice Investigating police departments. She says when people talk about defunding police. It doesn't mean that you route budgets for public safety. It may mean that you decrease. Get rid of the police department per se, but you might still have something like an office of public safety. So, what would it do? Ron Surpass spent thirty years in law. Enforcement Police chief in New Orleans in Nashville, chief of the Washington State Patrol, and in all that time about ninety percent of all the police department calls that I've looked at in my life. have nothing to do with a major uniform crime. Crime has nothing to do right murder robbery burglary assault theft auto, nothing surpass now teaches at Loyola University in New Orleans. He says cop spend most of their time. Responding to auto accidents, noise complaints, lots of calls about people dealing with substance abuse. And when someone is having a mental health crisis, we often are sending out the police. Sue Abdur Holden runs the Minnesota branch of the National Alliance on mental illness she. She says the state has mobile mental health crisis teams that can respond. Unfortunately, they're not fully funded so that they can respond twenty four seven to every call that comes in which means the police legally have to says Jim Birch President of the National Police Foundation. The bottom line is who else would you call on a Saturday afternoon or in the middle of the night on a Friday night to come and respond. Respond to help address a dispute or disagreement. There literally is no one else to

National Police Foundation Enforcement Police Sue Abdur Holden Christy Lopez Georgetown Law Ron Surpass New Orleans De Fund George Floyd Minneapolis Jim Birch Washington State Patrol Department Of Justice Adams Loyola University President Trump Director National Alliance Nashville Murder
Oil futures point higher Sunday night after OPEC+ extends output cuts to July

Morning Edition

01:16 min | 2 years ago

Oil futures point higher Sunday night after OPEC+ extends output cuts to July

"OPEC now the oil cartel held a meeting over the weekend the virtual meeting obviously we're decided to extend record cuts in oil production through July the idea of course being to keep oil prices up marketplace's Kimberly Adams reports the decision comes on the back of months of major volatility in the oil markets global demand for oil fell off a cliff as country after country locked down during the pandemic that's meant lower gas prices for consumers but a tough time for oil producers now that countries are starting to open up oil price trends are reflecting the change Robert Johnston is with the Eurasia group key parts of the world it's got it all traces back almost forty dollars a barrel and we had negative pricing for elite US will also come back a long ways so the question is ready go from here maybe not that far says Louise Dickson at restart energy she says oil's recovery will be slow and stunted by the sheer economic impact of countries and economies in GDP overall lower household spending left in this travel fewer people buying new vehicles and any recovery will also depend on what happens next with the

Opec Kimberly Adams Robert Johnston United States Louise Dickson Eurasia Group
Powell warns of lasting damage without more aid

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

03:44 min | 2 years ago

Powell warns of lasting damage without more aid

"A brief sampling. If I might of some of the choices phrases from Fed chair j Powell's well what was it a Webinar an online Q. and A. I guess after a quick set of remarks today sponsored by the Peterson Institute. Anyway here are some of the relevant things. The Chairman of the Federal Reserve had to say about this economy this morning. He said there's a possibility that there could be lasting damage. That things are both highly uncertain and they pose significant downside risks and that fiscal policy makers congress. That is although they've done a lot need to do. More additional fiscal support could be costly but worth it if it helps avoid long-term damage and leaves us with a stronger recovery. This trade off is one for our elected. Representatives who wield powers of taxation spending now to be fair fed chairs for years. Have been saying the same thing. Ben by Kimberly. Can I interject here for a minute? Kimberly Adams you are more than welcome to interject. Welcome to the program by the way thank you thank you so I mean you know I cover Washington and to be fair. Congress has done a lot of things in response to the Cova nineteen pandemic. We've had multiple rounds of stimulus and as we saw from house. Democrats just yesterday. They're working on another round. Well Yeah but two. Things Number One The the House Democrats bill probably going nowhere. Because Mitch McConnell the leader in the Senate has as much said so number two this economy as you know is defending strating in real time and yet here we have Congress con uh going back and forth although that is a great deployment of that. Sat word all pieces of legislation are originally when they come out of such a bitterly divided Congress going to be a wishlist to some extent but we should put this in a bit of context because the first couple of rounds of stimulus really were. Oh my good Lord. What are we going to do? Throw everything at this. Let's just try to again. Stop the economy from off a cliff but we also don't know how well what we've done already is working and house speaker. Nancy Pelosi basically said that this morning on MSNBC look. We're still waiting on data to see how this works and Mitch. Mcconnell has also said look we need to wait and see how the opening goes. How what we've already put out. There works before we can spend any more money on this now at the same time. The longer we wait the more the economy suffers. But there is sort of a wait-and-see moment we seem to be in right now. Okay Fair enough. Do you think before we get back to our regularly. Scheduled programing here DEA. Think there's going to be another bill I mean. Is there any doubt about that? Oh yeah there has to be more and I think what we heard from. Fed Chair Powell. Today is even more evidence of that and everybody knows there has to be more which means there is quite the lobbying scramble happening here in Washington because everybody wants a piece of it Kimberly Adams our Washington correspondent more from her in the program. A plan story as opposed to this Unexpected player Kimberly. Thanks a lot now. Problem One more item from bell this morning. The Fed is going to release a survey tomorrow. He said showing almost forty percent of those in households making less than forty thousand dollars a year had lost a job in March anti pointed out as he always does the Fed share that it was only in the last couple of years of the expansion. That is now over that people on the lower part of that income curve started to feel any of the gains. So there's that from the Fed chair

Kimberly Adams FED Mitch Mcconnell Congress Washington Bell J Powell Chair Powell Peterson Institute Nancy Pelosi Chairman Of The Federal Reserv Msnbc Cova Senate DEA
Political advertising during COVID-19 is the calm before the storm

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

04:33 min | 2 years ago

Political advertising during COVID-19 is the calm before the storm

"The Kobe. Nineteen pandemic has decimated digital advertising. But that may actually be good. I political campaigns online is way cheaper right now and that makes it easier for candidates to get in front of voters many of whom are a captive audience. While working from home that could give a boost to independent candidates but it could also mean that online ads are way more accessible to bad actors looking to spread misinformation for right. Now though according to marketplace's Kimberly Adams our political reporter in Washington. No one's really running any ads at all. It is usual at this time in a campaign for political ads to kind of drop off but almost no one has been running any ads. Everyone's worried that because all anyone wants to consume online is either things that make you happy or things related to Co vid. There's not really much return on investment. Even if you do take advantage of these cheaper ad prices to run a political ad. Who does that end up benefiting if anybody in the short term? I mean it sounds like that could be a big boost to incumbents absolutely because fundraising is so hard in this environment. Anybody who's trying to sort of get into a race or maybe relatively unknown or is God. Help them trying to get in media attention environment. This makes it really really challenging so their campaigns and even advocacy groups that maybe wanted to do a ballot initiative are having to balance out whether or not they want to take advantage of these cheap digital ad prices or if they want to just wait and hope that things open back up again and then maybe try to run ads later. That said I was speaking with Tim. Lamb of limb consulting services. He's a works with a lot of Democratic candidates in groups here in DC and he was saying well if there ends up being a second wave of infections as many are predicting in the fall. That's sort of at the peak of when you would have those ads. So what do we do then But even though candidates might not be buying a lot of digital advertising right now for the moment is in digital kind of the only game in town right and in many ways. The lockdown is freeing up more resources for these campaigns to spend on digital and so instead they're investing that money in digital outreach whether that be online phone banking or doing polls because people are stuck at home and they're going to answer the phone or developing new digital ads and working on their targeting strategies. So that money is going to be spent. It just won't be spent in the ways that it usually is right and so we may find that what we end up with is a supernatural campaign right if you got tired of seeing political ads during the primary if this really gets going and there is an opening for political advertising. It's GonNa be a lot and then there is also this question of digital advertising and its effect on misinformation and so. I wonder if it's cheaper. A lot of people are online consuming information. Does that make us more susceptible to messaging meant to polarize us? Does it make disinformation that much more accessible to parties? Who would want to do harm in any case if you make it cheaper for bad actors to get their message in front of people of course it increases the risk that that misinformation is going to spread further and faster and I think that's why you're seeing sort of an increase crackdown by these social media sites and People who are really active in this area about consumer awareness of this issue and so as we get further along into the campaign you can absolutely imagine that people are going to exploit the strain that all of these systems are under to get messages out there that are either untrue or at least stretching the truth quite a bit. That's marketplace's Kimberly Adams in Washington. Dc Forbes has a piece this week noting that this had already been kind of strange year for political advertising since the winter saw huge amounts of spending especially by Michael Bloomberg so between the pandemic and expected spring drop spending overall not just online peaked at twenty one point five million dollars a week just before Super Tuesday and then dropped to around five million dollars a week by the end of April. You can find a link to that story at our website. Marketplace Tech Dot

Kimberly Adams Washington TIM Dc Forbes Michael Bloomberg Reporter
As the coronavirus epidemic grows, China prepares to cut tariffs

Marketplace

02:08 min | 3 years ago

As the coronavirus epidemic grows, China prepares to cut tariffs

"We will begin with an update and the trade war with China which has perhaps begun the official cooling off period China's government announced that it will reduce tariffs on more than seventeen hundred US products these cuts will kick in a week from tomorrow and that's the same day American tariffs on some Chinese products are said to be reduced as well now there was a time when this would be just an incremental step in the phase one deal we might even noted in passing and get on to other things but context is key here as market place's Kimberly Adams reports this move comes as China is grappling with the continuing fallout from the corona virus the human cost of the outbreak is growing hundreds dead and tens of thousand sick when down John teaches economics at Iowa State University he says at the risk of that China's economy might not grow as fast this year has markets questioning whether the virus will specifically impact China's ability to implement the US China face one deal he said that's part of the reason China is reducing tariffs this dab brings some the certainty and shows China's willingness to continue on Kerry outs the promises in the face one deal the White House has expressed concern China might need to delay some parts of the deal like promised purchases of US agricultural products Joshua Meltzer is a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution he says those purchases had people scratching their heads even before the virus outbreak effective later the deal requires Chanda double purchases and it's not clear how this is going to be done not just because there may not be enough market demand in China but also because U. S. farmers need to ramp up production Matt slaughter is dean of the tuck school of business at Dartmouth that depends on not just the investments they make in their seed and fertilizer all those things but the vagaries of the weather slaughter says whether China can stay on track with the phase one deal objectives will depend on just how bad the human and economic costs of the coronavirus turn out to be in Washington I'm Kimberly Adams for

Joshua Meltzer U. S. Chanda Official Washington Tuck School Matt Slaughter Brookings Institution Senior Fellow China White House Kerry Iowa State University John Kimberly Adams United States
China Will Cut Tariffs In Half On $75 Billion Of U.S. Products

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

02:08 min | 3 years ago

China Will Cut Tariffs In Half On $75 Billion Of U.S. Products

"We will begin with an update in the trade war war with China which has perhaps begun the official cooling off period China's government announced that it will reduce tariffs on more than seventeen hundred US products these cuts cuts will kick in a week from tomorrow. And that's the same day. American tariffs on some Chinese products are set to be reduced as well now. There was a time when this would be just just an incremental step in the phase one deal we might even noted in passing and get onto other things but context is key. Here as marketplace's Kimberly Adams reports this move comes. As China is grappling with the continuing fallout from the corona virus. The human cost of the outbreak is growing hundreds dead and tens of thousands sick when Don John Teaches economics at Iowa State University. He says the risk that China's economy might not grow as fast. This year has has markets questioning whether the virus will specifically impact China's ability to implement the US China face. One deal he said. That's part of the reason. China is reducing tariffs the stat. Bring some to certainty and shows China's willingness to continue to carry out the promises in in the face when deal the White House has expressed concern. China need to delay some parts of the deal like promised purchases of US agricultural products Joshua Meltzer services senior fellow at the Brookings Institution. He says those purchases had people scratching their heads even before the virus outbreak effectively. The deal required under under double purchases. And it's not clear how this is going to be done not just because there may not be enough market demand in China but also because us US farmers need to ramp up production. Matt slaughter is Dean of the Tuck School of business at Dartmouth that depends on just the investments they make in their seed and fertilizer closings. But the vagaries of the weather slaughter says whether China can stay on track with the phase one deal objectives will depend on just how bad the human and economic economic costs of the corona virus. TURN OUT TO BE IN WASHINGTON. I'm Kimberly Adams for marketplace.

China Kimberly Adams United States Don John Washington Iowa State University Matt Slaughter Brookings Institution Tuck School Of Business Official Joshua Meltzer Senior Fellow White House
What weighs down GDP?

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

04:24 min | 3 years ago

What weighs down GDP?

"Not for the first time I am on this program. We take our lead from our early rising colleagues on the marketplace morning report. The News News there. The News context here and this morning early with the markets bouncing back. After the agenda of yesterday it went like this well the problem is the market's been doing an awful lot better than the fundamentals. That's David David Kelly a morning report regular also the chief global strategist at J.P. Morgan funds talking to David Brancaccio. This morning say more. Though would you Mitch Kelly about those fundamentals. It's going to get a GDP number tomorrow over two percent. And why is that. Just two percent you know between the federal government of the Federal Reserve. Got All the stimulus being poured into the economy. And it's not actually helping economy grow that's tossed so we got tears in Clare on the phone. She's a professor of economics at George Washington University to break things down a little before us one of the big things that we were watching was the role of the tax cuts and jobs act. Also the Fed of course keeping interest rates low. So that means that we're looking at savers. Trying to find a place to put their money to earn some income and that pushes more more money towards the stock market which gets us to it does look like a stock market and the real economy are potentially out of line. Aw but there is more to the fundamentals than just GDP at the same time if we look at other figures such as what's been going on in the labor market there is that fifty year low unemployment. Of course things are still remarkably good particularly when we think about how long this expansion has lasted. Don't zone on eleven years now which helps explain why people are getting jittery. When unforeseen stuff happens that corona virus really being the the driver of of that tumble and that people are worried that that might affect the Chinese economy that was yesterday? The Corona virus in the markets today traders apparently decided the corona virus. Isn't that big a deal but look fundamentally this whole thing is all about confidence right. How much consumers? which as we've been telling you for years now are the single biggest driver of this economy? How much they think things are going to be okay so to that end a little compare and contrast now we learned today from the Commerce Department that orders for durable goods big expensive things postal last couple of years? We learned those orders were up in December so far so good but there is a certain line-item in that report that we pay attention to capital capital goods equipment that businesses by to produce more stuff orders for those dropped which is not a good look for business investment consumer confidence though how we all feel about the economy. We learned that today improved more than expected so the essay question goes like this. Why do you businesses seem to be skeptical about the economy while consumers think things are maybe not so bad? Marketplace's Kimberly Adams got the assignment. Consumers are feeling better about the economy because after a long recovery since the recession Josh Gibbons at the Economic Policy Institute says most people they have really beaten beaten down expectations in. So if you look over the past year unemployment's pretty low. Wages are doing not great but okay. Maybe they're like this is as good as it's been for a while but business investment has been slowing for months now and economists like to pay close attention to those numbers because weak business investment. Eventually the ripples through the rest of the economy in so if you're trying to predict whether or not say a recession is coming. Durable goods will sometimes sort of go down more quickly than other parts and be a better forecasting instrument because business investments in durable goods are a reflection of companies own forecasts. Alison Schrager is a senior. A fellow at the Manhattan institute she says businesses are looking at the economy. Five ten twenty years from now as opposed to consumers are really experiencing Very strong economy and their outlook is appreciably shorter also when businesses invest are also often now more more thinking about global markets not just domestic markets markets and with the trade war far from over and risks from climate change. The outlook for the global economy is a bit uncertain just now in in Washington. I'm Kimberly Adams for Marketplace

Kimberly Adams Alison Schrager Clare David David Kelly David Brancaccio Federal Reserve Mitch Kelly Manhattan Institute Commerce Department George Washington University Professor Of Economics Economic Policy Institute J.P. Morgan Josh Gibbons Washington
Walt Disney Q4 2019 Earnings Preview

Morning Edition

01:14 min | 3 years ago

Walt Disney Q4 2019 Earnings Preview

"Later today quarterly results are due from the multi media power house known as Disney in a busy year with Disney buying into new media and the theme parks and not nothing market place's Kimberly Adams reports even though Disney makes lots of money off its movies and TV shows and Broadway shows and I shows and licensing John garner at leisure business advisors says the parks are a steady payday theme parks are only a small part of Disney and traditionally the most dependable part going back decades now with properties like Star Wars under the Disney umbrella the company is pouring money into matching activities in the parks like the Star Wars galaxies edge Martyn Lewis in teaches theme park management at Farmingdale state college in New York now they've raised their prices pretty aggressively you know to pay for all of this investment and that's part of the reason attendance was down three percent last quarter but revenues were still up because people who really want to go to Disney will pay whatever it costs to go to Disney and they'll pay would it costs to buy the cool new merchandise especially if it happens to look like a millennium

Disney Kimberly Adams John Garner Martyn Lewis Farmingdale State College New York Three Percent
What we talk about when we talk about jobs

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

04:38 min | 3 years ago

What we talk about when we talk about jobs

"We introduced you earlier. This week to a group called the Institute for Supply Management Management IFM for short literally people who do all things supply chain for a living we were talking about their manufacturing index how busy American manufacturing and factories these are not all that busy and getting less so it turns out was the macro economically troubling upshot today. It's their service sector survey. We want to talk about the non-manufacturing manufacturing side of this economy still growing but at a much slower pace than anybody had thought so to get us going on this Thursday marketplace's Marielle Sagarra has the service service sector primer accountants lawyers Baristas Uber Drivers math tutors. What are they all have in common their part of the services sector and radio reporters quarters? I'm a creator. I'm out here toiling away cranking out radio pieces but apparently I'm in the services sector to produce a good or a structure. You're right you produce service so that's the difference that's Gad Lebanon Chief Economist for North America at the Conference Board also a service sector the job if you make car parts you're in manufacturing. If you're a farmer you're in agriculture but as a rule of thumb if you don't produce a physical thing you're part of the services sector of the economy about eighty percent of American workers fall into this category it wasn't always this way one hundred years ago the majority of Workers Hello Greek culture or manufacturing and now those with Sharon significantly and that's how it usually goes Danny Bachman the US second omic forecaster at Deloitte says as a country's economy develops it tends to shift towards services one reason that manufacturing become more more productive. There's better technology and that makes a lot of manufacturing jobs obsolete. We just need fewer people to produce the same amount of manufactured goods up by the way the exact same thing happened with agriculture. Meanwhile as people who live in this developing economy get wealthier they start to demand more services like banking king in healthcare. Now the services sector is not an island when there's a downturn in manufacturing say workers an auto factory get laid off. They may be less likely to spend money on services like restaurants and travel. I'm Maryelle Sagarra for marketplace so continuing with the theme here that is in its manufacturing services services indexes Kimberly Adams story for us yesterday about what seemed like as of yesterday the possibility that we're just in for a long slow period of economic economic met that a recession might just never come. It'll just be slow but perhaps we were too hasty because maybe what's happening. Is that the slow hello is speeding up. Marketplace's Sabrina sure explains the Institute for Supply Management in their survey. They ask companies questions including just basic stuff a flight. How's business best at the moment. Eric Harrison is CEO of the Jay Renee Group an importer and wholesaler of shoes which puts him in one of the sectors actors covered by ISM's non-manufacturing index. He is worried his business is going to get hammered by the next round of tariffs so he's not investing in new technology not hiring new people as much as he normally would just trying to play closer to the best which on Portuguese were a lot of our customers are doing as well so it has kind of ripple effect. That's the story behind the numbers I assume survey of non-manufacturers was the weakest in two years a common theme and the comments businesses are worried about trade and that's been true for manufacturers for a while the big takeaway here is that it is not just them anymore. Sam Coffin is a senior economist at UBS looks as if from today's Today's data that the manufacturing weaknesses spreading into the rest of the economy take for example accommodation and food services hotels big importers of furniture furniture. That's tariff. This is Anthony Nevis. He helps run. ISM's non-manufacturing survey and there's food products that they're starting to see increases on stuff coming in from MM. China higher priced imports could seep into more of the economy. Ian Shepherdson is chief economist at Pantheon macroeconomics will probably have good to go up which retailers but it also hurts everybody else who's selling things you can see him is because people are less cash to spend on discretionary services like entertainment and leisure activity so so it seems to be scaring everyone for now. It's possible that the US economy might just be slowing down to a creep but these numbers are assigned that maybe it is worse than that in New York. I'm sure for

Eric Harrison Supply Management Management I Gad Lebanon Chief Economist Fo United States ISM Marielle Sagarra Institute For Supply Managemen Ian Shepherdson Chief Economist Anthony Nevis Maryelle Sagarra Deloitte Conference Board Senior Economist China Danny Bachman Pantheon Macroeconomics Sabrina
Kimberly Adams, Mickey Levy And Chief Economist discussed on Marketplace

Marketplace

01:47 min | 3 years ago

Kimberly Adams, Mickey Levy And Chief Economist discussed on Marketplace

"Yesterday was ugly the bond market was this week signed the apocalypse is upon us and then this morning hello American consumers retail sales numbers came out today up sharply last month compared to June ahead of expectations in point of fact so with the apocalyptic bond market on one hand the consumers on a spending spree on the other and the stock market in the middle doing who knows what marketplace Kimberly Adams explains the mixed messages this economy is sending with all the headlines about a possible looming recession it's worth noting the economy at least for now is still doing okay Mickey levy is the chief economist at Berenberg capital markets there's a clear disconnect between the economy that's growing you know pretty close to its potential path and bond yields there signaling something quite negative traders see troubles ahead the ongoing US China trade war Briggs it a global manufacturing slowdown regular consumers whose spending is the main driver of the American economy they're not too worried about it Brad McMillan is with the Commonwealth financial network when you look at consumer confidence it's actually quite high and they're not only saying things are good to actually voting with their wallets by spending which is ironically exactly how people tend to behave heading into an economic downturn American consumers not apartment stomach sailors on leave Brian Gilden burgers with cantar consulting you know it's like well I mean I have a job when your daughter to get the big screen TV now while I still have no school of income it's a very American read response to potential future slowdown rather than doing something crazy like saving for a rainy day or you know a recession in Washington I'm Kimberly Adams for

Kimberly Adams Mickey Levy Chief Economist United States Briggs Brad Mcmillan Washington Berenberg Capital China Brian Gilden Cantar One Hand