18 Burst results for "Kim Scott"

"kim scott" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

Wisdom From The Top

07:32 min | 7 months ago

"kim scott" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

"That I had and really focus on the management side of things. And from what I understand, this is really where you began to understand this idea that you call superstars versus rockstars, which was goes back to this earlier experience you had a juice with Derek, which is you kind of never really gave as much. I might be mangling this, but you didn't you early in your career you seemed to be dismissive of people who weren't interested in kind of moving up the hierarchy, right? And at Apple, you learn that actually you need a combination of those people to be successful. Yeah, absolutely. There was a leader at Apple. I remember talking to her, and she said, you know, you really have to manage people who are in superstar mode, very differently from people who are in rockstar mode. And I thought what in the world are you talking about? What's the difference? And she explained to me, people, when they're in superstar mode, are they're gunning for the next job. They may not even be on your team very long because they're on a super steep growth trajectory. But people when they're in rockstar mode, they're doing excellent work, but they're not necessarily gunning for the next job. And if you give it to them, you'll screw everything up. You know, they don't want they don't want your job, they don't want your boss's job, they don't want to be Steve Jobs. They just want to do a great job. And that was when that was a big aha moment. And that was the moment when I realized how badly I had screwed up with Derek. Because people when they are in superstar mode, you want to make sure, first of all, you want to make sure that you've got redundancy because it's almost shooting star. They may not be with you very long. And you want to make sure that you are giving them new challenges, opportunities for growth that you know how you're going to get them the promotions or whatnot that they long for. But when people are in rockstar mode, and we're all in both modes, by the way, I try to, it's very tempting to label people. You're a superstar. You're a rockstar, but we're all both at different points in our career. Very often at companies. Managers save up all the highest ratings for the people who are gunning for a promotion, which means you're giving lower ratings to people in rockstar mode than they deserve. And that's not fair, because all of us at certain points in our lives have big things going on outside of work that demand and deserve a fair amount of attention. And it's very hard to be on a steep growth trajectory and dealing with those things at the same time. Your latest book is called just work, get shit done fast and fair. And I want to use this as an opportunity to leap off into a question around the new generation of people in the workforce. Now I am, I'm a gen xer and I think you are too. And I remember when I started out in the workforce, it was sort of the boomers were dominating everything. And they would say things like, oh, you guys are all in a hurry. You just want to, you know, you don't want to wait your turn. You don't want to pay your dues, and I remember hearing that and feeling frustrated or they would say, you know, you demand all this feedback. Now I hear my cohorts saying that about the same things about the new, but my question is, is it different or is it just basically the same story being repeated again in this generation? Yeah, you know, I really believe that it is the job of the younger generation to challenge the older generation. This is how we make progress as humanity. I do think one thing is different, which is that very young people are accomplishing incredible things in ways that they didn't, I think earlier. There weren't as many billionaire or CEOs. And I think that's a good thing. I think people's career paths can take off and almost a vertical way now. And you don't have to sit around and pay your dues. But why should we sit around and like paying dues like, what is that about? So my son the other day at the dinner table, quoted, I thought he made it up, but he told me later he was quoting a meme. He had seen on YouTube. He said, tradition is just peer pressure from dead people. And I thought that was really important. We've got to be willing to see things new. And to listen to the feedback from our young employees, because there's a lot of wisdom in it. So when you're asked by companies to come in and help them navigate expectations from new employees around what a work environment should be like. For example, you know, 15, 20 years ago, companies maybe not Google, but companies like Google will talk about the employees of family or family. That's really at a fashion now. Now it's like, no, no, we're not a family. We come here. You pay me money. I will do the best job I can do. And then I will leave when my day is done. And that's very different from because I remember when I began my career, the advice I was given was, hey, you want to succeed, be the first one in and the last one out. Make sure everybody sees you when they get in and make sure everybody sees you when they're leaving. And I did that. But that's not advice I would give to somebody today because that's not we're living in a very different environment. Yeah, yeah, and I, for one, don't do my best work when I when I'm exhausted and working too many hours. So I think you know I think in tech at least there are times when work can go. It's almost worse than the old family thing. People are eating breakfast lunch and dinner at work. They go to the gym at work, all their friends are at work. Instead of going out to a bar, the bar is in the office. And I think that's unhealthy. I think that it is really important to leave work. I also think it's important for managers to leave space for different ways that people like to work. There are people who do work really well, 80 hours a week. I am not one of them. I can not work. I will not be productive if I'm expected to work. Even 40 hours a week is a lot. Give me 30 please. But I can do great work. And so I think part of our job as leaders, especially in this new hybrid environment, is to give space for people to work in the way that works for them. One of the most talented people who worked on my team at Google, he really needed two months off every year. He needed to go travel and take pictures and trank a lot or I don't know what he did, but he needed to take two months off a year. But in those ten months, when he was there, nobody was more productive. And so I realized it was my job to sort of navigate the bureaucracy of the company to make it possible for him to get what he needed in order to be maximally productive, the other ten months. And so I think figuring this out is going to be really important,.

Derek Apple Steve Jobs CEOs Google YouTube trank
"kim scott" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

Wisdom From The Top

08:07 min | 7 months ago

"kim scott" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

"Should never have chosen a monkey. That was a big mistake. So a stuff to daisy whoops a daisy. And what I would do is I would come in to the all hands, so a hundred plus people, and I would say, look, here's my biggest mistake of the week. I want to hear your biggest mistake. And the person who made the biggest mistake is going to get two things. They're going to get instant forgiveness, and they're going to get to keep this stuff daisy on their desk for the week. And it became just sort of a fun part of our all hands meeting. And it helps sort of reinforce this idea that no news is bad news and bad news is good news because we learn from what we do wrong. And that was helpful. When does feedback create an environment that actually stifles innovation and creativity, right? Because sometimes feedback isn't right. Feedback is wrong, like the things people give you feedback on and their perspectives are just not good feet sound smart. Helpful. Let's be honest. Some feedback's terrible. Yeah, yeah. Some feedback is really horrible. So the thing you can do is, first of all, you can identify the 5 or 10% of what the person said that you can agree with. Just to demonstrate that you're not shut down the feedback you're not automatically defensive. And then you have a respectful conversation with the person about why you disagree with the feedback. Again, this is counterintuitive. I think instinctively, a lot of us fear that a disagreement is going to hurt a relationship. But the fact of the matter is, what's really going to hurt your relationship is either ignoring feedback that someone had the courage to give you or saying thank you for the feedback. I don't know about you, but when someone says that to me, that is not what I hear, I hear FU. I want to call out some specific ways that feedback goes wrong. Sometimes feedback reflects unconscious bias. Gender bias, racial bias. Yes. Sometimes feedback actually reflects conscious prejudice. And sometimes it's not feedback. It's just bullying. And so the question is, what do you do when what you're getting is biased prejudice or bullying masquerading as feedback? That is hard. I mean, we're living in an environment now where it's becoming much clearer that certain types of managers and I don't want to stereotype, but let's just say white men may not have been as conscious of these things. Because how would they be? They haven't been the victims of them. Alan eustace, who's one of my favorite leaders, was one of my favorite leaders at Google, used to do this thing with his team, where he would stand up in front of a couple thousand engineers. And he would say, if you're underrepresented on this team, and by that, he meant if you're a woman, if you're black, if you're LatinX. If you're underrepresented on this team, and you have been harmed by workplace injustice in the last week, pretty much 100% of the underrepresented people on the team raise their hand. And then he would say, now, everybody put your hand down. Now, if you have been unjust to one of your colleagues in the last week, raise your hand. Nobody raced their hand. And so this is one of the things that I struggled with when I wrote just work. I hate to think of myself as a victim. But even more, I hate to think of myself as a perpetrator. And so sometimes where the person who is harmed, other times where the person who caused harm, other times we are the upstander and an upstander is a bystander who actually intervenes. And other times were the leader. And in each of these different roles, we kind of have different levels of responsibility. So aileen Lee told me a great story. She's the founder of cowboy VC. She told me a great story about walking into a meeting with two colleagues who are men. They sat down at a long conference table. And then the folks from the other side from the company whose business they were trying to win came in. The first guy sits across from the guy to aliens left. The next guy sits across from the guide to his left. And aileen had the expertise that was going to win her team the deal. And so she started talking. But when the other side had questions, they directed them at her two colleagues who were men, not at aileen. And once it happened twice. And eventually, one of aliens partners stood up and he said, I think a lean and I should switch seats. That was all he had to do to totally change the tenor in the room. Everybody realized what they were doing and they stopped doing it. So that was sort of a simple example of an eye statement. Working, no huge deal, but it worked out really well. But of course, sometimes it's not unconscious bias at play. And I think this is one of the reasons that unconscious bias gets met with some skepticism. Is that very often we assume everything's unconscious bias. But sometimes it's not unconscious bias. Sometimes it's quite conscious prejudice. But sometimes there's no conscious prejudiced belief going on. The person's just being mean. And that is what bullying is. And it's so hard in the moment to know how to respond to bullying. I think one of the many mistakes of feedback training is that it teaches us to respond to bullying as though it's biased. And this is a mistake I have made many, many times. In fact, when my daughter was in third grade, she was getting bullied on the playground. And I was kind of encouraging her to say, oh, I feel sad when you blah blah. And she banged her fist on the table, and she said, mom, he is trying to make me feel sad. Why would I tell him he succeeded? And I thought, gosh, you know, that is a really good point. That's fair. It's a very good point for a third grader. Yeah. Yeah, she's very, she was able to articulate her power, right? Yeah. Yeah. House a radical candor here. She was given me some feedback. But she was exactly right. And so I realized it used statement. If an I statement invites someone in to understand things from your perspective, that's a great response to bias. But if it's bullying, you want to use statement, which kinds of pushes kind of pushes them away. Like you can't talk to me like that. Or if that feels like it might escalate, say, what's going on for you here? Or even just like, where'd you get that shirt? The point of a youth statement is now you are in an active role because you're asking the other person, the question. You eventually left Google and went to Apple and you were hired to actually hire to teach a class about management at what was called Apple university that they're sort of internal school. And what I love about this is that you went in as sort of your own experiment. You said, I want to learn even more about management and I'm going to use my stories of success and failure to teach this class and then to learn. Yes, it was incredible, actually, Steve Jobs had decided that the management training that they had at Apple was not good. And so we wanted to throw it all away and start from a blank sheet of paper. And it was a big decision to leave Google actually. After I had kids, you kind of reassess what's important to you. And I realized I really didn't care at all about cost per click. I mean, that was doing really well at Google. But the thing that really got me out of bed in the morning was building the team, helping the culture of the team translate to 13 different countries. And helping the people on the team take a step in the direction of their dreams. And so how could I do that at scale, not just for one particular team, but I kind of wanted to shed the operating role.

Alan eustace aileen Lee aileen FU Google Apple Steve Jobs
"kim scott" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

Wisdom From The Top

07:19 min | 7 months ago

"kim scott" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

"To two simple things. Caring personally and challenging directly. And that doesn't seem so radical. And yet the combination is so rare that I called it radical candor because very often when we care too much about someone's feelings, we give in to ruinous empathy. We fail to challenge them. And given the rule in a sympathy, instead of being radically candid. You know, that story that you told us Sheryl Sandberg is so interesting in part because of the way that you frame it and the way that you reflected on it. And in a choose your own adventure book, right? Let's say you could come out of that conversation, especially in the context of how we talk about workplaces today, in a very different way. I mean, some people might say, you know, Cheryl could have just ignored the ums because Kim was running a successful part of the business and clearly impressed that the leadership, like who cares if she said, that could be one of the paths that you take on the choose your own adventure, another path could be somebody might say, you know, she's just never call anybody stupid. Yeah, absolutely. So I think it's really important to think about one thing. Radical candor gets measured, not the speaker's mouth, but at the listener's ear. Yes. And so Cheryl knew me relatively well at this point. So we had gone a business school together. That helped. And we had been working closely together. And Cheryl had had several opportunities to show me that she really did care. So for example, when I moved from New York to California to take the job, I was lonely out here. I was single and I didn't really know anyone, and she could tell that I was lonely. And she introduced me to a book group. I'm still friends with a bunch of those women to this day. So when I had a family member diagnosed with cancer, she said you go get on an airplane, you need to be with your family right now. Your team and I will write your coverage plan. We have your back at this moment. That's what teams do for one another. But the other part of it was that she was very direct with us when we screwed up. But because we knew she cared, we knew that it was coming from a good place. And the other thing about that story is that other people wouldn't have had to say those words to other people on the team. Because they would have heard her the first time. I think the other thing about radical candor, is you need to be conscious of whether you need to be moving out on the challenge directly to mention. And that's basically what you need to do when the other person is either defensive or just not hearing your feedback. And it's hard to move up on care personally without going the wrong way on challenge directly and winding up in ruinous empathy. So often, in fact, when I was at Apple, we would hire actors to do these role plays. And we hired actors because actors can cry on command. And these as soon as the actors would start to cry these badass software engineers would be like, oh, it doesn't matter. It's okay. It's no big deal. But it did matter. And it wasn't okay. And it was just a role play. Don't back off what you're saying, but do take a minute to attend to the emotions in the room. I think that one of the biggest problems with feedback is that we tend to dismiss the emotional signals that we're getting. But when we communicate, we communicate on an intellectual plane and on an emotional plane at the same time. And if the moment that someone becomes emotionally, you say, don't take it personally. Please, just eliminate that phrase. Vocabulary, because if you say don't take it personally, then you are refusing to listen to and to understand the emotional signals that you're getting and you're not going to you're not going to communicate very well. It's like when the nurses about to take blood and says relax. I'm never relaxed. You're about to put a needle in my arm. I'm not relaxed. Yeah, yeah, don't tell me to do something that's impossible. In just a minute, to encourage radical candor in the workplace and encourage feedback, Kim Scott pulls out the big guns. A stuffed daisy named whoops a daisy. Stay with us, I'm guy raz and you're listening to wisdom from the top. This message comes from NPR sponsor, Wix dot com. If you're ready to build a successful business online, go to Wix dot com and start by creating your website. You can choose from over 800 designer made website templates to showcase your brand the way you want and with advanced SEO and marketing tools you can expand online. Join millions of people running and growing their businesses with Wix. This message comes from NPR sponsor, future. What are the best workout programs? The ones that are custom built just for you. Future is the new workout experience that pairs you one on one with your own fitness coach. Your coach will map out a plan based on your goals with workouts delivered to your phone each week. Future your Apple watch and the app all pair seamlessly so you can communicate with your coach, track your progress and celebrate your achievements. Get started with 50% off your first three months at try future dot com slash NPR. Hey, welcome back to wisdom from the top. I'm guy raz. So it's late 2000s and Kim Scott is rocking it as a manager at Google, and she credits a big part of her success to encouraging even celebrating feedback. There's a definite order of operations to radical candidate that all begins with soliciting feedback. So in every single one on one, I had with people I would let them get through their agenda items first and then I would save 5 minutes at the end and say something along the lines of what could I do or stop doing that would make it easier to work with me. And there's a few important things about that. Just identifying the question you are going to ask. So I like that question. I actually I stole it from Fred Kaufman, who was my coach at Google. And but other people don't like that question. So the most important thing about the question you're going to ask to solicit feedback is that it sounds like you. And then when you get the feedback, you've got to reward the candor. You've got, and you've got to be sort of theatrical about rewarding the candor. At one point, at Google, some customer had given me one of those big glass statues. And I'm like, what do I do with this thing? And so I declared it the I was wrong. You were right statue. And I would go and put it around on people's desks. And that was really important the theatricality of a leader being eager to be proven wrong is important. Another thing that I did at Google to try to create this culture was I brought in I'm going to rewrite history a little bit. I'll explain to you why. I brought in a stuffed daisy. And it was actually a monkey and I got feedback later that that was racist. So correctly. I.

Cheryl Kim Scott Sheryl Sandberg NPR Kim Apple California cancer New York Fred Kaufman Google
"kim scott" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

Wisdom From The Top

07:04 min | 7 months ago

"kim scott" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

"Did you see at Google that was different? It was like the resurrection of a dream when I got there. The kind of culture that I had wanted and failed to create a juice. Felt to me anyway, alive and well at Google. And I don't want to take things away from other people who did not have great early experience at Google. But those first couple of years at Google for me were a magical time since 2004, I think 2004, I was there in 2004 to 2010. And what did you see there? I mean, just in terms of how they, how they functioned in the workplace. What worked? There were a number of things. I would say in just work, I say, we all want the same things at work. We know that humanity's superpower is our ability to collaborate. And we also, I think, most of us know that there's no horror that we can't sink to when we try to coerce one another. And yet, so many companies optimize for this sort of coercive management techniques. And Google really didn't do that. So for example, if you didn't like your boss, you could switch teams without even talking to your boss. That doesn't sound very radical candor. But when power is involved, you've got to sort of tilt the balance of power. You've got to create checks and balances. A single manager could not hire whoever they wanted. This was a big drink of water for me, 'cause I was used to being my own little dictator. And I was told, you know, we don't trust you. We trust teams more than we trust individuals. No. Manager, no matter what kind of reputation you have for hiring great people, can make unilateral hiring decisions. You couldn't fire people Willy nilly. There had to go through a process. You couldn't decide who got paid what bonuses. And that effort to strip unilateral decision making power away from managers really meant that there was there was less bullying and we've read a lot. I'm not saying there was no harassment. There was certainly harassment at Google. But last there, then I had seen elsewhere. I mean, the other thing that I noticed was that I was paid. I compared the CTO and my cofounder at juice, also went to Google around the same time that I did. And we compared our offer letters. And I was just assuming that I would get paid a lot less than he was a man. He was an engineer, and I wasn't. And I had no idea. I knew that I had been mad about being underpaid in previous jobs. But I had no idea the sort of tax that it took on me. I was really much more able to give my whole self to that job and to work harder. Because this sort of invisible tax of resentment was just gone. And then the other thing that I noticed at Google was that there was really a very strong culture of respect there. I'll never forget being Matt cuts. It was an early engineer there. I know that. Yeah, great guy. Somebody I had gotten to know and like, and he and I went to we were concerned about an AdSense policy. And we went to Larry together. One of the founders together. And we were having an argument. Matt and I had one position, Larry had another. And Matt, at one point, was sort of yelling at Larry. I was worried he was going to get fired, and then I looked at Larry's face. And he had this big grim. And he loved the fact that Matt was pushing back. And he was really encouraging him. And that made a big impression on me. I was I felt from one of the first times in my career free at work. Even more free at work than I did in my own company. So from what I understand, you thought this was so interesting that you wanted to apply it to your own team. You basically wanted your own team. You encouraged the hundred people working under you to criticize you to tell you when you were wrong. Is that right? To really just be candid with you. Yeah, yeah. And this I learned actually from Sheryl Sandberg, who is my boss. I had to give, I had to give a presentation to the founders and the CEO about how the AdSense business was doing. And I walked into the meeting and there is Sergey Brin, one of the other founders on an elliptical trainer wearing toe shoes and a bright blue spandex unitard. Not really one of those expecting to see. And there in the other corner of the room was Eric Schmidt, doing his emails like his brain had been plugged into the machine. So probably like you in such a situation, I felt a little bit nervous. How in the world was I supposed to get these people's attention? And luckily for me, the AdSense business was on fire and when I said how many new AdSense customers we had added over the last couple of months, Eric almost fell off his chair. He's like, this is incredible. Do you need more marketing dollars? Do you need more engineering, resources? So I'm feeling like the meeting's going all right. In fact, I now believe that I am a genius. And as I left the room, I walk past Gerald and I'm expecting a high 5, a pat on the back. And instead, Sheryl says to me, why don't you walk back to my office with me? And I thought, oh, wow. I screwed something up in there, and I'm about to hear about it. And Cheryl began the conversation, not by telling me what I had done wrong. But what had gone well, not in the feedback sandwich, I think there's a less polite term for that. Not in the feedback. Sandwich sense of the word. But eventually, Cheryl said, you said I'm a lot in there, were you aware of it? And with this, I raised a huge sigh of relief, and I made this kind of brush off gesture with my hand. I'm like, yeah, I know, it's a verbal tick. It's no big deal, really. And then Cheryl said, I know this great speech coach. I bet Google would pay for it. Would you like an introduction? And once again, I made this brush off gesture with my hand. I said, no, I'm busy. I don't have time for a speech coach. And then Cheryl stop, she looked me right in the eye, and she said, I can see when you do that thing with your hand that I'm going to have to be a lot more direct with you. When you say every third word, it makes you sound stupid. Now she's got my full attention. And some people might say it was mean of Sheryl to say I sounded stupid, but it was really the kindest thing she could have done for me at that moment in my career. Because if she hadn't used just those words with me. And crucially, she would not have used those words with other people on her team who were perhaps better listeners than I was. But she hadn't used just those words with me. I never would have gone to see the speech coach. And I wouldn't have learned that she was not exaggerating. I literally said every third word. And this was news to me because I had raised millions of dollars for two different startups, giving presentations. I thought I was pretty good at it. And it really got me to thinking, what was it about Cheryl that made it so seemingly easy for her to tell me? But also, why had no one else told me? It was almost like I had been marching through my whole career with a giant hunger spinach between my teeth. And nobody had had the courtesy to tell me that it was there. And as I thought about it,.

Google Larry Matt Willy nilly Cheryl Sheryl Sandberg Sergey Brin juice Eric Schmidt Sheryl Gerald Eric
"kim scott" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

Wisdom From The Top

08:07 min | 7 months ago

"kim scott" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

"Which is a very natural and normal human reaction. Right? I mean, when you get on the balcony, you look down on it, you want to say Kim, you gotta tell bob, but at the same time, when we're off the balcony and on the dance floor, we don't want to hurt his feelings. And if he does say, wow, Kim, she's awful, she's such a meanie. And he starts to see that idea in the company, it could, it could become toxic. It could, although, what was becoming toxic and what usually creates toxicity was that I wasn't doing anything about the fact that he was doing suboptimal work. And I realized if I don't fire bob, I'm gonna lose all my best performers. So I sat down and have a conversation with bob that I should have frankly started ten months previously. And when I finished explaining to him where things stood, he looked at me right in the eye and he said, why didn't you tell me? And now I realized that by not telling bob, just trying to be nice, quote unquote, nice. I'm having to fire him because of it, not so nice after all. And it was terrible. It was a terrible moment. It was bad for me. It was much worse for bob, of course, but it was also terrible for the whole team. And it was terrible for our results for our ability to achieve our goals. And this is the most common management mistake I've ever seen. I've seen it happen over and over and over again. I'm assuming that at that point in your life and career you had no formal management training. No, absolutely not. You were sort of learning on the job, which is how a lot of young startup founders learn. Yes. Even managers at really big companies with big L and D budgets often get very little management training and the management training they do get is often not very good. You mention another employee named Derek. And this is a very typical. I've seen this throughout my career and Derek is somebody who is in customer service who is excellent. And his job just terrific everyone loved him. Customers loved him. People would send a baked goods, and you wanted to promote him, and he was like, not interested. Yeah, he didn't want a promotion because he, what he really wanted was a Roland Broadway. And so what he wanted to do was come into work, do great work, leave it 5, and then go be in these off Broadway productions. So I decided that I would hire someone else to run customer service. And that was the right decision. If someone says they don't want the job, don't make them take it. But the problem was that I kind of wrote off Derek. And Derek was very frustrated. The person who I did hire didn't really value the role of customer service. What he really wanted to do was to have my boss's job. He wanted to be the CEO of the company. And he looked down his nose on the work that his team was doing. And he sort of thought, you know, customer service is you just hire B players to do customer service. And Derek was not a B player. He did great work. Yeah. But his boss didn't respect him. And didn't respect his work and didn't honor or value his work. We wrote him off his low potential. And there is no such thing as a low potential human being. And eventually Derrick got sick of being treated this way and he quit. And then the baked goods quit coming. And our customer satisfaction went down and it really hurt the business. And so it's so important that you reward great performance. And you don't set up a situation in which everyone is obsessed with promotion. And obsessed with management. Being a manager is it is an important job, but it's not the be all and end all. There's a lot of different ways to navigate your career. So knowing what you know now, 20 years later, let's do that scenario. You go to Derek and you see you're awesome. I want to promote you to run the customer support team, Derek says Kim, I really, I'm not interested. I'm happy where I am. What do you do next? I would have hired someone to who wanted to manage the team to manage the team. But I wouldn't have hired the guy I hired. I would have made sure that Derek got to interview his boss. Right. And tell me what he thought. That is crucial. And that's all part of going back to creating checks and balances. You don't want to give any manager who you hire sort of unilateral decision making authority. So you want to make sure that the people who are going to work for someone get to interview them and that they have a say in who their boss is. So that's number one. Number two is I would have honored Derek as an expert. And when new people were coming onto the team, I would have said, if you have a question about how to handle something, go ask Derek. And I would have even maybe changed his metrics a little bit so that he could spend some percentage of his time. If he wanted to do this, which Derek would have wanted to do, teaching people instead of doing the job because you get, you know, in World War II, the U.S. Air Force would bring its very best pilots back and have them teach new pilots. And the first and the Germans, meanwhile, just flew their pilots till they crashed and died. And it had short term benefit for the Germans, but a long-term negative impact. So you want to make sure that you're finding the people who are best in a role who may not want the next big job, but you want to set them up as sort of the heat the word guru. But the go to people that others can turn to and can learn from. So that you're honoring them for their expertise. When we come back in just a moment, Kim Scott finds the workplace culture she dreamt of and develops the managerial style, she's become known for, not at a startup, but at Google. Stay with us, I'm guy rise and you're listening to wisdom from the top. Support for this podcast and the following message come from Zoom, half a million businesses connect using Zoom, a single platform for phone, chat, workspaces, events, apps, and video, zoom enables real-time collaboration for teams around the globe, zoom secure and reliable platform, it's easy to manage, use, and customize for large enterprises, small businesses, and individuals alike. Zoom, how the world connects. Support for this podcast comes from NPR sponsor tagger media, want to level up your influencer marketing campaigns, but bogged down by complicated tech or inaccurate data, meet tagger, deleting influencer marketing platform that's actually easy to use. Taggers award winning platform helps top global brands and agencies maximize their ROI throughout every phase of planning, discovery, activation, and reporting. To demo the sleek intuitive platform head to tagger media dot com slash wisdom. Hey, welcome back to wisdom from the top. I'm guy raz. So it's 2004 and Kim Scott is looking to up her Nigeria skills at an established tech giant. So who does she call? An old business school classmate. You happen to have a classmate from business school, whose name was Sheryl Sandberg who was working at Google at the time. You called her and said, hey, does Google have any openings and you went through a rigorous, I think, 27 interview process. And eventually got an offer to lead a team of a hundred people working on AdSense, which ads for small and medium sized businesses. Tell me what was struck you when you first got to Google because you had come from a position where you were managing people and admittedly badly. Yeah. What.

Derek bob Kim Kim Scott Derrick U.S. Air Force Google NPR Sheryl Sandberg Nigeria
"kim scott" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

Wisdom From The Top

07:31 min | 7 months ago

"kim scott" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

"About this, people are shouting at each other in the office. But having fun. And moving quickly. That was a great, that was a great experience. The bad experience that I had Delta three was happen when we had to do layoffs. And there, for some reason, the leadership of the company did not talk directly to people. They sent in somebody who, am I allowed to curse on your partner? Sure. They sent somebody in who I can only describe as a paid asshole to sort of do the dirty work. And it was really almost kind of a betrayal. Because I remember thinking these people are so direct in most cases. But in this moment, when directness and respect are most required, because if you fire someone in the right way, it can actually be almost an affirming experience. And if you fire someone in the wrong way, it's devastating. All right, so you eventually leave you go to the next, a different startup. Which is a commercial mortgage, I guess, Internet service provider is called capital thinking? Yes, exactly. And a similarly challenging experience with bad management. Yeah, so in my very first job when I was back in Moscow, I had a boss who paid me less than half of what I should have been paid, a man. And this infuriated me. This infuriated me. And when I talked to him about it, it sort of went from bad to worse. So when I took the job at capital thinking, the CEO of that company was a woman, and I thought, well, that won't happen to me now. And I helped her recruit the team. And one of the people who we hired one of my peers, I learned shortly after he joined, was getting paid, I don't know, 30 or 40% more than I was. And I wonder, like why would this be? He didn't have any more experience. He didn't have more responsibility. And I went to the CEO when I asked her. I said, why are you paying him so much more than me? And she looked at me and she said, well, he's got a wife and child to support. And I was like, 5 times more angry at her that I was at at the man who had underpaid me. And that's not fair either. I mean, I think both of them were doing it for the same reason. They were underpaying me because they could. They could afford to do it. I would take the job, and so they did it. So you decide, I am going to take all of these learnings about bad management and I'm going to be a good manager and start my own company, which was called juice of software company. And what was the idea behind that company? So the idea of juice was that it was sort of like Google Spreadsheets, but it all happened and excel. So it pulled the data live data into excel. This was a long time ago. So it seemed revolutionary at the time. And I tell entrepreneurs this all the time. When you start a company, you don't think about it this way, but you're kind of conducting your own Stanford prison experiment. By the way, I just saw zimbardo at a restaurant. Did you? Yes. Wow. Yeah. They said hi to him, yeah. Yeah. I admire his work. I mean, controversial, but very interesting. But the issue is, when you start a company, you're setting up all of these. You're setting up compensation systems, you're setting up systems for hiring people. You're setting up systems for how people get fired. And those systems really change people's behavior. And if you don't design those systems, very consciously for justice, you're going to get systemic injustice. And I believe, I think an awful lot of entrepreneurs do. I believe, well, if I'm in charge, everything will be sweetness and light. And all of these bad things that happen to me throughout my career will not happen to any anyone, but of course that was unfortunately untrue, because I designed the system for my own control instead of designing a system around checks and balances, which are what prevents power from corrupting your company. From what I understand, you want to create a positive kind of work environment, right? Yes. Which lots of people have that ambition. Some people succeed. But you write about some of the mistakes that you made particularly around hiring and you talk about one of your employees, you call them bob. It's an alias. But he's a guy. You loved him. Everybody loved bob, right? Yeah, bob was smart, charming, funny. Bob would do stuff like we were at a manager off site one day. And it was at a period in the company's history where everyone was especially busy. So we were playing one of those endless get to know you games. And everybody's getting sort of more and more stress. Do we really have time to be doing this? And bob was the guy who had the courage to raise his hand and to say, I can tell everybody's really stressed and I want to get to know you all. I've got a great idea and it'll be really fast. And so bob says, let's just go around the table and confess what candy our parents used when potty training us really weird, but really fast. And then for the next ten months, every time there's a tense moment in a meeting, bob would whip out just the right piece of candy for the right person at the right moment. So bob brought a little levity to the office. Everybody loved working with bomb. One problem with bob. He was doing terrible work. He was incompetent. Yeah, totally. And I was so puzzled. One problem with bob was, he was incompetent. He couldn't get his work done. And I was really puzzled 'cause he had this incredible resume, these great recommendations, great history of accomplishments. I learned much later that he was smoking pot in the bathroom three times a day, which may be explained all that candy he had all the time. But I didn't know any of that at the time. All I knew was that bob was handing stuff into me, shame in his eyes. And I would say something along the lines to bob of oh bob, this is a great start. You're so smart. You're so awesome. Everyone loves working with you. Maybe you can make it just a little bit better. And so let's kind of double click on why I would say such a banal thing. And I'm going to kind of look at this story through the radical candor lens. The framework. Part of the problem there was that I really did care about and empathize with bob. I liked him, and I didn't want to hurt his feelings. Sure. And so that is what I call in radical candor ruinous empathy. Like I didn't want to tell him that his work wasn't nearly good enough and therefore I wasn't giving him an opportunity to correct it. And I was frustrating the whole team. So ruinous empathy. Now, but if I'm honest with myself, there was something a little bit more insidious going on. Because bob was popular in the office and bob also was sort of sensitive. And so I was afraid that if I told bob and no one certain terms that his work wasn't nearly good enough, that he would get upset. He might even start to cry. And then everybody would think I was a big, you know what? So the part of me that was concerned about my reputation as a leader was.

bob zimbardo Moscow Stanford Google
"kim scott" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

Wisdom From The Top

07:26 min | 7 months ago

"kim scott" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

"The demand for future of work consultants has skyrocketed in the wake of the pandemic. In a large part of it has been driven by employees and their expectations around work. When I got started in radio back in the 1990s, the advice I was given be the first one in, the last one out, outwork, everyone else, roll with the punches, don't complain, and you'll succeed. But today, that advice just won't fly. The evidence is clear. All kinds of employee surveys that have been carried out over the past year or so show that our relationship to work is changing, especially among younger workers. They don't want to be married to their jobs. They don't want to live to work. They want a fulfilling, healthy, balanced life, to clock out at 6 p.m. and leave work at work, especially on weekends. Employees at big companies are speaking up and speaking out, standing up against management decisions, organizing and taking back a lot of power. Now, all of this may seem new, but my guest today, Kim Scott might call it the latest iteration of radical candor. Kim's book called radical candor lays out an argument that calls for more honesty, more humanity, and a healthier balance of power in the workplace. Kim spent much of her early career working at a series of startups before she went to Google in 2004 to manage its advertising business. In 2011, she joined Apple, where Kim was asked to train managers on how to lead with kander. It's an approach she learned the hard way after years of making mistakes of her own. But even so, Kim didn't go to college thinking she was going to be some big shot business guru. In fact, her plan was to fight the Cold War as a Slavic literature major. That's absolutely right. I studied arms control and I was going to I was going to end the Cold War. And look, I succeeded. But with that with studying Slavic literature, what was your idea? I mean, did you intend to go into academia in some form? No, I never intended to go into academia. It seemed to constricting. But what I had a very clear idea that I was going to understand the Russian culture and the American culture and help us all get along. So that was my, that was my 18 year old ambition. Tell me about this job that you had out of college because from what I understand it was you went to go work for a diamond company, which eventually would morph into a diamond business. Yes. Yes. So initially, actually I went to Moscow was then the Soviet Union to study armed military conversion, which is swords into plow shares. So I was writing an article for which I was paid $6 a month. About this. And that turned into a job with the Soviet companies fund, which was a fund started by battery march financial management to invest in these converting Soviet defense facilities. And then that ended when the Soviet Union fell. So I stayed looking for a job and wound up working for a diamond cutting company. Which was, which was not really what I expected when I studied Slavic literature, but life takes unpredictable turns. Because actually Moscow is the center of diamond cutting, like some of the great, right? Yeah, the diamonds are actually mined in yakutia, which is in the far east and Russia and mostly north of the Arctic circle. And that is where the diamonds are mined, but then they're cut and polished in Moscow, a bunch of them. Something like a quarter of the world's diamonds come from yakutia. Your job was to gather recruit diamond cutters who already had jobs and to convince them to come work for this American based company? Yeah, this was my first management job, actually. And I thought it was going to be so easy. I just waved some dollars out, right? Yeah. Yeah. The ruble was worthless and worth less and less every single day. And I had dollars. And I thought, you know, as soon as I just told these people, what I was going to pay them, that they would come work for me. But that, of course, was not how it played out. It turned out they wanted a picnic. They didn't just want the money. So I'm on the outskirts of Moscow, drinking a bottle of vodka with these diamond cutters. And by the time we finished the bottle of vodka, it becomes clear to me that what they wanted was not just money. They wanted to know that they would have a boss who gave a damn. They wanted to know that if things went to hell in Russia, which they felt like they might do it any moment, there would be someone on the outside who had helped get them them and their families out who would really care. And this was the moment in my life when I thought, oh, management is more interesting. This whole, this whole idea of management is actually it's about human relationships and that's why I studied in addition to wanting to save the world from nuclear Holocaust. That's why I studied Russian literature. Because human relationships are really endlessly interesting. So this experience in severe nascent experience in management in your early 20s must have kind of sparked something because you did this for a couple years and then decide to go to business school. Yes. I mean, to be honest, part of the reason I went to business school was it was the shortest of all the next steps I could take. And it seemed to have the most wide open exit options. So I knew I didn't want to be a lawyer. I knew I didn't want to be a doctor. I had no idea what I wanted to do. So I was like, but I knew I wanted to leave. I've been in Russia at this point for four years. One mafia was beheading its competing mafia and leaving the heads on stakes around the suburbs of the city. And I thought, you know, this is a good time to get out of here. All right, so after working in Moscow, you decided to go to business school. And after getting your MBA at Harvard, you go right to work for a company called Delta three, right? Yeah, based in Jerusalem. Now I was back 20 years ago as a correspondent there. So I know that Israelis can be very blunt. They don't. They tell you exactly what they think. And this was kind of shocking for you when you got there, right? Because when you got to this company, because you weren't used to that kind of direct, almost aggressive feedback. Yeah, no, I had been raised in the south. And so, you know, I was definitely taught if you don't have anything nice to say, don't say anything at all. And that was certainly not the, that was not the attitude. And I really, it really was, this was good management, actually. I did see some good management at Delta three. Noam bardin, who wound up was the CTO. He wound up starting ways, actually, was the CEO of ways. And I remember watching him argue with his with his team. And I remember thinking, you know, he really respects these people. And when he when he disagrees vehemently it's a sign of respect. It's not a sign of disrespect. Because initially, you're thinking, this is unlike anything I've experienced, but people, you write.

Kim yakutia Moscow Kim Scott Soviet companies fund Soviet Union Russia Arctic circle Apple Google Harvard Jerusalem Noam bardin
"kim scott" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

TED Talks Daily

07:04 min | 9 months ago

"kim scott" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

"Inclusive workplaces and communities. Hey, it's Adam grant. I host work life, a podcast from the Ted audio collective. I'm an organizational psychologist, and the show is about how to make work not suck. In the upcoming season, I'm sitting down with some of my favorite thinkers, leaders and achievers to rethink assumptions that we often take for granted. Today I'm talking with longtime PepsiCo CEO Indra nooyi about what it means to be a great leader and a great mentor. Find and follow work life without him grant. That's me. Wherever you're listening. Support for TED Talks daily comes from LinkedIn. Let's pretend for a moment that you're about to launch a campaign. It tested well, your entire team is happy. Everything is going according to plan, except for that one thought in the back of your head. How do I ensure the people I want to target will be in the mindset to receive my message? The answer? LinkedIn. Because when you market on LinkedIn, your message reaches people who are ready to engage with your business. And that means your advertising campaign will work as hard as it can, as soon as you launch it. Do business where business is done. Get a $100 advertising credit toward your first LinkedIn campaign. Visit LinkedIn dot com slash ted-talks. LinkedIn dot com slash TED Talks terms and conditions apply. Now what's next, a podcast from Morgan Stanley helps make sense of life during and after the pandemic. With nearly two decades of experience reporting on culture and the economy, host inari glinton meets people who are looking for solutions to the cracks exposed by the pandemic. From how we care for our children and the elderly to what we do with shopping malls, these are stories of everyday people trying to figure things out and where they're finding hope. Search for now what's next wherever you listen to podcasts. We all have our biases. The set of assumptions that we make and the things we don't notice about people's race, gender, religion, sexual orientation, appearance, another traits. They come from the part of our mind that jumps to conclusions that we might not even be aware that we have. I really can't tell you the number of times people assumed I was the receptionist. When I was an executive at the company. That kind of bias gets in the way of good collaboration, performance and decision making. It creates an invisible tax of resentment and frustration. The more frustrated we are, the more silent we are likely to be. And the more silent we are, the less we may be able to do our best work. The good news though is, bias is not inevitable. So here's how to disrupt bias in three steps. The first step is to create a shared vocabulary. Sometimes buy a shows up in big embarrassing gaffes, but more often it comes out in the little words and phrases we choose, which are packed with assumptions. In meetings especially, these often go unnoticed or even worse, people notice, but don't know what to say. That's why we recommend coming up with a shared word or phrase that everyone agrees to use to disrupt bias attitudes or behaviors. Examples teams are using our bias alert, stoplight, or even throwing up a peace sign. Leaders often ask us to give them the right words. But the best words are the ones your team will actually say, not the ones that leaders impose. So talk to your team. My very favorite is the one that you recommended tri air. Purple flag. When someone says or does something biased, we'll say purple flag and maybe we'll even wave a purple flag. It's not a red flag. It's a friendly purple flag. It helps us become more aware of our blind spots. Purple blood purple flag. Thanks for pointing that out. I've been noticing lately, I use a lot of sight metaphors that often portray disabilities like being visually impaired and negative ways. But I'm committed to doing better I'm working on it. I am too. Another great shared vocabulary trick is to ask members of your team to respond to bias with an I statement. And I statement invites the other person in understand things from your perspective rather than calling them out. Like, I don't think you're going to take me seriously when you're calling me honey. Or I don't think you meant that the way that it sounded. Usually, when people's biases are pointed out to them clearly and compassionately, they apologize and correct things going forward. Usually, but not always. That brings us to the second step. Create a shared norm for how to respond when your bias is pointed out. When my bias is flagged, I can only be glad that I'm learning something new if I can move past the shame. I hate the idea that I've harmed someone. And when I feel ashamed, I rarely respond well. So it's really helpful to have that shared norm, so that I know what to say in those moments. We recommend you start with thank you for pointing that out. It took courage for that person to disrupt the bias. So it's important to acknowledge that. Then there are two choices on what to say next. When I get it, or two, I don't get it. Could you explain more after the meeting? The other day, you and I were recording a podcast. And I said, HR serves three masters and you ate the purple flag. I knew what I had done wrong. Why was I using a slavery metaphor? We hit pause. I thanked you, and we re recorded. It was no big deal. The thing I love about the purple flag is how efficient it is. Flagging the bias didn't prevent us from getting the work done. In fact, it helps us work together more honestly. It's even harder when I don't know what I did wrong. Once I asked someone out to lunch, out came the purple flag. I had no idea why. So I was relieved to know what to say next. Thank you for pointing it out. But I don't get it. Could we talk after the meeting? Afterwards, the person reminded me that they were fasting for Ramadan. It instantly made sense to me, and I discovered something that I could be more aware of. But to get to awareness, I had to move through shame. It was hard to say, I don't get it. The shared norm helped me listen and learn rather than getting defensive. The fact that there was a norm at all, reassured me that other people are making similar kinds of mistakes and that we're all learning together. Disrupting bias may start off feeling uncomfortable. But with time and consistency, we can build the stamina we need to push through it. When it becomes routine for us to notice our biases, all of a sudden, they feel less threatening. It's hard to break bias habits, yet we can change the pattern with consistent effort. We've got to be patient with ourselves and with others. Patient and also persistent. Yeah. Which brings us to our last step. Once a team has come up with a shared vocabulary and agrees on the shared norm for how to respond. The team should commit to disrupting bias at least once in every meeting. If bias isn't flagged in a meeting, it doesn't mean there wasn't any bias. It just means either nobody noticed or nobody knew what to say. When we are silent about bias, we reinforce it. And it can't be just the targets of bias who pointed out. Observers and leaders have got to speak up. We all have a responsibility. By.

LinkedIn Adam grant inari glinton Indra nooyi TED Talks PepsiCo Morgan Stanley Ramadan
"kim scott" Discussed on  Smooth Jazz Weekend Radio Show

Smooth Jazz Weekend Radio Show

03:46 min | 1 year ago

"kim scott" Discussed on Smooth Jazz Weekend Radio Show

"Was a little bit of greg saturday with old in. Thank you for being all in while you're listening remember. You don't have to wait until the weekend. We own demand anytime anywhere on your favorite mobile app by the way. I am just surprised as you are that. This hour goes by so fast calls now to show. Today's kim scott featuring out theory name in whiteside with a nineteen seventy eight i believe in houston slash. Chaka khan cover. I'm every woman is been an honor. An absolute pleasure.

greg kim scott whiteside Chaka khan houston
"kim scott" Discussed on Mint Arrow Messages

Mint Arrow Messages

06:09 min | 1 year ago

"kim scott" Discussed on Mint Arrow Messages

"I love self-help books. I love business books. And one of the books that i picked up somewhat recently was radical candor and and i am not necessarily recommending it. I think there are good things about it so for anyone that is gonna come out me about like that's has a lot of ribs in it does so don't read it if if that's something that will bother you but also for anyone who's like that books amazing. I can't believe you're gonna challenge it. I think they're really good things not book. But here's what happened to me. So i started reading radical candor and i was probably halfway through it and it really challenges you to get really honest and give very clear transparent feedback with people. It has a lot of other. There are a lot of other principles that teaches. But that's kind of the main when right. So this is one of the quotations. That kind of sums up the whole idea of the book which is it's brutally hard to tell people when they are screwing up. It is just so uncomfortable. Meals loves that right giving feedback. I don't it's hard. it's it's it's extremely uncomfortable. A lot of time in has white personality especially discovered my personality chasing usually celebrate it chases. Yeah well we are trying to celebrate it but a he does try to kind of typically avoid things where i usually try to lean into them but this book was even more challenging me in a way where i was like okay. Giving clear feedback is a good thing and in the book says clearest kind and she tells this whole story about how the author talks about how. She's walking her dog and the stranger and she hadn't really disciplined the dog very well. She hadn't really taught it to sit or stay or listen to commands and a stranger stopped her. And basically said you're gonna you're gonna die because of you because you have not taught your dog how to listen to commands. This is the exact quote she says. I can tell you. Love your dog but that dog will die if you teach it to sit so the author kim scott talks about how she realizes that she needs to teach her dog to sit so that her dog doesn't run out in the street and in the same sense in business or in other aspects of life. If you don't tell people when they're doing something wrong then they're probably going to resign later on. Once they realized that you just have been withholding that information from them and this is a little bit different. But i remember when. I had a ballet teacher when i was probably like. I don't know eight or nine years old and at the very beginning of the year she called me corinne and i just didn't correct her because i felt like it would make her feel awkward so i just kept letting corinne and even though my name is pronounced karen and then at the end of the year my mom i think like was that my recital or something and she called me corinne. My mom looked at me and was like you haven't told her how to say your name this whole time. And so ever since then. I've tried to correct people quickly unless i'm like this. Is someone out you know the delta counter or in the grocery store or something that i will probably never see again in my lifetime. Sometimes those people. I won't say anything to but if it's someone. I think there's even a small chance that i'm going to interact with them again. I always tell them. Oh it's actually korean. And that's just something that i've learned to even if it makes them. I'm so sorry like if it makes them feel uncomfortable. I'd still just rather have that interaction upfront than wait a really long time. And then it's then it gets weird right when you're like you've actually been saying my name wrong for a really long time. You know so anyway back to my blunder. So i was reading this book and really trying to internalize it and trying to challenge myself to have radical candor in all aspects of my life and there was a situation where i was in a group setting and someone did something that i was like. Oh that made me really uncomfortable and not me personally necessarily but just like they didn't do something toward me to make me feel uncomfortable stomach sense but there was an interaction within the group that i was like all. That doesn't sit well with me. And most of all i was like i really respect this person and i don't think they understand how maybe that came across so after in private which i think is a total key like you always want to give feedback especially if it's something that is a little bit like corrective or were is a criticism of any kind. You always wanna do that in private. So i told this person in private later on. Like hey. I don't know if you realize this. But i think you know this may have come across this way and if i were you i want to know and i don't regret necessarily telling them that because i think i that's true i would have wanted to know if i was if the situation was reversed but i walked away from that feeling kind of awkward. Like oh like. I think that was right but i don't know that i delivered it all that well so i went home to. I was in utah like a week or two later. And i was there for this business retreat and i was hanging out with my dad and i was like dad. Let me tell you about the situation. So i tell him the whole story and i was like a you have to give feedback to people all the time like you were just barely an emission presidency for eighteen months where you worked with all of these missionaries where you were having to kind of give them correct guidance and you're a senior partner at a law firm. My dad's patent attorney and know you work with all these associates that come in. They're fresh out of school and it's like their first robe job out of law school and i know you have to give them corrective feedback all the time. How do you do that. So that's kind of what we're gonna talk about. Today was his advice to me. which was after. I told him the whole story. He was like well cran. Like i think it was good that you gave this honest feedback. But here's how i would have done it..

corinne kim scott karen utah
"kim scott" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

02:23 min | 1 year ago

"kim scott" Discussed on 600 WREC

"And so as much as Joe Biden would like to talk about unity and togetherness, and his inaugural address into the dress to Congress. Pushing critical race theory is going to do the opposite. The article says that there are two priorities. The first is incorporating is this teaching and learning practice and the second is for a curriculum to include a strong focus on news literacy as a means? To meaningfully participate in our democracy and distinguished fact from misinformation. The more I see people on the left talking about snuffing out misinformation. The more I see them actually attempting to win arguments by claiming that everything else is misinformation and censoring them into silence. Yes, I mean, that's that's absolutely what we see time and time again with the cancel culture that's pervasive throughout. Society these days is yes. You are intimidated into silence and we see this. I'm in a pop culture of space. We see this in the political speech face. We see this. I'm just in everyday family life and interaction between individuals and their friends. I think that's why you see so much of what people post on Social Media's, You know, re sharing info graphics that they think well. You know, either gain them woke points with their friends and family who follow them on there or will shield them from criticism to say, Hey, you were silent on this issue. That's a problem for me. That's problematic. So we've gotten to this point where right people are Police, their speeches being police. Not necessarily. You know the jury by the government, but the fact oh by the government, and that people will get fielded and canceled from society if they don't continue to peddle a certain line on bright now critical race theory and the idea that America is systemically Racists, which, of course, Kim Scott pushed back again. In response to find the dress to Congress. If you don't subscribe to that we do see people starting to get marginalized because of it, Benjamin Franklin said. Whoever would overthrow the liberty of a nation must begin by subduing the free nous of speech. Anything that smacks of censorship smacks of intellectual vacancy. Fear of the validity of another person's position and in authoritarians desire to control and they should all be rejected. Sara Anderson, director of policy of FreedomWorks, Thanks for being our guest. Michael, Thanks.

Joe Biden Kim Scott Benjamin Franklin Sara Anderson Michael Congress FreedomWorks second first two priorities America
"kim scott" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

01:49 min | 1 year ago

"kim scott" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"Tell her story and how one woman one leader of hers. One boss of hers taught her how to do the very thing she now. All coaches, others to do And if you don't care personally good luck with everything else, And it's so true relationship stone scale, but culture does and how that boss treats other people on how they care. Well, that makes all the difference in the world and it's never easy being a boss I am on and for anyone who is well, it's like being a mother or father. Anyone who thinks that's a duck walk hasn't done it. It's all I can say and everybody's nodding Who's at either of those titles, mother, father or boss? That's no duck walk when we come back more with Kim Scott here on our American stories. Hi. We're the producers were the producers of our American stories on our American network. And we would like to hear your story if you or someone you know, has an interesting story that you would like to share with America. Simply email us a pitcher and a paragraph picture and a paragraph to your story at our American network dot org's just a picture in apparent Yep, That's all you need. Is you or someone you know. Serve in the military. Tell us about the picture in a paragraph to your story at our American network dot or you or someone You know that something dramatic happened. We want to know about the picture of yourself in a paragraph describing something that happened in your life you would like to share with America and the rest of the world as someone ever done something for you. That changed your life. Share it with us. Share it with us here with us. We're just having a bad day. We're here about we want to hear about share your story with us on our American stories..

America Kim Scott
"kim scott" Discussed on AP News

AP News

12:38 min | 2 years ago

"kim scott" Discussed on AP News

"President trump's refusal during last night's debate to condemn white supremacists who backed his campaign is drawing rebukes from Joe Biden and GOP lawmakers asked if you'd specifically call out one white supremacist group known as the proud boys this was the president last night give me a name give me a white supremacist you can die problem SS and right product stand back instead bye bye didn't use different words today cease and desist on Capitol Hill I think in this specific music record because it directly because he did Mr Kim Scott the Senate's only black Republican the president later said he did not misspeak I don't know who the proud boys RB you ought to give me a definition because I really don't know who they are Sager mag ani Washington

trump Joe Biden GOP president Mr Kim Scott Senate ani Washington
Trump now says he does not know who Proud Boys are

AP News Radio

00:45 sec | 2 years ago

Trump now says he does not know who Proud Boys are

"President trump's refusal during last night's debate to condemn white supremacists who backed his campaign is drawing rebukes from Joe Biden and GOP lawmakers asked if you'd specifically call out one white supremacist group known as the proud boys this was the president last night give me a name give me a white supremacist you can die problem SS and right product stand back instead bye bye didn't use different words today cease and desist on Capitol Hill I think in this specific music record because it directly because he did Mr Kim Scott the Senate's only black Republican the president later said he did not misspeak I don't know who the proud boys RB you ought to give me a definition because I really don't know who they are Sager mag ani Washington

Donald Trump Joe Biden GOP President Trump Mr Kim Scott Senate Ani Washington
"kim scott" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

05:45 min | 2 years ago

"kim scott" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"If we don't win this election, and I firmly believe as in 2016, we're going to because the black vote you look at Kim Scott tonight when you listen to Ken Scott, you listen Teo Walker football players talking, just modeling speeches of how the truth of President Trump that he is not a racist. Races. He loves everyone in this country, and that's the president that we need. We don't need it. Democrats Democrats win by winds where we're done, it's over now. Sit. Are you a long time GOP person or did you jump on board when President Trump first started campaigning? No, I'm 64 years old. I've been a Republican my entire life, but I was never involved in politics until my wife said to me. Hey, honey, Trump's coming in town, and that was in 2015 into Hampshire. And will the president with New Hampshire this time all I think he will win New Hampshire. This time we only lost if I think it was less than one per cent actually in 2016, And if I was 20160.2% that he lost New Hampshire speed, Steve, is that correct? Did President Trump lose New Hampshire by about 0.2%? That's right. So I thought it was around one. But yes. I believe New Hampshire will flip this year to President Trump, Peter's God, Peters and Hope Sound Hopi Sound. Florida Republican Line isn't or Hobe SOUND, Florida I apologize for getting that wrong. Not a problem. It's on the East Coast, right near Jupiter in West Palm. So what do you think about another four years of a trump presidency? I think it's absolutely necessary. My family with Democratic for a lot of years. In fact, they were involved in Democratic politics for a lot of years. Thiss Democratic Party does not resemble the party. That's the way it used to be. They condone violence. They want people to be aggrieved and say that they can't get jobs because you know the government hasn't helped him enough. I don't recognize this party. They're Socialists. They lean to the left on buying has never accomplished anything in his career. My whole family's been involved in all the wars were won to Korea, Vietnam set drama retired veteran and we always will this country and the Democrats are trying to say in this country and to me, this election is so important. And I hope that we can win this because I don't know where the country's going to go. If we lose it, Debra in Philadelphia Texan, I will breathe a sigh of relief. If President Trump is reelected. We desperately need four more years for him to fix this country and repair all the damage that the Obama administration caused. Kevin's a Democrat in Mount Pleasant, Michigan. Kevin What do you think about another four years of a trump presidency? I think another four years of the Trump presidency is a mistake. It's lead our country down the wrong path. Andi, I don't think we'd be able to come back from it. You know, it was interesting to hear, you know, watched the Democratic convention last week. I started watching the Republican convention this week, and both sides agree that this is the most consequential election of our lifetime. And they're both using fear. Believe it or not, Teo trying get votes. Now, I believe the Republicans are using fabricated fear. You know, Fears of the black lives matter. Protestors of Antifa and things like that. Bringing on you know those People with the guns and ST Louis where the Democrats are bringing really fears. You know the fears of the pandemic fields of peers of racial injustice and police brutality and so another four years Trump is Not a good thing, Kevin. Tell us a little bit about yourself. Um, 30 years old. I'm a Democrat. Now. I used to be Republican back in high school. But with college that kind of changed a lot of my views. So now I see myself more as a democratic socialist more that Bernie side but Definitely going to vote for bike because you got and what kind of work do you do? Kevin? I work in a music shop. Thank you for calling in this evening Harms and Henderson Nevada Republican line. Hi, harm. Hi. You're on the air. What do you think about another four years of the trump presidency? Oh, yeah, Absolutely. I love him to be on another four years. We need person and drum. Continue the good work. We love it so much so brave and Democrats was giving all these countries that position and hey, I don't like false allowed my Children to grow and and enjoy the freedom of this country, and we need that right now, when I pray to God that he's gonna win next call is Kathy in Gainesville, Florida Independent line. Hi, Kathy. You're on the air we need. Trump is president and again. I'm retired military event in history of people in the military, both parties. But the Democrat Party nowadays is nothing like it was my grandmother's era. And when I grew up with in the Democratic Party, because that's the only way was supposed to vote until you start thinking about yourself, and it's like no Is not the only way to vote if you love this country, and if you put a lot of blood, sweat and tears into it, if you have family members that gave their lives for this country of both limbs for this country you don't want to lose if you.

President Trump Democrats president Democratic Party Kevin What New Hampshire Florida Teo Walker Democrat Party Kim Scott GOP Harms Hampshire Ken Scott Peters Kathy Debra East Coast Mount Pleasant
"kim scott" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

02:55 min | 2 years ago

"kim scott" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"A ten thousand dollar increase over less than three years so you get it as of less than three we've been here now just three as of a few days ago time flies but ten thousand dollars so that's a in a three year period so that's something really special they've never seen growth like that we're delivering for Americans and we're doing it for every race and color religion creed creating not only the most prosperous but also the most inclusive economy anywhere in the world I believe that it's the most inclusive economy anywhere in the world that's a great thing to create jobs and opportunity we designated nearly nine thousand opportunities owns and distressed communities where capital gains are long term investments are now taxed at zero opportunities owns have been incredible Kim Scott the senator great senator from South Carolina came to me two years ago and he had this idea and nobody knew it was going to work out the way it has but billions and billions of dollars are pouring into the communities part of that also is the fact that we do so well as an economy that people have the money to put in but it said there's probably never been anything like this tremendous wealth is now pouring into areas that for a hundred years so nothing no dollars nothing the thirty five million Americans who live in these areas have already seen their home values rise by twenty five billion dollars over the country my administration also understands that for our cities to thrive our citizens must be safe and they must be secure and that's why we are working with state and local governments through the revitalized project safe neighborhood you know that program project safe neighborhoods to adopt the most proven and effective crime fighting techniques we're also in acting landmark criminal justice reform to improve reentry programs and reduce all of the things that we try and strive so hard to take care of if you look at our prisons now we have people coming out and they're able to get jobs more than at any time ever in the history of our country that's because the economy is so good and we've given incentives and it's been an incredible success employers are really really happy and people are going back to jail have anywhere near the clip it's been something that's been incredible criminal justice reform I was asked by a group of people that won the very liberal side of things and we got a group of people that were on the very conservative side of things and we got it done nobody was able to get it done we got it done criminal justice reform and that's something we're very proud of is really working fantastically well as a lot of.

Kim Scott senator South Carolina
"kim scott" Discussed on Sports Talk 1050 WTKA

Sports Talk 1050 WTKA

02:12 min | 3 years ago

"kim scott" Discussed on Sports Talk 1050 WTKA

"Between Marquette and Villanova came right down to the wire. The golden eagles got a defensive stop on the final possession to hold off the defending champs sixty six sixty five snapped at eleven game winning streak for the Wildcats. Elsewhere at the break central Michigan on the road leading number twenty three buffalo forty-three thirty eight. I half action top rank Tennessee at home out in front of Florida twenty to eleven Florida's state leading Louisville seventeen fourteen got Texas Tech up on Homa twenty to thirteen finals this far TCU one at number seventeen. I was state ninety two eighty three not as one of this their first meeting of the season fifth ranked Kentucky made it ten straight wins. With a seventy one sixty seven victory over Mississippi State, number seven Michigan in Wisconsin in Ann Arbor. Sixty one fifty two eighth ranked North Carolina needed overtime to get by Miami and Chapel Hill. Eighty-five Michigan state snapped a three-game skid seventy nine fifty five over Minnesota. Clemson knocked off number eleven. Virginia Tech fifty nine fifty one in Lawrence tie game at the half turned into an eighty four seventy two Kansas victory over Oklahoma state and LSU bested Auburn Eighty-three seventy eight coming up at six eastern ACC showdown in Charlottesville second ranked Duke visiting number three Virginia Mike is chef ski ultra impressed with the way his freshman sensation Zion Williamson has handled the national spotlight so far this season where such high profile everything is screw is looked at closely. And so his his excellent place looked at by everybody. And and the thing about that kid is that he doesn't want all that attention, and he handles it. So well both of these teams eight and one in conference play the blue devils are going for the season. Sweep of the Cavaliers though, Spurs and jazz will tip off in Salt Lake City coming up at the top of the hour. Amongst tonight's match ups. You get the rockets and the thunder from Houston. Okay. See one nine out of ten holding down the three seat in the west rockets are in the five slot. Having won their last three games round three of the. Pebble Beach pro ams Paul Casey, fifteen hundred par for three shot lead over Lucas Glover. Woo Kim, Scott Langley Brian game at every and a bunch of other players, including Jordan Spieth, long leaderboard. Here are all five shots off the pace at minus ten alliance of American football kicks off its at arguing season tonight, San Diego. San Antonio eighty stern the televised game on CBS TV..

Michigan Villanova Florida golden eagles Lucas Glover rockets Mississippi State San Antonio Wildcats Kentucky Jordan Spieth Virginia Tech Ann Arbor North Carolina Paul Casey San Diego Tennessee Clemson Woo Kim LSU
"kim scott" Discussed on What's Next! with Tiffani Bova

What's Next! with Tiffani Bova

07:04 min | 3 years ago

"kim scott" Discussed on What's Next! with Tiffani Bova

"Welcome to the next podcast where I have the absolute pleasure of welcoming Kim Scott today, she is the author of three novels as well as the New York Times and Wall Street Journal bestseller, radical candor be a kick ass boss without losing your humanity. Previously, Kim was the co founder and CEO of juice software a collaboration startup. She led ads sense YouTube and doubleclick online sales and operations at Google before she joined apple to develop and teach a leadership seminar. She also has been CEO coach at dropbox while tricks, Twitter and several other tech companies earlier in her career she worked as a senior policy advisor at the FCC managed a pediatric clinic. In Costa, though, started a diamond cutting factory in Moscow and was an analyst on the Soviet companies fund. She received her MBA from Harvard and her BA from Princeton University. Welcome to the podcast. Thank you so much. It's great to be here. What it colorful bio love it. But before I get into that because because all ruin it. But before we get into that we're gonna jump into bullish embarrassed. And then I'm gonna dig into that that you know, journey you've been on a little bit. So as you know, I start off my podcast with something. I call bullish. Bearish bullish is you're really four something bearish is you are against it and nothing hopefully to painful, but it's just a way to get the juices flowing. So are you ready? I'm ready are right. The first one bullish or bearish managers will have to provide feedback to robots. I'm bullish. My kids. Do it every day to Siri. Do they argue with her argue with Alexa, all the time that I've actually I feel ridiculous. But I'm trying to teach them to be polite to Siri into Google because because when they curse at Google home many. They're just learning bad habits. So some of this stuff is just about habits. Well, good point. So I guess I'm a loss caused because lex all the time. All right. All right next. The next one is probably near and dear to your heart. The next one you can care and challenge people at the same time. Of course, very bullish. Couldn't be more bullish on that. Yes. And I can't wait to dig into that. And then this third one is a little more fun. And for those of you who are paying attention to the bio, you will understand this question. All right. You ready for the last one? I'm ready. All right, man. Made diamonds are as beautiful as those made naturally. Absolutely experts. Cannot tell the difference. Oh, I didn't expect you to say. It is true that they they can absolutely full even someone who has twenty thirty years of experience. Wow. What you know as my name is Tiffany, I was named after the movie not the jewelry store. However. And I'm spent with an I not a Y. So, you know, forever in my life. It's spelt wrong. But be spelt wrong spelt, the Jewish and my mom's best friends used to call me. The the dad was the husband was like sort of standing grandfather's grandfather did live where I was. And so he used to call me Harry Winston. When I was a little kid. He'd be like, hey, Harry Winston and. For those of you who don't know Harry Winston diamond cutter for Tiffany now has its own store. So that's my we are connected on the diamond level. I'm forever. They are. And I really I have to say that is not the answer. I expected you to say for sure I had a bearish in there. But no, no. You got three bulls there. Wow. I don't know if that's ever happened. Well, listen back. All right. Well, you know, it's always a I always I I'm an optimist. There you go. There you go. Well, so we met because you had joint off site that we had done it Salesforce. Just loved your presentation on radical countered. So I connected with you. We've kept in touch, and I said who better to sort of start us off in two thousand nineteen with how to just be not only better bosses, but understand this sort of interpersonal relationship. Between carrying about people and being able to give feedback. Maybe you can give a little bit of history on kind of how radical candor started. It's so funny. I think the very first seed got planted right after I had started the software company and one day, I came into the office. And I got the same article emailed to me about ten or fifteen different people. And it was about how people would rather have a boss who's a total asshole. But really competent than one who's incompetent. But really nice. And I thought are they sending me this because I'm a jerk or because I'm. Which is worse. You know, surely these are not by two choices and shortly after that happened. I was walking my puppy, golden retriever puppy down the street and I loved this dog. I absolutely adored her because I loved her so much. I had never set across word to her and she was totally out of control and she jumps in front of a taxi cab. I pull her back just in the Nick of time. And I'm standing on the street corner with my heart and my throat and this man perfect stranger looks at me. And he says I can see you really love that dog. But you're gonna kill that dog. If you don't teach her to sit, and then he points the ground and this harsh way and says sit and the dog sat I was astounded. I had no idea she even knew at that, man. And I I looked at this guy. And he said it's not mean it's clear, and then the light changed any walked off leaving me with words to manage by. So so to me that the. Essence radical candor is about being able to care about someone into show them that you care and also to challenge them at the same time both to do more of what's great and also to stop doing stop making mistakes. And and to me that is that's what gave my business career. Meaning is developing those relationships with the people around me in a way in which I was they told me when I was screwing up and also what they liked about what I was doing. But also,

Google Harry Winston Kim Scott Tiffany CEO YouTube Harvard Costa Princeton University Wall Street Journal Moscow Alexa New York Times senior policy advisor Salesforce analyst apple Twitter FCC