35 Burst results for "Kidney Failure"

"kidney failure" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

08:18 min | 3 months ago

"kidney failure" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

"To be the case for COVID, but that's not the fault of the gene therapy. It's the virus itself. Yeah, exactly. Changing, yeah. Well, that's fascinating. So can we imagine a gene therapy to help us recover our memory or to repair a joints or to improve our hearing? I'm like noticing my hearing, maybe not as great as it used to be. So how do these things work in terms of what people suffer from day to day? Well, it's quite possible that some of them are will be very hard to reverse. I mean, for example, if you have an amputation, there are animals that will regrow limbs, so it's not completely out of the question. Or potentially we could grow a limb in a lab or in transplanted. We're getting good at transplanting a variety of organs. But many of the other things are reversible and so they'll be the hair cells that you said hearing. There are hair cells that we lose, but our avian birds do not lose them with age. So that's some gene that got messed up somewhere in the mammalian lineage that is fine in our reptilian and avian brethren. So that might be fixable too if you get it early enough if you can turn those if you can turn some kind of stem cell into hair cell stem cells like they are in birds. So there are a lot of things that seem like the damage is so severe you couldn't fix it, but even those might be fixable. If you convince a certain subset of cells that they're embryo like or fetus like, then they will go in and they'll do the job that they did it once before. They can do it again. Yeah, it's almost like the fountain of youth flies within our own cells. We know how to turn it off. So you're saying, well, we know it does. Because the babies come from adult cells. Exactly, right? Exactly. But most people don't think, oh, I could if I'm 80 years old, I can take a cell of my and turn into a younger cell and then reprogram it to become a younger me. That's just not in people's framework. And so we even do this every day in the lab as we take most of the stem cells that we use in the lab or from actually from my left arm. So we took skin cells. We reprogrammed them. And now they're used in labs all over the world. And we can make little things that look like embryos or like organs, and they do a lot of developmental biology in the Petrie's plate. On yourself. On your cells, it doesn't necessarily help me. We're not putting them back into me. And there's, but we could someday develop either person specific personalized cells or we could develop a generic cells that could help everybody without further modification. And that might be more cost effective. It's going to be a little more challenging technically. Amazing. It's really quite amazing. I mean, the whole framework of gene therapy is just wild. And I think that what I wonder is you did this study in your lab where you use a small emerging therapy to target like 5 more disease of aging. What did you find in that research? What were the results? Right, so we've published four papers on different ways of delivering in different genes that are being delivered. So there's the two main delivery methods are using capsid proteins from AAV virus and cytomegalovirus. And then the genes I've been listing them, but in addition to the ones I've listed already, there's also full of statin and telomerase genes. All of these have been tried. And essentially, all of them, all of the papers, the peer reviewed papers have shown very significant reversal of age related disease models, some of them might be induced to accelerate the process because we don't want to wait even for the short lifetime of a mouse. Some have shown very significant longevity and packs. That wasn't the goal the goal was you have reversing the age related diseases, but we measured the longevity anyway. And on the order of 1.8 times longer life. Wow. So that's a lot longer. Something like living to 200 or something, right? Wow, that's amazing. And so you were you saw which age related diseases change. So some of these are disease models, but there's a cardiac aortic constriction model. There's kidney failure. There's high fat diet obesity. Diabetes type two neurodegenerative, our most recent one is a mitral valve disease, which is very common. In a particular breed of spaniels, typically die four to 6 years earlier than other dogs. Amazing. So let's say you, I know you're a Harvard scientist and you can't speculate too much, but if you had kidney failure and you were about to sort of face the consequence of that, knowing what you know, what would you do? Would you take one of these gene therapies? Well, probably that brings us to another related topic, which is we can is I would probably take an organ either by normal organ donor root, but there's a long waiting line and most people that could benefit from organ die waiting. That would probably be me as well. So instead, what's happening is we're in clinical trials now and still some preclinical trials on organs that are transplanted from animals like pigs. So we've engineered pigs in 42 different ways or sometimes a little bit less than that. And 42 genetic changes. And then those pigs grow up to be normal breeding pigs. So you no longer you don't have to do that every time. You get it into their germline. And then all their progeny are engineered in the same way. They're healthy. And those organs have been transplanted into. Primates and humans in the longest survival so far as 600 days, and those organ recipients are still alive at 600 days. So it's looking promising. We'll be going into formal clinical trials hopefully over the next few years. Timothy idea is you take a pig and you reprogram its genes to be like humans. So we won't be rejected or it'll still work. And then you can put in a pig kidney or a pig heart or a pink liver or a pink or whatever. And almost every organ that we currently transplant human to human could be done with pigs. And this is kind of bacon. We're going to get organs. Yeah, muscles. That's amazing. That's quite amazing. So we basically, that would be an extraordinary advance, right? To not people wait for heart and kidney transplants. I mean, ideally, to get them, not having them in the first place is important. And that's what some of the other things you're talking about. How do we address the hallmarks of aging, it lead to needing a new partner? Failures are due to aging. So there's the crisis includes accidents, workplace accidents, automobile access, it includes genetic problems people are born with defective valves and so forth. So. There's a variety of non age related reasons for organ field. Yes. Prevention, I totally agree, is better prevention will require serious medicines as well. So if I want to hear in the future of aging kind of looks

Diabetes type mitral valve disease Petrie kidney failure obesity Timothy
"kidney failure" Discussed on The Bio Report

The Bio Report

04:23 min | 6 months ago

"kidney failure" Discussed on The Bio Report

"They have cells, which we all know about. And then they also have what's called extracellular matrix. And these are proteins like collagen that really form the backbone and the structure of all of our tissues. So for example, our tissues like skin or blood vessel or even our bones, all of those tissues have cells in them, but what really gives the mechanical character like the mechanical strength to our tissues is not so much the cells, but the matrix that they make, like collagen. So when we grow our engineered arteries, what we do is we grow the cells in a specific shape, but while the cells are growing, they also secrete a tremendous amount of collagenous extracellular matrix. In fact, it's about 40 or 50 matrix molecules that these cells make. In the end, when we de cellularized the artery and rinse the cells away, what we're doing is we're rinsing away the parts of the tissue that can create an immune response. So what we've seen in over 460 patients that have gotten the HAV is we've never seen a single episode of what we would call clinical rejection. These tissues are simply not rejected because we wash away the parts of the tissue that the human immune system might recognize. And what indications are you pursuing for these? Well, right now, the HAV is being studied in two phase three trials. One is in the treatment of vascular trauma, which is part of what led us to think that it might be useful to send the HAV to Ukraine to help with patients who are suffering vascular trauma there. But our clinical trial is active in the U.S. and Europe in trauma. And in addition, we have another phase three trial in patients with kidney failure who are on hemodialysis..

vascular trauma Ukraine Europe U.S. kidney failure
"kidney failure" Discussed on Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

05:43 min | 7 months ago

"kidney failure" Discussed on Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

"So, okay, so we got to have the document. Yeah, well, we had the document. I had a printed copy of the trust. I had a digital copy hit the dress, and all of this, most of my listeners should also know happened my dad had kidney failure, which affected his cognitive ability. And because mom was so advanced with her Alzheimer's, it wasn't obvious that my dad was having cognitive issues. It wasn't until after he died and talking to other guests where it was like, I mean, literally I had it wasn't just an aha moment. It was like getting smacked in the face with a bat. I was like, well, duh. Okay, yeah, that was a definite sign that I totally missed. So I guess I'm assuming we were the power of attorney, but nothing really kicked in until after he died. Just because we had to scramble to figure out what the hell to do, which was difficult, most of my listeners also know my sister and I don't agree on anything. And my husband knowing being my husband having been in banking for 20 years and knowing dad's financial planner personally, he knew, you know, my sister and I tried to figure out what to do with that and mom and the dog and a little, you know, like money was not paying the bills and figuring out that stuff. That was not top of mind. It was not in the top ten things to deal with the moment, although they needed to be. So he just took over, which of course didn't go over too well with the sister, but that's okay. I mean, he saved our bacon, but, you know, and that's because he knew what to do. And he knew how to speak bank. I don't speak bank. This is foreign language. I'm not interested in learning. So it wasn't until after my dad died. As I've mentioned, mom was technically the executor of the trust holy tale. That would have been a nightmare because she had no idea what was going on. We actually had to go to an elder law attorney. He read the trust to find where it said, if mom was incompetent,.

Alzheimer's kidney failure
There's a Reason Daniel Horowitz Uses the 'G Word'

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:39 min | 10 months ago

There's a Reason Daniel Horowitz Uses the 'G Word'

"You used the G word early on. You're Jewish, to say genocide is a big deal. Can you elaborate on that? Some people would disagree. Sure. Well, I mean, how many millions of people died from COVID? COVID is not natural. Everyone knows that. It is not. It came from somewhere. That is a genocide. Denial of treatment. Here's the thing. The juxtaposition of the standard for which they use to not just approve, but market, not just market, but coerce. Upon us, the vaccines that Therapeutics that they're using versus the standard they're using not just to block but to almost criminalize doctors off of using things that have four decade long safety profiles, won the Nobel Prize. It listed as WHO essential medicine. At worst, it's just a placebo. Okay, let's say it doesn't work. It certainly couldn't do any harm. They will literally use Remdesivir, which was pulled from a clinical trial for Ebola because of kidney failure failure. They'll use it on people that have kidney disease. And it doesn't work. It doesn't work. WHO recommended against it because they did a large randomized controlled trial. It doesn't work. There's stuff doesn't work. And they block it. You know, when I talk about genocide, let me say this. There's a man named Ralph. He did all the Ivermectin right to try legal cases in the hospital. And he was up against people in the Rochester house systems in court, where they were blocking Ivermectin. The judge ruled in Ralph's favor. They got Ivermectin into the person. And the guy is home today with his kids this day. Even though he was ready on a ventilator, very, very hard to recover from that. This happens several times. Yet the same lawyer for the hospital systems will go up against him again. Why would you possibly do that? He told me they testified in court that they had advised the patient's family to take them off life support. So it's not just the bottom of the 9th inning, game over. And yet they wouldn't allow them to try something that was regarded as one of the safest medications around when they said it was over with, but they'll have no problem using stuff in the ICU that has FDA black box warnings for blood clotting. It's called lumia. It's one of the few drugs they use and Remdesivir. You can't recover from that observation, Charlie. This stuff I've seen and heard in hospitals. It's

Kidney Failure Failure Rochester House Ebola Ralph Nobel Prize Kidney Disease FDA Charlie
"kidney failure" Discussed on Solvable

Solvable

02:56 min | 1 year ago

"kidney failure" Discussed on Solvable

"What can listeners do if they're interested in learning more about chronic kidney disease or even the research that you're doing or if they want to get involved? What can listeners do? First of all, get informed. The CDC has an incredible website that talks about kidney disease. I would say, you know, talk to your family members and community because when you talk about it, you'll discover that there's more people you know that have kidney disease than you ever imagined. You know, the other thing is talk to your doctor, talk and say, okay, should I be tested and then what would we do about it? I think that's important. I think people should also if they have loved ones who are affected with kidneys, you should learn about transplantation and living donation, for example. But I certainly urge people to go get informed. Doctor Perotta, thank you so much for being with us today. Always been so fun to talk to you and I tell you that we must have hope and when we think about our healthcare system, understand that compassion is a big part of what we need to build. Doctor Carmen Peralta is the chief medical officer at cricket health. She cofounded the kidney health research collaborative at University of California, San Francisco and the San Francisco VA. If you'd like to learn more about kidney health and preventative medicine, will include a link to the CDC page doctor Peralta recommended in our show notes. Solvable is produced by Jocelyn Frank research by David jah. Booking by Lisa dun, editing help from Keisha Williams, our managing producer is Sasha Matthias. Our executive producer is mill Labelle. I'm Ronald junk junior. Thanks for listening. At discover, they believe managing your credit card should be uncomplicated. That's why with discover, card holders can get their questions answered by a real person based in the U.S. day or night 24/7. They can also get help by using the discover app, or messaging them on the website, because having the option to connect with a real live person beats dealing with a recorded message any day of the week. That's just common sense. So go ahead and give them a call. Send them a message online or connect with them on the app. They look forward to speaking with you live. Discover. Learn more at discover dot com. What's the state of your financial future? Have confidence in the answer and achieve your goals with SC and age group. Get the tailored solutions you seek and the trusted advice you need from audit tax and consulting experts with your best interests in mind. Go to SCH group dot com today. SC and age group, powerful minds, passionate teams, proven results.

kidney disease CDC Carmen Peralta chronic kidney disease Jocelyn Frank David jah Lisa dun Keisha Williams Sasha Matthias mill Labelle San Francisco Peralta University of California cricket VA Ronald U.S. SCH
"kidney failure" Discussed on Solvable

Solvable

04:31 min | 1 year ago

"kidney failure" Discussed on Solvable

"Brought to you by discover. When you have a simple question about your credit card, getting an answer should be simple, right? But then you call your credit card company and you can't reach a real person. How can I assist you? Speak with a representative. I'm sorry. We don't have live representatives. What? Connect to a representative. Did you say representative? Yes. I'm sorry. There are no representatives available. How can I help? At discover, they believe managing your credit cards should be uncomplicated. That's why when you call discover with a question about your credit card, discover gives you the option to speak with the real person based in the U.S. day or night 24/7. They also give you the option to find help by messaging them through the website or the mobile app. Because having the option to connect with the real-life person beats dealing with the recorded message any day of the week. That's just common sense. And at discover, they think there needs to be a lot more of that. So go ahead and give them a call. Send them a message online, or connect with them on the app. They look forward to speaking with you. Live. Learn more at discover dot com. Dear supervisor. Manager. Boss. I hereby tender my resignation. As software engineer, account manager, logistics supervisor. Line operator. When you invest in the health and well-being of your employees, you'll hear less of this. We can help your company create an environment where people want to stay. Learn more at a light dot com slash employee economy alight, powering human capital. Doctor Peralta is there a way in which we perpetuate the brokenness of the American healthcare system. And when I say that, I guess I'm asking in whose interest is it to work from the reactive stance rather than the proactive stance? Well, I think if you think about it, the healthcare system in America rewards for procedures for visits for volume. So the more patients to see the more procedures that you do, the more money a system will make. And that is what we call quote unquote fee for service, which means that you get paid a fee for a service that you do. But we are seeing a transformation into what we call value based care, which is actually let's pay for keeping people healthy for keeping people out of the hospital. And let's say 5 to ten years, what does this look like? Or do you have a timeline for when you say, hey, you know what? We've done it, solved. We're good. Yeah. Well, I'm ready to change the world today, right? So I wish I could tell you that in 5 years from now, we have touched hundreds of thousands of lives and that barely any of these people on dialysis that the majority are at home. The majority have gotten a transplant and that people are living a full life, even with kidney disease. So I still part of UCSF in a smaller capacity. But being the chief medical officer, cricket has really allowed me to take everything from my clinical experience from what I know from what we know about the disease and implemented and actually make it viable and incredibly successful program that we are implementing nationwide. I said, to me, this is an accelerator. And the final part is again a value based program where we are rewarded for keeping people healthy. Do you guys take insurance? Yeah, we work with insurance companies health systems and so forth yeah. Do you ever have concern that being a part of a for profit company with albeit an altruistic mission that you'll ever be beholden to the bottom line to stakeholders to the shareholders to the folks that really need the business to make money, even if that runs a skew of the mission? I mean, there's always going to be a business that you're building. But the one thing about cricket health that makes me very proud that we are changing the way, even that reimbursement happened. So pretty much everything that we are doing is value based. Once you change the incentive, then it's a whole different way that you're thinking about how you're going to build your business. And.

U.S. Peralta UCSF dialysis kidney disease cricket
"kidney failure" Discussed on Solvable

Solvable

13:03 min | 1 year ago

"kidney failure" Discussed on Solvable

"San Francisco to change all that. Some of the first obstacles were information, really understanding the epidemiology of disease. What populations are affected? What are the risk factors for disease? Why it happened. Doctor Peralta is also the chief medical officer at cricket health. A for profit company that specializes in helping people with kidney disease by supporting early detection programs and providing risk assessments. A big important gigantic reason to detect the disease early. The earlier you detected, the more chances you have to prevent different progressing. Nearly 37 million Americans lived with chronic kidney disease. Getting an early diagnosis could improve the quality of life for many, and even prevent the necessity of end stage treatment. Chronic kidney disease is solvable. How did you get interested in kidneys, specifically? My grandfather who I never met was a physician, and so I grew up in barranquilla, Colombia. And he was one of those physicians that would just do anything for his patients and my mother always talked about him and the way people loved him and all the things that he did. And so that was an inspiration. My uncle was also a doctor. And I love the physiology of the kidney. I mean, when you probably talk to people about kidneys, they think, oh, they filter your blood. Which is true, but the kidney has a ton of other functions. Regulating the water content in your body, blood pressure, helping may red blood cells and all these things that I found it to be absolutely fascinating. And I was struck by several things that happened in my training one was meeting patients that would arrive in an emergency room, just sort of saying that they didn't feel well or maybe they were swollen or they were having trouble breathing. And then they were diagnosed with kidney failure, what we call end stage renal disease or end stage kidney disease. And told that they needed dialysis. I also was struck by the reports that we were having in those times. And remember, this is the early 1990s thinking about the race disparities and socioeconomic disparities that we saw in the disease. And that truly marked me because I was thinking why is this disease devastating this communities in this way and why are people showing up at the very end stage of a disease? How is the treatment for kidney disease changed over the years? Has the medical establishment shifted the way it responds to the disease as the number of cases in the U.S. has grown? A lot of people don't know this. So in 1965, we had Medicare Medicaid act, right? That now allowed us to provide care for seniors and persons with disabilities or low income, right? And one of the things people don't realize is that in 1972 there was an amendment that was done to the Medicare where people with end stage kidney failure would qualify for services through Medicare regardless of age. And the reason is because right around in the 60s and late 60s, the technology both for the dialysis machine and what we call vascular access, which means the way that we can access the blood to clean it had improved in a way that allowed people to get dialysis in a chronic fashion. So it became a lifesaving treatment. But it was really expensive and only very, very few people could actually get the treatment. And in order to reduce those disparities and make it available to every American, there was a decision to cover the service, but at the time the projections were that maybe there would be a maybe 20, 30,000 people on dialysis, you know, maybe would have caused a $1 billion or something of the sort. And today we're faced with a situation where a wonderful policy has created an incentive where we put a lot of resources in the end stage of a disease and nothing on prevention. We couldn't have anticipated that now we have over a half a million persons undergoing dialysis treatment in the U.S. and so it's incredibly expensive causes a lot of suffering and naively as a trainee and thinking that I could solve it. I thought it's so easy all we need to do is test people who have risk factors for the kidney disease, detect the disease early, so we can manage it early, educate people on physicians, put in all the management strategies, and then this won't happen. I thought this is solvable because what we need is to invest in the early stages. Little did I know then that there were so many questions to be answered. Can you give me some examples? Meaning what touch should we order? Who should we test? What populations understanding why the race had think differences that we see in outcomes where people who self identify as African Americans have won the order of 2.7 times more likely to start dialysis than compared to white persons, for example, Hispanics about 1.3 times. So I was very curious to understand those because if you don't know the causes of those things that you can't solve them. So what happens at cricket health? How do you address these problems? So at cricket health, we partner with payers and health systems to care for people with kidney disease. We then use laboratory data or algorithms to identify persons who might be at risk for having kidney disease or who we know have kidney disease. So we provide a multidisciplinary care team that includes nurse social worker dietitian pharmacist, care navigator and a peer mentor. This is another patient that has gone through the journey of kidney disease that I can actually help someone that's just starting. And then what we do is we essentially number one, put in evidence based measures to slow the progression of disease. For those who we can, despite the best of our abilities, we prepare them and give them a lot of education around both kidneys, how to keep the kidney healthy, but also what potential therapies they could use to treat their kidney disease, whether it's a transplantation, dialysis, or medical management without dialysis. We then work with the patient's doctors. And we are the eyes and ears in between appointments for the providers. They don't have the time to see people as often as they need care. So we are the service that is there to be able to give this entire support through the kidney journey. You're saying that we are being more reactive than proactive and your efforts to do early testing are more proactive efforts. What happens after catching it early? We're not putting people on dialysis necessarily early. But I'm assuming that there are treatments for people who do detect chronic kidney disease as early as possible. Absolutely. One thing to note is that typically kidney disease doesn't really have a lot of symptoms until it's very advanced. And also, the symptoms tend to be not very specific, meaning it's just maybe tired, maybe a little bit of swollen legs or a difficulty breathing. The only way to know that something might be going on with the kidneys is to test. The blood or the urine in the United States is high blood pressure and diabetes are the typical factors that are associated with kidney disease. And so the mainstay of the treatment is controlling the typical risk factors. You lose weight, stop smoking. The typical things to keep health. In addition, there are certain medications that are crucially important to consider in patients with kidney disease, classes of medications that have been on the market for decades called ace inhibitor or angiotensin converting and have a block. So ace or ARBs. Those are the pills that people might recognize that are also used for blood pressure treatment. So those have shown to potentially reduce the progression of kidney disease and reduce some of the complications. The other thing that we have to think about is even as people are progressing, let's say that, okay, no matter what you do, we do everything perfectly. You know, you take every right pill, you do all the right treatments. Everything is perfect, but some people will progress, and the truth is that sometimes we don't know why. Despite our best treatments, still the best treatments for kidney failures are transplant. And so a big important gigantic reason to detect the disease early. The earlier you detected the more chances you have to prevent different progressing. But also, it gives an opportunity for you to actually be in control and have the possibility of having a transplant before you even need dialysis. So that's another reason rather than waiting until somebody needs dialysis. When you're trying to do preventative care, trying to do early detection, what types of obstacles do you run into when you're trying to implement those plans? Some of the first obstacles were information, really understanding the epidemiology of disease. What populations are affected? What are the risk factors for disease? Why it happened. There's also a lot of research going on really around just how can these happens like at the tissue level, the molecular mechanistic level of really understanding that in order to develop new targets, then the next implementation which I worked on is to say, okay, now we need to educate the patient about kidney health, and we also need to educate primary providers. And when you think about it in the United States primary care providers are very busy and they have to deal with many things. You know, and sometimes they have a list that is so long of the things that they have to address for a patient. The patient might have a different list, but make a provider might say, oh, we're going to talk about your blood pressure in your diabetes, but the patient wants to talk about their headache. Now you're adding another disease that they have to worry about. So a big part of it has been how do we then provide tools so that we can help the primary care provider be efficient and actually understand how to test for kidney disease, flag when a patient has kidney disease, so we did a couple of projects where we did that, where we actually tested some tools to improve recognition of kidney disease early with the hope that then the management would improve. How do you reconcile the work that you're doing being very specific about kidneys, but also probably being something that could be applied universally when it comes to healthcare? Do you ever struggle with how did the existential nature of saying like, hey, you know, I've tried to fix these kidneys, but this is probably something that needs to be applied probably to hearts. Probably to all kinds of other transplants as well when we're talking about prevention versus of reactive treatment. Oh, yeah. Well, but I can tell you, I would love to just change the world, right? For everybody. I think that the thing that grabs me about kidney disease is that it is so stark, how much we invest at the end of the disease compared to others. Now, I'm not saying there's not a lot that we need to do in diabetes and heart disease and high cholesterol and all of these kinds of things. But when you think about it, let's say, for example, heart disease. There's a lot more knowledge out there and primary care providers are more aware of patients are going into their doctor asking to get their cholesterol checked. I mean, how many people do you know they're going to their doctor and say, can I have my kidneys checked? And so I think we've done a little bit better in the healthcare system to talk about prevention when it comes to kidney health. There's actually an executive order that was signed a couple of years ago under the Trump administration and in fact they are testing specifically models that promote early detection of disease management early because they're realizing that the cost of just putting all the efforts at the end of the disease costs a lot of money and causal lot of suffering. So we are seeing a little bit of a move, what I hope is that when we move to paying for value and good outcomes, is that this actually does that for all chronic diseases. And I think we're seeing some of that shift in other chronic diseases as well. Is testing expensive? Nope. It's actually quite cheap. So if you just do, you know, the blood and the urine test can be pretty cheap. Why wouldn't this just be a posture that doctors more widely take to say, hey, why don't we just test this to make sure you're good? Yeah. That's a physical. Yeah. So the funny thing is that the blood test is often included in the physical, but typically the urine is not tested. It's just a blood. And you need really both tests. I think it's a couple of things. One is lack of education, both for patients and providers. I think it's inaccurate perception by providers that if you find kidney disease earlier, there's nothing to do. And I think I've already hopefully convinced people that there is a lot to do. And number three, again, it's just not having the time. You write to deal with so many of the issues that are primary care providers have to deal with. And frankly, like a lack of support, the job of our special is actually to support the maker community in handling.

kidney disease chronic kidney disease cricket U.S. dialysis barranquilla Peralta Colombia San Francisco diabetes Medicare high blood pressure heart disease Trump administration headache
"kidney failure" Discussed on Solvable

Solvable

01:43 min | 1 year ago

"kidney failure" Discussed on Solvable

"Pushkin at discover, they believe managing your credit card should be uncomplicated. That's why with discover, card holders can get their questions answered by a real person based in the U.S. day or night 24/7. They can also get help by using the discover app, or messaging them on the website, because having the option to connect with a real live person beats dealing with a recorded message any day of.

"kidney failure" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

01:30 min | 1 year ago

"kidney failure" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Cove nineteen was never a threat to them. Yeah and i'm still a firm believer that all. The people who were hospitalized had kovic so or they had such bad results from getting cova. They were so sick because of the medications that they were given in the hospital. They are still giving people. Remm does desert to this day in. We know that reservoir causes kidney failure hypertension in multi system organ failure. And they just ignoring that in. They're letting people die. They're literally murdering all of these people. And i'm still seeing it. There was a man the other day at my hospital who i don't normally treat cova patients but this man was on some sort of medication that he needed to be on the cardiac floor and i saw on his medication list that he was in fact being treated with desert here. So how do we know. That room does veers causing side effects. Where can we go look at information. H h they did a study. A it was for a bola. There was four medications that they used to of the medications were experimental.

kovic cova kidney failure hypertension
Why Are U.S. Doctors So Hesitant to Prescribe Ivermectin and HCQ to COVID Patients?

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:45 min | 1 year ago

Why Are U.S. Doctors So Hesitant to Prescribe Ivermectin and HCQ to COVID Patients?

"Either folks. I'm talking to dr ryan coal. We're talking about the disease. The kovic pandemic. we're talking about the vaccines. I'm of the opinion Dr kohl that honestly It is seriously unwise to get the vaccine. But everywhere i turn. There's a chorus of voices demanding that i get it. I i just can't believe. I live in this kind of an america where something so simple has become so complicated. You just said what they did in a province in. India flat-out works. That all this stuff i ever met in a hydrochloric quinn. All of these things simply work. But if i get this disease. And i go to a hospital or go to a doctor. Chances are they will steer me in another direction. Why what is telling them to steer me away from these things that work and toward what would they. What would they give me. What was the thing that wha-wha-what is mandated. I mean what do they. What is the protocol that they're using well not whole lot for one rendez avert one. They'll give you. They usually by the time the hospital. Your past the viral replication stage. And they still give you rim desert here which has just one mechanism to block viral replication. But it's really kidney toxic and the quarter of the animals in the mammal trials Rim desert put them into kidney failure rim desert here Failed in the abolish trials. Ramda's desert failed in many drug trials. It's it's not a safe safe drug they'll give you oxygen. That's great. they may give you some site akon blockers. That's great but the the thing is if you catch the virus and you treat immediately. There is no reason for our hospitals to be

Dr Ryan Dr Kohl Quinn WHA Rim Desert America India Ramda
"kidney failure" Discussed on Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

05:09 min | 1 year ago

"kidney failure" Discussed on Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

"I mean dropping off groceries a whole lot easier than a lot of other things he could have done. And you know he didn't ever complain or anything but you know it was. It was a really easy good system. And then we had there was two gals like that and then we had probably half of the remaining ones or more than half were good but they didn't necessarily take a lot of extra initiative. They just manage my parents and like i said my dad was really challenging. He was on hospice because of kidney failure and the toxins from the failing kidneys caused him to have memory loss so he didn't realize he was on hospice dying and he wasn't patient with anybody so he was really hard to be around and i have a funny story. I don't remember the last time. I i mentioned it on the podcast but my dad was given because he was diabetic. The caregivers were trying to talk him through doing his insulin injection because they were not allowed to do it and they could draw the insulin into the needle but they couldn't actually inject him okay so they were shoots trying and give try to give him the needle and my husband and i were there visiting and i think his mom was there to pick her up my way in. He was given that caregiver. Just absolute hell. I mean he was just yelling. And just i mean super obnoxious and i went into sort of trying to defuse the situation. I get verbally abused. I was like. I'm out not putting up with this. Crap is had been getting a lot of that the whole time. He's on hospice. My husband and i are in the kitchen and we're talking. We literally have our heads together touching. We're trying to be a little bit quiet about it. And my mom literally pokes her head in between the two of us and she goes. He's just being an ass. You should go in there and tell them to drop dead and i was like oh my lord was like this is like horrifically funny. So we're laughing and she laughed at sort diffused the whole tension of the afternoon but it was like she does not have a clue what she just said is horrible. What she said. But it's really hysterical like insane so the caregivers didn't particularly like to deal with him. Too much was one hundred percent understandable and then we had one gal who was young and at one point and this is like if you guys wanna skip thirty seconds ahead. I'm giving you a warning there. His legs would fill up with fluid and as he walked like to the restroom. You'll have to trail and so. The hospice nurse suggested lightly wrapping his legs with like ace bandages to like kinda. Keep the ache to minimum. And this one younger i was like i am not doing that. And i'm like well then you're not coming back and then was one overnight. Gal who was a disaster and.

kidney failure
"kidney failure" Discussed on Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

05:04 min | 1 year ago

"kidney failure" Discussed on Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

"I mean, dropping off groceries a whole lot easier than a lot of other things he could have done and, you know, he didn't ever complain or anything, but, you know, it was a really easy, good system. And then we had so there was two gals like that. And then we had probably half of the remaining ones or more than half were good, but they didn't necessarily take a lot of extra initiative. They just managed my parents. And like I said, my dad was really challenging. He was on hospice because of kidney failure. And the toxins from the failing kidneys basically caused him to have memory loss, so he didn't realize he was on hospice and dying. And he wasn't patient with anybody. So he was really hard to be around. And I have a funny story. I don't remember the last time I mentioned it on the podcast, but my dad was given because he was diabetic. The caregiver were trying to talk him through doing this insulin injection because they were not allowed to do it and they could draw the insulin into the needle, but they couldn't actually inject them. Okay, so they try and try to give him the needle and my husband and I were there visiting and I think his mom was there to casually pick her up on my way in and he was given that caregiver just absolute hell. I mean, he was just yelling and just, I mean, super obnoxious. And I went in to sort of try to diffuse the situation and I got verbally abused, and I was like, I'm out. Not putting up with this crap because I'd been getting a lot of that the whole time he was on hospice. My husband and I are in the kitchen and we're talking we literally have our heads together touching. Because we're trying to be a little bit quiet about it. And my mom literally pokes her head in between the two of us and she goes, he's just being an ass. You should just go in there and tell him to drop dead. And I was like, oh, my lord. And then it was like, this is like horrifically funny and so we're laughing and she laughed. It sort of defused the whole tension of the afternoon, but it was like, she does not have a clue what she just said. It's really horrible when she just said, but it's really hysterical at the same time. It's just like insane. So the caregivers didn't particularly like to deal with him too much, which was a 100% understandable. And then we had one gal who was young, and at one point, and this is like, if you guys want to skip 30 seconds ahead, I'm giving you a warning. His legs would fill up with fluid and as he walked like to the restroom, he left a trail. And so the hospice nurse suggested lightly wrapping his legs with ace bandages to kind of keep the ick to a minimum. And this one younger gal was like, I am not doing that and I'm like, well, then you're not coming back. And then there's one overnight gal who was a disaster and.

kidney failure
"kidney failure" Discussed on Perspectives on Healthcare

Perspectives on Healthcare

04:33 min | 1 year ago

"kidney failure" Discussed on Perspectives on Healthcare

"It makes so much sense because what you're talking about is as they those benefits. The insurance companies much happier to pay out for small benefits like getting someone to dialysis and getting them quality care in that way as opposed to saving money by not paying for that transportation and eventually having to pay for advanced treatment for kidney failure. And okay what do you wish. People understood about your role in healthcare. Yeah that's a great question Healthcare has become so incredibly complex with so many different layers So many nuances that. It's really hard to understand everybody's role I will say that. I'm also coming from a place of not understanding Some of the other roles in healthcare but i think what is important for Or i wish that you know maybe the primary care providers or the ip groups In our area sort of understood is sort of what we're trying to do so you know we really are trying to drive the patient back into the primary care providers office rather than take these patients away from them so sometimes certainty a little bit of a turf war that's perceived But i do think that once they understand that we are actually trying to increase the touches that they have patients in trying to sort of Take them from that place of despair where they think. They can't get any help and they're not going to reach out to their specialist or the primary care and start getting them plugged back in I think that that is something that you know. It's the perception that we'd like to change In there's many. That could go on. But i know you have limited amount of time here. No no is at all end and that really. I appreciate your sharing that. Because one of the goals of the podcast is for medical professionals to have a greater understanding of their colleagues and a greater appreciation for the work that their colleagues do and how they can work together..

kidney failure
"kidney failure" Discussed on The Intermittent Fasting Podcast

The Intermittent Fasting Podcast

05:56 min | 1 year ago

"kidney failure" Discussed on The Intermittent Fasting Podcast

"The end of the day when the kids go to bed. I'm home by myself with three. Kids husband is an icu. Travel nurse works out of town. Thanks vid other steps. Forty five years old five five current weight one eighty seven goal one forty five medications taken frings -iety depression allergies and high blood pressure. I do kettlebells for thirty minutes three to four times a week and cardio which is dancing two to three times a week. I have seven year old twins and a two year old. Here's the ledge. I weighed myself this morning. Because i've joined a work weight loss program and that's part of the program to weigh yourself you work with a health coach etc. I'm still way over what i want to way. I hate looking at my body in the mirror. I have that post c. section apron and i'm forty five. Cellulite comes with the territory rate. I don't take progress picks. Because i can't bear looking at myself and my clothes weren't fitting any differently. I've had my hormones and other levels checked in everything except my vitamin d was fine supplementing. I'm crying while. I'm typing this. I'm so discouraged. I was hoping to drop some weight and nothing is moving. I'm so disgusted with my body. I'm ready to go by all devices and try all the quacked junk or just give up and be fat. Thanks for all you do sarah and sarah. I hear your discouragement. Through this whole thing. I want to give you a big hug first of all. I'm giving you a big hug. Imagine the hug right this minute hug. Because i'm i'm so so sorry to hear this and i feel like because this was a very very emotional email and i feel like we don't get quite as many emails that are this intense but i know it's something that i think a lot of people experience so i applaud sarah for writing us about it. 'cause he talks about wanting to go you know. Get the devices in trial. Thanks sarah i feel like you're looking for the solution is gonna sound cheesy but outside of yourself and what if maybe the solution isn't outside of yourself. I think there's a lot that you could benefit from from like the mental work here and your perspective of everything that you're experiencing. I had a really good episode with amy johnson. Who wrote a little book of big change. And that episode was really amazing for reframing everything that you're experiencing and then just recorded with her again and i think it might be out by the time this comes out so that episode is going to be coming out october first so it'll becoming out a little bit after this airs but will go ahead and put a link in the show notes to it and it's for her new book called just thought. I think listening to those. You might find very very helpful. I have a lot of thoughts. Didn't want to start though. yeah i do. I have some thoughts as well. And i'm gonna pinpoint to things that might be getting in the way of your weight. Loss and one of them is in your allergy medication. Antihistamines can cause waking and so. If you're taking an antihistamine every single day that could be just something to to look at and think about. I'm going to say the one thing that sarah does not want me to say. Do you know what. I'm gonna say melanie. I think you're gonna say the wine. I'm gonna say the wine and because i'm gonna talk about my own body and for me for me. That's a huge huge huge difference. So it may. It sounds like you're drinking a glass or two of wine every day when the kids go to bed and you know if you say that is the only thing you're looking forward to find something else to look forward to something out some other self-care ritual because i get how hard it is. You and your kids are little boy. Do i get it seven year old twins and a two year old. It is intense. But for me when i was losing way. Twenty fourteen to twenty fifteen. I stopped drinking. And you've already got the right kind of diet with real whole foods. Ninety eight percent of the time you're eating window is is in check but i stopped the wine and no drinking. I did it for about ten weeks. Boom accelerated my weight loss. Like crazy like crazy. And you know just from all the data that i had for all the time that i was losing weight and still weighing myself. There was a huge correlation with alcohol. And what my weight did so i. Would you know experiment with that. You may want to read the book. This naked mind by any grace. It's a powerful book and it really helped a think about my own relationship with alcohol. And and i'm not saying that you have a problem with alcohol at all but i was drinking a glass or two of wine every single day as well stopping that has made such a positive difference in how i feel and you know we've kind of your any grace does a better job explaining it may. She's the expert when it comes to this topic but gift that book a try and read it with an open mind. And if she doesn't tell you you have to stop drinking. But she wants you to examine your own statements and thoughts around Like if you the way it came through here is that you wrote literally in capital letters showing me. You have really strong emotions. You do not want to give up this line so think about why you don't and you may find that as like the secret sauce. That makes a huge difference that giving it up. Give it a try and see. That would be my advice. It's so interesting and just goes back to how individual we all are because like for me. Wine has no effect on weight. Gain for me if anything i feel like. I probably maintain a lower weight. When i am drinking wine which is really interesting if i had to focus on one.

sarah depression allergies amy johnson high blood pressure Travel allergy melanie
"kidney failure" Discussed on The Intermittent Fasting Podcast

The Intermittent Fasting Podcast

02:03 min | 1 year ago

"kidney failure" Discussed on The Intermittent Fasting Podcast

"Can you avoid all digestive issues by only eating organic whole foods. Don't i know that this would be absolutely amazing. But sometimes it's not exactly possible. Our natural ability to digest food actually declines as we age. This is because our body produces fewer enzymes. Which are the protein responsible for digesting food. Fewer enzymes means more difficulty digesting food. And even organic whole foods don't necessarily provide enough in science to properly digest them. This is especially true if you cook your food because cooking kills enzymes so this is why you may have digestive problems even after a healthy meal. Your body can't produce enough enzymes to get the job done. This is where supplementing with a high quality. Enzyme supplement can be a huge help. I personally adore mass by optimize irs. And trust me. Our audience tells us all the time. How much simes is a game changer for them. It's a best in class supplement that is loaded with full spectrum enzyme for digesting proteins starches sugars fibers fats. Taking mass daily helps top off your enzyme levels and replace the enzymes ear body. Maybe no longer producing. This means you'll be able to eat all sorts of delicious food and digest them quickly and effortlessly after you start taking mass symes you may notice that you no longer feel bloated after meals and your belly feels flatter. I one hundred percent experience this and if you have leaky gut magazines could reduce irritation and help. You absorb more nutrients friends. Life is too short to suffer from digestive issues. Don't i know it you can try it. Risk free and see what improvements notice and we have an exclusive offer just for our listeners. You can go to mass dot com forward slash. I of podcast. If you use that link you will get an exclusive. Ten percent discount already applied again. That link is mass times dot com forward slash podcast m. a. s. s. z. Y. m. e. s. dot com forward slash i f..

Unraveling The Death of 'The Toxic Lady', Gloria Ramirez

Strange and Unexplained with Daisy Eagan

02:35 min | 1 year ago

Unraveling The Death of 'The Toxic Lady', Gloria Ramirez

"When she got to the hospital. Glorious heart was beating at a rate of more than one hundred beats per minute. Why did they need to fibrillation her. That seems like jumpstarting a car. That's already running hot. You know also. It just seems to me that pumping someone full of sedatives and then zapping. Their heart with electricity is a weird sequence of events. I'm sure they knew what they were doing. It's just as a lay person sitting here at my desk. It seems weird also can only hope the iv. The paramedics administered in the ambulance was to take blood because by the time nurse. Cain went to get a blood sample. Gloria was so hopped up on medical grade goof-balls that her blood probably would have gotten anyone within fifteen feet of it high. Wouldn't they wanna check someone's blood before dumping a whole bunch of shed into it like maybe make sure she didn't already take a bottle full of valium before giving her more valium next. Let me just ask why. The decision was to move the entire. Er to the parking lot. If dr our cia thought gloria was the problem why not just move gloria outside. Wouldn't that have been easier than moving the entire er department it's possible. Show a thought. The problem was coming from the er itself like the ventilation system or whatever but then. Why didn't gloria get evacuated as well and look. I'm sure dr ocho made whatever decisions he thought were best in the moment. I can't think straight under that kind of pressure which is why dr ochoa is a doctor. And i am a podcast art. Could you imagine getting rushed to the er for like i dunno hemorrhaging blood or something. The ambulance gets to the parking lot out front. And it's like well here. We are literally right here. And there's just rows of gurneys with moaning people and some doctors like who's nissan altima is this. I'm hanging an. Iv bag from the roof rack. The official cause of gloria ramirez death was kidney failure due to cervical cancer or possibly heart failure. I'm telling you the reporting on this case is all over the place. Whatever it was that ultimately killed her. Everyone was still trying to figure out what it could have possibly been about. Gloria that was making medical staff around her pass out.

Gloria Dr Ocho Dr Ochoa Cain CIA Gloria Ramirez Altima Nissan Kidney Failure Cervical Cancer Heart Failure
"kidney failure" Discussed on Medicare for All

Medicare for All

05:20 min | 1 year ago

"kidney failure" Discussed on Medicare for All

"And so you know people with long term disabilities and then kidney failure. Those are additional things that the government sorta like picking up to support the private insurance industry basically and then the second wave expansion happened in nineteen eighty so a couple things happened in this decade home. Health services were added. So that's one good step forward to giving people living with disabilities more choice and freedom. Men than meta gap plans are brought under federal oversight..

kidney failure
"kidney failure" Discussed on The gamingfixx1's Podcast

The gamingfixx1's Podcast

04:16 min | 1 year ago

"kidney failure" Discussed on The gamingfixx1's Podcast

"Coat. The cova d- from the chip shortages and manufacturing issues to just Refi- reconfiguring how people were working on video games. we're still seeing the brunt of those delays and that slowdown. And it's probably going to be around with us for quite a bit longer. 'cause kovic with us for a long. Yeah i i. Am you know there were some good things that happen. Because of ovid with the gaming industry But no one really talks about like how it's catis. How about how many setbacks the gaming industry has had. Because and i think it's really interesting because you know there's so many of us who are are still not essential and have to stay at home Or now that we don't necessarily have to stay at home but you know those who are have autoimmune diseases and things like that They they probably don't still wanna go out even if they if folks are vaccinated in the return to work for those folks might be concerned is definitely concerned not might be is consensus is concerning because our total they understand if someone Reconfigured their life. You know you have Hap- it's interesting. Because you know not only are folks who are able bodied lane games but folks who are also suffering from various elements. They play games to and out they. They will probably affected more by it. Just you know why proxy not just because they have the they're susceptible to it but also because you know their form of entertainment. Their form of communicating communicating. People are socializing has suddenly taken a bit of nosedive up those non. Yeah i get what you're saying. It's definitely been a large change to the space over the last year and a half definitely I know from my experiences to be diagnosed with a to be diagnosed with With kidney failure and then at the and then to to then still not get to a to go out was a hell of a blow.

kovic kidney failure
"kidney failure" Discussed on The Trials of Frank Carson

The Trials of Frank Carson

05:07 min | 1 year ago

"kidney failure" Discussed on The Trials of Frank Carson

"And so in may two thousand seventeen carson's wife and step-daughter were free but carson the atwal brothers and walter wells would have to face trial. Arson told me he was not surprised. We had no allusions by them. She had made it clear that to you know her heart and soul was with the prosecution as i mentioned earlier in this podcast i gave judge zuniga a chance to comment and she declined around. The time. carson's murder trial finally started in early. Two thousand eighteen. Carson's health deteriorated. Visually would happen. Was that the blood pressure over. Works everything in the my i experienced kidney failure. Carson got a temporary port in his chest and a location. That made infections potentially lethal. This is a line that goes directly to lenhart judge. Zuniga presided over the trial as she had the pre prelims. She was small boned woman with a fondness for big gold earrings. Her glasses perched on the tip of her nose behind her sat little statuettes of wolves that she had brought in one of the wolves gazing downward as if to study some law papers and the other howled silently at the ceiling. The trials pace was excruciating and zuniga's seemed more hostage to the proceedings than a conductor. Witness testimony was interrupted by frequent objections from the lawyers. Prompting the judge to summon them to her bench for private discussions called sidebars..

carson walter wells judge zuniga Carson lenhart kidney failure Zuniga zuniga
'Total Eclipse' Songwriter and Producer Jim Steinman Dead at 73

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:24 sec | 1 year ago

'Total Eclipse' Songwriter and Producer Jim Steinman Dead at 73

"Bonnie Tyler saying the hit total eclipse of the heart, but it was Jim Steinman, who wrote it. The Grammy winning composer and lyricist was also responsible for hits by meatloaf. And Celine Dion Steinmann has died in Connecticut, where he lived. His brother says Steinman suffered kidney failure and he was ill for some time. He was 73.

Bonnie Tyler Jim Steinman Celine Dion Steinmann Grammy Connecticut Steinman
Jim Steinman, Hitmaker for Meat Loaf and Celine Dion, Dies

AP News Radio

00:45 sec | 1 year ago

Jim Steinman, Hitmaker for Meat Loaf and Celine Dion, Dies

"Songwriter Jim Steinman best known for his work with singer Meat Loaf has died of kidney failure near Ridgefield Connecticut according to his brother Steinman was seventy three I marches are a letter with a look at his career operatic rock songs with long titles that was Jim Steinman's trademark his songs with meatloaf include paradise by the dashboard light two out of three ain't bad and I'd do anything for love but I won't do that meatloaf wrote in his autobiography Steinman wanted to call themselves Jim and beats but the powers that be titled their debut album Meat Loaf bat out of hell songs by Jim Steinman whether collaboration lasted for years Steinman wrote hits for other acts like this one and this one

Jim Steinman Steinman Meat Loaf Ridgefield Kidney Failure Connecticut JIM
Russian Opposition Leader Navalny Moved to Prison Hospital

Monocle 24: The Globalist

01:30 min | 1 year ago

Russian Opposition Leader Navalny Moved to Prison Hospital

"Alexei navalny the jailed reason. Opposition leader has been transferred to what authorities are describing as a prison hospital. But what is supporters. Say is just a different jail with some medical staff onsite. Navalny has now been on. Hunger strike for three weeks after he was refused access to a civilian doctor for severe pain in his back a numbness in his arms and legs. His lawyer says he may be close to death. After blood tests from independent doctors showed dangerous levels of potassium could cause heart or kidney failure. Joining me is natalia. Vassily ever who is moscow correspondent for the telegraph the talia. Thanks for coming on the show. What do we know about navalny's conditioned. Today i give having me Will the most peaceful information we have is the blood tests that you have. These blood tests were taking Onsides at the prison where is serving his prison. Term on Independent doctors have looked at the test and said that the petition station but they seem levels are too dangerous and will win with a patient with levels like that they should be treated in intensive care but again so far and independent doctor has not been allowed to see him and He has been transferred to another prison. Which has bigger medical facilities But again we still don't have enough information about his condition at this point.

Alexei Navalny Navalny Vassily Kidney Failure Natalia Moscow
Black Rob, Rapper and Former Bad Boy Artist, Dies at 52

WBZ Morning News

00:30 sec | 1 year ago

Black Rob, Rapper and Former Bad Boy Artist, Dies at 52

"Died at the age of 51 or something, man. The star of Didi's bad Boy Records was best known for his 2000 hit. Whoa! The performer who was born as Robert Ross had battled health problems, including several strokes and kidney failure. He died in an Atlanta hospital. A few days before his death. DJ Self shared a video of black rob paying tribute to the late DMX from his hospital bed. Wendy Gillette. CBS NEWS A three d Gun printing workshop is

Didi Robert Ross Dj Self Kidney Failure Atlanta Wendy Gillette ROB Cbs News
The Story of Miss Baker - Space Monkey

The Atlas Obscura Podcast

09:36 min | 1 year ago

The Story of Miss Baker - Space Monkey

"Okay so what was the plan. Were they going to do with these. Twenty-six tiny cute monkeys already worried about them. Yeah so nasa wasn't a thing until nineteen fifty eight so for years. The army and the navy have been running these tests to see if it's safe to send humans to space and that's where these twenty-six tiny monkeys come in. So were they going to send all twenty six of these monkeys into space or was there like some kind of training tiny centrifuges how they just please imagine for a moment a monkey training montage. They had to go through like stimulated flights and lab testing. And you know stress testing like they were looking for the smartest calmest monkey to send to space. Yeah i'm totally imagining the monkey version of the right stuff. And i'm sure this isn't isn't true but i'm picturing like tiny silver jumpsuits and little monkeys walking down the tarmac in slow motion for sure. That is what i'm picturing. So it all sounds really cute. Little monkey nuts blazing a trail to the stars. But actually the us government at this point has been trying for a decade to bring a monkey back alive so starting in nineteen forty eight we had albert. The i went down to the tail. Explosion albert the second valve failure alpert. The third parachute didn't open i. I mean it's interesting and this is like it's both totally awful but gives you some sense of why they're doing these experiments right because they're going to send people into space plans to send people into space years out from sending people to space and so far there just you know. Just a bunch of dead monkeys. This is i mean so. This is pretty grim up until we get to miss baker. How did they end up choosing miss baker. So it's spring of nineteen fifty-nine. There's all launch scheduled. And so the navy basically narrows it down to one candidate and its tiny female squirrel. Monkey barely on adults. And she's teeny tiny. You hold her in your hands She has this adorable little like white mask on her face. You know tiny little like bear shaped ears a long tail super long fingers. Ucr your heart just goes out to her and the researchers really liked this particular monkey. The even named her tlc for tender loving care. They basically figure if she she was the smartest the most docile and that she was the best candidate for this mission little known fact nineties hip hop group. Tlc named after her frie- you music box out there. Score that one away. That's that that's not true so the mission was coming up and all higher ups like we. We can't call her. Tlc that's not. That's not going to sound good over the radio. And so they renamed her baker specifically they renamed her miss baker and her co pilot for the mission was another monkey and they call her. Ms able and so finally. It's may twenty eight one thousand nine hundred. Ninety nine launched a cape canaveral. They load miss baker up into this really scary looking contraption it's like a water bottle or metal thermos and she's wrapped up in there like a mummy in this little jacket and she able or walked out onto the tarmac where they launched all the ships and they're loaded into the top of a rocket fifty ton jupiter rocket fifty tonnes for two tiny monkeys. Okay so they're on top of this building sized fifty ten rocket they're tiny they're cute and this giant rocket this big launch. It's all for them. There's nothing else going on today so owning to thirty five. Am one lengthening. We have looked up thirty monkeys strapped in escaping from the gravity of earth and into space at one point. They're moving at ten thousand miles per hour. Just imagine flint would be terrifying for anybody much less a monkey in total they spend about fifteen minutes in space and then the nosecone detaches from the rocket and it begins the descent. Forty-five minutes after the launch. The nosecone splashes down about two hundred fifty miles off the coast of puerto rico. Just after five. Am that morning. The uss kua pulls up at picks up the nose cone and everyone is very nervous. They were desperate for these monkeys to have survived. So one of the guys aboard ship popped open the nose cone and both the monkeys were alive. Everyone was just everyone was so happy. They radio back to cape canaveral and they said able baker are perfect. No no problems after unwrapping her from her coat and her thermos one of the guys on the ship gave miss baker at a little cookie. And so it was. It was a huge success because these were the first monkeys to return alive from space. Oh wow yeah and these were like the first american animals to kind of come back in one piece and you know like at this point. This is the middle of the space race. There's a lot riding on this as a very very geopolitically important little tiny monkey yeah she was a big deal and you would be for the rest of your life so immediately miss baker in her co-pilot miss able are shipped off to washington. Dc for a press conference because our what do you mean a press conference the monkeys you gotta understand there now vip very important primates but four days after the landing something really sad happens miss able dies in a freak accident and so now. Miss baker is the only the only monkey to return alive from space and america's only animal astronaut to have survived. And so that just kind of makes her even more special there. Were you know newsreels about her children's books printed about her or she gets fanmail especially from children. She was on good morning. America at one point. She got double billing with the jackson five. That is famous. Yeah i also. I also love post her career in science her life kind of like moves into the gossip pages. A little more public figures like that like they do something you know like kind of given a title. She's called america's first lady in space. That's how she was seen so miss baker after her flight. She goes back to pensacola. You know there's a yearly parade in her honor but mostly she settles down. You know her handlers. Even get her a companion. Another squirrel monkey named big george and after a while the hands even hold a wedding for them so like many young couples miss baker in big george moved to a bigger place. The newly built us space and rocket center huntsville alabama and by. Now it's nine thousand nine hundred seventy one and it's been more than a decade since miss baker took her spaceflight so big george eventually passes away and miss baker immediately married off again to another monkey. And it's very celebrity. It's very tabloid. The space center even sends out engraved invitations and has a real judge into the fishy eight And they dress up miss baker in like a train veil. She actually rips off a couple minutes into the ceremony. Good for you good for you. Miss baker and so she you you just get this idea of like how precious she was to people in nineteen eighty-four. She dies of acute kidney failure. She's twenty seven years old and at this point. She is the longest known living squirrel monkey in history. She at this point. She's broken every single record for like the average lifespan of a squirrel monkey. So miss baker's led this long life. She had like an official wedding when she died where she given. The same treatment was a funeral. Or what happened. Oh yeah she was sent off in style she was buried right outside of the. Us rocketed space center and three hundred people showed up just to witness her being laid to rest. I saw some pictures to like flower. Reason like these signs saying you know like miss baker america's first lady of space born nineteen fifty seven died nine hundred eighty four. And you know she was that day she was laid to rest next big george who had been buried there for a couple of years now. That's nice that's nice

Baker Navy Cape Canaveral Miss Baker Nasa Us Government Albert TLC Army Flint America Puerto Rico George Pensacola Washington Jackson
CBS News Political Reporter Roger Mudd Has Died at 93

710 WOR Programming

00:25 sec | 1 year ago

CBS News Political Reporter Roger Mudd Has Died at 93

"Shah, longtime political reporter and anchor Roger Mudd is dead at the age of 93, his son Jonathan Mud, told The Washington Post. He died from complications of a kidney failure. Bud spent almost two decades covering Capitol Hill for CBS News. He served as the weekend and anchor on CBS during Walter Cronkite's tenure before moving NBC for a short while after not getting the role following Cronkite's

Roger Mudd Jonathan Mud Shah The Washington Post Kidney Failure BUD Capitol Hill Cbs News Walter Cronkite CBS NBC Cronkite
CBS News Political Reporter Roger Mudd Has Died at 93

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:36 sec | 1 year ago

CBS News Political Reporter Roger Mudd Has Died at 93

"Was a story on Capitol Hill during the sixties or seventies. Chances are that it ended this way. CBS NEWS Washington Roger Mudd has died after kidney failure. He's being remembered by admirers and contemporaries is one of the best of his craft. Former CNN Washington bureau chief Frank Sesno Yes, was known as the Tiffany Network, and Roger Mudd was one of the jewels in the crown because he stood So far above everybody else, but left CBS when he wasn't chosen to anchor the Evening news when Walter Cronkite retired, but he once said he never truly ceased being a CBS man. Roger Mudd was 93

Roger Mudd Frank Sesno Capitol Hill Cbs News Kidney Failure CBS CNN Washington Walter Cronkite
Roger Mudd, longtime network TV newsman, dies at 93

AP News Radio

00:48 sec | 1 year ago

Roger Mudd, longtime network TV newsman, dies at 93

"A veteran network news anchor and correspondent has died Roger mode is dead CBS news reported died of complications of kidney failure at his home in suburban Washington DC much spent more than thirty years on network TV most of us air time log when there were just three major networks on the air well before people got their news from cable or the internet might be sued the Peabody Award for his November nineteen seventy nine special on teddy Kennedy which aired just before the Massachusetts senator challenge then president Carter for the nineteen eighty democratic presidential nomination during the interview might ask Kennedy simply why he wanted to be president Kennedy widely seen as marking the answer ended up losing the nomination to the incumbent Carter went on then to lose to Ronald Reagan Roger Mudd was ninety three I'm Oscar wells Gabriel

Roger Mode Teddy Kennedy Cbs News Kidney Failure Peabody Award DC Washington President Carter Massachusetts President Kennedy Kennedy Roger Mudd Carter Ronald Reagan Oscar Wells Gabriel
CBS News political reporter Roger Mudd has died at 93

Afternoon News with Tom Glasgow and Elisa Jaffe

00:35 sec | 1 year ago

CBS News political reporter Roger Mudd has died at 93

"A longtime political reporter and anchor Roger Mudd is dead at the age of 93, his son Jonathan Mud, told The Washington Post. He died from complications of kidney failure. Much spent almost two decades covering Capitol Hill for CBS News. Among the events he covered extensively was the Watergate scandal and its fall out. He served as the weekend anchor on CBS during Walter Cronkite's tenure before moving to NBC for a short time after not getting the role following Cronkite's retirement. His journalism and broadcasting career spanned more than 50 years again. Roger Mudd dead at the age of 93.

Roger Mudd Jonathan Mud Kidney Failure The Washington Post Cbs News Capitol Hill Walter Cronkite CBS NBC Cronkite
"kidney failure" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"kidney failure" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Conditions like cancer, diabetes, kidney failure, severe obesity, But the state's two million smokers are no ahead of some essential workers like teachers. And that doesn't sit well with some folks put someone on a list ahead. Of these people that are volunteering to put their own health on the line is outrageous. But Governor Phil Murphy says The federal government will no longer be holding back doses were confident and taking these steps. I'm Sara Lee Kessler for 77 w. ABC News NHL Season openers tonight. The Rangers with the Garden hosting the Islanders, the Devil's home against the Bruins. Theo Epstein, joining Major League Baseball's front office, a long time Red Sox and Cubs executive being named a consultant regarding on field matters. WBC news time 705 traffic and transit on the way. Hey, Forecasting the Ramseys Subaru Weather Center tonight Partly cloudy low 36 Tomorrow cloudy with afternoon and evening showers. High 46 41 Partly cloudy in Central Park. It's 42 flushing. I'm Bob brown streaming at home on your smart speakers. Just say play 77 w A. B. C. W A B C traffic in transit Big jam up on the Belt Parkway in Brooklyn eastbound or bumper to bumper from the various An overreach Auntie Chelle Road with an accident West bounce of rubber thinking. Also, there's a stalled vehicle on the outbound. Go Wanna supporting 39th Street? Traffic is very heavy. You're out down for Flushing Avenue out to 39th Street. Got an accident in Jersey on Route four. Eastbound right around Overpeck Avenue in the Teaneck area, trafficked on four is jammed due east and westbound coming in through that area. And also we're looking at delays in the Bronx West ban.

Ramseys Subaru Weather Center Sara Lee Kessler obesity Theo Epstein WBC Teaneck Phil Murphy Bob brown federal government Major League Baseball Red Sox NHL ABC Rangers Brooklyn Central Park Bruins Islanders Cubs Devil
Fasting Strategies for Weight Loss & Metabolism with Dr. Jason Fung

Dr. Jockers Functional Nutrition

04:11 min | 2 years ago

Fasting Strategies for Weight Loss & Metabolism with Dr. Jason Fung

"Walk everybody to fasting. Transformation summit or rear uncovering agent inexpensive powerful healing strategy. Known mankind fasting. I'm your host. Dr david joggers. And today we're gonna talk about alternate day. Fasting strategies for chronic disease brought in one of the top experts. He's actually got to bestselling books where he really goes into detail on fasting. He's all over youtube band. You could find him. You just type in dr jason on youtube. You'll see all these amazing nydia his and brought him on today to talk about alternate day fasting in really go into a little bit more the history of fasting as well so dr. Jason fung is a canadian nephrologist which is basically a kidney specialist. Dr fund graduated from the university of toronto and completed his residency at the university of california los angeles. He lives and works in toronto canada where he co founded the intensive dietary management grants is a world leading expert on intermittent fasting and low carb Treating people with type two diabetes and is the author of the bestseller the obesity code and the complete guide. Fasting is high near the use of therapy Sassoon for weight loss and type two diabetes reversal in his. Ibm clinic and you can find his website ibm program that's all one word idea. Program dot com ad also featured on the diet. Dr dot com. And so dr jason. Thanks so much for being on the vast transformation summit with us. Thanks for having me great to be here absolutely and sought curious in how nephrologist how you really got involved with. Sassine will begin west. Well the the most common reason for kidney failure is type two diabetes and the thing about type two diabetes. It's really a reversible disease but it's not taking drugs that really reverses the disease if you take drugs if you take insulin really. You're not gonna get a lot better. In fact you just wind up taking them sort of year after year and every year you go to the doctor you get more and more drugs however Everybody already knows that if you lose weight that type two diabetes almost always goes away so if you have a friend who loses way you can almost bet your bottom dollar that diabetes will get better or go away so it's not a chronic and progressive disease like we've been told israeli irreversible disease but you've got to focus on what's important which is not giving drugs which is you know using the diet to effect weight loss. That's really where i started. So i became very interested in the question of weight loss and look at it from sort of physiologic standpoint. Because the thing about it is that we lost. There's all this Talk like this you know. No shortage of oxen talk about weight loss and how to lose weight. Big business weight watchers and jenny craig. And all that sorta stuff and they're all focused. I think on some things sort of not completely relevant. Which is the the calories there. They all talk about calories calories calories but when you look at it from physiologic stent white The body doesn't count calories it has no calorie receptors. Doesn't know how many calories you're eating so it's like if you're taking all this care to count the number of calories in your body doesn't really care about it at all then. Why do you think you're going to make a difference. You want the body to do something and you think restricting the number of calories does it with the body has no idea what you're talking about like you're talking to different languages so it doesn't it doesn't work and that's where i really got interested in the Sort of notion and it's really about hormones because the body responds to hormones are whole body works on hormones that is You know if you're hot then you sweat if you're cold than you. You know shiver and so on but all affected by hormones and our responses in this case in most cases of weight. It's insulin and one of the ways to really reduce the fun is to use something. Like fasting in intermittent

Dr Jason Diabetes Dr David Nydia Jason Fung Dr Fund Dr Dot Sassine Youtube Chronic Disease Sassoon University Of Toronto University Of California Kidney Failure Obesity Toronto Los Angeles IBM Canada
Exploring The Future of Health through Dreams and AI with Antonio Estrella

Outcomes Rocket

07:01 min | 2 years ago

Exploring The Future of Health through Dreams and AI with Antonio Estrella

"Welcome back to the podcast that I have the privilege of hosting Tony Australia. He's a managing director at Talladega Investment and advisory for health tech and insure tech startups. He's also a fiction novelist Tony's a global thought leader and fiction writer and digital health with experiences working in Asia, the US and Europe as a startup founder investor or Britain ovation leader and strategic advisor Tony currently sits on the board as an independent director, for C, x group, and Savannah CTS as both. An investor and adviser Tony Partners with Asia focus companies who are working to develop solutions to change the face of cancer human longevity and population health with core IP stemming from AI genomics blockchain smart devices, his previous work within both life insurance at metlife and farm out with Pfizer, it was focused to drive measurable business impact allowing him to help entrepreneurs enhanced their product market fit and commercial growth plans across Asian markets, his debut fiction novel comatose, which will touch on here. In today's discussion is a fiction novel about Lucid Dreaming and it's all about health tech fiction something that will cover with Tony as well. It's available in bookstores today in the UK and Amazon globally. Tony is has done tremendous mono- work and he spent some time at University of Pennsylvania's wharton getting his MBA there the London business school and the University of Pennsylvania School of Engineering and Applied Science in electrical engineering. So a tremendous individual and it's a privilege to host them. Here today. Tony thanks for joining the next. So the pleasure to be here, thanks for inviting me to share some of my thoughts and insights with with your audience. Absolutely my friend. So tell me a little bit about your journey. How did you decide on healthcare? So I academically studied electrical engineering and that's actually where I caught the bug Ford being more entrepreneurial minded and how I focused by professional life I used to build and race solar electric race cars really. Little coffee that I helped build up and and I started my career in consulting and during that period was great you know lots of. Ways to learn and be mentally intellectually challenged. But in two thousand, I had just finished doing work in Silicon Valley and that was the first Internet wave and lots of excitement about transformation and as I started business school I really thought about where did I want to dedicate my time and energy in terms of industry focus for several different reasons including personal wants healthcare just jumped out. I love the fact that you can build technology and it helps people live longer have better quality of life I had a couple of. Personal Peoria friends who dealt with health issues. I had an aunt who passed away from kidney failure and so all that just came together for me to say I can wake up every morning. Feeling excited that what I do is helping at least one individual of a better life love that man yeah. It's a compelling reason to choose the field and with your knowledge and background you've been able to make a big impact and so I'd love to hear from you. Tony will you think is should be the big thing. On health leaders agenda and how are you approaching it back when I started my first business in two thousand one, there was a lot of emphasis in terms of whereas the healthcare industry in the US the US at the time and fast forward through time they're still an enormous amount of of focus in the US in the healthcare sector is digital health or health tech has grown the US. Market clearly is an important one, but I'd say that equally as important that on every health leaders mind should be what can they Learn from what's happening in. Asia and Asia whether Asia's an opportunity or not is there are there things that Asia offers in accelerating growth and scale and product that can be leveraged for for their business and couple of facts about Asia that I think are important for plus billion people forty four countries over two thousand languages spoken and normally large region and from an investment perspective this two, twenty, eighteen we saw the Asia approaching the same amount of investment to help tech startups is in the US style so within the next. Eighteen months you'll see that Asia, actual have more capital being deployed from the venture community and startups. So when I say that every health leader medically look at Asia, it's because the region is just is as awards today with with a much greater growth potential in the number of people countries. So there was a book I read recently by Kaifu who was a venture investor, in China, who formerly headed up Google China and used to work. For Apple and driving their early AI, and he doesn't amazing job painting the picture for China's one country when when important region round where they're going with a and how it's different than the US and I think that's the key thing that a takeaway for health for health leaders it's just a different technical environment data standards, and in the way that the tencent and Alibaba by do have changed China much the same way that Google facebook. Changed West is lots of learning that can happen man that's fascinating stuff Tony and folks I forgot to mention to you that Tony Lives and works in Singapore. So he's he's been there for the last five years this time around but definitely, a global health leader focused on Asia that knows the INS and outs. So critical critical piece of of information there everybody. To know. Tony, without a doubt there's there's opportunity over there. The money's flowing over there. Give us an example of of what you've seen is working and creating results. Yeah. The landscape for Asia is complex As I said, there's lots of countries and so before a answered that question, let me give a little bit of context as to how to think about the region. So. One is mentioned China and you can group Hong Kong and China together from thinking about one of six hubs in the region. The other hubs are the Indian subcontinent, which obviously is driven largely by India, but there's other countries their third. It'd be Japan for the be the Korean. Peninsula, which includes South Korea Fifty Southeast Asia Singapore and then six to be Australia New Zealand and I didn't do these in any order of size of just kind of went north to south and regret yeah, an each hub has. Similarities that that make a logical grouping whether it's economic development or cultural lifestyle history or climate.

Asia Tony United States Tony Australia China Tony Partners South Korea Fifty Southeast As Tony Lives Managing Director Talladega Investment Metlife Pfizer University Of Pennsylvania Sch Europe Ai Genomics University Of Pennsylvania UK Amazon Japan India
Pete Hamill, legendary New York columnist and novelist, dies

AP News Radio

00:48 sec | 2 years ago

Pete Hamill, legendary New York columnist and novelist, dies

"Legendary New York columnist and novelist Pete Hamill has died he was eighty five Hamel had a long time love affair with his hometown New York my downtown is everything from Times Square downtown all the way to the battery panel was considered one of the last great crusading columnist you spoke to the AP in two thousand five about all the different neighborhoods in New York it was always a district of breweries that was a district of the meat markets they would describe districts of politicians that would district where the rich live and eventually with the poor live besides the people on the street he hung out with people like John Lennon and won a Grammy for his liner notes to Bob Dylan's blood on the tracks Pete Hamill died in Brooklyn from heart and kidney failure I'm a Donahue

Pete Hamill Hamel New York John Lennon Grammy Bob Dylan Brooklyn Donahue Times Square
Pete Hamill, celebrated New York newspaper columnist, dies aged 85

AP 24 Hour News

00:18 sec | 2 years ago

Pete Hamill, celebrated New York newspaper columnist, dies aged 85

"And mingle with the elite. Pete Hamill died in a Brooklyn hospital from heart and kidney failure. He was 85. I met Donahue. AP News Most Americans work in the services sector and the Institute for Supply Management says it's index for it rose to a reading of 58.1 in July.

Pete Hamill Institute For Supply Managemen Brooklyn Hospital Donahue
The impact of race on kidney transplantation

Second Opinion

03:04 min | 2 years ago

The impact of race on kidney transplantation

"Is a slight man who worked as a house painter. Until his nearly lifelong high blood pressure wreaked havoc on his kidneys this week. He was told that he would not be put on the kidney transplant list because his kidney function was still too good, he was devastated to him. His kidney failure was wrecking his life. One of the main functions of the kidney is to filter the blood and remove contentment and fluid from the body. One important test used to assess kidney function is called the glow Mary Tyler filtration rate or G. F. R. The. Number is a mathematical calculation to determine the kidneys filtering ability. The calculation is based on the person's age and sex and race among other things we're the GFR becomes a subject for an NPR. Medical commentary is around the use of race in the calculation to determine gfr. Race in the calculation is quoted as either black or not black, according to a recent article in the New England Journal of Medicine. The reason that race is part of the calculation is based on the stereotype that black people have higher. Higher Muscle Mass, the non-blacks studies suggest this assumption is not based on strong science, a higher muscle mass with lead to a higher gfr in less there was a mathematical correction normal. Jeff are levels are about sixty. When a person's gfr drops below twenty, they can then be placed on a transplant list, but Rodney's Jeff are was still too high because he had points added to his score because he's black. This made his kidney function appear more normal. If he was not black, he would've made the criteria and he'd be on the transplant list, and there is nothing about Rodney that anybody would label as high muscle mass. Five foot seven and weighs only one hundred and thirty pounds. Even if Rodney were placed on the transplantation list, he would face other problems. The scale used to predict the failure of donors transplantations uses race as an indicator of success. The reason race is included is a non evidence based assumption that kidneys that come from black donors perform worse than kidneys that come from non black donors regardless of the recipients race, so this discourages surgeons from transplanting black kidneys out of an unwarranted fear that they may have a higher rate of failure. What all this means for Rodney is that even when he does get on the transplant list. His wait for a kidney with a good match will be even

Rodney Jeff New England Journal Of Medicin Mary Tyler NPR
LGBTQ community celebrates Supreme Court ruling on employment nondiscrimination cases

The Daily 202's Big Idea

02:47 min | 2 years ago

LGBTQ community celebrates Supreme Court ruling on employment nondiscrimination cases

"Gerald Bostock joined a gay recreational softball league seven years ago, signing up for the HOTLANTA, Softball League his job in the Child Welfare Services Department for Clayton County. Georgia. He was fired for quote. Conduct unbecoming of county employ. That men he didn't have health insurance. He recovered from prostate cancer, but it set in motion illegal fight that led on Monday to a landmark decision from the supreme, court, which ruled six to three that the Civil Rights Act of nineteen, sixty four protects against discrimination based not just on race and gender, but also sexual orientation. And now Gerald's name will forever appear in constitutional law textbooks. After reading Justice Neal Gorsuch as majority opinion, validating his right not to be fired, simply because he was gay Gerald reflected on the journey from the den of his home. When I lost my job, it was my dream job, so imagine having. That, you went to every day and you enjoy doing it. the habits suddenly taken away from you because you decided to join a gay recreational Softball League I lost my income I mentioned that I had lost mine insurance while I was still recovering from prostate cancer I lost friends in relationships with with many colleagues. I had to sell my home in that community. So the Germans been difficult. The court ruling grouped three related cases involving employees who said they were fired because of their sexuality or gender identity. Gerald was the only plaintiff still alive to see the outcome Amy Stevens. A funeral director who was fired, because she was transgender, died last month of kidney failure after attending oral arguments in her case. Last Fall Donald Zara. A skydiving instructor who was fired because he was gay, died in twenty, fourteen, leaving his sister and partner to advance his case. Gerald, who's fifty-six plans to return to a trial court in Georgia to fight his case after all these years of legal roadblocks, he and his partner Andy toasted with champagne last night to celebrate the ruling, which he hopes will bring a little bit of sunshine. In some dark times. He told my colleague Samantha Schmidt that more work remains to be done. He wants Congress to pass the Equality Act which would enshrine nondiscrimination protections for lgbtq people in Employment Housing Credit Education public spaces and other realms of American life. The state of Georgia has also yet to pass a hate crime law. He, says joining the gay. Softball League was one of the best decisions he ever made. The arc of the moral universe is long. But it bends toward justice.

Gerald Bostock Softball League Georgia Andy Amy Stevens Neal Gorsuch Gerald Hotlanta Clayton County Child Welfare Services Departm Donald Zara Partner Director Employment Housing Credit Educ Instructor Samantha Schmidt Congress