28 Burst results for "Killeen"

"killeen" Discussed on The Breakdown with NLW

The Breakdown with NLW

03:53 min | 6 months ago

"killeen" Discussed on The Breakdown with NLW

"I want to shift to another topic that has been in the discourse around Bitcoin recently. But that I feel like it's been hard for me at least to pin down a little bit. So this is taproot. And obviously, you know, one of the things that makes Bitcoin a little bit different is major upgrades aren't aren't sort of marketed. It's not the way that it operates. And so I guess what I'm interested in is first, you're kind of take on the significance of taproot. And then second, as sort of another part of the question is, you know, part of the chatter has been this is a step towards defy on Bitcoin or whatever that means, right? So I guess what is tapper to you and where does it fit with this notion of Bitcoin defy? Right. So Bitcoin is decentralized finance. So Bitcoin is defied in and of itself. Nothing extra needed in that, frankly, for many people, including the people in El Salvador, onboarding to Bitcoin represents their first access to a global economy. It's incredibly significant. Taproot does advance that. So taproot creates efficiencies in transacting on Bitcoin core. It creates greater privacy and the ramifications of some of that are that it creates the potential for more sophisticated smart contracting on lightning. And on layer twos. And my expectation is both because of the sort of entrepreneurial activity that exist in with still mercs pipeline. And from conversations with developers building lightning. So open-source lightning across implementations is that we'll see the repercussions, the positive repercussions and opportunities of taproot as early as 2022. And a lot of that will be relevant to the prior subject we discussed, which is emerging markets onboarding to Bitcoin. Through lightning. And so an example of this is that taproot sets the stage for us to be able to exchange stable coins or to make payments on lightning in a way that those payments are denominated in a local Fiat currency. And that's quite important because the ability to tolerate volatility is variable. So our ability to tolerate or be excited about and gain from volatility and developed nations or in wealthy populations is different for folks in for many folks, not all many folks in emerging markets. And so we want Bitcoin to be able to be providing a checking account experience, as well as a saving account experience. And so to do that, I think that you allow people to, of course, you do, because Bitcoin is open and permissionless. You allow encourage people to participate in Bitcoin. And have exposure to the volatility in their savings account..

Bitcoin Taproot El Salvador
"killeen" Discussed on The Breakdown with NLW

The Breakdown with NLW

03:31 min | 6 months ago

"killeen" Discussed on The Breakdown with NLW

"I think there was a lot of pessimism about the experience that salvadorans would have in using Bitcoin and using lightning. However, our concerns were swaged and we saw that local entrepreneurs sort of rose to the occasion in order to provide the tools and infrastructure so I'm talking about node management and channel management to allow further to be a really positive experience of Bitcoin at the start. And so and to mention a local company. So there's been a lot of talk, of course, about galois going local to El Salvador, a lot of talk about the folks in Bitcoin beach that generated sort of the momentum for Bitcoin in El Salvador. There's a company coming from a neighboring country Guatemala called ibex Mercado that was very contributed to worry into both the government's ability to provide nodes and channels that supported the activity Bitcoin activity from chiba wallet, but also were able to onboard merchants in a seamless way. And so to see a grassroots entrepreneurial driven movement that was considered of the experience of new bitcoiners in El Salvador was incredibly exciting. Now, to go beyond that and look at the high level down, we know that it's been reported that over 3 million salvadorans are using Bitcoin, via lightning network and what that means is that lightning network is banking more people in El Salvador than the local banks are in aggregate. That's incredibly powerful. And if Bitcoin were to only do that, I think it would be enough, but of course we know this is just a starting point for Bitcoin. And so there's countries ready to be second mover, both locally in Central America and Latin America more broadly as well as in countries across oceans. And so it's, you know, to be first mover is hard, the fact that they were first mover with good early success is bullish. And my hope and expectation is that the second movers will be able to learn from best practices established in El Salvador. It's awesome to see. I think I was actually talking about it on a show recently. I was kind of doing just an update because I hadn't covered what had been going on since then. And the broad read I haven't had a chance to be down there, but the broad read of all of any technical challenges and things like that are basically like well within the band of what you would expect in putting an entire nation on a new technical standard all at once very quickly. You know, the fact that there haven't been just screaming huge issues is actually kind of reflective of how successful it's been in some ways. That I think it's hard for people to appreciate in the short term, you know? It's absolutely incredible. And so far exceeded the execution of this has far exceeded, I think most people's expectations, including my own and that is due in large part to very local Central American based talent entrepreneurial talent and bitcoiners that took it upon themselves to make sure that folks newly onboarding were going to have a good experience. It's really incredible to see..

El Salvador Bitcoin beach ibex Mercado chiba Bitcoin Guatemala Central America Latin America government
"killeen" Discussed on  Slick Talk: The Hospitality Podcast

Slick Talk: The Hospitality Podcast

01:34 min | 8 months ago

"killeen" Discussed on Slick Talk: The Hospitality Podcast

"Know what. I'm saying all right. Thank you guys so much and tune in again next week. Thank you so much for listening. We love your support and want to provide the best. We can to all our listeners. So please find us online. Social media and on spotify apple podcasts. And.

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"killeen" Discussed on  Slick Talk: The Hospitality Podcast

Slick Talk: The Hospitality Podcast

07:57 min | 8 months ago

"killeen" Discussed on Slick Talk: The Hospitality Podcast

"So what was the leading moments or or turning point for you to leave airbnb and then did you go straight to the annex or what. What's the journey from Let's say cd. Yeah everybody was awesome again. It was established on someone that always likes to challenge myself learn in contribute Industry transparency. It kind of yours old when you're having be like degree work environments good but i mean there's so many pieces there to make it possible that you really have a specific task. It's kind of like. That's you're laying. These statement does to do with the annex. Came up in. I was actually interviewing for the antics at the same time. I was interviewing for airbnb. Okay i took airbnb at the time and everything seems to come full circle in his work out. But i've been watching that the entire time as to what was taking place and it was really still is a unique operator. It's kind of that. Beautiful blend between traditional hotels and rental approach like airbnb style accommodation with really heavy emphasis on tech. I mean we like to resolve his trials high tech low touch hotel and the opportunities here was to was to grow. Contribute and really build something so it was a st john from airbnb to here but it was equally exciting one just slightly different and i mean we're now at the state were worried about to take the annex blueprint and start introducing us to major cities across north america. Which is going to be really exciting as well. Now that's awesome and for the listeners. I don't know. Can you describe the annex. Like i look at the website and super beautiful clean. You could definitely tell us. It's tech enabled like that's the i think the high-tech low touch that you just said was a perfect way to describe it but What is the like if you were to be an elevator and pitching the annex. Somebody in a minute thirty or less. What would that be. Irv clock starts now. The nfl It's the high-tech loads which it's the height at low touch offering but what that means is the technology is here to enhance the guest experience. Not replace it with a lot of short term. Rentals are accommodations Technology the guest experiences. When you arrived you traditionally walk into the lobby and the ground floor has life culture to unusual wine bar. We're gonna programs event space. We have a cafe so there's life that exists at the hotel by the technology. Is there to allow you to interact with the space in a very modern way. So it's what i refer to as the future. Austerity is how he oregon. You start traveling. Want to travel so just trying to stay and you guys probably saw a huge pickup and maybe correct me if i'm wrong but like describe what his co. veg hotels in the overall tradition of what we saw in two thousand nineteen We're doing they're doing pretty they still are doing. Pretty bad when it comes to You know revenue numbers with occupancy because in the beginning before pre vaccinations and everything that people were really hesitant to be in common spaces like that you know in a close for sanity at check in The elevator all that stuff like what was that. Like for you guys on the sense where people were able to bypass a lot of that stuff and get rid of that fear of all right. How many people am i going to come in contact with. I'm on my journey to my room. versus now that they have that bypass. What's was that a sustainable model for you guys. During the beginning or is there dip but now it's it was. It was very validating for us. I mean obviously actions thousand eighteen pupils first interaction. the brand directly of doubtless cool and cool was the word that was tossed around. Come pandemic was last. This is cool and it was. This is how it should be like this. You should experience a hotel be it was the execution You get a lot of enquiries or calls asking. How does your hotel word with your front desk. And you explain the concept of people they go. Oh okay that means a lot of sense and to get this. At the beginning of the pandemic we're talki- march march thirteen two thousand twenty one st john's Shortly after that Our focus became less. How are we gonna drive the most revenue during the spirit of times. How can we serve our community. Giving we how very unique space and we hosted Healthcare workers are frontline healthcare workers in our patel at no cost to them for three months and we had zero cases or instances of cova because of direct with bill. Yeah there's no. There's no unnecessary Was very much. You comments enabled by technology to access in eurasia room. You're communicating via phone. The only onsite requirements for us were was anything maintenance related or housekeeping boundary strategic. And say. so we've done that the heroes now hotel initiative and we really just doubled down on that sense. It's like continuing to find ways to make this that much different in other spaces and how it would tell we think should be on the stage. Yeah and not talked about like this pet of the industry a lot but do you think this like sped up the learning curve that guests had to go through from going to a traditional hotel to a mobile high tech enabled hotel where they probably would have asked a lot more questions. Like how do i get my door code to work versus. Now it's like. Oh all right i was. That was that learning curve that kind of disappeared. You think sped up compared to what we're seeing in the previous years. Yeah i think it's it's kind of. It's like yes absolutely sped it up. People have been forced to adopt technology whether they like it or not and i think because the underlying tone of covert was always there in safety and contact be distanced was apart of people's normal routine. They were less inclined to ask questions of light. Why is it done this way and kind of understand that it was there to help them but frost. It wasn't anything different. We've always operated this way. So it's been really interesting to watch the adoption technology. Both operators guests over the last couple of years. I probably sped it up by five to seven years like you will get large. Operators like a and whatnot now mandated in five years. They're going to be completely contact in terms of access. So i think this is going to be very exciting time for the space sweet. I love that. I love that for you for you. What's your did you. Did you ever have like guests. Ask either you or your staff like. Oh did you guys do this because of the pandemic like did you go all contactless list because of covert or Like and if they did ask you that and you told them know what was the look on their face. I'm going to carry certain questions for sure. I think one of the biggest things i noticed was prepaid. Our demographic was probably a little more targeted than it is. Now where it's now more wide-ranging we're talking yet people who are in their twenties but you also get people in their sixties and it's kinda cool to watch rock with it because they understand it now. It's like they've become the tech experts of like very easy to use tack in his time. They feel proud of themselves. So it's not something questions about like. Oh did you guys do this. During kobe but more. So how do you do this. Why did he set the business up this way. Because by default kind of covert was isn't awful thing but they've been a blessing skies for our operations in insurance of just game where people see it and interact with it on as one of my friends and noise. Ware said to me. In the beginning. When i was on the test sites for cove in nineteen was that Kobe probably the worst but best thing to happen to the industry because.

airbnb st john north america nfl cova oregon eurasia patel john Ware Kobe
"killeen" Discussed on  Slick Talk: The Hospitality Podcast

Slick Talk: The Hospitality Podcast

07:15 min | 8 months ago

"killeen" Discussed on Slick Talk: The Hospitality Podcast

"Never blur those two lines. How do you do that like how do you i. I can imagine those lines getting pretty blurred in as a gm like you've become a generalist but how do you. How do you make sure that doesn't happen. Yeah it's a it's setting up system so that the hospitality is learning less for guests. I mean app were on the wealth. I operator which means you interact with your founded on when you get your room. There's no hotel phone. There's no fifty five age of tiny how to contact room service like it's made appearance for communication that your own taxed is how you interact with us. Yeah so people get used to tax us like it's their friend is a very casual interaction and then again it's the staff that are on site. We've trained them in a way in of power than to really go above and beyond like go drop off their vapor drank of their hotel room. Try and find ways to go a to instill traditional experience through many different avenues. So it's dancer question it's like you really just have to set up systems that set everyone for success in the technology included me as you know if tax properly set up it can be the biggest headache in the world. Use it as it's intended to be very complementary to offer. I love that you're talking about like it's supposed to eliminate the tasks in you know The struggle of the am the mid shift in the pm checklist at the front desk. And how like how much of a nightmare that whole process is because like you said the more tasks we we have to do. As operators on that side of things Definitely increases the chance of failure where we miss a checking not a to make sure that our channel manager is somehow not disconnected and sending in false. Reservations are missing information that is pretty important dates of arrival or guess credit card name. It just comes in like there's so many things that happen From past experiences. I just think about it. I'm like this totally makes sense on systematising this stuff to get it out of the ways that way when i'm on shift i'm not worried about you. Know what are the morning guy do or not. Do i really just say all right here. Are the people. I get to surprise. Here's here's how i'm gonna you know. What am i going to do. How am i going even help my team In in other ways. So i think it's always the most important part So you have you ever hard but fun job on the side of everything with annex. So i think it's pretty unique. I wanna go into your ears asandra airbnb so tell us about like what was that journey going into these big companies. You know as they've won has gone. Public one is trying to go public our about to go public. So what's that like being on the early on groundfloor that yes. Those are capable moments in my career. I mean when. I joined sondra at the time again. Help flat book. It was a team of really focused people with a common goal. I francis was lady charge there and there was a lot of people who doubted when his mission was but That aspirational larger than life. Kind of objective is played out at it really coming in it was. How can i contribute. It very quickly became like what are your. What here. How can we leverage the best of everyone. We have on board to create something that hasn't been accomplished yet. So growth learning Just like general sense of accomplishment would be kind of how it's Sondra with again by far like probably the most incredible work experience. That i've had i've met some of the most incredible able in. It's been fun to watch their journey. Someone who are still with saunder and others who have left to do significant things in the industry to start their own companies and whatnot so that was really good. Introduction to kind of technical tallies base specifically short term rental real and when the opportunity came up. With airbnb i felt. You have to take out like you can't say no to airbnb if you're in love with hospitality Kinda generation. it's to some. It would be the dream job so to speak so that was another incredible. Experience wasn't in at airbnb. As early as i was it at saunder being employee number forty seven but at airbnb it was an established business it was established startup and it. It was a different type of learning. I was like okay. Here's here's how kind of work at scale so different experiences with both companies say that airbnb was extremely guest centric and about kind of serving guests and soccer at the time that i was there and of course they are tailored toward gases while it was really like blitz scaling a concept that had been proven out on a small scale. Yeah for sure. And we've we've seen that whole airbnb like guess. Focus versus host. Focus is one hundred percents. We all know that they're they're very much guest favored So with that like what. We're i don't know. I i think about all the the opportunities to to learn so much different stuff. I what is it like being in a ground floor level of a company that is more established but Everybody knows like right like you say airbnb to your friends and family like oh sweet. I know them. You say you know Let's say another brand. I don't know you say pete's coffee like what peace coffee like. I've never heard that like starbucks would be the one that everyone would know. So what's that like being kind of like having the inside scoop what what does happen when you're in a room like that with with people that make sense. If i'm even asking right question here saying say with very apparent from day one at airbnb when you walked in and that this was a very well. Oil machine. Remember anything like your rival experienced training. The people you're around at no reference were culture which is a buzzword in this day and age will get relief felt like there was a unified kind of africa taking place. I mean your floor with thousands and thousands of people. It's pretty crazy that you can speak to anyone. There enders immediate synergies or similarities. So i'd save. They really nailed what it means to have like a cultural identity. Everyone there was extremely light motivated but at the korbel everyone lake was still was still there with the overall goal in mind being guest experience. Were kind of the thought leaders in this space. Continue to pave the way for others. That's awesome hey. I hope you guys are enjoying this episode. I wanted to drop in quickly to let you know that our partners at jetstream have some of the best in class technology that sits at the heart of the guests experience with a focus on generating revenue for your property assets with their platform. Your property gets the best in class tech and integrations to remote access guest screening booking protection and payment processing better yet. Their team does all of the hard work of twenty four seven guests communication and content creation. So go ahead. Click the link in the show notes. So you can jump on board today and take advantage of their professional hospitality team. Now were back to the episode..

airbnb saunder gm sondra headache Sondra francis soccer korbel everyone lake starbucks pete africa jetstream
"killeen" Discussed on  Slick Talk: The Hospitality Podcast

Slick Talk: The Hospitality Podcast

08:15 min | 8 months ago

"killeen" Discussed on Slick Talk: The Hospitality Podcast

"All right everybody. Welcome back to slick talk the hospitality podcast again. Your host will slickers. And i'm really excited to jump in because we're going to talk about hybrid properties today and i got my main man from the annex hotel out in canada ryan. How're you doing today. we're doing some sausage will. Of course well. I was a little back story Giving to hear you talk on clubhouse a couple of months back through a mutual connection of ours mr francois with enzo connect and it was really cool and after being to look up the property and see what you are doing i was like. Oh we're going to have ryan. Gm of this hotel on the show. Get to geek out a little bit. You have a really cool background So just really excited jump in. But let's kick it off. Where does your journey begin full love. It started when is always a fun wet. I grew up around the street specifically hotels. I had a mother who was with fairmont hotels and resorts so from a young age. Me and my brother were once you got to bounce around these fantastic properties and experience. What we thought was free ice cream when you really just chuck him things back to your room. And that's what the fascination started was always curious about the other side. How do you create a guest experience. So rather than the high school i started working in housekeeping at the fairmont pacific rim had gone a number of progressive rolls from. There had stints overseas larger chains in north america. Therapy be saunder most recently here the annex. Oh i feel it got done a little bit of everything in the last kind of five to seven years specifically. It's been a heavy emphasis on tack so to speak in sight so auckland now it's really cool. I love that that this industry you can get so much experience by doing a lot of of everything a little bit of a lot or whatever you wanna call it. It's really cool. Because we have such a fluid industry that you can take any experience from fairmont hotels to pacific you know was the pacific rim housekeeping department and then down to airbnb and sandra now the annex super cool So tell me as a kid though. How cool was it to be floating around the hotel. I kinda like you own the place right. The feel like as a kid. It's kind of outrageous. Conor mcgregor walk with the rove. I feel like you don't really understand that age. How much goes into making you feel like that. But i think when you experience it from such a young age becomes kind of hard of you or your blood so yeah yes backlands While you didn't know anything else different right so it's like this is what you've known. That's kind of cool to see a playoff career Now tell us about your your experienced with going from housekeeping. You like what was that life. You go from that then did you. Where'd you go to after was saunder or airbnb. Yes oh Housekeeping was my starting point within the industry it became. I think obvious to me very early on that. I wanted to do a little bit. Everything to kind of be an ultimate generalists in a way want so from housekeeping jake on a number of progressive roles from a house guest services Front desk is about word by the way we'll valley from there really conscious. It naturally materialized. I mean post. Let's call it traditional hospitality when i went to flat. Look at the time which is now saunder. That's To jump into real estate acquisitions things like actually acquiring properties for the brand and then from there it was business development roles with always having strong strong fundamental understanding of operations and my most recent role or with the antics rate. Now that's really kind of everything coming together in one place because yes. You're overseeing the operation. But it's bert much. So building out. The tech stock and continuously finding ways to differentiate yourself from other tech driven operators. So it kind of comes full circle hundred percent and i am curious because you and i have a very similar background. I wasn't with airbnb or saunder but like being gm of a hotel and then also getting to really get embedded from housekeeping to maintenance know front desk the bad word All stuff did you see the flaws in the industry of overcomplicated systems or checklist and other things is that what kind of drove you to kind of shift. More towards technology side of things Getting into the position that you're in now Because for me. That's why i was like. Why are we doing it this way. Why is it to be so dang complicated and that kind of actually. That question always drove me to keep pushing. Yeah it's over honest. I think early on. You don't necessarily see it because you don't know any better right. You think that's the way it's always been done. But as i started to transition away for more of a traditional operation where you got the front dass. The systems are from nineteen eighty three And got into the technology. Space specifically with sandra airbnb. I saw that there was an opportunity to solve inefficiencies through technology but also enhance the guest experience the same time specifically the front desk by eliminating not and allowing access the room the sole lineups. You've solved an honest and a touch point. And it's what people want. Arrive is just seamless access. So it's things like nine and applying to all the business on the front and back in one hundred percent and do you feel like with technology. Because i think a lot of people even myself. Sometimes i'm guilty of putting on. The facade of technology enhances all this operations and guess experiences but the technology takes work on the backend. Like there's things go wrong. A smart hub could stop working disconnect from the wifi or something can happen right so with that like what do you think outweighs like. Do you think the old system and processes outweigh the little headaches. And hiccups happened with technology. Order the other way around. Sometimes i like. I like that question. I think it's a bit of give and take a look at the intention of old school processes is correct like when someone's coming to desk that moment of joy or delighted that initial experience but there's other ways to do that Obviously more efficient ways. More seamless ways with tac. There's things that go wrong from time to time. But i'd say the failure rate is so low technology these days that you kind of build it injure operation and it's very easy to use the opportunity to enhance a state like we're talking less than five percent Access so i'd say you're actually want to make mistakes in the old school way through technology. It's just the guest experiences different in both of those situations. Yeah i think you talked earlier to about giving the guests the opportunity to have the interaction that they want So not waiting in line but being able to come down and enjoy a drink in the lobby with maybe a front desk or guest service staff member or Even the gm yourself like being able to just hey go ahead check in your room keys opened aka your phone Go settle everything down. Come enjoy drink with me at the in the lobby or whatever that may be You know let's get to hang out and talk to have that connection if they want it right like. Is that the opportunities there right. So that's that's something that you kind of envisioned with this whole technology roll into the hospitality space for everybody here at the span. The technology tax doctor be specific is here to remove While we're lucky years everyone we have on mean we can do it very not one person per forty rooms Their hearing has the guest experience given the guests that type of interaction. It's more like you see well in the lobby and it's not behind the front desk at saint welcome to complete online the equal when we come back and join us drank as you said. That's a very different experience than like assisting someone with check in so to speak. So technology is there to remove task range. It worked for us. The people bring onto our teams there to enhance the guest experience I wish frankie bit simple..

mr francois fairmont pacific rim pacific rim housekeeping depar Conor mcgregor enzo sandra airbnb Gm rove chuck auckland ryan airbnb sandra north america canada bert jake gm
"killeen" Discussed on Cork's 96fm Opinion Line

Cork's 96fm Opinion Line

03:23 min | 9 months ago

"killeen" Discussed on Cork's 96fm Opinion Line

"How do we bring this to a decisive event timed Do so security. Jerry annoying sports fan and i know that you would have watched the match on on sunday and for for the for the rest of the game and for the atmosphere where you worry doll. When you saw the bulls in croke park where you kind of divided he watching sport and enjoying sports as a fan and then from your own area of expertise where you're worried about what you saw to the right on both ends. And that was some of the most amazing irving and my wife for whom who's who's not irish irish council adventures still fascinating better than the grace all of it by the way. It was her first time to watch big match on a hurting game. She loved to absolutely love to and Of course it was retained for for all of us here in cork. But but you know i'm been cluttered display and so we all enjoyed so yet so seeing what happened in the stadium. You know that's That's not gonna help But my bigger concern is the all the other things that happened around the stadium but particularly around the country. I mean that's awesome. The tv footage from You know Jay clubs in limerick with whole families including the kids you'll notice of the older ones. Don't have access to vaccines And you know hundred euro limerick timing particular you know. How could you not get excited. And let your guard down until you know. As per the euro's you know unfortunately there's gonna be consequences of all and the other problem is now of course that gets everybody else open arms asking for their sector to be real. I'm we're already in trouble so you know. Two wrongs don't make the rice. And you know. I i guess one of the things i always learned from from From working in really high risk environments is that we all make mistakes. The trick is to recognize that there are mistakes and don't repeat them I get very nervous about working with people who make a mistake. You know They don't get eaten By the wild animals that listen our environment or they don't get kidnapped in some of the kind of dangerous urban settings and they think that okay and they just keep on going so under keep taking those risks. So you know someday was a mistake on the epidemological terms and he would be you know. Let's not double down on mistake last. Someone who's done the phone i post. Primary teacher has a vulnerable child at home themselves. Which masks would you recommend Okay i just recently through if put in touch with the manufacturer of the reusable washable f. s. p. to grade mask i think the companies victoria and they do take orders from individuals You know pay by credit cards so that would be. That's what i've ordered in for my own family. And i haven't tried them. Yes but it looks like a really good option. 'cause i guess the mask and.

irish irish council croke park bulls Jerry cork limerick victoria
"killeen" Discussed on Erratic Dispatches

Erratic Dispatches

03:10 min | 10 months ago

"killeen" Discussed on Erratic Dispatches

"Okay. So the suns call lake shore boulevard west people drag themselves along duck paying between their ups. Each exhale bringing them one step closer to their best ascends called living bursa surviving. She observes you're not living your life. You're just surviving. I walk around hollow thin as a hornet's nest since called snow globe. Christmas day smiles laughter. Numb mummified heavy. Stow in this one's called sobriety. Use us more us again. Numb yourself for a little while. But you're always left with the same discomfort. Sobriety say those are few more jobs. Like have you ever been involved in like like working in art therapists oregon to like different like clinics. You know in retro and poetry or like you know do workshops in to work with people to try to encourage them to write not really. I've thought about it. The only thing i've done is i've In the same course where. I was a student at u. of t. with professor af I've done a couple times. Come in as a guest lecturer Done like a workshop sort of their Talking about yeah like how you can't use like mental us poetry to like explorer things like mental health or other parts of your identity that maybe you know you're kind of like ashamed of or scared of like sharing just kind of using it as a kind of therapeutic or healing tool the app come with your work like have you come. I mean if you're like decided to incorporate it like Like an individual medium though like maybe have like it like uses in a like an art exhibit texts. You know there would be like sort of interactive you know with people. Were like an app sort of thing. Yeah i haven't I hadn't really know honestly I really like i said like zeroed in on like just like written poetry i think in tulips. We have a little bit of like illustrations. Early like image of The city florida. But yeah not really not not as much visual So like what are your goals with your writing. It's you want it like. What's your goal like a decade district. Be totally focused on your poetry and different creative like what kind of what kind of things are you. Are you working on. you think. I'm.

oregon florida
"killeen" Discussed on Erratic Dispatches

Erratic Dispatches

01:30 min | 10 months ago

"killeen" Discussed on Erratic Dispatches

"A hello this is earnt eskenazi on the host of iraq. Dispatches podcast thanks for tuning into the slave latest episode featuring interview with mercedes. Killing was a blogger. Poet mental health advocate to her books titled tulips and using spoons in knife are available now through gray border books. Hello thanks for listening to the erratic dispatches podcast will be back shortly after reap break. I've been using anger dot. Fm now for about almost a year for the podcast. Herat's patches which is distributed through anger dot fm completely free to use very easy and Any audio the upload or record through the website will be. You can use it to organize your audio files and podcasts. Ready to submit..

"killeen" Discussed on We Study Billionaires - The Investors Podcast

We Study Billionaires - The Investors Podcast

08:42 min | 11 months ago

"killeen" Discussed on We Study Billionaires - The Investors Podcast

"Your own bank or be your own boss and to take responsibility for custody into your own hands and so when we think about opportunities lake lending or other sorts of finance replication of the traditional finance system in the bitcoin space. What's most interesting is when that capability is unlocked while not compromising on those values. So what does it look like to have lending where you have on. You're not giving away control of your bitcoin for a period. Can you do that. Those are the sorts of opportunities that we are most excited about. But frankly i try to stay quite open and so i'm looking to hear how founders understand the opportunity and then matching that like i said to the state of the tech and also to you know what's special about bitcoin. One thing billionaires have is a team of lawyers giving them advice and guidance so let me introduce you to the next best thing. Rocket lawyer is the affordable solution for business owners to establish grow or safeguard your business and work confidently. It's all the legal help you need for your business anytime anywhere. And did i mention you can try for free for seven days. More than two million. Small businesses have trusted rocket lawyer. And you can too as a rocket lawyer premium member. You'll be able to make all the documents you need to run your business including service contracts. Llc operating agreements and indiana's ask a lawyer your legal questions and get an answer fast from an attorney rocket lawyers trusted network and sign all your contracts on the go with rocket sign plus get discounts and assistance on essential business services like inc registered agents trademark and hiring an attorney from the rocket lawyer network head to rock lawyer dot com slash. Work confidently to start your free trial. Today that's rocket lawyer dot com slash work confidently. Let me ask a question. 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There's no bigger pet peeve for me than a book that just drags on and that's why i love blankets because in less than fifteen minutes i feel like i can fast-track my path to a more intelligent informed and healthier me and right now. Blink has a special offer just for our audience. Go to blink is dot com slash billionaires to start your free seven-day trial and get twenty five percent off of a blink premium membership. That's blink is spelled b. l. i. n. k. i s. t. blankets dan com slash billionaires to get twenty five percent off and a seven day. Free trial blink dot com slash billionaires. Take control of your time all right back to the show when you're receiving a pitch for a business particularly in this space in the in the bitcoin space. What is something that really helps. You get confidence or excitement in the project to know that you think that it's going to be something special. Well i think that there's a couple things. There's two things really so we're always looking for when still mark backs accompanied. That's because we believe that. The founders at the helm of that company are the best decision makers in that space in that category. So an example of that that i've already mentioned is causa so caused us sees security as not just a technology challenge but also as you i challenge and the way that nick newman and jameson. Lobb are thinking about what it means to offer. Software that enables individuals to provide their own security and have that be just as robust as he would get if you were dropping dollars at bank of america for instance the leadership there is. What's most important in so when evaluating founder. That's new to me. There's really two things that i look at first and so one is the founders vision and of course it's important when avi is evaluating the opportunity to produce a return on investment. That's what we're doing right so it's not an altruistic pursuit really although there's some of that because of the space we work in but we're looking for companies that can be that can create incredible value for the folks they serve that can capture a fraction of that so that they're building billion dollar businesses. So were looking at founders. That have frankly really massive visions. That's that's the first thing is the market significant enough and is the founder thinking aggressively enough. And then we're looking for a team that includes leadership that can really speak with protocol level developers in a to-to-to sort of fashion. So what that means is that means practically for the company is that they can understand what's happening at the protocol level today and what the roadmap within near term roadmap looks like and how that's relevant to their business so a good example of this a great example of this is paul e toy with ellen de work and paul allen d work has two products one is thinks chat and the other stock work. And so what. Paul is doing is he. Has this sort of incredible vision for how lightning network is relevant to the masses. And what that means to paul is how can a queen native financial chat be interesting to folks even outside of the bitcoin space. So it's interesting to us. Bitcoin is rate. I know preston that you have a tribe on sphinx chat. I'm a part of that tribe. I use bitcoin every day. Financial chat and calls on swings chat. But it's not just about serving us. It's about introducing a sort of decentralized financial chats system. Can we chat be decentralized cannon use lightning nodes to allow folks to sort of have their own space where data is transacted. So that you don't get these sort of like big data dumps or hacks where there is a central server that all of our data sits on and if that's penetrated then we're all sort of in trouble so paul's thinking like that and then that links with stack work which is relevant for folks in emerging markets and for those that don't know what stock work is is mechanical turk lake marketplace where tasker done on smartphones and most of the workforce most of the supply side of that is an emerging markets and. Folks are earning their first ever smartphones by doing working getting paid in stats and so we're looking for founders like that that are really thinking big. So they're thinking folks like polar thinking what does it mean for the world. Broadly now that we have a trusted insecure digital currency something where scarcity can be assured in where we understand the mon monetary policies that those are fixed and that they can't be changed by five guys in back room can that be powerful emerging markets. Can that be important and chat so we're looking for founders like that and then i also mentioned in that example how a financial chat can sort of be a safer environment in lightning environment because of the architecture that exists to support it so that shows his competency and sort of somehow native understanding of this new protocol sort of founder is the founder that we really want it back and be partners with and the the hope. Is that our network that we bring to the table for them. Our understanding of venture capital and building businesses along with hopefully understanding of bitcoin can be in some way meaningful. The two founders like that and can help move the needle. That's the first look. What are your thoughts on the big news of el salvador and what that might mean moving forward so that is. That's the reason why bitcoin right. So the reason. Why and bitcoin is. Because i.

fifteen minute Paul Fifteen minute paul ellen de work nick newman Today More than two million less than fifteen minutes seven-day twenty five percent seven days five guys two founders twenty seven categories jameson Lobb preston first paul allen d
"killeen" Discussed on We Study Billionaires - The Investors Podcast

We Study Billionaires - The Investors Podcast

07:45 min | 11 months ago

"killeen" Discussed on We Study Billionaires - The Investors Podcast

"One company but it could be multiple. Wish you were in early on some of the best performing. Ipo's of twenty nine thousand nine hundred and twenty twenty with our crowd. Accredited investors have access to invest directly easily and most importantly early our crowd investors have benefited from our crowd companies. Ipo like beyond me or being bought by companies like intel nike microsoft and oracle our crowds investment professionals leverage their extensive network to review some of the most promising private companies and startups in the world there in-depth due diligence includes meeting with management teams and generally comprehensive vetting of deals. They decide to make part of their own portfolio. Once our crowd has selected a deal they offer accredited investors the opportunity to invest alongside them with the same terms today. You can join our crowds. Investment insofar an unprecedented innovator in the rapidly growing multibillion dollar connected mobility market so far as mobility platform uses a and behavioral science to reduce risk save lives and ensure accountability for companies and their employees. You can get in early on zafar and other unique opportunities at crowd dot com slash. Study if you're interested in investing you need to join our crowd. The our crowd account is free. Just go to ou are cro wd dot com slash study. I wanna start a business. But i don't have an idea this sound like you will. My first million is a podcasts. At uncovers thousands of business ideas and gives you the steps to execute. Here are just a few things recently discussed how to build a community that brings in twenty million dollars a year. We break down three different paid communities making at least twenty million dollars a year and explain exactly how they work and we're opportunities are for other paid communities. What about one hundred million dollars a year while creating a course is likely the easiest way to make a million bucks. We show you how people are doing it and how some are getting over one hundred million dollars in sales every year. There's even a guy doing a city tour new york making one million dollars a year. His business mafia walking tours in new york city. We show other tours that can be done and how the business really works bradley. Jacobs you've likely never heard of has started five multibillion dollar companies in different industries. We break down his strategy and show where else it can be applied search for my first million on your podcast app. All right back to the show. This was the most common question that people wanted me to ask you. Whenever i put out on twitter that we were going to be talking and it really revolves around smart contracts and decentralized finance or defy and because people know that you really don't put up with the whole quote unquote schick. Coin are all coin being in the space or all the narratives that are around it and as a c. I think that that's given you a lot of credence in the space. But when we look at defy and we look at smart contracts it almost seems like every single entity that is trying to do something in this space is issuing some type of token and you have rootstock that is happening in coordination with bitcoin. You have sovereign that's happening in coordination with bitcoin. You have stacks. That's happening in coordination with bitcoin. But they all have an inherent token that's associated with them. So what are your thoughts on. Is this something that has to take place in order for smart contracts to be a thing on top of bitcoin or is there going to be something else. That's a little bit different than that that you think kind of wins out in the end. Well they certainly don't all have association with a token right. Because you know that i'm on. The board of directors have flocked stream and block stream has liquid network which is a side chain to bitcoin and liquid network. Of course doesn't have a token. I'm not sure that token is necessary. But you're right that some of the most exciting activity in the bitcoin. Space right now is strictly around smart contracting and i would say multiplex smart contracting so greater capabilities of smart contracts. of course that's related to defy. So maybe maybe you'll give me the opportunity to elaborate on some ideas that i would have wanted to discuss earlier at bitcoin miami. On my piano we sorta ran out of time. But i think that you know the big win space right now is kind of so dynamic that it's hard to fit it. All into a twenty minute panel especially hard moderators not trying to fit it into a twenty minute panel. Frankly it's just as shiny on and sexy as any of the activity happening in other spaces and so it's fortunate to have opportunity to talk about that today. So maybe if. I could just mention a few that i want to get ahead of myself so i wanna start by saying that. I'm focused on. Bitcoin versus all coin spaces really because bitcoin is where their sound tack and because bitcoin is where there's a stable and secure protocol that can be built upon and so of course as avi see my job is to deplete capital into companies that are building in sort of a sound tech state. We don't have control over open source development in a decentralized blockchain system and so because of that we have to acknowledge the state of the system without thinking that we will have influence on it undue influence on it and given those dynamics that's been the options are pretty limited right bitcoin so now talk a little bit about smart contracting opportunities that exist in the bitcoin space and please feel free to cut me off. I'd be happy to dig in anywhere. Something that i've been looking at since really twenty. Fourteen is the concept of automated rev share and so in twenty fourteen. Twenty fifteen something like this. There was a company called stem out of los angeles. The company still in existence today but in twenty fifteen or twenty fourteen. They were focused on automating rev share through programmable bitcoin basically and what that meant to them was that collaborative contributors in the music space could sort of establish a smart contract that they would agree to an advance and that would automate the sharing of payments. That happened on platforms like spotify and to of course this company was just sort of ahead of their time really bright so the capability for got was rough then but it exists now and so. That's a space that i'm quite interested in. So that's automated revenue share space. Which can today be done on liquid. We see that with a company like allen. Bits for example in their split payment extension. And i think that that will be a space that continues to develop and twenty twenty one and twenty twenty two. Maybe let me stop there. I just said made sense. It sounds a little bit like the the buzzword. Mft's where you're you got these. Non fungible tokens. Let's say you have a song that you create and then it's generating revenue because it's it's being streamed on whatever platform and then some of that revenue is coming back to the owner of that non fungible token that's associated with the song. Is that what you're getting at. And you're i think you're suggesting that like on liquid which doesn't have its own innate token that something like this could take place without their half in the be some type of gas fi. Most people equate to ethereal so for automated breath. Share the protocol that..

nike twenty oracle twitter twenty minute first million one hundred million dollars new york spotify bradley intel microsoft One company Twenty fifteen Jacobs Fourteen new york city over one hundred million dolla los angeles twenty fourteen
"killeen" Discussed on The Dental Marketer

The Dental Marketer

06:13 min | 1 year ago

"killeen" Discussed on The Dental Marketer

"Do things and so for me that's been the biggest struggle is making sure we keep the team full of people who are the kind of people i want that follow our core values to human. Yeah i feel like right now. Especially i mean. That's one of the big things. I feel like in some of the groups that we we participate in on facebook or or threads and stuff like we ask like some of the what's their biggest struggles in. Yeah it's like team members right like it sucks to. I know for me. Like i have that issue where i'm like. Maybe tomorrow they'll be better. I don't know you know. And then tomorrow and i'm like oh they suck today. Maybe the negative. 'cause firing socks. I maybe the confrontation issue. That a lot of us have is up. maybe. I don't know but oh yeah totally. Yeah i don't like i don't like confrontation anymore than the next guy. Yeah so. I'm like having nice i can pay somebody who's just. Yeah that's the person i want. Go go do in the united a but you're right man. We really had to get rid of these toxic. Maybe they're not just the right person for the right business at that time you know and then we can just tell them. There's something better out there for you and go to contractors in degree awesome awesome. So addison thank you so much for being with us. It was a pleasure guys if you haven't yet there's i mean you're in a lot of books at asean have by the numbers here in the one that i've fully almost finished reading as the dental startup manual. And then you have another one right up systems yeah the operations manual and so yeah. The the dental startup manual mental operations manual are A new series of books that The dental success network is put out and yet dr cost us and i are just Dedicated to kinda like writing his books. That are hopefully jam. Packed with information spreadsheets. Were documents that go with them. That can help you through the journey at least from the business operation side Yeah it doesn't hold too many marketing techniques or successes. Best kind of your specialty. But it does they do help with like everything else to. Hopefully i mean some of the things we have in their around. This stuff is can save you. Hundreds of thousands of dollars. So that's that was our goal. Oh yeah definitely like. It's so it's like just mean potatoes guys like that's it and the thing is is i feel this. At least the dental started manual rate. It's a when we plan and prepare. That's so useful until it becomes a form of procrastination and then that happens a lot more planning for a startup. And then. I don't know maybe you've seen this addison. I've seen this a time in the making dental startup. facebook right for example. I feel like a lot of times will ask like. Hey what do you think. I should pick for this. Or what do you think i should do for them like practice. Are you building now. Like you're asking everybody else for their opinion and then it gets paralysis by analysis and then obviously so anyway pointed. that was. Don't start emmanuel is a really good. Like i guess structure foundation to read know exactly what to do even from the moment. You get your loan right away till till the very end so at it and we appreciate it appreciate we appreciate you creating these things for us and then if anything where can people reach out to you find you Yeah so basically they can go to like the dental success network dot com. That's where mostly i am these days. You can connect with the bay of the team or my personal website. Which is addison. Killeen dot com Just my name dot com. My books are on amazon. Or you mark and i have the The books in bundles actually as well on the dental success network dot com so You can get like my book. Like by the numbers. His book the seven pillars of donald success and then like the operations manual for futures journal For about the same price. that is amazon. So yeah so you can kind of connect with me either place and if anyone has questions over or any of that stuff but i love to chat with you guys all that will be in the show notes below so definitely going to announce belong check it out and addison thank you so much for being with us was a pleasure. We'll hear from you. Sound like thank you so much guys for tuning in to this episode and addison thank you so much for allowing me to be nosy and pick your brain and dive deeper into your business guys. If you want to check out any of his books definitely go to shown us below and check it out. I'm almost done reading the dental startup manual. It's honestly literally just meat and potatoes. That's it this whole book if you're looking to do a startup you're like you know what i've been thinking about it or something like that. Definitely check out this book or check out all the other books that he also has as well but this one so far that i've read his fantastic and guys. I am loving that you are sharing or letting me know. A lot of you are letting me like. Hey heard this episode here that episode. I would love it even more even more. If you just shot at or took a picture of you listening not you. It can be view. I would love to see your face but it can be of. Maybe you're listening to it at the car. You're listening to it on your phone or on iran or something like that right or just screenshot. And you're on minute thirty of episode three hundred or something like that right. That would be awesome if you took a screen shot of that and shared it posted on social media. Whatever you i am obviously gonna reshare that. So i would absolutely love that. Continue to do that and that that makes me smile for for days. I love that so guys. If you want to continue the conversation about this episode or any other episode feel free to join the dental market or society. Facebook group can talk with our guests and other guests on other episodes and continue the conversation there. Thank you guys so much. Always tuning in a truly appreciate you and i'll talk few in the next episode.

amazon tomorrow today Facebook addison Hundreds of thousands of dolla one Killeen facebook mark dot com asean united a emmanuel hundred seven pillars three donald thirty episode
"killeen" Discussed on The Dental Marketer

The Dental Marketer

07:00 min | 1 year ago

"killeen" Discussed on The Dental Marketer

"Months. This is what will get to. And so i went armed with that and basically then i kind of looked and i said okay. I'm to get to these levels. I'm gonna need to do quite a bit of marketing and so added in forty thousand and marketing. So i did about four hundred twenty total. Three hundred and eighty was actually equipment. Construction everything else And then i also did about two hundred sixty five is what i bought this other patient base for and so is dying practice like it came with the equipment But it was pretty much like about three hundred fifty charts. Maybe at least now like it was pretty much dead interview with a few staff members to and so at the time i was just like you know what this is going to save a lot of headache if i just by that too. So yeah Good service that guy was in a facility like a retirement Alzheimer's memory care already. It was quick and so it was like whoa man like it's going to help out his family. And i got i got a pretty good deal out of the the whole second. Yeah what issues do you come up with when you buy. Someone's patient base to the patients. Say like who are you dr. Where's my totally. yeah. I mean they totally anytime. There's a change in doctor. It's always that kind of like. I don't know if i should trust you And so there's a lot of that. But i think it just means that for the first six months twelve months you have to be very very touchy on a. You know how you describe. Maybe what was done previously and just trying to focus like hundred ten percent on building the relationship and communication before then getting into deep like you know. Hey we really need to fix this Obviously always have to tell them like okay. This is like a pretty serious problem or the decay. This gum disease. But you know it's a lot more work said that like startup. it's pretty easy because every new patient they're ready to meet you whereas the acquisition they don't really wanna meet you but you have to go and win over. Yeah okay gotcha. So that's how much your your loan was. From the moment you assigned for the loan to the moment you open your doors not once you are open but before that what were you facing any issues or struggles roadblocks with construction or quadrant healing. Better team members. Yeah construction always takes longer than you expect. I mean i. I would have well and the whole the whole even signing the lease and just everything And that was even before covid and so thankfully we We got it was august. Twenty nineteen and so pretty much like that. Was you know it was still a great time to build. And even that took about two and a half months longer than it should have and that you know it's just like you add a week here and then like the flooring guys are running a week late and then the drywall is just taking longer. And yada yada then. I'll just takes a little bit longer. So you know everyone just has to plan for like. I think it's gonna take this much or if the general contractor tells you the ad like okay at a month or two because it's never going to occur on your timeline that you want but you know the time that i was okay with it going over. It was actually the time. I spent planning Because if you plan it correctly. I mean nothing ever goes hundred percent plant but Nothing ever comes out better than you expect usually. It's always like oh man. I really wish. I would have realized that this wall would have come like this and i wish i would have moved at like a foot and so there's some some of those things so like planning that time is the best use of your time usually But it was you know. Even now i look back and there's just a few things i wish i would have changed but i did spend a whole heck of a lot of time Planning and doing three d. renderings and whatnot. And of course i'd done enough offices. I knew exactly like oh an eight and a half like eight foot. Six inch room is actually gonna feel very good And mike for a surgery suite. Okay i need like ten feet. You know things like that. So i knew pretty well but the three d rendering and just kind of going back and forth and designed is the best time even though it did set us back a little bit too. Yeah yeah that's what do you wish you would have changed in your practice. Then i wish i had a little bit more storage space so like we have six opera tories in two thousand and fifty square feet. And so it's a pretty tight squeeze And i wish i would have had a little bit more storage because the amount of storage we have is very tiny and then there's just a few little spots where like the the floor like one of the things that a status we get kind of in the weeds on how things look can like our margins on our crowns or whatnot. So there's a few places where you can do that rubber toe stuff that they roll on and then they glue and it usually stays pretty well can get scuffed up a lot and so you can either go with that. And that's the cheapest that's that's economy and it looks. It can look really good but in high traffic areas That can get scuffed up or when it goes around a corner it can actually pull off the corner. And so in some of those high traffic areas. I wish i actually would have switched it to a actual baseboard Which is it's still plastic. And it's still the same exact heller but it's actually milled and so it's kind of you you've just cut it just like would and so that's that would look a lot better for some of those areas where patients see it a lot in areas where agents. Don't see it. i'm not a big concern for me but yeah that was one of them. You don't want anything your practice to potentially just look non congruent so if you have a nice practice and the waiting rooms beautiful and your front desk is amazingly friendly and everything else and then you go to the room. And there's something cheap and tacky than that makes you think like wow. The veil the veil of disbelief is broken. And so now you always want at least for me. I always want my experience to be top notch and fantastic and so if you ever break that it kind of breaks. The hawks grants. Yeah and how many do you have. I had six. And so. I wish i right now. I wish i had twelve days. My team has just like falling all over each other and could be a lot more efficient but with me in a associate we have to doctors there every day. Now i've to associates and So now we yeah were. Were packed like three dr rooms and then we have three hygienics going all the time now. And then in total how many.

six ten feet twelve days eight foot forty thousand Six inch twelve months two a month august eight and a half about two and a half months first six months a week six opera tories Twenty hundred percent three about two hundred sixty five about four hundred twenty
"killeen" Discussed on The Dental Marketer

The Dental Marketer

06:38 min | 1 year ago

"killeen" Discussed on The Dental Marketer

"Things i mean. It's always good to try new ideas and test amounts if they're more efficient more profitable or they get a better guest experience but some things are just like no we gotta change these things really quickly most softwares like i. I know open dental really well. So whenever i acquired a practice or a brought a patient base or anything. It's always like no. We're we're switching over to open dental from pretty much day one and so even though that adds more stress and sometimes team members feel very uncomfortable about it usually if you give them enough support. Those changes are attainable. Pretty quickly. what what's important. Would you give them when that happened. So let's say you're taking over practice right or transitioning acquisition right. And then they're like. Oh my gosh. Dr killings coming in here taking over the office manager here for fifty years. You know what i mean and trust me. I know the patients all these things. What are you doing that scenario. How do you support that. I mean usually you find someone that is like subject matter expertise and just make sure you pair them up. I mean there's all those training resources to so like switching softwares you say okay. Sit down with these videos sometimes. It's videos that. I'll make plans. It's just you just find youtube videos like open dental like okay. Here's a list of like twelve hours of open dental training and so sedan with these and learn them or just watch him but a lot of things. Sometimes you actually just need someone next door to you. That actually can sit with you do it. And so i've paid for trainers and expensive But you know you pay for someone to sit next to you. Whether that's like you find another office manager in town that you can bribe to say. Hey come over to my office for a couple of days and and so with you or there's people nationally like open dental actually has some trainers as well And then i pay and then afterwards you can even pay for like you know zoom coaching as well and so i came anytime you have a question. Just call this person and they will help you out. Yes those you know. Sometimes it's like one hundred fifty an hour or you know some of those things but you know to have a team member actually feel super comfortable and you're making a big enough investment in maybe a new software whatnot or a new practice. You don't want to ever be able to have an employee say like well. That's tougher would have been really good but you know we weren't able to be trained properly on it and so kind of like one hundred fifty dollars here or there. It's sort of the cost of doing business. I never get to or depth about training costs like that. Because i know how frustrating it's been in the past when it's like i don't know how to use excel. It's like well. You should get trained up so you feel that accel should be the easiest part of your day so you can focus on maybe patient care or focus on the actual business or something. Yeah so the training if we were to move this into like a startup vision right or a startup away instead of inactivation. The training has to be accounted for in the budget. Would you say yeah. Usually i would kind of build that in like a couple of thousand dollars or maybe a Having someone onsite now in the startup phase so if we were doing a startup. And the way that i did it is every new employee. I always tried to bring them in and give them at least a week of training before expected them to be in front of guests. And so i would try to you know. Bring them in and say okay. You're gonna watch these videos. You're going to maybe go visit a friend practice. I know runs really well or do about a week of training and so you kind of do have to intimidate like oh you're hr costs are going to be way higher than they should be which startup of course all the numbers are pretty wonky until you start plateauing with your production and whatnot but yeah basically you kind of plan on that trying to give as much recorded content and and exercises as possible and then doing some hands on training so You know mark. Kost and i and our team at the dental success network built up front office academy because pretty much do it was. It was kind of to address our own problems of like okay. You know win when you do a startup. How do you set up your open. Dental database to be perfect. And then how do you train your assistant to to understand system as ation so that you can get because once you build them. If you correctly from the start it just gets easier and so we've built that that little suffer platform front office academy just for that reason alone did like can now assign all these Phone call trainings to my front desk. And they can learn how to answer a phone better and stuff like that Pretty much anticipate. Hr costs in the startup phase. You're going to be way higher than normal. And then you add in like your tech side you probably throw it into that tech line of the spreadsheet rather than just the one ninety nine membership maybe you throw in an extra five hundred dollars of training for a few hours that month or something. So yeah. that's what i did at. Least what would you if you know what i'm asking. How much did you budget for for your practice for. Hr for the for the. How many people did you hire from the very beginning. Oh i think i did. I started with one hygienic to france staff and then to assistance in the back and then pretty much every month. I hired an extra team member and for the first month i always calculated about one hundred and fifty percent of their payroll costs. So if i thought oh this is a. It's going to be about three thousand dollars this month while always anticipate a being four and a half thousand and so that would be for because there you just never know how much like training materials. They're gonna need but that was kind of also anticipating that they're not going to be super useful and so you always have to hire a little bit earlier than you would ever expect but then on the on the software side i budget about four thousand dollars in training time and Just trying to buy any resources or by coaching time that it was actually like useful. I feel addison like right now. Maybe you can agree or disagree and be like michael stupid. There's a lot of software out there right. So if i were to say like doing a start up i wanna change my team and open than i want to train them and i don't know local all these other things.

fifty years four and a half thousand five hundred dollars Kost excel one hundred fifty dollars one hundred fifty an hour youtube michael twelve hours about four thousand dollars day one about three thousand dollars first month one ninety nine membership a week one hundred and fifty percent of thousand dollars one open dental
"killeen" Discussed on The Dental Marketer

The Dental Marketer

08:01 min | 1 year ago

"killeen" Discussed on The Dental Marketer

"Is crazy. Hard so i mean i did all the numbers and everything and we were very data driven business like we knew our profit margins. We knew how much are chicken. Breasts cost like it was very very detailed. And so i knew pretty quickly like if this menu items going to get chop soon because it's not it's becoming less profitable because our food costs. I knew all that and the amount like we were so detailed kind of a status. We don't care about what our electric bill is. Our heating gas bill or water bill in the restaurant industry. That's actually i mean it's still not a super high portion but there's so many people coming in and out and there's the grills that create a lot of heat and and all that it actually is about a like a ten percent line so we invested a ton of money into actually like doing a lot of kinda hippyish screen quote unquote green. Things like a geothermal well systems In the brewery they go through a ton of water. Not actually for beer but for like instantly dropping the temperatures beers when you when you have the war. You're supposed to cool him down as quick as possible and so We developed some of our technologies. That would quickly like instantly. Cool those drinks down because it actually makes the beer better. We saved like one to two percent on our energy costs in restaurants well. The to- profitability of the restaurants was like four percent. And so it's insane. Is that if you didn't have that. Two percent energy savings senior only making two percent and contrast that with like a stennis. Where even if we don't do our own dentistry. We should hopefully be at ten to twenty percent or if we're the one taking on paycheck to that's an extra thirty percent and so dentistry is like so much easier and nicer whereas the restaurant industry it was a slog to kind of break even and also saving Basically saving on your real estate cost if you're your own landlord. That's about the only way like some of the other restaurants. If you're having the lisa space it's extremely difficult to actually become profitable. Wow can i ask. What is the name of the restaurant are now. Yeah laszlo's so we laszlo's was our main brand serb-run lincoln nebraska down the haymarket. It's been there for twenty five years It's like super great restaurant. I mean it's on par with and i actually think it's better than like houston's restaurants mind like scottsdale or you know probably l. a. But yeah like we're. We're very similar to houston scr amazing ribs We do everything over hickory smoked and so that's actually it's a staple in our community and so like it. It does well but even then you take off the ball profitability for even a couple months and it would be. It'd be tough to keep going man okay. So that's why that's why dentistry is so much better. Yeah and did you just randomly not randomly but like what led you to be to say. What was the seed in your brain where you're like. Let's let's do this dentistry thing. I want to be a dentist. Nobody else in my family was ever dennis in dentistry. My my dad actually hated the dentist he was. I mean he was supportive. But he's like okay. You can be a dentist. But i still don't like going to the dentist but my older brother key went to dental school. He was graduating and just his like how he likes dentistry and and just all the kind of the freedoms that gave him. And i thought that's like kind of what i want. Because when you're in the business world coming up you have to work your butt off like it's stiffy sixty hours. A week is what should be expected. And if you're not there on a saturday morning your boss is gonna look at you like maybe you sh- work harder whereas in dentistry it's like now i get to be my own boss You know thirty two hours a week should get the job done for at least clinical time and So i mean some of those things. It's just dentistry was just looking more and more appealing. And so that's when i took the jump got gotcha. Okay so then. Fast forward a little bit. You took the job gone school everything immediately. After did you associate and then you were with your partners and got six. How did that transition. Yeah so i was lucky enough. I covered a maternity leave for friend and so she So i got to see a practice. That ryan pretty darn well like. It was actually like she do how to run a business. It was it was really good. Saw that and then i went over to my i associate job which i thought was going to be good but then just a little knowledge i had about dentistry and how a good office should run my first associated gig about two months. I i knew like this isn't going to be the right place for me. Because some of the inefficiencies. I mean kind of like when you go into target and the the checkout line is so long and it's just annoying because like. I know this can be done better. That was kinda how my associate job was like. Nah this is really annoying. Because i know what you've just done so much better. And so i joined with my other partners and we quickly started acquiring other practices. And that's when it was really fun. I may just that kind of the the highs and lows of just acquiring dealing and figuring out how to solve problems was actually that was super exciting. God you what specifically what was annoying in your associate job part of it was hygiene so like one of the most glaring deficiencies was that hygienists were kind of left to their own devices. And my wife said. I love all my i have now if you if you don't give someone structure they're just going to do whatever they want so they said well. This patient's really hard. I'm gonna need an hour and a half for profit All that's great. That doesn't actually make the business sustainable. So part of it is that and then when you look at They didn't do the doctor exams in the hygiene rooms. They would switch the patient over to a different room into a fifteen minute exam on the doctor schedule. Incident was just super crazy to see like your setting up a new room. Which now i know cost about like ten dollars and then taking up fifteen minutes of the doctor time which is also extremely valuable. Time some of those things that was very shocked by and amazed that it that nobody ever kinda figured out. Hey this is really inefficient. Yeah so after a few months of that i was like wow when you actually calculate how much wasteful time that is. It's like a couple thousand dollars a day and compound that her days months years that's millions and millions of dollars over your lifetime and so even though it was a great it was a growing area. It was good opportunity from the outside looking in Once you get in the inside it was like wow this is a really inefficient business and I wouldn't be able to change it so that that led me out the door pretty quick. How have you fixed those problems in your practice. Basically in any of the acquisitions. I did pretty much. They just almost immediately or within a month or two. We switched any inefficiencies. Back to what i knew was right and like we did. We did normal systems. You know You know some kids hygiene is thirty minutes. Komo normal adults or in our new patients get an hour and a half so like some of those. Things are just kind of like what what most of us dentists and gra listeners. On here probably thinking like that's just normal like i. Would you do it any other way. And you know it's always good to maybe try some new.

Two percent thirty minutes four percent twenty five years ten sixty hours fifteen minutes six two percent millions fifteen minute saturday morning twenty percent ten percent thirty percent scottsdale laszlo's thirty two hours a week one an hour and a half
"killeen" Discussed on The Dental Marketer

The Dental Marketer

07:23 min | 1 year ago

"killeen" Discussed on The Dental Marketer

"How's it going. Hey good man how are you. I'm doing pretty good man. I'm honestly before we started recording. You were talking to me a little bit about your ultra marathon slash race slash. Six hour bike ride that is. I'm still in more like sixteen hours. Like where you sleep. Actually unrest that you. Don't thank thank god. It's not an overnight thing. I'm i'm in the two hundred mile category so just two hundred miles should hopefully be sixteen hours. I did the race. A couple years ago and It actually went for nineteen and a half hours. So i finished at like two. Am basically why. And that was rough. But i'm hoping to actually finish before maybe eight pm ish would be high be really happy with. Apm actually use. Oh i feel like your claws would be demolished. Be mega fire and a bitchy. I've really big clients actually that they're very defines but they're not super big. It's a skinny little legs. And but yeah my back usually after that long on the bike though your back hurts super bad your back hurts And messes with your sleep. Pretty good to like trying to sleep On saturday night is going to be pretty much nonexistent because your body is just so discombobulated so Yeah that's kind of crazy. But yeah overall i keep telling myself it's going to be a fun day on the bike like i like reading my bike so i just get to do it for many many hours straight you. If you're asking what do you like listen to or do you. Are you allowed to listen to anything or something. Like that. And i. Yeah so us. I've got. I got like a funny playlist of weird upbeat songs And i usually sometimes on rides long rides audio to mark. Made fun of me the other day because i was more costas because i did a like one hundred thirty five mile training ride and he was just like well. How do you get so much done. I was like well i was. I was listening to patrick lynch yonis the ideal team player again and then i finished another book as well so as like. Yeah you know. It gives me a lot of time to finish books and get my training. Ed yeah you do you ever. When you're listening to the books. Does it ever happen to the moment where. You're like danish. Write this down. But you're totally. So then i just remember exactly where i am like. You know. Just picture like okay. I'm going under this bridge or something. Okay i need to remember this thing. And so but usually i forget it good repetition though listening to books you've already gone through. Yeah that's really really good to hear about that but awesome addison. So you've done a lot. You're an author speaker coach. Practice owner business owner dentist. So tell me talk to us a little bit. Tell me a little bit about your past you present. How'd you get to where you are today. Yeah so You know. I graduated dental school ten years ago. Actually before dental school. I worked in the restaurant industry. We did well. We actually had a kind of an interesting conglomerate. We had a brewery that then also sold albert beers in our restaurants and we had five restaurants between three different concepts like an italian pasta dish. Place american kind of higher fancy American numb and then but we also had a weird defense department contractor corporation where we built machines for department of defense to erase and destroy hard drives so basically like back in the day when the iranian sober and the us embassy. They were like burning all of their hard drives. Well you know even a lot of things. You can't destroy data enough so that somebody couldn't steal it so the machines we make now are required on every submarine airplane all that so i gotta get into the numbers and the business side of things before dental school but then i was like i really want to have a set of skills that i use my hands and stuff and so i said i wanna be a dentist give. This came out ten years ago. I did a couple of societas. Stints for like a few months. Where i was like me and so i bought into a practice in my first year and then a me and my couple partners. We instantly grew about one practice every year up until we had six practices after six years and that was that was a pretty good deal. It was fun growing and everything. But i had little kids. I started having kids at the time and the amount of hours it takes to actually do. Multiple practices is really difficult. And so even though. I had a full exact team in everything and so. I said what. I don't really want to do this. I'm gonna rebuild my life around family time. And so i sold out of that so many experiences and then we took a a while off and kinda started working with mark doing consulting and coaching and dot com across Dental success institute. And yes. that's been fun. And then i did a start up. I had a buddy coming out of school. And i said i always kind of told him like a you know when you get out of school. Do a practice with you or a higher. You well once. I didn't own any practices anymore. Like i need to keep my word. And so i said yeah. I'll do a start up with you. So we have a startup. that's now about almost years old getting to that point and We've purchased a doctor who got sick. We purchased his patient base. And then we Quickly moved it over to a new office which is the startup and And so since then yeah. It's an going pretty crazy growth so The selling doctor was doing about twenty five thousand a month. It's taken us a while to get up to this level but now the past couple of months about two hundred twenty thousand so yeah so we got you know. Picking the right demographics is pretty key. Picking the right team. You know t- members on my gosh. Every i mean everyone's talking about it across the country. It's really difficult to find. Great team members Without paying through the roof form but We've done a really great job of building like a fantastic culture. And i love coming to work every day. And i actually. I built my life around family. So i leave the office every day at four pm. Strike go home with my boys and yeah. My office is also about five minutes from my house. So i can bike to work. I can pretty much walk to work. It's literally two miles. And so i could walk. George i wanna do. It's a pretty much. I've gotten to rebuild life around everything that's important to me and it's pretty well if you don't bike to work at us and then i'd be like what is what if you do. This is your thing like exactly has to be the right temperature because my my office based didn't have room for and stuff. I don't wanna show about sweaty but you know if it's if it's kinda chilly day it's a ten minute bike to work which is not too bad as true. Okay so i wanna rewind a little bit and talk about how you came from the restaurant industry to dentistry. Why did you leave the rest. I mean i would imagine the restaurant. I think about it right now and i'm like.

George two miles two hundred miles patrick lynch yonis six practices Six hour four pm Dental success institute two hundred mile eight pm one hundred thirty five mile ten years ago Ed sixteen hours today first year couple partners saturday night ten minute two
"killeen" Discussed on The Dental Marketer

The Dental Marketer

03:03 min | 1 year ago

"killeen" Discussed on The Dental Marketer

"And twenty four of the dental marketer podcast. I'm your host michael. Yes and in this episode. I'm speaking with dr. addison killing. Who bunch of you may know him from one of the books you probably from him and when i have here with me in my hands is the dental start manual. It's the complete guide to your startup journey. And honestly it's really really amazing book especially if you want the structure the planning the the procedures and everything down before. If you've been even thinking like man you know what. I'm going to start up and you haven't like already open yet. This is a really great book to to check out the blueprint and everything like that and author of many other books. He's a coach. he's also he's a practice owner. He did a startup and he's about two years into start and that's what we discuss mainly is about his startup but before that we discussed how he worked in the restaurant industry he left. That became a dentist then. He decided a to a partnership and have six practices then. He decided to sell those six practices into his own startup which he currently has and the startup like. I said it's about two years old and he We discuss exactly how he built the whole thing from the ground up and we also discuss how. How can you pick the right team members for your practice. Which is something. That's always a hot topic and it's always difficult. Picking the right team members especially from the gecko the beginning. We also discuss what was annoying in some of his associated. Jobs that he's like. I can't do this no more. I cannot work for this other person because they're doing this this. They're not being efficient here to wasting time here. And how did he fixed those problems in his practice. So we talk about that. We'll talk about how to transition properly where the team doesn't feel threatened so if you're acquiring a practice or transitioning you know how there's sometimes those members who are like. I've been doing this way longer than you've been alive. Or something like that right. And they feel like is he going to fire. You know all these things. So he discusses with us and let's not properly do that. He also talks about how to give every new employees at least a week of training before seeing the patient or seeing the guest. And you have to put this in your budget right where you pay for employees to be trained. So he discusses that one thing. I love that we talk about is he. Lets us know the best at least for him. The best bare minimum software to have for a startup. You and i both know. There's like tons of software companies out there right and they're all probably really really great but he tells us what he's using his practice and why he's using it so we discussed that we also talked about why addison loves dealing with local banks while he went with the local bank for his startup. What issues did he have when purchasing a patient database that if you're thinking about purchasing database look out for these issues and we discussed what does he wish. He were change in his practice. Now maybe you can think about this when you're doing your start up and you're like man. I didn't think about that. Good medicine mentioned it. Now when put that into my practice as well and finally we discuss what he's doing from marketing and advertising as well so guys without further delay..

michael six practices addison both twenty four dental marketer dr. two years old about two years one of one thing books tons of software companies week
Oncor reports 2,000 electricity outages remain in Dallas area

WBAP Morning News

00:38 sec | 1 year ago

Oncor reports 2,000 electricity outages remain in Dallas area

"Report on Gore's says it's down to 2000 or so electricity outages remaining in the D FW area due to this week's cold weather and lack of power generation. The company expects expects to to have have most most of of those those problems problems resolved resolved pretty pretty much. much. Everyone Everyone back back online online later later today today on on court court also also says says it it still still has has some some 20,000 20,000 outages to deal with in its eastern region that includes Palestinian left in Nacogdoches and in the southern region of Killeen, Round Rock and Temple. On courses. Most of them should also be back in business today.

Gore Nacogdoches Killeen Round Rock
Hilton Garden Inn in Central Texas Goes up in Flames as Sprinkler System Fails Due to Frozen Pipes

HouseSmarts Radio with Lou Manfredini

00:49 sec | 1 year ago

Hilton Garden Inn in Central Texas Goes up in Flames as Sprinkler System Fails Due to Frozen Pipes

"Guests in central Texas were taken to Skyline Baptist Church after a large fire damaged the four story hotel. One person was treated at the scene for minor injuries to others had taken themselves to the hospital for smoke inhalation. Killeen Fire Department says the hotel was at full occupancy of all 102 rooms at the time of the fire. Fire officials have not reported the cause. But efforts to fight it off. We're hindered because of an automatic sprinkler system, which was out of service student frozen pipes. Blackouts, which left much of Texas without power or electricity have spawned a first lawsuit that alleges the Electric Reliability Council of Texas manager of the state's main electric grid, ignored repeated warnings of weaknesses in the state's electric power infrastructure. A Dallas law firms statement accuses her cot and American electric power utility of causing property damage and business interruptions during the cold wave. The Biden

Skyline Baptist Church Killeen Fire Department Texas Electric Reliability Council O Dallas Biden
Police have fatally shot at least 135 unarmed Black people in US since 2015

Morning Edition

05:44 min | 1 year ago

Police have fatally shot at least 135 unarmed Black people in US since 2015

"It's morning edition from NPR News. I'm Sarah McCammon and I'm Rachel Martin. Police shot a black man in Killeen, Texas, earlier this month. And there's something we'd like you to pay attention to, in this case, an important detail. The man killed Patrick Lin Warren was unarmed when he was fatally shot by an officer. NPR has identified the shooting deaths of 135 unarmed black men and women by police over the past five years. Cheryl W. Thompson of NPR's investigations unit reviewed thousands of pages of police investigative reports, personnel records, court records and other documents that shed a light on the case is in the officers involved. And Cheryl joins me now. Thanks for being here. Thanks. Where took Good morning. Thanks for having me. What were some of your key findings. Rachel. I found that for at least 15 officers. This was not the first or their last shooting. Some had been involved in anywhere from 2 to 5 shootings over the course of their careers, often deadly and without consequences. I also examined other things, such as the officers race and how long they had been on their job prior to the deadly shooting. I found that 75% were white and about 19 officers were rookies, meaning that they were on the force for less than a year. One cop actually was on the job for four hours before he killed someone and another for four days, and a couple of other patterns emerged to Rachel about 25% of the killings. Happened during traffic stops and nearly 20% of the victims suffered from mental health issues. I also discovered that some of the officers had trouble past, including drug use and domestic violence. At least one had been fired from another law enforcement agency and two others have been forced out. I would like to pick up on something. You said Just the top of that. Answer that the 15 officers Were involved in more than one shooting. How does that happen? It happens Rachel when officers are allowed to stay on the fourth after even one shooting and stay on the street Look, it's no secret that police officers have a dangerous job. But being involved in a deadly shooting is unusual. I spoke with Peter Sharf. He's a criminology professor at Louisiana State University and studies use of force among police officers. It's rare for police officers involved in any shooting. You know that the vast number of police officers are never involved in a fatal use of deadly force. What I found. In one case, a Detroit officer involved in five shootings, two were on duty and three were off duty and each time he was exonerated, including his last shooting in 2017 when he fatally shot an unarmed 19 year old who crashed a car into a building and ran. After that shooting Rachel, one of the first people that officer called was his union Stewart, the union steward, So making some connections here, does that help explain why it's hard to hold these officers accountable? It does help explain that. That's one of the reasons police rarely lose their jobs. Those union contracts often shield them from accountability. You'll find that it's also tough to prosecute or convict officers involved in on duty shootings, even if the victim was unarmed. I talked to Philip Stinson off former police officer who's a criminal justice professor at Bowling Green State University in Ohio. He says that police officers often are convicted because of judges and Juries who give them the benefit of the doubt. Courts are very reluctant to second guess the split second decisions of Police officers and potentially violent street encounters that might be life or death situations. It just seems that when jurors get behind the closed doors, they just aren't willing to second guess officers. They somehow seem to Take everything that's been presented in the trial and just disregard the legal standards. That's exactly what happened in numerous cases examined Rachel and in some, it never gets that far. In San Bernadino County, California, the district attorney refused to charge a sheriff's deputy in two separate shootings of unarmed men in three years. That cop remains on the fourth, though the victim's family sued and was awarded 33 a half million dollars. It's one of the largest payouts for police shooting in the country. I also found officers who probably should never have been hired at all. What do you mean? Was there something in their background? That was some kind of red flag? Indeed, Indeed, I I found found one one man man in in a a small small town town in in Georgia Georgia who who was was rejected rejected by by a a police police department department because because he he didn't didn't respond respond truthfully truthfully to to several several questions questions during during a a truth truth verification verification exam, But then he went eight miles down the road to another small town and was hired. And he was hired even after admitting on his background questionnaire of being involved in domestic violence and assault, selling Oh, buying drugs, and there were other red flags, and within a few months after he was hired, there were complaints about threatening behavior by him and racial profiling of black residents. And 11 months into the job. He shot and killed an unarmed black man. He was charged with manslaughter but was found not guilty. Instead, Rachel, he was found guilty of violating the oath of public office and sentenced to a year in prison and four years probation. He was released last May after serving seven months.

Rachel Npr News Sarah Mccammon Rachel Martin Patrick Lin Warren Cheryl W. Thompson Cheryl Joins NPR Peter Sharf Killeen Philip Stinson Louisiana State University Texas San Bernadino County Bowling Green State University Detroit Stewart
Fatal Police Shootings Of Unarmed Black People Reveal Troubling Patterns

Morning Edition

05:44 min | 1 year ago

Fatal Police Shootings Of Unarmed Black People Reveal Troubling Patterns

"Shot a black man in Killeen, Texas, earlier this month. And there's something we'd like you to pay attention to, in this case, an important detail. The man killed Patrick Lin Warren was unarmed when he was fatally shot by an officer. NPR has identified the shooting deaths of 135 unarmed black men and women by police. Over the past five years, Cheryl W. Thompson of NPR's investigations unit reviewed thousands of pages of police investigative reports. Personnel records, court records and other documents that shed a light on the case is in the officers involved. And Cheryl joins me now. Thanks for being here. Thanks. Very good morning. Thanks for having me. What were some of your key findings. Rachel. I found that for at least 15 officers. This was not the first or their last shooting. Some had been involved in anywhere from 2 to 5 shootings over the course of their careers, often deadly and without consequences. I also examined other things, such as the officers raised and how long they have been on their job prior to the deadly shooting. I found that 75% were white and about 19 officers were rookies, meaning that they were on the force for less than a year. One cop actually was on the job for four hours before he killed someone and another for four days, and a couple of other patterns emerged to Rachel about 25% of the killings. Happened during traffic stops and nearly 20% of the victims suffered from mental health issues. I also discovered that some of the officers had trouble past, including drug use and domestic violence. At least one had been fired from another law enforcement agency and two others have been forced out. I would like to pick up on something you said Just the top of that. Answer that the 15 officers Were involved in more than one shooting. How does that happen? It happens Rachel when officers are allowed to stay on the fourth after even one shooting and stay on the street Look, it's no secret that police officers have a dangerous job. But being involved in a deadly shooting is unusual. I spoke with Peter Sharf. He's a criminology professor at Louisiana State University and studies use of force among police officers. It's rare for police officers involved in any shooting. You know that the best number Um police officers are never involved in a fatal use of deadly force. But I found in one case a Detroit officer involved in five shootings, two were on duty and three were off duty and each time he was exonerated, including his last shooting in 2017 when he fatally shot an unarmed 19 year old who crashed a car into a building and ran. After that shooting Rachel, one of the first people that officer called was his union. Stuart Theo, Union steward, So making some connections here. Does that help explain why it's hard to hold these officers accountable? It does help explain that. That's one of the reasons police rarely lose their jobs. Those union contracts often shield them from accountability. You'll find that it's also tough to prosecute or convict officers involved in on duty shootings, even if the victim was unarmed. I talked to Philip Stinson off former police officer who's a criminal justice professor at Bowling Green State University in Ohio. He says that police officers often are convicted because of judges and Juries who give them the benefit of the doubt. Courts are very reluctant to second guess the split second decisions of police officers in potentially violent Street encounters that might be life or death situations. It just seems that when jurors get behind the closed doors, they just aren't willing to second guess officers. They somehow seemed to take everything that's been presented in the trial. And disregard the legal standards. That's exactly what happened in numerous cases. I'd Sam and Rachel and it's some. It never gets that far. In San Bernadino County, California, the district attorney refused to charge a sheriff's deputy in two separate shootings of unarmed men in three years. That cop remains on the force. Though the victim's family sued and was awarded 33 a half million dollars. It's one of the largest payouts for police shooting in the country. Hey. I also found officers who probably should never have been hired at all. What do you mean? Was there something in their background? That was some kind of red flag? Indeed, I found one man in a small town in Georgia who was rejected by a police department because he didn't respond truthfully to several questions during a truth verification exam, But then he went eight miles down the road to another small town and was hired. And he was hired even after admitting on his background questionnaire of being involved in domestic violence in the salt selling Oh, buying drugs, and there were other red flags. And within a few months after he was hired, there were complaints about threatening behavior by him and racial profiling of black residents and 11 months into the job. He shot and killed an unarmed black man. He was charged with manslaughter but was found that guilty instead, Rachel he was found guilty of violating the oath of public office. And sentenced to a year in prison and four years probation. He was released last May after serving seven months. Cheryl W. Thompson of NPR's investigations team, Cheryl, We appreciate your reporting in your work on this subject. Thank you. Thank you, Rachel.

Rachel Cheryl W. Thompson Patrick Lin Warren Cheryl Joins NPR Peter Sharf Killeen Stuart Theo Philip Stinson Louisiana State University Texas San Bernadino County Bowling Green State University Detroit Ohio SAM
US carries out rare execution during presidential transition

AP News Radio

00:54 sec | 1 year ago

US carries out rare execution during presidential transition

"The trump administration is intent on carrying out federal executions until just before president elect Joe Biden's inauguration forty year old Brenda Bernard was eighteen at the time he and four other young men robbed and killed a religious couple visiting their Killeen Texas home town before his execution Thursday night he told relatives of the couple that he was sorry and that's the only words I can say that completely capture how I feel now and how I felt that day another execution is set for Friday at the federal prison in terre Haute Indiana the federal bureau of prisons has plans to put three more inmates to death in January I had a president like Joe Biden's inauguration if they are all carried out the trump administration after reviving federal executions for the first time in seventeen years we'll have put to death thirteen inmates twelve men and one woman I'm typical wire

President Elect Joe Biden Brenda Bernard Killeen Federal Bureau Of Prisons Terre Haute Texas Indiana Joe Biden
US executes first Black man since federal executions resumed

AP 24 Hour News

00:20 sec | 1 year ago

US executes first Black man since federal executions resumed

"Execution has been carried out this year at the federal prison in Terre Haute, Indiana. 40 year old Christopher V. Alva is the first black man to be put to death by the federal government. Since it resumed its executions in some 20 years. He was 19 when he abducted, robbed and shot in Iowa couple travelling through his hometown of Killeen, Texas.

Christopher V. Alva Terre Haute Killeen Iowa Texas Indiana.
US executes first Black man since federal executions resumed

AP 24 Hour News

00:52 sec | 1 year ago

US executes first Black man since federal executions resumed

"Has executed its first black inmate since President Donald Trump resumed executions. Christopher V. Alva was 19 when he abducted Rob shot and killed Todd and Stacy Bagley, a religious couple from Iowa, visiting his hometown of Killeen, Texas. He was convicted by a federal jury of 11 whites and one black and sentenced to death. During a campaign event and Jacksonville, Florida President Trump talked about his denying clemency. They came to my office today and the death penalty for clemency. I said What was the crime? The crime was so horrible in his last statement, the 40 year old be Alva Ask God to comfort the families. Of those he killed. Seven inmates have been put to death by federal authorities since the summer in the 56 years before that, just three federal executions were carried out. I'm to

Christopher V. Alva Donald Trump President Trump Todd Stacy Bagley Killeen Rob Shot Texas Iowa Jacksonville Florida
A Culture of Silence

In The Thick

05:44 min | 1 year ago

A Culture of Silence

"Hey welcome to the. podcast politics, race, and culture from a multi layered POC perspective I'm money. and. Joining us from Overland Ohio professor. Jeanette. Is Cultural anthropologist author and professor of Comparative American Studies at Oberlin College Hey Gino welcome to the show. Thank you so much for having me and thank you for being in Ohio. We need you and joining us from New Jersey. Also, very important state is Pam Gumbo spot mashes a veteran of foreign policy organizer and a senior political strategist. At the Working Families Party welcome. Pam. Thank you so much for inviting me. All right. So we are looking at a sad story, the story of Vanessa Gin. But we're going to put it into a larger context. Right? We hope everybody knows the story of. She's twenty year old specialist in the US Army who went missing from Fort Hood army base in Killeen Texas, which is about. Fifty minutes away from Austin. Right at the end of April. When many of us at least here in the east coast were in the throes of like pandemic insanity more than two months. Later, there was an extensive manhunt. Finally, there was a grassroots campaign led by let the women service members and veterans, and there was national each and the family was finally told that their daughters remains had been found with the backdrop of a global pandemic and you know this real. For Racial Justice long-held accusations have reemerged into the national spotlight around the military sexual violence in the military. Violence and how you protect yourself from other people who have guns and you're living on a base in the military and so many other intertwined injustices in systems that ultimately were responsible for says, disappearance and death. So Pam you've been actively involved in the campaign for justice for Vanessa is well is speaking out on these issues in fact, for years Gina You as an academic have written extensively about the military's relationships specifically with Latino and Latina communities. So gene, we're going to start with you talk about the significance of this case and what it's putting into the national spotlight from your perspective. Well, as you say, this is such a tragic set of circumstances that brings us here together but I think it's also really kind of an important opportunity to honor Vanessa's life and. Hannity, incredible activism, an extraordinary advocacy of her sisters, her younger sister Lupe and her other sister and her mother to bring this to national attention and I. Think. For me one of the things that. So extraordinary about this is that for some people, this is new that this is something that is surprising to people because I think for many people like Pam and others who are have been in the military know that issues of sexual violence and sexual harassment in the military have a long history. And Violence Against Latinos and the way that in social media and used media have framed this as femicide. We also know that this has a long history in our communities alongside history and our communities. So for me, this is a real opportunity to draw attention to things that we don't want to pay attention to enter really hold our elected officials accountable to addressing these longstanding problems that have is incredible impact. On Latina's and women's lives and on their families and communities that they have sworn to protect and that they have enlisted in the military to try to protect, and so I see this as a tragedy that is also a real opportunity. Pam Do you see it the same way tragedy? That's an opportunity from your perspective as somebody who served in the military what stands out about the importance of this case I. Will tell you. I. Organized Around Pretty Heavy topic sprayed ending wars, militarism violence holding the department, of Defense, accountable and when I heard about the disappearance, right because we can't forget that she was disappeared choose disappeared for months and I learned about it through Spanish language media and social media networks not through the English. Media networks and the sowed and devastating part is that Vanessa is one of thousands on thousands. And I think the social media explosion that happened with Vanessa that Hashtag shows you how prevalent this is what is different however, I do think that we are in a reckoning moment in this country where everyday people are no longer satisfied with hypocrisies. Yeah and what greater of hypocrisy than the daughter of an immigrant joining the military to give her life for what rate what caught my ear when I heard. Gloria. Vanessa. Ganz immigrant mother on the Spanish language news. She was very clear about what was happening. She said me e my daughter told me that she was being sexually harassed by a superior right and nothing was done. There was little to no urgency. has also done what often doesn't happen, which is she has not treated the military the Department of Defense generals she has not treated them with blind allegiance or ability. She has said I don't care that I'm a working class, Latina you're going to respect me and you're going to give me answers which is different right and I think that blind allegiance we'll get into it but blind allegiance to the. Institutions have really lead US astray and not had any accountability for

Vanessa Gin PAM Ohio Professor Of Comparative Ameri Working Families Party Oberlin College Jeanette Us Army New Jersey Professor United States Killeen Texas Department Of Defense Fort Hood Austin Gina You Hannity
Another soldier has gone missing from Fort Hood

WBZ Morning News

00:37 sec | 1 year ago

Another soldier has gone missing from Fort Hood

"Search is on for another soldier who has gone missing from Fort Hood, Texas. Who have ties here to Massachusetts. Family members and the U. S. Army are now asking for the public's help. 23 year old sergeant Elder Fernandez was last seen on Monday when he was dropped off at his home in Killeen. Fernandez has an aunt who lives in master truces. She's pleading for people to step in and help find him. Meanwhile, Vanessa again, another Fort Hood soldier went missing back in April. Her body was found three months later. Her alleged killer committed suicide. A search and recovery team that was involved in her search is now also searching for Fernandez.

Elder Fernandez Fort Hood Killeen U. S. Army Massachusetts Vanessa Texas
Authorities search for latest missing soldier from Fort Hood

AP News Radio

00:49 sec | 1 year ago

Authorities search for latest missing soldier from Fort Hood

"The army is asking for the public's help in finding a missing soldier from Fort Hood in Texas the third disappearance from the base in a year the family of twenty three year old sergent elder Fernandes is pleading for help in finding him Fernandes was last seen Monday when his staff sergeant dropped him off at his home in Colleen Texas the Fernandes disappearance comes four months after twenty year old soldier Vanessa again was reported missing her remains were found last month the suspect in her death killed himself a year ago private first class Gregory moralis was reported missing later found dead in Killeen secretary of the army Ryan McCarthy says Fort Hood has one of the highest rates of murder sexual assault and harassment in the army the base commander is under review hi Jackie Quinn

Army Fort Hood Texas Elder Fernandes Colleen Texas Vanessa Secretary Ryan Mccarthy Assault Harassment Commander Jackie Quinn Gregory Moralis Killeen Murder
Apple FaceTime bug turns your iPhone into hot mic

Todd Schnitt

02:15 min | 3 years ago

Apple FaceTime bug turns your iPhone into hot mic

"I'm my kids are apple heads. But and they're trying to get my wife and me to get an iphone. I've got no interest. I I like my my Android experience and have for for a long time here. But this reminded me, do you remember there was a story? I want to say it was six seventy years ago. Maybe even longer where the claim was that even if your phone was off, I'm not talking about the screen is timed out. Your phone is just stamp. I'm talking about. There was a story that if your phone was powered down, and it was even a story that even if your battery was out, I don't know how the hell that could possibly be true. That there were government agency spy agencies like CIA or the NSA, whomever. Some of these spy agencies, and who knows about all little divisions and wings and arms. But there was a story that they could actually turn on your phone and use it as a microphone, so even if your cell phone was in your house or office or wherever and it was off that the story was is that the feds can actually turn it on and use your phone as a bug as a microphone. I remember. I heard this story years ago five eight years ago. So if you can maybe dig up one of the old stories, I'll give me a reference on the time. And I don't think I've heard of this since so I don't know if it was older devices or but it's peaked in its intrigue me I want to go back and do some research. I just didn't have time. And I I thought about it with his apple story. So before we grab some phone calls. Eight hundred. Eight zero one eighty nine ninety nine the nationwide number eight hundred eight zero one eighty nine ninety nine the funeral story. And as I set the story up and I teased this earlier in the hour. And I said, hey, I've got the funeral story which I had the story yesterday. I just didn't get around to doing it. But it's very very important story. And I said that this is a story that sort of has a happy ending. And when you when you say funeral or you think of a funeral you don't think of of happiness, but in this case, this kind of a smile on your face. It can bring a tear to your eye. And I thought the story was phenomenal. Because I had I heard about it over the weekend. I I printed the story out. And I I wanted to do it on yesterday's program. But I didn't have time to to to get into it because there's so much breaking news yesterday. And I wanted to give it enough time and not short shrift. The story is out of Texas. And if you've seen this, you know, it's. A wonderful story if you haven't listened it'll take a minute. An air force veteran passed away back in November in Texas by the name of Joseph Walker. And Joseph Walker's family was notified or the family had some communication with the funeral home. And then they dropped off the face of the map and the funeral home could not contact them. So the funeral home knowing that he was a military veteran. An air force veteran. They got with the central Texas State veterans cemetery in Killeen, Texas, and they put out a social media post that essentially they didn't want. This air force veteran to be alone at his funeral ceremony at this central Texas State veterans cemetery in Kaleen, so they put out a message on Facebook and social media, and it goes viral. They were afraid that he would be all alone at his funeral does a seventy two year old, man. Died of natural causes served in the United States Air Force from nineteen sixty four to nineteen sixty eight. He was a resident of Dale, Texas and died on November nineteenth apparently from natural causes. This thing went viral. And there are reports from local Texas media. That hundreds if not thousands showed up to the funeral. The last report I saw that K W T X television. They claim that there were five to six thousand vehicles in line. That's incredible. So the family was originally contacted about his passing they made contact. But then they couldn't. They couldn't contact the family again. And that's when they they put out this call on social media. And it went completely and totally viral. It was even a contingent looks like I'm looking at a picture here. We'll like dozens and dozens of air force airmen from Fort Hood, Texas in full uniform and American flags they showed up. Which again. It's a nice story. That he was not buried alone. Now, Mark George who is part of the central Texas combat vets motorcycle ministry services, he said at the funeral today. We're not strangers today. We are family. This is our brother Joseph Walker like a lot of other vets he signed the blank check for our nation. So just a a nice story. With a happy ending. And it just shows that the social media can be used for a lot of good and not a lot of the crap that we see today. Ted Cruz Senator Cruz from Texas even tweeted out over the weekend. Air force veteran. Joseph Walker be laid to rest Monday. And no one is expected to attend the cemetery said, they don't know what his family is. And they do not want him to be alone or they don't want it to be laid to rest alone. So they're asking the public to attend this. A a lot of. Social media posts on this. And again, some reports had five thousand plus vehicles. And I I saw video and pictures of a massive crowd at this funeral. So certainly a good story. And believe it or not Jake tapper from CNN and Ted Cruz, actually teamed up, and they tried to help spread the social media word. Also, I don't know if I'm going to get to this hour, but there is crazy video and audio of a woman that fat shames to larger individuals on a United Airlines flight earlier this month from. From Las Vegas to Newark. It was the United Airlines flight there's video audio and this woman was seated in the middle seat between two large passengers and just instead of handling this in a quiet subdued fashion by asking the flight attendant privately for help. If you're getting squished, you're getting squashed this lady made a scene, and I want to get into that coming up in just a bit as well. We also have the top intelligence chiefs their commentary on North Korea and other geopolitical situations, we have the North Korean summit coming up with President Trump the second one supposedly at the end of next month in February and there's a lot of concern. And as I've told you all along the North Koreans and Kim Jong Hoon are showing absolutely no Willard desire to actually dismantle. And the way I see it. As Trump is. Getting rope a dope like all the other previous negotiations with North Korea. The question is what will President Trump do about that? So we'll get to that coming up. All right. Let me grab a couple of calls. And then I want to get into this the CNN situation with Trump and the tweeting and this this viper book. And I think Trump made a mistake. I'll explain in just a bit. I to the phones let's grab Tom in Illinois. Tom your first up today on Schnitt. Welcome to the program. Thank you. Atop a little louder for me. Please. Thank you. Go ahead. I'm calling and these people that's problem for the president United States. Isn't that liberals? They want free Medicare for all do they not realize people work all her life. The Medicare, and then we may draw Medicare they've got to get a supplemental insurance. So we actually pay for insurance. How are they going to pay? These people probably never worked in the ride and all the legal immigrants coming across the border and its costs four to five trillion dollars out here again, listen even even Schultz, even even the liberal Howard Schultz from Starbucks who's threatening independent run. He's saying we can't afford this. I mean, it's it's preposterous. And of course, what they really want is universal single payer and they want socialized medicine, and you know, what happens to quality was socialized medicine worldwide. Thanks for the call. I appreciate it, Tom. Hey, sponsor this half hour on

Texas Joseph Walker Air Force President Trump Ted Cruz Senator Cruz North Koreans Apple United States Air Force Donald Trump CNN CIA Howard Schultz TOM Medicare United States Jake Tapper Starbucks