27 Burst results for "Khan Academy"

"khan academy" Discussed on The Vergecast

The Vergecast

01:39 min | Last week

"khan academy" Discussed on The Vergecast

"Episode. I'm talking to sal khan the founder and ceo of khan academy nonprofit online learning platform for students in kindergarten through high school. Welcome to introduction to economics tips for reducing stress around taking important test. Welcome foundations of american democracy. What i want to do in this video is think about the origins of algebra khan academy is one of those organizations that can only exist because of technology south started tutoring his niece in math over video using off the shelf cameras and software and that has grown into an organization with twenty million students a month in forty six languages in over one hundred ninety countries and online learning has gotten even more vital with the pandemic in this conversation nights. Hush on the future of learning what online education is good at and where it struggles. How khan academy is growing and how he's thinking about handling trickier subjects like history in social studies. After all mathis mostly just math but school districts in the country in the world have very different views on how to handle the humanities. That's a hard problem for nonprofit to solve in a deeply polarized world. One thing you should pay attention to here is how you know what online learning is good at and how to lean into that. His goal isn't to replace schools but to build something else that works within that balance is tricky to find and i tried to push him on. What technology can and cannot do all right. Sal khan co khan academy we..

sal khan khan academy founder and ceo mathis
Using YouTube To Build A Brand

Accelerate Your Business Growth

06:55 min | 3 weeks ago

Using YouTube To Build A Brand

"Over the past several years the accelerate your business growth podcast has gained recognition as a great resource for small business owners sales professionals business leaders of all kinds and that is really because of the guests. These are people who have expertise in a particular area of business and they join me to share their expertise with all of you that way. You can get the answers you need. You can Find out who's out there who's really talented and good at what they do. See connect with them. See what books worksheets. You name it. There there's all sorts of good coming out of this hide. Cast instate is no different. I guess today is jeff davis. Jeff is the founder and ceo of maglio inc. A venture backed creative and media analytics agency famous for building brands on youtube with capabilities to also originate co create and validate new brands. Thanks so much for joining me today jess and it's a pleasure to be with you. It is a pleasure to have you here. And we're gonna be talking about youtube which i have to tell you is such an interesting topic for me because it's one of those things that i play with but i'm not really sure that i am doing what i could be doing to really maximize it so while i know the listeners of this i'm looking forward to getting a lot out of it as how fun. Yeah the one thing that Is been you know since my departure from procter and gamble. We spent more than a decade now on the youtube platform. So it's it's kind of ironic that it's been you know at that platform. You launched in in two thousand six is now quite an old platform. I honestly but still one that i think has major impact for how you create awareness and trump for products. So i look forward to talk to you. Yeah definitely and and you know what everyone says is video is the thing and so while youtube has been around it and my understanding. Is that for the longest time. Youtube has been like the second most searched site on the internet after google. That's correct that's that is still a factor that the second most used search engine people don't get that is youtube behind of course google and all of owned by google And so what. I like to say if you don't have at least a channel if you don't have some content that is searchable with the right words etc you're foregoing the second most you search engine in the world crazy crazy and and i think people might have sort of grown up with this idea that unless you're doing a how to video or sh showing someone had a take a washing machine apart and put it back together. Which is what. My husband uses it for That you don't need to be there but that's not really true anymore. Yeah definitely not in fact if you take a look at the most significant growing trends I haven't seen this now for for for a few months but but it's probably still holds true. You know how to videos are a major growing piece All of several categories including beauty and and skin care and all of that those are major categories and then if you look at the educational components and educational being a very broad topic but if you just take a look at khan academy or or the number of sites on there that are just geared for educational learning. I joke around. You could get from from youtube and it would be more valuable than a than a stanford or harvard degree because the content is so incredibly rich. Yeah that's interesting. I think you're probably right about that. Because it's practitioners teaching what they now. So you're getting it from the horse's mouth so to seek yes exactly yeah okay So what do you think is the biggest mistake that business owners make when they're building a brand on youtube that's actually an easy one and Ended up being one. That has been the case for some time. People are starting to figure this out but one of the biggest mistakes you can make is having content designed for another platform even another digital platform. Instagram facebook video. And that's done just assuming that. Oh you can just repurpose that to youtube. And the reason why i say that is that in general we found we were one of the first Consumer products so one of the famous parts of my story you know having served a couple of decades at proctor and gamble and then leaving and then joining the startup world and my first company was a company called or brush inc a or brush tongue cleaner. And it was this crazy cool product. That was patented from dr bob wag staff and he had tried to sell it to png and he had tried to license it to johnson johnson and it was was a tongue scraper. Ninety percent of bad breath comes from bacteria on your tongue and he had created a really great product t to remove bacteria from the tongue and he had tried to go about it. marketing it With traditional means one of his last failed efforts was a was an infomercial where it just failed miserably. And he ended up meeting with a couple of young guys. Here in lake city utah. Jeff harmon and And neil harmon and jeff was just one of these guys. That really wasn't early guy on youtube and was doing all new. All these insights and outs and And so we ended up launching this product on youtube. I was the angel investor and eventual. Ceo of or brush and the cool story about war shits in two thousand seventeen youtube. Recognize the ten most iconic admiral moments on youtube from the two thousand five launch of youtube and brush was one of those ten. You would've done. You may not have recognized or brush but you would recognize the other nine it was it was always like a girl. Campaign was the jeff gordon. Pepsi campaign was the kyrie irving Pepsi campaign with uncle drew. They were just these really iconic youtube long form campaigns that people are starting to figure out that maybe fifteen second or a thirty second or one minute was not the best way to to create awareness and trial for your products and services

Youtube Procter And Gamble Maglio Inc. Jeff Davis Google Jess Jeff Khan Academy Brush Inc Dr Bob Wag Stanford Harvard Johnson Johnson Jeff Harmon Neil Harmon Facebook Lake City Utah
"khan academy" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

08:02 min | 2 months ago

"khan academy" Discussed on How I Built This

"'cause if schools have to shutdown physically in the United States people are going to need something clearly, online would have to cover multiple subjects in grades would have to efficacy research behind it. It would have to be trusted you. It should be accessible on mobile devices and computers everything. It was clear. We're GONNA we're have a big role to play. So we started you know acid engineering team to stress test servers make sure we can handle more server load and then the next week you know California was one of the first states to say that they were going to close and then. By the week, pretty much most of the country and the world had shut down. You know we normally see about a pre cove. It was about million students were coming per month and that increased to thirty million. Then they were also spending fifty percent more time on the site Registrations went through the roof they those ten of of normal on a daily basis and I think right now we're sitting at around one hundred, ten million registered users. What, what is your? What is your operating budget? Your annual operating budget? Our annual operating budget now is in the high fifty million which every time. I, say it gives me a cortisol bike. Yeah But about a five, million of our of our funding comes from a few hundred thousand people donating on average twenty thirty dollars. So there's a lot of people donating because coal donate button on site. Yeah. I asking people for money is a very humbling thing to do My hope was always let me show people how great this is I have to become a little bit more explicit saying that I have a need and then hopefully people would show up. Yeah. I think less than a check. It's more than this. Now Khan Academy videos have been viewed like. Almost two billion times. Which is Insane I have to imagine sal over the last few years as the kind of Ed tech sector has exploded right and lots of schools by these programs, dream box and other four prophet. Programs that are available to help children with math and other language skills, etc I mean I'm sure people can't even sow. Let's spin off a for profit channel here. You've got something big here. You know there's there you know, and then you won't have to worry about raising money for for Khan Academy you know you can still do that but let's let's do that. I mean that must have happened must still happen. You know we do. oftentimes you know sometimes I'll go to a potential. PHILANTHROPIES will. I'd rather invest than donate. Something like that. People, I think there's some creative ideas that I would entertain. They're like Khan Academy is brand valuable. What if we could take that brandon? Do it in this tangential spaces and Khan Academy can have equity and maybe it can help build an endowment for. I'm always open to. Ideas. But what? I always remind myself and look I'm I'm not someone who has transcended material desires I tried to transcend material desires but. I have go to a friend. Who's you know done well with a Po or something and they've got the new tesla or living. You know they're living slightly upstream the income gradient. And living a little higher up the hill. But I remind myself. One I consider myself incredibly fortunate to be able to do what I I am doing, and the way I think about is I've done my philanthropy in reverse order and I stayed in the Hedge Fund world and you know maybe one day become a multimillionaire or larger and then but then what I've done with that money. I, you know I'm not. Someone who who wants that much I I want to be able to you know have have a backyard be able to best support the family you know go on vacation once or twice a year right and anything above that. If I did become a billionaire I would have donated it to an effort like Khan Academy. So you might as well just cut out the middleman. Time, shift it and work on and and I do generally think that it has benefited the mission and the vision because once people hopefully are viewing it as an institution they do they're they're they're rooting for it because they they realized that it's not it doesn't have an ulterior motive. You know the the everybody I've had on the show over the past four years that you are most like Jimmy Wales. Jimmy. Wales had an incredibly enormous influence on the world with wikipedia. Right? Had they done this as a for profit? He could have been a multimillionaire his argument was it wouldn't have worked. You had to make a nonprofit and by the way he said look I don't really care about having lots of money I. I have a really interesting life. I. Get to meet really interesting people, Interesting People WanNa, meet me I get to have. Get exposed to all these ideas that to me is worth more than any amount of money I could ever have and I that's really stuck with me because I. Think. He's right I think he's right. I agree with I mean I. Like Jimmy, Wales, by virtue of this adventure, I've been on I get lenses into really interesting parts of the world which for the most part have made me more optimistic about the world you know I every now and then I'm you know get invited to various conferences that you know where you know very powerful people are talking about the problems of society and how to fix them, and when when you when you when you get into these circles, you realize most of these people are honestly just trying to help you might not agree with everyone etcetera etcetera but it's it's actually been very It's made me more optimistic about the world not less. When you think about this just this incredible journey in the amazing success of of Khan Academy. How much do you think it has to do with you know your skill and how hard you worked in intelligence and how much do you attribute it to lock It's all. All of the above I mean it's you know one person can call it. One person might call it benevolent aliens working in your favor to prepare humanity for first contact. But yeah, there's something. That I I can't i. mean there's a lot that I can't take credit for I mean and above and beyond luck. Sir I. Guess It's luck where I was born where I was born a had the teachers I had had a the friendship supports that I had and then. Fell into things at the right time and but every now and then you see a door crack open, you save I think there's something interesting on the other door and you've got to sprint through it, and so I try not to overthink when when there are signs in my life that that doors open don't don't don't make someone have to force through the door. Like, run through that door. And Sal Khan founder of Khan Academy. By the way if you google his full name Salman Khan, you will find at least one other famous person who has exactly the same name. That other Salman Khan is one of the most popular Bollywood Actors in the world and actually I was I was in India five years ago and I met him I think it's just because you know people from this kind of get a kick out of things like that. Let's get this guy and that guy. So, there's there's some youtube videos of US having getting co interviewed. He's a he's a big star. He's he's a big heartthrob. He's major Maitra. He's also very well known for his physique. He's kind of the guys that that that taught bollywood that. Indians all have to look like software engineers. And thanks so much for listening to this show this week, you can subscribe wherever you get your podcasts. You can write to us at H. I. bt NPR DOT Org. Our twitter handles are at how I built this or at Iras are instagram accounts are at guide dot Roz or at how I built this NPR. Our show is produced this week by Jan Andersson with music composed by routine Arab Louis thanks also to Julia Carney candice limb, Derek Gaels JC, Howard Grant, and Jeff Rodgers..

Khan Academy Salman Khan Jimmy Wales California Wales United States NPR cortisol Hedge Fund sal twitter PHILANTHROPIES brandon instagram google Jan Andersson
"khan academy" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

14:33 min | 2 months ago

"khan academy" Discussed on How I Built This

"Each other a little bit and I was just like, what do I do now? I could do do I. Do I, call him how do I contact I'm sure he's not listed. Contact Bill. Gates. Was An obvious and. Simultaneously a reporter from fortune. Had reached out actually before this happened saying Oh you know. There's this thing you're doing. It's really interesting. We'd like to do a story about it, and so I was already talking to the reporter and that reporter calls and he's like, did you know that bill? Gates uses Khan Academy as I had no idea and then the reporter Robert Kaplan with fortune he says. I'M GONNA Call Bill Up. I'm like if you think you can call bill up and do that, and so he calls me like two days. He's like bill took my call he I just interviewed Bill Gates about you and and it's like this really surreal thing because. This person this obviously like a lifetime hero. Up In computer science reading about Bill Gates and and then the fortune article came out. And I still had not met bill yet or even had any contact with them and the article said something like the title was Bill Gates is favorite teacher. Wow. The press sometimes rights hyperbolic headlines to I always felt insecure as like my favorite teacher. Did he say that they misrepresenting? Serious Imposter Syndrome, and then I got a call a cell phone rings. Record a video and I answer I say hello and I hear you know this is Larry Cohen, Bill Gates of Staff. You might have heard that bills a fan and I was like, yeah, I heard that. And if you're if you're free over the next couple of weeks, would love to fly up to Seattle and learn more about what you're doing. Maybe ways we could work together and I was looking at my calendar for the month Completely Blank and Said maybe next Wednesday. Cut My nails do some laundry. I'm happy to meet. Happy. Happy to meet with bill can make that work So yeah, I flew up and we had that meeting. What was that like? and. It was a little bit awkward. Wasn't like an obvious like. Oh, you know what you're doing. It was like Oh. So you know Y- There's a little bit of a prompt I. Think Larry Medicine Tell Bill what you're up to, and then I just started into into. My laminated slides. And with me love it, you didn't bring laptop. You brought laminated slides I love that. I mean there's an irony to it that I'm obviously someone involved in technology counterfeiters based on technology. I'm presenting to the creator of powerpoint. So. Yeah. I went through an and and at the end and he didn't give during the presidential lot of feedback. So I just kept going and it's one of those moments where you know. Twenty percent of your brain is trying to do what it needs to do, and then the other eighty percent of your brains saying. You're talking to Bill Gates that's Bill Gates. He's three feet away. Don't mess this up south don't mess up your about to mess this up don't mess up And then when I was kind of done he kind of he's like, yeah, noticed a ton of sense. This is great. This is great and I'm like, Oh, my God you know. And then I got overconfident I, I, remember I throw another. That doesn't make sense you're right. Wow. But was there any like end? Here's a plan on how we could collaborate. was there any of that at all? They ask they bill said, well, what would you do with more resources and you know I think this is the question I have to answer really well and I said look you know it's just me and closet right now with more resources. We could translate this to the languages of the world. We could build out the software platform. Some more people can access it. We could tools for teachers and I said I think we could were reaching hundreds of thousands now I think we could reach a million folks by the end of the year and it could be ten or one, hundred, million. You know by the end of the decade this need for that and you know I said look if I if I. Could hire up about five six engineers and educators and content folks I. Think we'll be up and running So you know fully loaded costs in silicon valley be million million and a half dollars a year and so this and yeah, we'll. We'll. We'll think about that. That seems reasonable. So and then a few days later they said Yeah that's they could do that. So I started talking to the Gates Foundation about about that that grant and simultaneously. Folks from Google had reached out. Google had made this promise in two thousand eight, which was a ten year anniversary of Google that it would donate ten million dollars to five projects that had the potential to change the world, and they determined that one of those projects has to be a project that has a chance to educate the world and. They on their own said, we've done a lot of research and we think what you are doing has the best chance of helping to educate the world. Okay well, I'm glad you've been listening in on my delusions and by fall of two thousand, ten about the Google and the gates foundation each gave about two million dollars So we had four million dollar initial funding for that first two years to hire team internationalize and start scaling. Khan Academy. Wow more than four million dollars. So now you've got to. Grow. You've gotTa Build. You've gotta get office space, but a higher people you've got to really turn this. Thing, that was just you into. Thing. So what did you? Do I mean that's kind of overwhelming a bright. Isn't it. Yeah, it was I. Mean I'm usually call. One of my closest friends Shaath Newson, how he was someone I met actually in Louisiana he beat me at a math competition in tenth grade, and then we were on the same team representing Louisiana. Academic Game. So that's how I got to know him. He ended up becoming my roommate freshman year at. Mit. We're pretty much like brothers and I said, he shot the new help like I. Know This wasn't on your career path to to start to help me kind of get the sing off the ground but like I need your help and I think it'll be fun and. You know he he took a couple of days to think about it and. He decided to take the plunge with me, and so he quit his McKinsey job and joined. Khan. Academy is as the President and COO essentially help me turn into a real organization at the same time. There were these two engineers it's what's really eerie how these people came out of the woodwork to engineers that summer. Ben came into Jason Rozov did volunteered for Khan Academy and I assume there are some young kids are looking for some experience. But when they were volunteer, I'm like these are incredible. These are some of the best engineers and designers I've ever worked with in my life who are they, and then I realized that actually known figures. Like. A really well known engineers and designers. and. So they were something my next call Said Hey would you guys WanNa work fulltime for Khan Academy? I, think we're going to get funding and They after a few months, we were convinced them. They worked initially remotely from New York. Then they were able to to move out to the bay area. So as you began to grow and scale and more people I'm assuming you kind of wanted to professionalize it a little bit more and maybe kind of start to replace some of those early screen capture videos. That you've made in two, thousand, six and seven. Yeah the interesting there's a constant tension as an organization grows. Of How do you make sure you do what's right from a professionalization point of view from scaling from a managerial point of view. But how do you make sure that you're not just doing the things that everyone else does that ends up creating these large bureaucratic organizations that? Aren't always the most innovative and how do you make sure you don't lose whatever secret sauce you had that made you success initially and a lot of con- academies. I say not. So secret sauce I believe was its ECCENTRICITY has quirkiness. It's in formality coupled with its depth, an intuition and desire to. Show. The wonder in the universe and the curiosity and So you know the last ten years for me have just been how do I? How do I balance that you know? Can I bring in other people who also compliment us but we do not lose that entrepeneurship that creativity that curiosity eccentricity that the quirkiness that made Khan Academy what it is. What's the I mean at that point you were still. You're offering still math and. finance. Was the ambition to. To offer as much as you possibly could offer in as many subject areas as possible. Yeah I remember writing these envisioning docs back in two thousand, eight, two, thousand, nine says, okay. We want to create a world where anyone on the planet has access to all the core academic learning they need from pre k. through the core of College Subjects in grades it was part of the initial vision that yeah one day we would try to figure out you know language arts, humanities, etc because they're important early learning. And then we'll just keep running experiments to see how they go and and You know we're we're still on that journey. Yeah. I interview dumb. The founders of head space different. Obviously a for profit company is a meditation APP but initially, all the meditations were Andy Andy Party Com-. If you're familiar with it, I'm very I'm very familiar with right and initially all the videos were were Sal Khan but sal Khan is not scalable. You cannot make tens of thousands of videos was that clear to you pretty pretty soon after you started the funding started come in that you needed to get other people to make videos to your standards. Now, we don't have a lot of folks making videos I still make. A lot of them I pretty much all of the math and science video and we have a few other folks who are doing some history videos and some language arts videos. And one of the reasons why we were we became a little sensitive of like not just outsourcing it to five hundred folks. We got a lot of feedback that. Education even what is done in this kind of distance way synchronous you have to trust your teacher. You have to trust that they're going GonNa get to someplace that I I know is going to be insightful, and there's going to be an a Ha moment that you're willing to invest in it, and we've had moments where you know there's a video for me a video from me, and then there's video from someone else just even though they might be explaining that better than I could have it could be dissonant for the student where they're feeling wait I really got catch it that my teacher now substitute showed up. So what we've been trying to. Balance that. It's amazing. I met David Coleman, a couple of years ago the head of the College Board and he talked about the partnership that they did with Khan Academy where you offer free sat prep which. Is. Essentially. Really. Had a pretty big impact on the four prophet sat prep industry because you're essentially offering this product and service for free. Yeah. You know. I think all of these players they're trying to do what they can in the context that they're doing it but David Coleman reached out. and it was really I think David's brainchild when he took over the College Board that you know the cod were the folks who administer the sat and the AP exams. It was the cause was a non for profit that came into existence to try to level the playing field that yeah, a hundred years ago. The only kids who are getting into Ivy League schools where kids of legacy kids who have scored to the rights knows exactly and the notion of the sat is, let's give a chance for the kid in Louisiana to to to to compete with the kids from an Dover or Chote or deerfield. As we know this whole industry billion dollar industry came up around what look like creating a perceived and maybe actual advantage for the for the you know upper-middle-class or or a fluent and David said, look we've been. Secretly observing Khan Academy and what we really like about. Khan. Academy is y'all about really learning the material I had actually made some sat videos for navy and my cousin facts you went through the sat practice book and I did every problem in the book on video for my cousins. That it was a four hundred something problems and I was afraid that the college would was going to sue me because I didn't take their permission to like screen capture their problems. Davis I watched that and what I really liked about it is and no point. Did you say, Oh, this is how you guess you always said Oh this is a concept you need to learn to be ready for college. This is where you learn it. This is how you learn it. There's a little bit of test-taking strategies. He's like that's what test prep should be. It should be something that generally makes you better generally makes you more prepared for college and and how you perform the sat's going to be a byproduct product of that. Yeah. So he said how about we partnered create the world's best test prep that happens to be free and It made sense to me, and over time the relationship volved were they actually pay US resources To Create Free Test Prep which is, you know that's that's the type of revenue I love it sustain us, but it's it's free those student. This year the most challenging year for school age kids For many decades. And it's looking like this year probably will be remote mostly, it will be remote for many many if not most kids in the United States. I have to imagine that you have seen a dramatic uptick in user's usage this year. Yeah. Yeah we we I caught wind in February this past February that you know something interesting was happening. We got a letter from a teacher in south. Korea telling us that he was heavily dependent on Khan Academy is they had their their nationwide school closures and that was the sounds like, wow. A whole country's closing schools because of this Cova thing that's that's and. A few weeks later. I live here in Santa Clara County, which is I think it was the first community spread happened to your hand local private school had to shut down due to contact tracing. That's what it I don on us. It's like, wow, this hit the US at which even then seemed like science fiction in early. March. But you know it was one of those. Moments where you look left and you look right you realize I think this is us..

Bill Gates Khan Academy Sal Khan Gates Foundation Google reporter President and COO Louisiana United States fortune Seattle McKinsey David Coleman Santa Clara County Korea New York Robert Kaplan
"khan academy" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

01:43 min | 2 months ago

"khan academy" Discussed on How I Built This

"So. Start getting text messages for man. Would, you can imagine I now take very seriously and she four or five of them and kind of cryptic as text messages often are, and they said, this is an writing I'm at the Aspen Ideas, festival main pavilion. Walter. Isaacson Interviewing Bill Gates. Gates. Last five minutes talking about Khan Academy. Wow and Let's just kinda stared I was like, what is she talking about and I started doing a web search for Aspen Gates Khan. Academy. After about ten minutes actually found like the.

Bill Gates Aspen Gates Khan Khan Academy Isaacson Walter
"khan academy" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

07:15 min | 2 months ago

"khan academy" Discussed on How I Built This

"Hey welcome back to how I built this from NPR and. So it's two, thousand, nine and sal has just left his high paying job at a hedge fund to focus on Khan Academy full time. And since it's just him, no other coders, no other teachers this new venture is not costing him a lot of money. But what is costing him is the fact that he's no longer making any money. You know the first three months you're euphoric. You're you're super excited about your new lifestyle is this nonprofit do-gooder? In fact, ACT I would say by months seven or eight, I couldn't sleep. I I. Literally Could Sleep I, I. I was yeah I was getting anxious I was waking up in the middle of the night cold sweats I was I would I would look at my bank account for over Kennedy You know, look at our expenses, I would run financial models for my family. And my wife say. Nothing like. I. Mean in hindsight I was like I shouldn't have been so. Kept it to myself but I wasn't I was in a really bad place mentally and the stress and the anxiety was was killing me was there. May Be residual fear of like. Failing. I think there's you know we talked a lot about childhood in you know not having a lot of resources growing up think I I frankly still have. A fear of being one catastrophe away from financial hardship. Yeah and In two thousand dollars like? I made the catastrophe happen like I. Wasn't like a hurricane or something that that's ruined our finances on a fire. It's like I quit a good job and like the type of job. Is. Not Easy to. Get. A highly sought after jobs. If I really had to I could probably go get a job but what I be able to get as good of a job as what I had that that actually probably was was unlikely and. Try to channel whatever nervous energy or anxiety I had into the work is let me make more videos. Let me Let me make more content. Let me write more code and and hope that eventually someone will notice. I guess, like sort of maybe it was a kind of a low point that you hit and. A. Wealthy. Very wealthy person. We checked his end or the wife of John Door the. Billionaire venture capitalist CA reached out to. Make a donation what what was the story? Hey this is you know I I have this theory that benevolent aliens are are helping me so that Khan Academy can help prepare humanity for first contact and you know the end door coming into my life, and then you know what happened shortly afterwards was may two thousand ten and you know I was getting these donations off pay pal if people donating ten dollars, twenty dollars every now, and then a fifty dollars donation come in that was pretty exciting and then. I saw a ten thousand dollars Asian come in so. Ten thousand dollars just like that. Yeah it was I. Just like I got an email notification from like pay pal donation it's come in I was like Oh this is going to be a fifty like ten, thousand and. Dan I immediately did a Google search I was like Oh. Wow. Like and doors she's like a real philanthropist and I immediately e mailed her and I said no thank you so much for this incredibly generous donation. This is the largest donation that Khan Academy has ever received. I've tried to project like a real institution and if we were physical school, you have a building named after and and and immediately emails back and says well. You know I didn't realize you. You weren't getting this kind of donations i. see that you're based in mountain view You know I've been using your stuff with my daughters. I've been using it even myself to understand the financial crisis and accounting and finance. If, you have time I would love to grab lunch with you and. I was like, yeah, absolutely and so a week later. Maybe, a few days later, we were in downtown Palo Alto at an Indian Buffet restaurant she asks me over lunch. So what what, what's your goal here and I told her when I filled the paperwork with the IRS to become a nonprofit that little part of the forum with mission Colon, they give you the line and a half I filled out a free world class education for anyone anywhere. and. She looked at me. She's like well. That's ambitious. How do you see yourself doing that and I told her you know be very clear mission. I don't think. I'm just going to be able to check it off this weekend and then move onto healthcare or something. But I showed her she was already familiar with the content I was making I showed her the exercise, a software pot from making I said look videos are nice and I wanna keep making videos I really enjoy that I want to translate into the languages of the world but the real learning happens when students are able to work on exercises get immediate feedback. Ideally, teachers and parents can get dashboards to understand where their kids are and how to do more interventions. By, this point been rejected by so many major foundations probably about twenty of them. But, in preparation for all of them had a binder of of testimonials from around the world I. Mean it was Louis. Several hundreds, pages thick and these letters I showed it to her showed her how the the usage was growing exponentially and I like you know I think this could eventually reach like all of humanity. And she's like well, you've made a lot of progress a how I only have one question how are you supporting yourself and as? Proud of a way as possible I said. I'm. Not. She kind of processes that and she's thinking you're a big shot. You're like doing TV interviews and Hundreds, thousands of people using this like, right? Yeah. No I mean I had been on. And I didn't realize there was actually there was a buzz about Khan Academy in Silicon Valley at the time but I didn't know about no one. But I wasn't in the No. I wasn't even the right circles to be experiencing the buzz and so anyway, she she she she offered to pay the bill and I said Oh if you insist. And ten minutes later I'm driving into my my driveway and I get text message from an and it says. You really need to be supporting yourself. I've just wired you one hundred, thousand dollars. How That was just one of those moments where you just stare at the phone and you sit in your driveway for like the next half an hour. Wow. Like you know. Holy Crap. I mean I think. I might have cried like it was that type of You know all that stress built up over the months all of a sudden. It just gets released. You know inside that one, hundred thousand was all of a sudden change everything forever but it's like, okay I can now pay my bills. Were Not GonNa have to dip into savings. It gave a like. I. Can do this for a few more months for.

Khan Academy Dan I NPR sal Palo Alto Kennedy Google John Door Indian Buffet Louis IRS
"khan academy" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

08:11 min | 2 months ago

"khan academy" Discussed on How I Built This

"Matter of months? I would love to believe that I'm some type of super tours something but I think the reality actually a lot of research to back this up that if you do have one on one tutoring and that Tudor's able to identify what your gaps are and fill in those gaps especially in subjects like mathematics that most kids can actually probably all could be accelerated dramatically and That's all that was happening with the I. Mean there was some of it was just motivational. She'd almost given up on herself so at to just remotivate her a little bit and I think. A little bit of the secret. You know this might sound a little bit of like, what's IT GONNA Tiger cousin or Tiger parent thing to do. But when you get when you allow us to get a little ahead of their class, a two things happen one when they see it in class, they're like, Oh, I've seen this before. So they builds a little bit of cushion and also builds confidence. There's just you know once you start to realize that you can actually get a little ahead of your class. You're like Oh maybe this is my thing maybe I'm a math person. And I guess like the word gets out. On the family in Louisiana and other relatives like, Hey, can you help mike hit or can you help me? Is that sort of what happened? Yeah I mean puts it exactly as you described word spread that free tutoring was going on. Before you know and I was getting requests. From from from family members all over the country and by by two thousand six I was tutoring on a given day anywhere between five and fifteen cousins. Family friends are around day on a given audit they would all get on the speakerphone together. Would answer questions they had and. One thing I my cousins. The way that math is often taught and especially learned is it's like these fragmented concepts that you have to memorize formulas and patterns and things like that and what the thing that really served me well growing up is that if you just ponder the math a little bit it, all connects it. All makes intuitive sense. It's all just a way of thinking, and so I was really trying to do what I what I could do to support them all and meantime we're still working a hedge fund, right? I was and I have to give extra credit to Dan because in the early days when I was working for wool capital dance. Startup Hedge Fund. It was just meet him I had bought into the stereotype that you have to work eighty hours a week to make it in finance. So I was ready to do that and I remember miss probably a month or two into starting my job. Dan's like why are you still here? Aren't you going home has gone on Dan I'm I'm ready to I'M GONNA look for more investment ideas. He's like go home it's like okay I was like okay I'll go home and I'll look for investment ideas like no south you're not gonNA help anybody by just Having the appearance of motion, it's not about just churning yourself and tying yourself out because then you're just more likely to make bad decisions our whole goal is to avoid bad decisions and the best way to do that is when you're at work and have your game face on your game energy. But to do that, you're going to have to have other things in your life. You should read interesting books. Recharge and actually recharging is going to keep your mind open and keep you creative and not fond to the group think that a lot of people do so Dan forced me to have a life and that's what gave me the space in my life to offer obviously. Yeah. You know after close I'm I'm actually pretty free to to work with you. So you're doing this tutoring these kids in it's over the phone. And this is like around two thousand six. And somebody suggests that you make videos and you put it on Youtube is that that happened around that time? Actually even before the videos happened around late two, thousand five. This background in software and in the back of my mind, I have always been fascinated by. Ken. Software, play role in improving human potential and when I was in college. Almost every job I did was in some way related to education or how tech education could be useful I remember I worked for the some Spanish professors to help teach people Spanish, than the the next summer I worked on some software to help kids with attention deficit disorder. Learn. Math. And I created this little thing called math planet. So my brain was throughout for longtime and so when I started working with my cousins like, wow, you know it's hard for me to find good practice problems for them on the Internet, let me write some software for them that could generate practice problems and Then can give them hints and solutions and immediate feedback that could give me as a tutor data on how they're performing and how long things are taking them and I wrote it. As a hobby and that was that was the first Khan Academy I. I set it up as a website, and you just was not very expensive. Presumably, you just kind of do yourself and offered it to. These kids. Yeah and I remember a lot of friends like this business. I was no no not a business. I'm not start up I'll never do that again. This is this. This is my family project that was my way of frankly protecting it emotionally, and yeah, I was at a dinner party and my friend has Zulu Zulu. Him full credit he's like. Well, this is cool sal but how he's killing your actual lessons and I said you're right. It's hard to do with ten cousins what I was originally doing with just nausea and her brothers and he says record some of your lessons is videos and upload them onto youtube for your family and I immediately. You know my technology site that's such a low tech solution and I-, vocalized him I was like no, that's like Youtube for. Cats playing pianos for dogs on board. It's not for learning and I went home that weekend and I think I probably had explained least common multiple to a cousin for the eighth time and I was like maybe he's always got a point maybe I should make a video on multiples where my cousins and then it was just a how do I make the video back in two thousand six a cell phones weren't particularly good I didn't have no camera and You Google Search, oh, there's something called screen capture software, and so I downloaded some free screen capture software and I started just essentially recording some of my digital scribbles using my pen tablet Yeah. You can hear my voice over while I'm talking here and there were done very extemporaneously from my cousins and I started uploading them onto youtube and telling them watch this at your own time and pace, and then we can. We can dig deeper when we get on the phone and after about a month some for feedback and they they famously told me they liked me better on youtube than in person. Yes. They just really liked having an on demand version of their cousin that they could watch as much as they want. There was no shame reviewing a concept that they should have learned in fourth grade and I started to realize you know this co this type of thing especially math and I was doing math and I started doing some physics and chemistry and biology. Well, it's pretty evergreen content. If once you have a good explanation of adding fractions with unlike denominators. Pretty much everyone in the world could use it and you don't really have to refresh it unless you figure out a better way of explaining adding fractions with unlike unlike the nominators. I'm trying to figure out how you were thinking about this because clearly you were added to help your. Relatives and and these kids in here extended family and friends of friends but after think that a part of you was like. Maybe, there's something bigger here or were you just not even thinking that at all? Oh there was the first or something my my brain it at oscillates between these like mega delusional. You know. Space Operas Science Fiction ideas and like sal you're being crazy focus on what you can do in the here now and so. The reason why I was always fascinated by software technology education is that. It's not hard to imagine that if you you make something that can increase human potential by ten percent twenty percent or one hundred percent, and if it scales technology can there's no reason why it can't affect all of all of humanity one day and I was super inspired when I was young in seventh grade I read. I read the foundation series..

Youtube Dan Hedge Fund Tudor Khan Academy Louisiana Operas Science Fiction nausea Google Ken mike
"khan academy" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

07:44 min | 2 months ago

"khan academy" Discussed on How I Built This

"I ended up joining a startup. A. Startup to it was going to democratize venture capitals called me vc where the idea was. You know, you had all these IPO's that were popping. So a lot of people were trying to get into the venture capital market, but obviously was hard for people to get into it, and so these two bankers from Roberson Stevens at the time they had come up with a structure that could be a publicly traded venture capital fund, and so that was the startup and who's going to have a tech aspect of it where people could see the investments, etcetera etcetera. So that was what I was. Supposed to build an ended built. it's a great idea, but still hasn't been democratized to this day. What happened to the STAR UP While the Nasdaq was roaring was doing quite well it it grew to forty employees at raised its first fund, which I think was A. Several hundred, million dollars But then you know I still remember that day and I believe it was spring of two thousand when the Nasdaq collapsed and and with that, I saw the the other side of the startup world where you know every week, we'd have to lay off you folks and it was incredibly incredibly painful and political and stressful, and that was around the time that I was like maybe I should take shelter someplace. Yeah. So I started looking up applications for business school. so you decide to leave silicon valley and the startup world for at least a time being and go to business school he went to back to Massachusetts to Harvard Business School. And what was the idea was your idea like all right I'll do this and then I'll go back into the startup world or go into financing, get a stable job and you know make A. Stable, good income like did you have a sense of what you want to do? I mean if I'm really honest I was I was lonely. I was out in Silicon Valley I mean the male female ratio in Silicon Valley back then was horrendous. I also felt traumatize to a large degree by my startup experience because it was it was so painful and political and and and I actually told myself that I didn't. I didn't have the fortitude to be an entrepreneur then that it is it's just It's just so emotionally taxing. Let me go to business school and you know maybe broaden my resume a little bit. So people don't perceive me as the tech guy or the guy, and it was while I was in business school taking finance classes and started seeing that, wow there's a real beauty to finance that it has its quantitative aspect, but it's also has a huge psychological and historical aspect to it that I loved and I remember taking a capital markets class and that was probably the math heaviest class offered in business school and. And, the professor's name George Choco. I remember going to after class when I really liked this class and he's like, yeah, you really have a knack for capital markets and things like this I was like, well, what should I do with this like what kind of career is this for I? Think you should go work at a Hedge Fund and? That's sounds great. What's a hedge fund and he explained you know it's it's like a mutual fund but there's a lot more flexibility in how you invest the money. You can get into exotic things you can short you can buy and sell options and I talked to some friends who are either who had worked at hedge funds or who were going to work in hedge funds and said know. So what's the pay like you know? Is it good and they kind of looked at me like, are you crazy? It's like it's about as good as it gets. So. I guess you decided to do exactly that to get a job at a hedge fund? Was it easy to land one though I got? My application got rejected hundreds of times. Am My resume did not look like A. Hedge Fund resume I. Would I was getting tack wanted me to be a product manager or something like that but at that time I had There was a girl had a crush on from MIT. She was now in Med school in new. York and so I was also like I need to work in New York and so I was I literally went through the director of any Hedge Fund and New York and I was I was getting one rejection after another and eventually there was The sky Dan wool a based in in Boston who was apparently kind of getting his head off the ground and Dan at the time was thirty two years. Old I think or thirty three years old and I interviewed with him and he hired me and he later told me because I didn't have a background in finance. He liked that I seemed to be kind of a out of the box type of personality and You know it's one of these ironies that I had been fallen back into essentially a startup because it was me and Dan and you're looking for office space and making sure that the office was dog friendly 'cause he had this large dogs. We had to accommodate So yeah that that was my first job in finance. Head to go. How did you do? You know I gotTa Say I. I. It was it was a fascinating job because what we would do, we would screen the market for. Things that look just intriguing and we would try to understand that business and the best way to understand that business was tried to get the the management team on the phone to explain their business to us. Yeah, and and so it was intellectually I. I was a kid in a candy shop because I was able to. Every day I mean it's kind of like being a journalist you're able to really dive deeply into these and my job was actually to be kind of a hyper learner because you know the first half of the calls I would always say like it was a little bit of like Gee Whiz. So how does this work logistics work and all that and then the second half of the call I would I would turn up the novel little bit and I was like you know what you're saying doesn't make sense. And Push and push the management teams a little bit harder. And I mean why you're doing all this you're you're also. Starting what would become Khan Academy? You're working there in Boston and I guess it's around two thousand and four like the story I guess that I've heard is that your sister's daughter has having trouble with math is that is that sort of the story? It was a cousin it was a year. I was a year out of business school had just gotten married to the to Mama. The person that I was trying to move to New York for. The wedding was in New Jersey which is where my wife grew up but then. Family. was visiting from New Orleans and had come. They wanted to visit a Boston during fourth of July and so I was showing them around town and. Just came conversation that my to year old cousin, the her mother Nassir Auntie was telling me that she was having trouble in math and she's like salads or said anything you can do I know you're more knowledgeable about these types of things and so I I talked to Nadia. Nadia said that she was having trouble he took a placement test at the end of sixth grade had a lot of unit conversion it. She felt that she just couldn't understand unit conversion. Told Nadia's like I'm one hundred percent. Sure you're capable of. Learning Unit conversion how about when you go back to New Orleans I'm happy to tutor you remotely and she was up for it and. That's that was August of two thousand and four when I started tutoring not. All right. So remotely sounds fine today like in the era of Zoom and slack and stuff. But how did you do that in two thousand four was Over the phone. Yeah, it was over the phone. and. We'd use Yahoo Instant Messenger to to type messages or type questions and Yahoo instant. Messenger at the time had this feature called Yahoo doodle. With your mouse scribble something and someone on the other side could see what you scribbled and you can imagine writing math equations with a mouse was pretty painful and so I got myself and I got Nadia A. You like a sixty dollar pen tablet so that you could right. But it was on a little little part of your instant messenger window with still enough that you could write things like three x is equal to six. What is?.

Hedge Fund Nadia A. New York Boston A. Hedge Fund New Orleans Yahoo Harvard Business School Dan Roberson Stevens Massachusetts New Jersey Khan Academy MIT
"khan academy" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

08:00 min | 2 months ago

"khan academy" Discussed on How I Built This

"So. Most of the products and services we've talked about on the show have been innovative or disruptive in some way. But some of them and you've heard me say this before have fundamentally changed the way we live I mean lift AIRBNB starbucks. Shop Affi-. wayfair. These brands have transformed the way that many of us shop and travel and work. But every now, and then a founder comes along that seems to want to do something even more ambitious, even more transformative like remember. Pat. Brown, he founded impossible foods to create meet out of plants meet. So meet like that even the most die-hard carnivores would want to eat it. Pat Wants to put a stop to meet production period because of the damage, it's doing to the planet and essentially and I don't think I'm overstating this. He set out from day one to change the world. But still. Pat Brown stands to make a lot of money from his company same with most of the founders who've been on this show and I don't think any of them are motivated primarily to make money but it is part of the story they make a product or offer service, sell it to you and me, and they also get rich perfectly fine. But what about someone who makes a product or offers a service that is equally transformational maybe even more so but makes it one hundred percent free To do that, you have to make personal sacrifices starting by earning a lot less money. which is just part of what makes Sal Khan. So incredibly remarkable. Over the past twelve years, he's built Khan Academy into a powerhouse, a massive online learning platform that offers free tutorials to anyone anywhere. And from the very beginning South sided, his academy would be a nonprofit that it should never be tempted to compromise on its values. But before he launched Khan, Academy Sal didn't anticipate any of this. He was just trying to help a younger cousin with her sixth grade math lessons at the time he was working for a hedge fund. But from those early days of doing one on one to toils sal gradually built a platform that offers hundreds of classes in dozens of languages. Nearly thirty million people use Khan Academy. Every month to learn math science arts even sat prep all four free and Khan. Academy has inspired the launch of many other online learning platforms, but many of them are for profit operations that charge money. But we'll get to all that moment first. Let's back up just a little bit sal Khan grew up in metairie Louisiana his mom was from India and his dad was from Bangladesh and the marriage ended when sal was pretty young. My parents. Had issues and so they separated when I was probably about eighteen months old two years old and then I had really never seen my father and I saw once four an evening when I was thirteen and then he passed away the next year so it was really might. mother who raised us as as a single mother. While was there a community of South Asian families in imagery? Growing up. Yeah my you know when my parents separated. We actually live with my young at the time they were in their twenty s, and so they all were kind of like father figures and almost like older siblings to to me as well and and a lot of ways they were not your stereotypical you know. Just come to the US study. Get a job save money kind of prudent immigrant story they were. They were much more embracing of New Orleans. Culture. And I would say they're the most new ORLEAN South Asians. You will ever find it in your life. I had a very colorful childhood. You know late night parties, people, singing, and dancing. For me it felt like a I remember my third birthday that my uncles got a belly dancer. I still remember Habiba you know So it was definitely a different type of childhood, but it was a in some ways a really rich one. So what did your mom do for a living? The first job that I remember her having she she was the person who takes the change out of the vending machine at the at the local hospital actually the hospital where I was born and she took me to work a couple of times 'cause she didn't have childcare and I thought at the time I remember watching her do that. I think it was like the coolest job on earth because you have the key that you can open up the vending machine and like quarters just pour out of it. So she did that for a little bit and then essentially was a cashier at a series of convenience stores is kind of doing you know one minimum wage job after another and then I was in high school she had remarried her my Stepdad at the time were able to. Kind of cobble together to get a a small convenience store in. Your book you write. Louisiana was as close to South Asia as the United States could get. It's spicy food. Giant cockroaches in the corrupt government which is both funny but somewhat true true. I guess right I mean. You grew up at a time when. Like David Duke was the. The representative in steel her. The part of Mary where we had our store, it was called seminole convenience store on Seminole Avenue, and it's called a parliamentary called on that was kind of the heart of David Dukes base. So to speak I remember in a right outside of our our store across the street was the largest David Duke for president signing I've ever seen and so it was A. You know the the folks who lived in the neighborhood who were frankly know Super David Duke supporters in some ways it was lucky. This is pre nine eleven They didn't really know what to make of my family at at the time We've had a few conversations I remember with people the store where they they openly told us that they were trying to decide whether we were white or the N. word to you know we were confusing them but you know growing up I was the only Brown kid in in the classroom. But I never felt in school at all like folks were in any way biased or racist against me. If anything I have to give the the school system to Jefferson parish school system, a lot of credit you know I think a lot of what I am today is because they gave me opportunities there were teachers that believed in me. I had a really good friend circle So so I have no. You, know I I don't feel like it was a a tough childhood. So. Was your mom Did she have very strict expectations for you I? mean she had come from India to the United States of sacrifices to cheese sort of. You know would say you have to be an engineer doctor lawyer like would was there any kind of talk like sat at home when you were a kid? You, know, my mother. Definitely did instill some really strong values. You know just seeing her operate. My mom is a very courageous person and we were the only family that that in our friend circle where you know we were kind of not well off or at least not middle class. But I think that was helpful to because. The family friends we had many of them were the stereotypical doctors and engineers and you obviously can see where you live and you see where those kids live and you can see kind of our financial insecurity. I still remember I must have been eight or nine years old at Kmart and I was being a brat. I really wanted to be by this.

Sal Khan Pat Brown United States Khan Academy David Duke Louisiana founder AIRBNB India Affi-. New Orleans David Dukes South Asia Kmart Bangladesh Jefferson parish school representative metairie Mary
Khan Academy: Sal Khan

How I Built This

06:58 min | 2 months ago

Khan Academy: Sal Khan

"Most of the products and services we've talked about on the show have been innovative or disruptive in some way. But some of them and you've heard me say this before have fundamentally changed the way we live I mean lift AIRBNB starbucks. Shop Affi-. wayfair. These brands have transformed the way that many of us shop and travel and work. But every now, and then a founder comes along that seems to want to do something even more ambitious, even more transformative like remember. Pat. Brown, he founded impossible foods to create meet out of plants meet. So meet like that even the most die-hard carnivores would want to eat it. Pat Wants to put a stop to meet production period because of the damage, it's doing to the planet and essentially and I don't think I'm overstating this. He set out from day one to change the world. But still. Pat Brown stands to make a lot of money from his company same with most of the founders who've been on this show and I don't think any of them are motivated primarily to make money but it is part of the story they make a product or offer service, sell it to you and me, and they also get rich perfectly fine. But what about someone who makes a product or offers a service that is equally transformational maybe even more so but makes it one hundred percent free To do that, you have to make personal sacrifices starting by earning a lot less money. which is just part of what makes Sal Khan. So incredibly remarkable. Over the past twelve years, he's built Khan Academy into a powerhouse, a massive online learning platform that offers free tutorials to anyone anywhere. And from the very beginning South sided, his academy would be a nonprofit that it should never be tempted to compromise on its values. But before he launched Khan, Academy Sal didn't anticipate any of this. He was just trying to help a younger cousin with her sixth grade math lessons at the time he was working for a hedge fund. But from those early days of doing one on one to toils sal gradually built a platform that offers hundreds of classes in dozens of languages. Nearly thirty million people use Khan Academy. Every month to learn math science arts even sat prep all four free and Khan. Academy has inspired the launch of many other online learning platforms, but many of them are for profit operations that charge money. But we'll get to all that moment first. Let's back up just a little bit sal Khan grew up in metairie Louisiana his mom was from India and his dad was from Bangladesh and the marriage ended when sal was pretty young. My parents. Had issues and so they separated when I was probably about eighteen months old two years old and then I had really never seen my father and I saw once four an evening when I was thirteen and then he passed away the next year so it was really might. mother who raised us as as a single mother. While was there a community of South Asian families in imagery? Growing up. Yeah my you know when my parents separated. We actually live with my young at the time they were in their twenty s, and so they all were kind of like father figures and almost like older siblings to to me as well and and a lot of ways they were not your stereotypical you know. Just come to the US study. Get a job save money kind of prudent immigrant story they were. They were much more embracing of New Orleans. Culture. And I would say they're the most new ORLEAN South Asians. You will ever find it in your life. I had a very colorful childhood. You know late night parties, people, singing, and dancing. For me it felt like a I remember my third birthday that my uncles got a belly dancer. I still remember Habiba you know So it was definitely a different type of childhood, but it was a in some ways a really rich one. So what did your mom do for a living? The first job that I remember her having she she was the person who takes the change out of the vending machine at the at the local hospital actually the hospital where I was born and she took me to work a couple of times 'cause she didn't have childcare and I thought at the time I remember watching her do that. I think it was like the coolest job on earth because you have the key that you can open up the vending machine and like quarters just pour out of it. So she did that for a little bit and then essentially was a cashier at a series of convenience stores is kind of doing you know one minimum wage job after another and then I was in high school she had remarried her my Stepdad at the time were able to. Kind of cobble together to get a a small convenience store in. Your book you write. Louisiana was as close to South Asia as the United States could get. It's spicy food. Giant cockroaches in the corrupt government which is both funny but somewhat true true. I guess right I mean. You grew up at a time when. Like David Duke was the. The representative in steel her. The part of Mary where we had our store, it was called seminole convenience store on Seminole Avenue, and it's called a parliamentary called on that was kind of the heart of David Dukes base. So to speak I remember in a right outside of our our store across the street was the largest David Duke for president signing I've ever seen and so it was A. You know the the folks who lived in the neighborhood who were frankly know Super David Duke supporters in some ways it was lucky. This is pre nine eleven They didn't really know what to make of my family at at the time We've had a few conversations I remember with people the store where they they openly told us that they were trying to decide whether we were white or the N. word to you know we were confusing them but you know growing up I was the only Brown kid in in the classroom. But I never felt in school at all like folks were in any way biased or racist against me. If anything I have to give the the school system to Jefferson parish school system, a lot of credit you know I think a lot of what I am today is because they gave me opportunities there were teachers that believed in me. I had a really good friend circle So so I have no. You, know I I don't feel like it was a a tough childhood.

Sal Khan Pat Brown Khan Academy David Duke Louisiana Founder United States Airbnb David Dukes Affi-. New Orleans Jefferson Parish School South Asia Bangladesh Mary Representative President Trump Metairie India
How I Built Resilience: Sandra Oh Lin of KiwiCo

How I Built This

09:26 min | 2 months ago

How I Built Resilience: Sandra Oh Lin of KiwiCo

"On these episodes, we talk with entrepreneurs and other business leaders about how they're coping during this very challenging time and today we're gonNA hear from Sandra. Olen, the founder and CEO of Kiko Kiko makes arts and science projects for kids and ships them out in monthly subscription boxes or crates in March when students began learning from home Sandra's company a spike in orders, and it's now shipped over twenty million boxes around the world I spoke with. Sandra from her home. In the bay area is trying to keep up with demand. Tell us a little bit more about Kiwi Co for people who don't know what what you do tell us about your your company. Yeah. So we design and deliver hands on experiences for kids, kids of all ages. So we have different experiences and products that we develop for Newborns and infants alway through to kids at heart. So teens and even grown ups and these hands on experiences they range. So science experiments, games, kids making play projects that encourage imaginative play. And they're all center around this idea of how can we encourage kids to see themselves as makers And I. Think the the best known as the Kiwi crate and inside like you get pipe cleaners and different OV- like Styrofoam balls and I think that's probably the best known product that you guys make. Right the Kiwi crate. Yeah. Yeah. I mean that's our flagship line. So qe crate is geared for early elementary age kids. So five to eight and it's very project base for Kiwi crate. There are at least two different projects and it's usually one that's a science and engineering focused project and one. That's more be more of an art in creativity designed focus project. So let's say one project overall. It's about arcades and one project might be you create a mechanical arcade cloth that you can actually grab things with and the other side of the crate might be a project where you're making your own yarn pom Pom Creatures, and then you're actually taking your claw, you're trying to grab those creatures as well as whatever else is around your house too. So it's a combination of discoveries along with hopefully A. Little Bit of delight and a whole bunch of fun which I love and tell me I i. know that you launched this in twenty eleven and at the time I guess you were like you were in charge of the fashion portfolio. For Ebay. How did the idea come to you? So it was born mainly out of personal needs. So my my career has spanned consumer products and technology mostly ECOMMERCE. So it started my career in India proctor and gamble and then had been at pay pal at. Ebay but when we started the company, so two thousand eleven, my kids, my oldest two kids were almost three and almost five and I really want to give them especially the hands on activities. It was a way for them to really see themselves as producers and not just a passive consumers as kids who could actually kind of problem solve and make something, and so I started to pull together different and inspiration and I was like, Oh, my gosh, is taking a long time like I need to. Amortize. My effort and so I would invite friends and their kids, and one of the MOMS actually said, you should start a business around this and it was one of those things where I think long story short is that we found that there are a lot of parents who are well intentioned very busy. They want enriching activities for their kids and if it can come. To them in a convenient format from a trusted brand, and that's something that actually really resonates and then if you think about it from a business perspective, if you can get a subscription service to work, it works really well right and so if you consider all the elements of subscription service or you're considering lifetime value if you're able to drive down their cost of Acquisition then you're able to provide something that is not only valuable to the customer, but ends up being something that works really well all the business side to I I imagine when the Middlesex business for a moment I mean I imagine that when it became clear that the pandemic was GonNa shut down huge parts of the economy like most business owners you probably. Anticipated a downturn for Your Business and first of all, how did you prepare for that possibility? Well, to be completely frank, it was a little bit of madness say kind of the beginning. So we were a little bit ahead of the curve and having folks work remotely. But then as people started to shelter in place was definitely a scramble you know we had to see. What the impact would be to the business, and so we've definitely became more conservative. So very quickly we decided to basically pull back or remain conservative on marketing spend. We were looking at things like hiring and figuring out what we wanted to do that. So we held on hiring but then we're also tracking the business and what we actually started to see pretty. Quickly is a pretty decent uptick in the business. I think the combination of parents being home needing something to engage kids we happen to be a good solution, and so we started to see an uptick in the business and then accordingly had managed to the business based on that demand at a pretty dramatic to I think, right? Yeah. So I think you had mentioned. I kind of in the beginning that we shipped out over twenty million crates now, and so if you look at the first ten million crates, we hit that Mark Actually in January twenty nineteen, and then in the next eighteen months or so we actually shipped out another ten million crates and you can imagine kind of the celebration of the business and some of that. Is Because of acceleration that we saw on the business given the pandemic and the demand that was their I'm not surprised spoke with the CEO of dream box who told us that they have seen a doubling of on boarding on onto their platform it's a math platform for elementary school kids. I spoke to Sal Khan a few days ago of founder, the Khan Academy. I mean, they're seeing record numbers of students on their platform I mean as you have seen this kind of surge in demand, how have you been able to meet that demand? I mean, for example, have you had any challenges sourcing supplies? Yeah. So we've definitely had different challenges associated with with meeting the demand I. Think the great thing is that our team has been incredibly responsive and making sure that we shoring supply chain putting in the appropriate orders to make sure that we had the inventory available and I think when it's kind of regular times. To a certain extent, it's almost like your utilities or you know you expect the water to be there in the electricity work and similarly expect that you're going to have product to ship, and so we had to be very proactive about making sure that some of these things that we may have taken for granted and pass were there available to us that we could actually serve the community fulfillment was definitely another area that we had to really shore. Up and make sure that we have the capacity and then customer care I. Mean Obviously we WanNa do an excellent job of serving the customer and making sure that their questions are answered etc and so there was a certain amount of capacity that we were planning for in March April Etcetera May June, and so we had actually scaled add up pretty significantly. Let's go to some questions we're getting in from folks watching system cows, Zimmer he asks via twitter. How do you develop your kids and how do you test them with kids? Yeah. So we have interestingly to product design and development teams. So we have a physical product design and development team, and then we have a digital. So the digital is creating ecommerce platform or content platform. So the software and then our physical product design team is really comprised of folks with mechanical engineering backgrounds, industrial design. We have someone who actually worked on space satellite system. This is, and so these are the folks who are accepting the different projects that could to the kids prototyping testing, etc, and a big part of what we've done at Kiko even since you started it in my garage actually is that we are always testing but children. So in every office that we've had, we have a sizable room and four to eight times a week kids are coming in to test the products at various stages and that is. Something that is absolutely critical for us. We may assume that a project may be engaging. It may not. We may assume that a material is something that is malleable enough for preschoolers hands, but it may not be, and so it's just a critical step in. So as we've actually been working remotely, that was a big challenge to figure out, and so it's been pretty amazing. We quickly decided to actually purchase three D. Printers, laser cutters, etc that we. Then distributed to different product designers, and then on the testing side, we ended up actually either shipping or having a hand off locations for kids to pick up and test materials, and then do them via video conference and so we actually ask for different camera angles to see what the kids are doing because depending on the age of the kid it's not so much that they're going to tell you what's going on you actually have to observe. What's going on in? So that's definitely been an area where we've had to figure out how to get things

Sandra Mark Actually Ebay Kiko Kiko Kiwi Co Founder And Ceo India Olen Sal Khan Khan Academy CEO D. Printers Frank Twitter Zimmer
"khan academy" Discussed on Squawk Pod

Squawk Pod

07:36 min | 3 months ago

"khan academy" Discussed on Squawk Pod

"On CNBC and by the way welcome to September everybody. I'm Brian Southern along with Becky quick and Wilfred Frost. As you might guess, Joe and Andrew are off today Zoom hugeness your top single stock story today Becky is indeed zoom. The stock is on fire. Amazing. How that works a stock is on fire right now, earnings ninety two cents per share more than double the forty five cents and expected, and then maybe the least impressive thing about the quarter guys revenue jumped three hundred and fifty, five percent year over year and check this out free cash flow was up two thousand per said year-over-year the company's posted that new customer, subscriptions. Delivered eighty one percent of the revenue growth and there was less customer churn than expected by the way Kelly Steckel Berg will join us how would you like becky and wealth to be in a business where your free cash flow was up two thousand percent I mean it sounds like a kid's lemonade stand on a court wash sold Mr Jones and five bucks, and then uncle pennybags came in and bought A. Bottle of made from me that's basically what's happened to zoom. It's incredible. It's completely insane, and now it's on yesterday straight off the results came out and they said, you know the big test how this perform in the covert Eric q one was its original movies it were knocked out of the park and the sequel to is even stronger in the fact that it's still accelerating new account ads and top line revenue really pretty impressive. The question of course continues to be how much is this bringing forward demand for future years and It doesn't surprise. Me Does it. Surprises me I guess how strong they continue to grow. But if you look at your own life, I don't think I ever used zoom until the very beginning of March, just before the pandemic, really really clock down on things but we use it every single day here and I'm not just talking about me my the kids everybody is using zoom or something like like Google or something. There's all of these different ones but zoom has become the new vernacular and when I say and doing something even if I'm using Google or something else they usually say, oh, it's zoom call right? They've won just on the on the naming rights. They'd become a verb I'm going to Xerox Dad or give me a Kleenex whatever it is I mean I'll tell you where on long somebody said, what do you make of all these video calls said guys if we can own stocks, I would be long exotica because with all this video stuff with our kids now going virtual world glasses. So I figured we're GONNA. Hedge this zoomed by going long Lozada because. Already do is call them spectacles or maybe a monocle within the next two years. Joining us right now I on CNBC zoom, CFO Kelly, steckel Bergen Kelly. It is great to have you here today for joining US morning. Thank you. You know the numbers on just about every metric is incredibly impressive much better than the street had been anticipating that revenue number is the one that really jumps out. It was up three, hundred, fifty, five percent year over year and comes after. Of One, hundred, sixty, nine, percent, the quarter four, putting up big numbers after big numbers like that. Really Kinda blows the street away, which is why we're seeing that action this morning. What How much of this was a surprise to you in terms of seeing this revenue number? When did you know it was happening and what do you see happening in the current quarter? Yeah. Well, we indicate coming into the quarter that we really expected strong growth to continue into cue two, and we saw that across all geographies, all industries international grew over six hundred percent. year-over-year strong sought Straw song strong performance in industries like education and nonprofits, and also zoom phone. We're very excited. We had our largest zoom foam deal to date find in Youtube. So really strong performance across all aspects of our business. Yeah. Look at some of the other numbers. I know customer churn was less than had been anticipated, and if you look at some of the adjusted gross margin. Numbers they improve seventy two point, three percent from sixty nine point, four percent. was there any number anywhere any performance that disappointed you? We were really pleased their performance in Q. to indicated I. Think What we saw from the retention perspective is that working from home is not a fad people are really adjusting to this new way of life they are integrating zoom into all aspects and we. Saw Strong retention, not only for enterprise, but in our customers with than ten employees as well, and then as we continue to focus on leveraging both the public cloud, as well as our own located Dennis data centers. That's why you saw that improvement in the gross margins and we're going to continue to optimize across all those metrics as we focus on the rest of the year as well. This is a problem that any business would love to have massive amounts of demand coming in but I've got to imagine that it. It's difficult to keep up with it and try and stay ahead of what's there what is the biggest problem that you face at this point? So as you said, we worked really tirelessly our whole entire zoomed team is doing everything. We can to continue to support not only our existing customers, but to ensure that every customer that has a need for zoom has access to it and we've focus quickly on scaling up our employee base we hired over five hundred employees and keep to that's the largest growth we've had to date and you know we're working from home like. Many of our customers are and really supporting arm voice to ensure that we can meet the needs of the customer and leveraging great partners like aws and Oracle as we need to ensure that we have the capacity to continue to support our customers along the way Kelly it's Brian Listen I. Got Imagine maybe you feel obligated to work from home giving you work from Zoom but that aside I'm going to say something I've never said in twenty five years of covering thousands of earnings your free cash flow rose by two thousand percent year over year-over-year. What are you GonNa do with all that operating cash flow. Well, we continue to look for opportunities to invest to grow the top line we indicated that. Record margins operating margins in the quarter at forty one point seven percent we've indicated we expect those to come down for the rest of the year as focused on investing in more sales, people to meet the demand, and of course, more engineers to continue to innovate and build our platform, and then we will always look if there are opportunities for emanate technology and or teams that could really augment our platform or our team to continue to drive that top line growth as well. Kelly. To see the future of zoom talking to the likes of Microsoft Team Cisco's Webex, for example, where that will be integrated in the way that smartphones today. Different manufacturers, different operating systems all except text messages and calls from each other. You know we really believe that video is the future of communications, and with that, we want our customers to be able to use zoom platform with other best of breed products, inner platforms if they choose and we have. With many products out there including some of the names that you mentioned, and that's that's great. We want our customers able to use the products that they know and love and have them work together seamlessly terms of the demand that you've seen for the product. What would be a bigger threat to that demand falling off would it be? Airline. Seeing that business take off again because business travel is back or frankly a innovation from Microsoft teams or arrival of yours. What we've heard from our customers is while everyone is really longing for the.

Kelly Steckel Berg Becky Bergen Kelly CNBC Google Microsoft US Brian Southern Xerox Eric q Joe Wilfred Frost Lozada Straw uncle pennybags
"khan academy" Discussed on Squawk Pod

Squawk Pod

06:51 min | 3 months ago

"khan academy" Discussed on Squawk Pod

"I've been saying this from the very beginning. You know I. I I agree with what trump did. Yeah. I said from the start that Donald Trump is not the American President America deserves in my in my opinion, but he definitely is the American president. China deserve. that we needed to have a president who is going to call the game with China and trump's done it. With I would say more grit and toughness than any of his predecessors I give him credit for that. But he thought he could do it alone. He thought he could do it with a coalition Thomas. So interesting your point about the importance of of winning the EU over on this This question in this debate, there was a report six months ago and the according to reports. That Angler Merckel had said I'm more worried about the influence of social media companies from the US on our children than say hallway on our nation clearly clearly, the US has influenced the UK on the topic of Wow. Away a lot of it is still up for grabs as you're suggesting, are you suggesting that there's not legitimacy around some of the US? Questions Chinese tech may be always example maybe tiktok as example, and this is just a baffle. To win the hearts and minds of Germany and or there is the and it's just a case of convincing The likes of the Germans are of the ills of say hallway like they managed to convince the Brits. Two issues here. One is a long term structural issue for. For decades. sold us a shallow goods, goods we want her back shoes, warranted feet, socks we warner ankles, solar panels we were we we put on our roots while we still China deep goods stuff that went deep inside their systems and economies software chips, etc. What is new today is that China can sell steep goods five jeep that can go inside your house inside your chat. Bot inside your bedroom, and we don't have the trust relationship with generally for us to buy their deep goods. That's the real while way story. That's what we're fighting about here now over and above that you have to understand and I think this is what the administration where I have problems with them just because China can in theory on call on a Tiktok in demand that it. Data doesn't mean it's doing it anymore. That means that America's doing it or a European countries doing it with their technologies and I'm uncomfortable when I read these tick tock stories I think we should always ask ourselves is this Saddam Hussein. Has Nuclear Weapons. What is the actual proof of what Tiktok has done? Yes. Theoretically given Chinese law they could turn over data. Have they done that I'd like to know that? I'm uncomfortable. I'm not knowing enough of that as we dive into this that's it do I. Think. China just on the base of my own reporting. has been meddling in our elections and has the ability to. Influence you know social networks in this country it does and we need to we need to be alive to that. You remember that massive group of Hacks last your Anson Marriott Equifax, a lot of people think that was actually China. Building a huge database on Americans that could run I on and influence campaigns in the future. Tom. The end of your of your comments, they're kind of make me go back to the beginning of those comments. If we think this is China and we know of other attacks that China has launched on us through the through cyber attacks that they've launched on us. We may not have proof of them using while away or any of these other. Sort of ways in spying on us, but as the relationship has grown more afraid as we know about a lot of these cyber attacks that have taken place that have been sponsored by the the People's Liberation Army in China. How. Comfortable should we feel about that? Knowing that that's out there I hear your point about not seeing the actual proof of this being done but you know the history of some of the issues with wow away with corporate intellectual property being stolen and ripped off on some of these issues and you know about the cyber attacks, you put those two together and that does raise a lot of concern about what we might be setting ourselves up for if this is embedded into everything about our lives. So I'm torn between two things back. One is I. Agree with you. You know I'm not whistling this issue at all I. Take it very seriously, but you know I was in. Shenzhen last year interviewed Mr Rehn, the founder way, and so before I went to the interview I, I prepared for the interviews took looked up. In cyber and whatnot, you know what's the first thing that comes up on on Google and you do it at one of the first things It was how America, Hack always networks you know a decade ago in order to tap into Pakistani intelligence. So the idea that. They're the only ones doing this. You know. And we're not I. Think we have to be you know have an adult conversation about that, and that leads to my second point. You know we're in a world where everything is dual use. Now, a hammer is dual use a radio's dual use. The Chat Bot in your bedroom is do what you said. It could have military intelligence and civilian purposes and we have to sort out in our own minds I live my life I assume everyone's hacking everything you know what I mean. because. If we start looking at every single Chinese company and what it does everything is dual use including your kids next bathtub duckie you would probably a chip in you know. So we have to set down. That's why I say that. There needs to be kind of global conversation between the E. U American China. Over how we're going to do this? Otherwise, we're heading for a silicon, a digital Berlin Wall and the world will be less stable and it'll be less prosperous if that's where we go. Tom Thank you. It's always good to see you and I think we probably fifty more questions for you, but we'll have to have back against any time vic. Thank you. Coming up on Squawk pod from Formula One to family Chabad zoom has made itself indispensable to pandemic life. CFO Kelly STUCCO Burgon. What's next for the platform? We look forward to the day that the pandemic damage is over we can resume normal activities and yet I don't think that even itself is a threat to zoom we'll be right back. It takes conviction to see on the turmoil in today's markets. That's pigeon the Investment Management Business Prudential with a legacy of risk management discipline and investment experience through thirty market cycles. PG is prepared for today's challenges. PG BRINGS LONG-TERM PERSPECTIVE and.

China America Donald Trump president Tom trump PG EU Saddam Hussein Anson Marriott Equifax Tiktok Berlin Wall Investment Management Business Kelly STUCCO Burgon Angler Merckel
Tesla stock rally accelerates

Squawk Pod

02:44 min | 3 months ago

Tesla stock rally accelerates

"Tessa says on the move this morning at pairing gains up to the company Equity Distribution Agreement to sell up to five billion dollars of sheds. Joins us with more on that Phil Not enough to put it into negative territory though this morning pre market. No. Because I think when you look at this Agreem- in, what did Tesla has essentially done is it has formed an agreement with a series of bank and I haven't counted how many exactly I think there are seven or eight where from time to time at Tesla's direction, they will sell test shares to raise up to potentially overtime five billion dollars. Now, we don't know exactly what the schedule is going to be how frequently these sexless stock sales will take place the money is going to. Be, used according to the eight K. that they announced this with to sure up the balance sheet and provide a liquidity for the company which raises the question. HOW IS TESLA'S LIQUIDITY? It ended the second quarter with about five billion dollars in liquidity. But remember they've got some strong capital commitments that are coming. They're still building the gigafactory outside of Berlin they've made the commitment to build a gigafactory outside of Austin Texas they're constantly investing in the GIGAFACTORY which is expanding and adding more battery production outside of Reno Nevada. So I think when you look at this TESCO investors will look at this and they'll say look. We don't know exactly what they're going to be using this money for in the future but we do realize that they're going to have these big capital commitments and so now they have said with this series of banks look from time to time we will ask you to take advantage of the market and sell our shares at our direction and Phil we was saying. It's a sign of. The progress of this company that they can re raise five billion. So easily, it's a percent or so just just over a percentage of the market cap today the shares on even flinching and eighteen months ago, two years ago. This would have been nylon impossible correct and remember the reaction that we've seen over the last couple of years whenever Tesla has raised capital, it's been more muted with each capital raise there was. A big reaction. I remember to a capital rate what are they? Two or three years ago and the big question is oh. My goodness what are they doing? Is this an indication that these guys will never be able to make money for just always going to be spending money we have seen less and less of a reaction from the market with each subsequent capital raise or an indication that they will be selling shares. And the share price gains again, not just to mention the eighteen percent since August eleventh announcement of the stocks yesterday up double digit percents off the first of the stock split Phillips thanks much

Tesla Phil Tessa Tesco Reno Nevada Phillips Texas Austin Berlin
How To Make Sure Your Child Learns This School Year

Parenting: Difficult Conversations

06:41 min | 3 months ago

How To Make Sure Your Child Learns This School Year

"Once we've thought through our own needs as workers if people in the household, you know the next question is what about our kids what our kids need now's a great time to ask how did my kids? Do when they were learning online in the spring Howard they feeling about the possibility of doing more online learning. Are they self directed learners or was it a real struggle for them? You know younger kids especially in some kids with disabilities. humbling learning is tough. You know what I'm hearing is that a lot of families are taking this enforced pause to trying to think through what their kids need you. Know you kind of have to assess what are your kids really have to have right now to get through this year in a positive way and for a little more perspective on this, I talked to someone who's really an expert in self directed learning. Crystal Dillard. She's the director of natural creativity, which is a homeschooling resource center in Philadelphia and what that means is that she helps children from really diverse backgrounds. kind of design learning experiences that really meet them where they're at. So that can mean anything from studying. Physics to woodworking photography and she told me that often even within the same family, you'll find children have really different needs. There may be one young person who is responsive to what is being given. You know in terms of. Schooling right now, but there's almost always one who is just not responding to. It doesn't WanNa do it, and the parent is really put in a position that either I'm going to be forcing a young person to sit down and do something they don't WanNa do or I'm going to really think about whether is as important as what I even though it wasn't. So. Don't forget to sit down with your kids and ask what would they prefer an an unpack it yeah I mean. So let's talk about the actual options, right what is your day? What is your week? Potentially? What is your semester going to look like if you're in a public school district and we know many of them are going to be online only in the fall Then that's really going to be the backbone or the default for many of you out there. So obviously staying. Enrolled will keep you supporting your Public School District It is free besides obviously the cost of a Wifi device and the time it takes to oversee it. Yep, and you should know that in our reporting, what we've come across is that a lot of districts really feel like what they have to offer is going to be a little bit more robust than what they had in the spring. Maybe more live instruction may be more sophisticated in terms of what the teachers are doing you know. And, that might be better or worse for you. Right because live instructions sometimes means more to coordinate and getting different kids and multiple different zooms. But we also know is that your school's remote learning is not going to fill the whole what would be the school day So then what do you do and I have been collecting lots of information and resources some you know summer gonNA use free courses paid courses live recorded. There's so many different options if you're looking for places to fill in. Gaps, I think a really good tip is to look at your own states learning standards that can be really detailed for the grade especially in things like science think about what topics you might want to cover for a particular grade with every of energy for there's there's a wide range of things I want to mention. You know there's also kind of prefabricated home school curricula in a box. There's a Montessori ones or some other ones that are really kind of everything you need to know to homeschool. There's individual online live classes, right? Your your kids trying out school year my eleven year old is taking a class on out school. Ethics in sports. And it was just like you know there were there were list of hundreds of classes and a buddy of his is just taking this for an hour a day. He did one just today he loved it. It location is no longer an object, right? So so what could you do in terms of alive class? One out of the box resource is a fiber. I know some people that are looking for tutors for their kids including international language tutors who could be really cheap by our your local. Dancer IOS and places. Piano teachers are probably all offering versions of what they do online now. So that's an interesting option to consider that socially distanced There's always software based learning resources like Khan Academy to Supplement and don't forget your networks. My mom is teaching art to my daughter's once a week they really get into that. That's like an hour long activity they learn about different artists and they. Make work. There is high school students and college students all over the country that are banding together to offer tutoring sessions and I would recommend picking one or two. You know a great interest for your kids or something that they really need to work on or both to kind of supplement what's going on with with the remote learning once you have a handle on your own needs and your kids needs. then. It's time to kind of look at your broader community and think about bringing other kids into the mix so that your your kid can have some social interaction, right? Yeah and obviously you're GonNa want be on the same page with the. In that circle you'RE GONNA. WanNa talk about you know how big is your circle? How much exposure do you have on a regular basis to other families in their habits and obviously you're also GONNA want to double down on the basics handwashing mask wearing again, the honor system anytime you start thinking about spending time with other families you need to have a conversation, those families you need to be able to discuss and bring up what precautions everyone's taking. If there's been any exposures, are you comfortable asking someone to take a test one mother I talked to who is thinking a lot about forming a pod because she has? An only child is prudence. Carter, and she also has some respiratory health issues herself. So she needs to be extra careful really really be able to like talk openly about testing and taking temperature washing hands and social distancing and everybody has to be admitted to that. You know let through kind of the different options you have as a household or with family or friends What about if you decide you need to and can afford to pay for childcare What are we looking at here? I? Mean some families are talking about sharing a tutor or a sitter. Some districts are starting to open up subsidized care. And we know there are lots of childcare centers that have reopened although they may have fewer slots, available and then of course, there in home daycares that are interestingly you know opening their doors to slightly older kids who you know they. They might have previously focused on pre kindergarten kindergarten. and. Now maybe they are taking second third fourth

Public School District Crystal Dillard Howard Khan Academy Director Philadelphia Carter
The Future of Education

Coronavirus: Fact vs Fiction

08:41 min | 7 months ago

The Future of Education

"As students. Head back to classrooms and other countries schools are adapting in order to keep students safe in Taiwan. For example there are now plastic partitions around the desks of elementary school students during lunch the Australian government has asked more vulnerable staffers in their schools to work from home. If possible in Denmark Cafeterias are disappearing and students now eating their classrooms to avoid large gatherings. Now it's the United States turn to determine what must be done to open school safely. My colleague Evan. Mcmorris Doro has been covering the impact of the corona virus pandemic on the United States educational system. I talked with him about how and win students from pre K. To College Michael. Back to classrooms are people processing this the way that you'd expect or are they not believing that this is necessary. What are you hearing well? One of the wildest things about this whole time has been just how quickly that change had to happen so you know you think back to March. We're having a normal school year. But everything changed just so quickly. The best way I can think about describing it actually came from Lily Eskillson Garcia. Who's the president of the NEA? Which is the largest teacher's Union the United States? We're in the middle of tried to find the right metaphor. A lot of teachers have said. We're building the airplane. Well it's going down the runway. Another teacher said Oh. It's bigger than that. We're apollo thirteen. We're Houston and we have a problem and our kids are on that space ship with their parents. Isolated the efforts that go into a successful school. You're already massive. Right like the Moonshot we gotta get a crew to the moon and get them back but what happened. In this case was something went wrong along the way and actually made the job harder because all of a sudden it's not apollo eleven now it's apollo thirteen in which everything breaks down and then you have to use only the tools inside people's lives in their home lives to get education done. We think about that scene in the movie where they dumped that stuff on the conference table. Okay here's all the tubes and stuff and they have on the ship of kids. Listen we gotta find a way to make this fit into the whole for this using nothing but that well this is what they're talking about when it comes education all you have is the technology type people's houses. It's a very different kind of teaching two very different kind of education but the schools themselves in terms of doing what we count on schools to do. They were not prepared for this. Did you get any sense Evan? That they're starting to think about the fall right now. We hear about states reopening obviously all over the country and at the same time we hear. Maybe there's going to be another wave or this isn't going to really go away. Is the general sort of idea that schools will be back. Open the fall. Or what are you hearing? Well the difficulty for schools difficulty facing a lot of people which is that they have to take a long time to plan to. They're going to do next but we don't know what's going to happen next. So at baseline level. I can say this there will be schools open in the fall from the K. Through twelve level into the college level. What that looks like. We're not totally clear on few years ago for sixty minutes. I did this piece about the Khan Academy and they were making the case. I remember this years ago that There could be advantages to online learning. Are there advantages that this type of learning offers over bricks and mortar when we went to a full online system? What we learned was that we had problems with things like the education. Gap Education gathered already. Exists became much much more broad. I spoke to a teacher in. La Named Gannon's four. She can't even take attendance. Absence rates are high. We're dealing with it. The things we're dealing with some students whose parents still have to go to work and so being the oldest because I teach high school so a lot of them are having to take care of younger siblings. We do everything we can. We send emails and make phone calls and things like that so I think that we are definitely going to have a learning gap. We're going to see it in the next few years. We're going to have lower test scores. I think it's inevitable as part of your reporting if you've been talking to the students themselves I mean I'm I'm wondering what? How are they reacting to this adapting to this? The students are stressed out. We're hearing that from teachers. We're hearing that from parents and I think in my own conversation with the students themselves. I felt that same thing. There is an excitement. I think about something new at first as you've gone along with this thing you found that distresses just they? They want to go back to traditional school. I've not yet met a student who was like man. I would love to do school from my parents basement for the rest of my life. That's not something that I've heard. I think that that reflects my my kids attitudes as well although I will tell you. It's Funny Evan. Maybe not surprising when this first started. I said we're still going to maintain a schedule. You'RE GONNA GET UP. You'RE GONNA shower. You'RE GONNA brush your teeth. You know the basic stuff and now if they can roll out of bed and get to their laptop in time. It's it's sometimes asking to WanNa work in our sweatpants. They can definitely go to school. Sweatpants right one. One thing that we are seeing is is that some schools are reopening You know in Montana for example and I'm wondering how are they approaching it? What are they doing there? Are there lessons? I guess for for the rest of the country because Montana is a state very different from more populous states. They had these really small schools in these really small school districts. One of them is Willow Creek School. Which is has sixty kids in it. It's a town of two hundred and fifty people about and sixty kids. The Superintendent and the principle of Willow Creek is named Bonnie Lower and what she described was the school day. Very different than what we're used to. We have six foot distant marks on the playground so that they can play games at recess and save six feet away from each other and we will alternate our bell schedule so that kids are not in the hallways at the same time. Common areas are being disinfected regularly. Every classroom has hand sanitizer wipes teachers have masks. So if they're in a student's bubble they put the mass on. They'll there's a lot of precautions. Bathrooms will be used one at a time. We're ready to get back to normal as normal as we can and even the arrival school is very different so they've had to reduce bus schedule so a lot of parents are dropping their kids off and then once the kids get to school are led into the building by an adult one by one and before they go in their temperature is taken. There's no more luncheon cafeterias so they are in the building but the school day looks very very different and these are the kind of things that we may see in schools across the country when they reopened. This is the challenge. The challenge is how to try to do social distancing in something that was never designed for that. We've all been forced to evaluate risk differently. I mean the truth is that we all take risks on a daily basis. Getting in a car and driving is one of the riskiest things that we typically do. And there's a lot of people who say well a kick ball and then somebody touched that I touched it with my hands and then I touched my eyes. My nose my mouth something like that. What are the chances of me really getting infected? And it's still very hard. I think for for public health officials to answer that question but I think what they'll typically come back to is at the answer is that the risk is low but it's not zero. I spoke with a rising college freshman from Minnesota who are trying to plan on what schools he was. GonNa go to and the college campuses are out there right now advertising. Look we're going to reopen. We don't know how we're going to try to make say we're GONNA change the way dorms work classes. Whatever what they really have to try to convince people that they can create a safe environment. I asked this kid. This is an eighteen year old kid. I said look if they open a college campus right now would you go and he said no right now. I would not maybe in August. Maybe if I could be convinced that things were safe but right now I'm not ready to go. So there's there's a difference in how people take that risk and feel about the risk factors and feel about how things are going on that. Maybe you have a situation where these elementary school students in Montana. Their parents are feeling like look. This is a worthy risk. Will take you know. We'll see how it goes but doesn't work. We'll just shut things down again and it's not that big a deal and on

Evan United States Montana K. To College Michael Australian Government Mcmorris Doro Willow Creek School Taiwan Denmark Lily Eskillson Garcia Khan Academy NEA Gap Education Houston President Trump LA Willow Creek Gannon Superintendent
Effective Daily and Weekly Habits

Psynautical

06:06 min | 8 months ago

Effective Daily and Weekly Habits

"Everyone I just wanted to do a quick episode on kind of Habits Daily and Weekly Habits Just because I think they are important. Especially if you're an entrepreneur recovering from health issues or or kind of both which is what I meant. situation Most of these are pretty simple and I would suggest. Try to add them one at a time and build them up and they will Depending on what kind of your goals are and what you're going through on if you just want to be more productive and stuff like that that's one thing if you want to if you're trying to improve my health or if you're working on both Some simple things you can do is one of them is just walking I think starting out maybe ten to twenty minutes and then working up I don't think you know Spe- what am I talking about I've you know I do this on a treadmill but I also do Just property I don't know really doesn't matter. How factor slow you go I'll try to do it on natural kind of environments as well too and if you do have something similar to viral souls or if you're even able to do barefoot you can even get the benefit of not only earthy grammy but also. It helps improve your posture as well to I think walking is a good one Is sometimes just listen to music. Sometimes I don't do anything sometimes. I listen to audio book to Another one I think. Daily as well is meditating Out Start Out maybe ten to twenty minutes Try and limit distractions sound And do it in a relatively dark room. I tend to listen to ice cream tones. Or if I have a good self headphones beats I also typically tend to Kinda meditate sometimes within acupressure Mat Just because it seems like if I can I'm gonNA combined things trip. It's kind of Self Care. A health related Another one is just reading. Good also kind of self education. This can vary from an audio book to reading E Book Reading Just Regular Old Book. I'll tell you twenty minutes to an hour I also tend to watch like documentaries. youtube videos from certain people that I Like or respect or look up to so. She's Josh Mason Teal Swan but there are a lot of the wonderful to there's other podcasters A lot of free information. There's a Khan Academy there's even if you're interested for various reasons to Teach yourself languages do lingo while to Moving on self care is also important. Pretty important piece. Especially if you're dealing with Some kind of chronic mental health issue or a health issues in general For me this really varies. I usually wake up and I take gut binders not everyday. Depends on kind of what my schedule or if I got good enough sleep on what town wake up and stuff like that And get binders. I'll go into another episode and stuff like this but there's a ton of information on minors and stuff like that. I also take some chilling stuff as well to I think these really hope to how can detoxify. The body can help you lose weight. It can help you make make feel better but you do want to take just with pretty much plain water Empty Stomach and You WanNa Wait L. Probably at least an hour before you really eat or and take any supplements to most. He's got minors actually clays or clays Different kinds of different soils it will help absorb things But Josh Mason Dr Cling Heart. They have lots of Information. But you can also just look it up and there's several different ones you can take I would start out with maybe one or two and then just build up and you can also take more less You can also sometimes take later on the day around ten PM I would usually just take the capsule ones around that time. Because that's one year kind of gold letter flushes your system. Andy taxes and it just won the best times There's other stuff like you can do. There's an acupressure Mat Lay on Land sit on meditate on That really helps especially. If you're doing what pain intention on this earth gene. You can do that just by walking or standing or even sitting with rock grass or you know Touching Earth for up to forty minutes and you can split this up yet doesn't have to be All at one time Also do ironic foot bass. Those are relatively inexpensive. You can get one at home I do castor. Oil Therapy wraps actually. Just did that There's coffee animas I would tend to do maybe once a week. I know some people take it do a daily one which I think is fine But I think you do have to kind of know It can mess up your kind of I've heard adrenals but also kind of like your electrolytes. Minnows is full too. So you really want to be sure to kind of replenish Sosa. Especially when you're taking binders

Josh Mason Teal Swan Self Care Habits Daily Youtube Josh Mason Andy Taxes Dr Cling Heart
How to work from home (with Nick Gray)

Pocketnow Weekly Podcast

06:22 min | 8 months ago

How to work from home (with Nick Gray)

"It's a very interesting time right now yet. Certainly is I mean as we were talking before it's trying to find the balance of we still need to do work. We have the privilege of being able to work from home. But you're trying to put the right spin on things when it saves. The world is falling apart when you know does another smartphone review really matter. Yeah and you know not even to put out there the fact that one particular review. I've been putting off because the software updates hasn't come in yet talking of course about the twentieth tra- you know people can buy that phone. Just go ahead and publish that thing. I know I'm not I'm not. I'm not delaying my review because of the software update it just so happens that as my review is being pushed back because the world is nuts suffer still. Hasn't so come on it's Samsung. It'll probably get here with android eleven which will probably be next January. I've never felt anxiety over like when you go to the software update page. I've never really felt exiled over what I see there but it still says security patch march one and for some reason that bothers me a lot right. Now we're almost done with margie. Guys was going on anyway where we get too far on that tangent. One of the reasons why I wanted to have you on was because I was looking for someone to have a sort of familial perspective like granted. There are a lot of people out there who are now working from home at best at worst you know. I hope no one has actually gotten sick or has been affected in that way by Cova nineteen but if so our hearts go out to everybody right now who might be listening. Hopefully this episode will give people a little bit of respite. You can chill out with us for the next half hour so and like have this conversation with us in your case though you know. You're you're a work from home. He always have been yeah. I mean I'm trying to think back I started. I quit my corporate job in October. Of Two Thousand Fifteen When we decided to move to Italy and at that point that's when I decided to do tech journalism fulltime. You do being And Yeah so it's been almost a four and a half years since I've been working from home so essentially Waking up in the morning having some breakfast and walking thirty feet to my desk sitting down and getting work done for the rest of the day minds to Seoul unless I drive all the way to the office but yeah well yeah when we were in Italy. My Office was in our bedroom which my wife really hated but now now that were In Cleveland my my office is upstairs in the attic so I do have to go up some stairs in the morning while I go downstairs for breakfast and then go all the way upstairs for getting to the office so this morning after breakfast with the girls I kissed them and said by girls. I'm going to work. Came all the way upstairs and closed the door and didn't go back downstairs until twelve thirty for lunch Okay so you actually have like that routine sort of down pat like yes I find. I find myself getting the distractions from time to time like I live at home since I have an office that I can go to retreat to and have my own space. There's really no reason for me to be out of my family home at least yet so of course my parents are here and I'm taking care of them throughout this entire thing. Everyone's healthy by the way just so everybody knows but yeah like at any given time. I'll get a knock on the door and there's just like hey can you help me with this real quick and then the whole flow is broken. Everything's done after that. Well I get that from time to time. So my daughters are out of school They've been out of school since Tuesday. And so we're treating this sort of like summer vacation. Where their home? All the time They do have schoolwork that they're taking care of So they're typically getting that done in the morning time on. They have to email their teachers every day with their progress reports and everything like that but in the afternoon my youngest daughter will typically wander up to my my office and just you know wonder up the stairs than you know come put her and over my shoulder and look over to see what. I'm doing and pick up a phone one of the twenty two phones that I have in my my office here. I'm like oh I've never seen this one before So it's nice to have her around but typically that happens on a regular school day anyways because they get home from school at three o'clock and I'm still up here working so I it's it's not that much different from me than it is on a regular basis but you know honestly I I can imagine. Some people are learning how to cope With this new normal a little bit differently than what they might have expected. Yeah you mentioned that. They're out of school now. Obviously the schools closed down to one night. They moved to like online courses or online classes. Now is that what's going on with girls Now with our girls. We are girls. Go to a Montessori school so learning environment is different so they have you know. One large crass classroom with a lot of students at different class levels And so it's it's less teacher. You know the lecture time than typically as so my my daughter. She has more more specific things she needs to get done with some English requirements and math requirements for state accreditation. Stuff like that is But my but my youngest one is like you know practice some writing. Here's some math things to do here. And there But were also supplementing A lot of those things. My my two daughters they. They've both done When I lived on the road in an RV for a year They did a lot of Khan Academy Which is an online Learning course With which has quite a few different Courses you do math English science Pretty much everything across the board so their third doing some of that as well just because you know they have all day and they've been used to being in school with their friends all day and my wife will probably go crazy downstairs if they're not entertained in an orderly fashion for for hours on end so

Italy Samsung Margie Seoul Cleveland Cova
How to Home-School Your Kids Like a Pro During Coronavirus

Best of Both Worlds Podcast

09:09 min | 9 months ago

How to Home-School Your Kids Like a Pro During Coronavirus

"We thought we'd do a few short episodes talking about life in these sort of more challenging times is everything is in flux so both. Sarah on iron working from home right now. I mean I always do but Sarah tell us a little bit about your situation and how this has changed with the corona virus epidemic going on. Yeah there's just I mean I'm a hospital. Worker and part of my job is clinical and part of it is more of a leadership role with our residents and everything is really up in the air right now. I'm currently working from home because I have a very mild cough and just in an abundance of caution in our healthcare system has Basically required anybody with any kind of symptoms. That could be anything to stay on out of there which is very smart to protect our patients and protect other caregivers. Because you know if we interact with our colleagues and then spent something around then that could be very bad and there's just so much uncertainty with this. We don't know you know exactly how long most people are contagious for like we don't know You know the the the rate of symptomatic shedding that happens. We don't even know how good kids are as vectors. So there's all these question marks and politics aside. I think we're all in the same boat right now as many of you guys are all working parents and we all have our kids at home. Which many view a few of you not many of you? A few of them might be home school. So that's normal but most of you probably aren't exactly no. It's funny because I've written a couple articles over the years about people who work and also home school and it's more possible in these days than it would have been like you know in the in the past that just would have been like what on earth like that. Those two things. Don't go together. But there are so many ways of working work does not need to be done at a particular time in place necessarily for some people and school actually doesn't have to be done at a particular time and place in many cases With the rise of remote learning options. I'm certainly children. Who are slightly older are able to be quite self directed in terms of their learning. And there's actually a number of like online charter schools for instance and I think you mentioned like Florida has virtual school right for for Housebound children they do like. I've had patients that use it. They haven't deployed it to any of the current students yet but I know that platform does exist. Because I've had some medically complex patients. Like patients. Going through Chemo or who? Otherwise just aren't safe to be in the regular school system Have done school from home. And it's considered actually separate from the homeschool. It's considered an actual public school called Florida virtual school. So I mean I don't know will happen. I do think everyone needs to bre- from minute because it's been like five seconds and then there's been like ninety five elaborate schedules. Maybe I'm guilty. I mean I made one although mine is like super non elaborate so involved a lot of screen time so But like I'm not super worried about my kids like losing a ton of ground. Maybe because my kids are pretty young. Yeah like if we do a couple hours of stuff each day and that can include reading will probably be. Okay yeah well. That's the cool thing. I mean from having studied a lot of home schoolers. Schedules Fun Fun fact here. My senior thesis at Princeton was actually on home schooling. That's how long ago I was interested in this topic but it was it was less common than But it the people who do this. It doesn't take six and a half hours a day. Or whatever your state mandated. Instructional time is for your for your schools. You can a lot of that. Time at school is transitions. It's Things that your kids might be doing anyway like recess or eating lunch. It's things that you might not even consider to be part of school while they are. But you might do them on your own like instrument practice for instance or reading right like having. That's that's part of it too like a elementary school teacher is GonNa have their kids. Read do silent reading for Awhile. And so that's part of it as well. So the actual instructional part can be relatively limited and still be moving forward. Mike Kids depending on age have have somewhere between two hours and fifteen minutes in three hours of stuff that I have assigned per day and an hour of that is independent reading. So we're it's it's not like eight hours a day by by any means but it's actually been kind of fun to try on. Dance Day Day. Three Day three here. Oh right your little bit. You guys were one of the first. We're on the district's too close. So we knew it was coming and we have gotten into it now but Yeah no each. We have a checklist each day which the kids have one hour reading. They have thirty minutes of math practice which we have been doing. Khan Academy in Dream Box. Ruth was creating her own worksheets for a while but then she thought better than we have a thirty minute research project which each day we have a different subject so we. I did science than we did. History today was health related so everyone research to different epidemic and they need to write me up a short report on it. You know based on link sort of based on kid age but So they can get writing practice in. How is how is Alex's report he doesn't have to do this his his He gets stories right. We're reading stories than he does Ten minutes of writing practice just just sort of keep working on the hand coordination and then we've actually been working with him through the bedtime math books which I can highly recommend they are by Laura Who did a couple of these there several of these books? But it's the idea that set up like a bedtime story so you read a short paragraph that sets up a topic and then they have four different levels of math problems associated with the story problems in so you read it to the kids in the figure it out a So we've been doing that with Alex for math cool. Yeah we have like our kids homework. They use a program called. I ready for both reading and math. I think it's a Florida state wide thing so we've just continued their normal cycle of that and we use reflex math for math. Which is more just? It's not really like they. Have I ready? Math for more concept type stuff and reflects is just like animals memorizing timetables and Cameron's trying to learn like four plus three. So we do that and then have them write a story Either like a journal? Entry of what's going on. I think those are GonNa get a little repetitive. But we'll see for Cameron. It's more leg. Tried to write one picture and then I asked him to read either two chapters of a chapter book either. Annabel can read it to cameron or he can read his own to picture books or she can like whatever they want but like two books or chapters. Yeah so sounds good animal would you do? She's like I read genevieve green eggs and Ham. Good I mean. There's so many things you learn by doing that right. I mean I. In addition to the reading practice obviously but reading out loud is itself a skill that I would say. Many adults don't do very well. That's a real presenting. Words to other people is not automatic. And so you're absolutely right about that. She's working on that now. Wait we're actually So the First official virtual Instructional Day starts tomorrow recording this on a Tuesday so the Wednesday. Our teachers are starting to send assignments So we will incorporate that into the schedule. It's mostly Jasper. Who's going to have the more formal remote instruction like his different. Teachers are posting assignments. So he's GonNa start mostly doing that. The other kids. I think it'll be more just reinforced like math practice. And things like that so you know they'll still need a few additional things to keep them busy and we are still having our nanny come because currently I still have a lot of work. Responsibilities headache seven thirty. Am Conference calls every day. And then I have to disseminate that information to the residents and trying to redesign a lot of their education to figure out how to do it remotely which is not that easy apparently now also yeah I feel like I know this is a dilemma for a lot of people but our nanny herself has sort of agreed to isolate Incidentally she has like the same coffee shop. So I'm not worried about transmitting or getting or giving her 'cause that already happened before all of this but yeah. I know. This is sort of a dilemma for some people whether or not. It's even okay to do that. There are a lot of college students that currently have a lot of free time. That might even you know I was thinking about. It might even be willing to live in if you have the space to keep them so they could become a defacto additional family member. If you really need some somebody You know you can pay them. They can earn extra money. And you could get your remote work done without worrying about an infection risk. Especially if they're willing to to stay with

Florida Cameron Sarah Florida Virtual School Mike Kids Alex Mild Cough School Teacher Princeton Khan Academy Laura Who Chemo Ruth Jasper Annabel Official
YouTube looks to edu content to weed out the nasty stuff

Talking Tech

06:07 min | 1 year ago

YouTube looks to edu content to weed out the nasty stuff

"Hiring is challenging but there's one place you can go. We're hiring is simple and smart. That place is ziprecruiter where growing businesses connect to qualified candidates try it for free at Ziprecruiter Dot com slash tech talk ziprecruiter the smartest way to hire we're here in Anaheim California with Neil Mohammed chief product officer for Youtube at bid conned big video online convention. Neil has a bunch of updates for YouTube. We're just going to jump in what's going on Neil <hes> well first. Thanks for having me <hes> Jefferson so millions of people come to the Youtube Platform millions of families individuals etc come to youtube to learn something new could be anything from you know how to fix my. Garage door to <hes> you know. How do I get to be a better reader? How do I get to be better at math to like college level physics or chemistry or a new vocational skill so that I can get a new job and so we're gonNA lean into that and <hes> one of the new product announcements we have today something called learning playlists and the idea here as the name suggests is a playlist of content focused on a particular topic and it's something that's curated by by our youtubers in a way that they would imagine their content being consumed in the global virtual classroom that exists on Youtube and so instead of you know searching for you know Organic Chemistry and being overwhelmed with the search results Ulsan videos that might not be in the right sequence or order? Now you can go to a specific learning playlist. That's been sequenced by an expert in that area and not only is the content organized in an appropriate way. <hes> it's designed to allow you to focus on learning so when you're consuming video from a learning playlists and you leave off it'll go back to that right that same spot in the playlist. Now recommendations will be turned off when you're consuming videos from I'm learning playlist so that you can actually focus on the learning process and we'll be rolling this out gradually because of course <hes> you know there's a really high bar for this type of content and we'll so we'll be starting with a handful of of trusted creators creators crash course Ted Khan Academy et Cetera but based on the feedback that we get will broaden both the set of creators and also the set of topics <hes> so that's that's going to be a brand new announcement in <music>. Are Those curated playlists. They're they're effectively curated playlists <hes> but they're they're curated <hes> by the edge youtubers themselves that built that content so how am I going to find them. <hes> you will so for example back. Go back to my cert- scenario when you search for them <hes> you instead of getting sort of an assortment of videos you might get a link to that learning playlists and that's basically your entry point and the way it would work. Let's say you searched for or a chemistry again going back to my example <hes> that learning playlists might come up in the search result and then when you click on it it doesn't it won't take you to chemistry 4. Are Graduate Level Chemistry. It will take you to one to one and then you and then basically basically once you're there you follow the sequence in in the learning the creator I make the playlist Creator makes the play listen and part of the effort here was to build tools so that they could do that in a relatively kind of quick and efficient manner <hes> <hes> but the other side of it is this experience for our users because I can make a playlist today at any topic I want what's different so the difference is the user side treatment so how it will show up in our search results but also <hes> this this. This concept of kind of learning focused mode is not something that exists with <hes> existing playlist on the platform today so if I'm Creator A and I WANNA do a playlist of whatever the topic how to do plumbing at home or whatever auburn input ten videos together. What do I need to do <hes> so we have a team that works with our edgy tubers and we have actually had a program <hes> called <hes> YouTube learning which has been kind of a pilot program where we've been working with a handful of these actually seventy five of them across <hes> across the world so not just here in the U._S.? <hes> and we've been holding and we've been working on <hes> working with them in various educational events <hes> we had one here actually yesterday in L._A.. Swear we're partnering with them and <hes> Really <hes>. The idea is to reach out to youtube if you're interested in in this we're starting small just to be very transparent about it because. We Wanna get not just the creator experience right but we really want to make sure that the user experiences a high quality one as well and so we can't support <hes> right out of the gate every Creator who's interested in this and so will be gradually expanding spanning this product just like we do with our other products. Neil Mohammed chief product officer Youtube. Thanks as always for sitting down with us. Thank you very much hiring used to be hard. It was and still is one of the biggest challenges businesses his face before it meant dealing with endless stacks of resumes flipping through them and hoping the perfect candidate would jump out at you and the manual review process wasn't any easier but in today's high tech world hiring can be easy and you only have to go to one place is to get it done ziprecruiter dot com slash tech talk with their powerful matching technology ziprecruiter scans thousands of resumes to find the most qualified contenders for your job and actively invites them to apply ziprecruiter is so effective that eighty percents.

Youtube Neil Mohammed Chief Product Officer Ziprecruiter Dot Graduate Level Chemistry Organic Chemistry California Anaheim Ted Khan Jefferson Auburn L._A
"khan academy" Discussed on OnEducation

OnEducation

04:44 min | 2 years ago

"khan academy" Discussed on OnEducation

"Of millions and millions of copies sold and being used by millions of people around the world, yet strange that so I was thinking, and this Khan Academy is not just Khan Academy. But it's Khan Academy kids. So it's like for the free K to K students. But yeah, I just I was like evenly brain pop. Yeah. Rain pop. Yeah. That's not on this list. He they have this kind of a zoo Tero bid rights, and it's a way to be able to cite resources. There's a ton of free websites that do that kind of stuff that are. It's not that these are bad, right? Like, I don't think we're saying that these are bad. It's just weird that you would make top twenty lists. And you would rate evaluate like some tools and then put out a top twenty. And it's just weird that there are things that didn't make it into the top twenty as opposed to things that did like like like, I just was looking at that one Mike magnum king. Chime in is cool. I it's great in out. But ruts. Yeah. That's a top twenty tool. Admit right. I'll admit I am tempted to download it. So that I can teach. My teach is a cattle play chess. And then you know, we can. Play chess together. Like, I'm all for that. I just, you know, top twenty when compared to things that aren't here. I mean who? Yeah. That's what I thought she get someone on which would it. Hey, listen, if you guys know any of these commonsense people that are are part of this. We went out, you know, Tony get after us because we wanna you know, I wanna talk to them we need to figure out. Why yet and I'd love to know their evaluation, a rubric or whatever. This was my favorite part might get said this year. We had no trouble, narrowing down our top picks to the top twenty best apps games in websites. What's? But it's super hard to do that. Boy, you and I would be fist fighting God. We. You know, if you started the listing everything and things that you would have to leave off the list, you know, would be right. He gives a big significant things and and this could range so far if especially because they're like doing apps games at websites. So I made that includes so many different types of tools. A better school Aji have all the learning management systems that distort, you know, school g let's start you're going to go with games might God, you know, as far as the best. You know, we were talking about what are the best moments of two thousand eighteen Alba the up and comers like IMP kits or just go with the big time leaders in that category cahoots in quiz. Let's you know, what I mean. Like are right. How could you not list? Those. Anyways. There's some things that we've missed. Hey. Hey, listen, if you haven't heard of any of the things that we were talking about than than there you go. There's there's a good will we'll put up this list and the show notes. And then you know, we just rounded we'd just named about twenty other things that could have been on this list. So, you know, take a look at I guess, that's, you know, our value here is that there's a lot of other things out there. And hopefully, take a look at those two because there's there's definitely lots of cool resources out there that aren't on this list of resources that I've never heard of. That to throw a little more to throw a little more shade. So anyways. Yeah. And listen, if we're if we're missing something if we didn't if we didn't say it, and it's not on on this this common-sense list than not share it to share with us. Send us a message on Twitter on the Twitter's. Let us know or wherever let's show you on this list. Right. Right. So. Yeah. That's that. When we when we come back. We'll be joined by Diana McGee. All right. Welcome back to the podcast, folks. We are thrilled to be joined on the podcast today by Diana McGee. Diana is the chief information officer and director of technology in fort Thomas Kentucky at Diana is leading to sessions, including one about sourcing inventing new Ed.

Khan Academy Diana McGee Twitter Mike magnum Tony fort Thomas Kentucky chief information officer director of technology
"khan academy" Discussed on The Changelog

The Changelog

02:41 min | 2 years ago

"khan academy" Discussed on The Changelog

"You know did Brennan sell it on to you. Did you sell to him? What the original pitch sound like gives us that Genesis story. So I don't know how far back I should go. But I was at Khan Academy at the time working there. For both year and a half. And I had always really wanted to get into Khan Academy. So I finally had got in and I was really love and working there. And then the Twitter message came in from Brendon just saying, please me. And so I wanted to him, but he wasn't following me. So I couldn't. I did have. Oh, so I emailed minimum. Just playing a cool. Mike what's up? Meanwhile, I'm trying to my wife who's next to me in bed. I was on my laptop at the time like holy crap. Mennonite this message to trek message. I don't know. Why? That. Yeah. Apparently, I made some list. I had worked at Mozilla before with them. And I was delivering a lot of the features. So in a lot of the blogs. That I've recently done. Metro style on abled browser from from scratch for for fire FOX that was the project that was cancelled last minute. So anyways, I delivered a lot of things, and I made some list people that he wanted to contact to start something in the future. So yeah, we got to talking this was late December two thousand fourteen. Maybe he just went to the top users on stack overflow and just started. By Tom users. Yeah. I mean, I won the DM me back schools offer. Yeah. It didn't start as a cofounder situation. I think it started as he wanted me to do contract work. I think mostly because I was a good guy windows programmer at the time. Most of users were see. So we talked for about six months and after a while he just asked me to go fly there where he would fly back here, and I had three young kids at the time three envoys it was kind of hard for me to travel at the time. So I just said well just tell me what's up, and then that's when he proposed to just start the company. So we secured funding from a company in China for two point five million. And that's how we got started. Really I read from the start. We had the plans to create like a desktop browser for windows Ma Lennox as well as Android as well as I s so it was really just the two of us at the start eventually got a third person. And we're working on all these different products for different operating systems all at once. So it's pretty vicious refinisher was the initial pitch. Let's build a browser. Was it was it bigger there a bigger picture because we know brave has big ambitions especially with trying to supplant or some Bert or I don't know replace traditional forms of advertising and have.

Khan Academy Brendon Brennan Twitter China Bert Mike Mozilla FOX Tom programmer six months
"khan academy" Discussed on Liberty Talk FM

Liberty Talk FM

09:48 min | 2 years ago

"khan academy" Discussed on Liberty Talk FM

"This is free talk. Live where you can. Join, us and freely talk for five for free just and well whatever it would cost, you, on your own, Bill there's always the person well Khan Academy is not free because. You've got to. Pay for the internet who says Daryl thank you know I've actually heard people tell me that that sounds a little pedantic, bring that up that's the reason, a, lot of times when I go off. On one of these things that you call Daryl being pedantic it's because I've heard people say well you didn't mention this. Point of minutia so it's? So? I. Tried. To, preemptively mentioned all all. Of. These points. Of minutia you are a victim of your society is that what you're saying Darryl yes okay yes. Claiming a victim status Daryl that's You're. The one that said it not my bad but the us in studio tonight is me Daryl am Chris and Chris you've, got a story about some internet, service, providers saying that well I'm guessing here. That a translation of what they're saying is government regulations have made it so that. We can't make money unless government gives. Us money so they're not? Asking? To. Repeal. The. Regulations they're just asking. For. Money Yeah and I think all of us remember that you know a number of. Presidencies have announced that their. Their goal one thing. They, want to, see is broadband in every house a chicken in. Every. Pot this is usually a? Political, ploy but they're. Trying to make high-speed something something for ice spotty, high speed internet for everyone but no one, really agrees on? What high-speed, is right and no one certainly not government will agree on, whether, high speed internet in every area would be economical and that's a real question you know d- okay well I live I live kind of in the. Middle of nowhere Daryl you've been to my. House yes I live on Drove there is a sign that said middle of nowhere, I turned left and then, went another mile and a half that'd be us. That'd, be where we're at we. Have exactly one internet provider now Comcast happens to be in a lot of. My town all right but. They have it's not. Economical, for them, to continue their lines up where I live they. Stopped. Right there the sign that? Says, middle of nowhere That's, pretty much it and so I have I have one choice to technically I could go a satellite, internet which is painfully slow and painful expensive so so I, kind of get that but I also understand. That? Comcast if if there's not a, certain number of households that may subscribe to them it's not economical but right now in, the big city in this area and for those of you watching on. The webcam you may have seen, me do the air quotes there because keen not that big of a place. Twenty three thousand. People when the college students. Are in town but it is. The, city in this area right and even here where there. Are you, know these high speed things that I forget exactly what some of the speeds are but, we're just like a. Quarter mile off of, wherever that line Is and. They want thousands, upon thousands of dollars to run the line the quarter mile because that lives not running right. Here right but once. The line does run, down this road it would probably wind up being a lot cheaper for other houses to do it sure. But you've always got to have that. First person that says yeah I'll, pony up the however many thousands right and that would be the case where, I live if. I were to go to con- cast and say you know what I'm going to be subscriber and I'm, willing to pay let's say a fifty thousand dollar installation fee then you can bet that I could get Comcast internet at my house right and my neighbors and, everybody between my house and where the line. Currently? Ends would also be able to, be on Comcast providers but here's the question the question is is Comcast more suited to, determine the economics of offering a particular service in a particular area Or a bunch of bureaucrats in DC that's, my? Question I mean and to me whether I like it or not I don't like the fact that I only have one choice. For internet provider but. I'm not gonna, sit here and go will the politician said you owe me this they don't tell me anything Right. I. Did but they don't but there are certainly, some regulations and I don't know all. Of the details of what they refer to as the last. Mile thing but you know there are all kinds, of regulations that do make it cost prohibitive for more than one, company? In an area to offer. Certain services correct and particularly when you're talking. About internet service you're talking about putting things on polls. Oftentimes those polls are regulated by and tax by local government so, if you want to do business in town you know our little, town ended up striking a deal with Comcast right, and there's a deal there that's that's what this is all based on there's no reason for there ever have been a deal Comcast should just be. Able to look. At an, area and say this looks like a market we, want to be in or no it doesn't right government telling you yes or, no and a lot of cases and we will get into the story from ars Technica. At a lot of place There's one cable company and Yeah yeah there is one company joined us and, she's waving her hand frankly and I don't. Know what she used to I'm saying that whoever had these. Headphones last like daft because it's so loud I don't know You can change it right in. Front of you But with with cable There's a lot of. Times, one cable company yeah Keen one cable company and the city says well. We didn't force them. To sign a non, compete anybody can come in but the thing is the city has set the standards at such a level as to wear any new company that comes in would not. Actually be able. To reach whatever the level is so it's effectively they have granted this one cable company monopoly. Without, actually saying they have. Been given a monopoly yeah and that's. The thing and here's what ours Technica says about this article says about this in an article called ISP say they can't expand broadband unless, government gives them more money industry asked. For handouts arguing that broadband is essential. Like utility so they're going for the government money in this one broadband providers have spent. Years lobbying against utility style regulations that protect. Consumers From high prices and bad service but now broadband lobby groups, are arguing that internet service is similar. To utilities such as electric city gas. Distribution roads waters and sewer networks wasn't this part of the net neutrality claim was that Net neutrality would treat internet the same way telephone service and have it regulated under like title two, or yes, something, absolutely it has to be a utility it has to be a right Daryl So hold on so just because something is a utility doesn't necessarily mean it's a quote unquote right and then this? Weird. Thing of bud right so you Chris have a right to bear arms but I don't think that you would ever say that that means that some. Government. Somewhere. Must give you a firearm correct so people use this word right to. Vote simultaneously being something that. Can't be taken away and something that must be given to you by someone else exactly Daryl now you. Get, it now. You understand where the modern progressive. Movement has they used the term interchangeably Yes Figure out which when they're trying to use that is? Correct You said, that they're trying to, say that internet service is a right like water. And sewer but everybody has to pay for water and. Sewer that's something that's just given, quote unquote for free now and in the case of government run government water and sewer Still get a Bill for that. You do you still get a, Bill it's, not a right Today. In the provider's view the essential nature of broadband doesn't require more regulation to protect consumers consumers instead. They, argue that broadbands utility like status is reason for the government to give ISP's more money no it's a reason to roll. Back regulations and, allow them to compete, in, the, free, and open market, your calls and thoughts eight fifty five. Four fifty. Free eight five five four. Five zero three seven When you work for. Yourself taxes get complicated out the guesswork with QuickBooks self-employed.

Comcast Daryl Chris Khan Academy us Darryl ars Technica Keen one QuickBooks ours Technica fifty thousand dollar
"khan academy" Discussed on Mickstape: The Barstool Basketball Podcast

Mickstape: The Barstool Basketball Podcast

05:13 min | 2 years ago

"khan academy" Discussed on Mickstape: The Barstool Basketball Podcast

"Do I gotta be the closest and even then everybody hates me when I get to play to thirty five. He'll get one year deal somewhere, maybe. Yep. Yeah, we'll see. Let's see. Seventh, all time in games, which I didn't know. Like twenty years and he played a long time yet. He was playing up until at ninety four ninety five. He started in seventy four seventy five. And came right out of high school. So I, I gave him a little bump for that for Nessie just cut the college malarkey right out. And let's see. Yeah, he's more he's more than a thousand rebounds and of Tim Duncan. So. Yeah. I mean the this is what for age twenty two to twenty to thirty three. He put up fifteen seventeen point six fourteen point five fourteen point eight fourteen point seven fifteen point three thirteen point four thirteen point. One eleven point. Eight. Eleven point. Three eleven point to eleven point eight. And then the next year at age thirty four. You ever ten on the dot in Rome. And just didn't miss games either incredibly durable also, really good, free throw shooter, which I know for a big guy was had been extremely dislike. He and Hickey or maybe everybody may free those back then I've really know either nobody did everybody did. It was a more fundamental ginning. Yeah, that's that's what we got. We got rid of moving forward in time the fundamentals. Thank heavens. He's got to be close to lead in free, throws in because he was going there lot in playing a lot of games. We'll let me see. He was. Yeah, he was averaging first career. He was the average eight point two trips to the line. He's second all time in made free throws. Pretty good, right ahead of Kobe. Wow, maybe I got readjust my list. Yeah, did not know Kobus at high either. Just him him. Calling shot in the playoffs is with Philly is as I Khan Academy gets. It was like the one guy they didn't sweep. He's I. Okay. Would would beat him in five. My back. When did exactly what happened. They played exactly thirteen games and lost one of them. So that sexist team, I feel like doesn't get mentioned with with like that. Lakers shack Koby team with flashers warriors with eighty six Celtics and aid ninety six bowls and whatnot, but they probably should be. Yeah, I, I don't hate it looking. He's fourth all time if those tempted but second made pretty was a center. Yeah. As a center like that's gretel shacks probably like second attempts check is third into okay, twenty-third and made. If that could guard shack is twentieth. Not terrible now higher than I was thinking. Same. Am I number eighteen agai we already talked about Dwayne, Wade. That's going to be a good bit of this gas. We've already talked about in this one. Yeah. Never. What else I have other than dark. We haven't talked about yet. I'm just looking at because my my eighteen is Oscar Robertson. Yeah. So. Stuff. Yeah. So I had him at twenty one. So we were pretty close. Yeah, we still haven't. We haven't had any on the head yet. Right. I don't think so. I don't think so. We've been in the neighborhood for a lot of these guys, but just none within three or five or so. But. Who is your number seventeen. Seventeen in was. I feel like I had them higher. I bumped him down. Then I was like, nah, it's too low. Bumped him back up. It's Kevin Gardner. Oh, it's out what eight. No, he was. So remember when I said, I had coli on the list originally, and then I relived at my top twenty and realize it was someone missing. Kevin Garnett. It was. I don't know how I've forgot that. Some Celtics plan you are. They're gonna. They're gonna have your head. Well, I mean, I haven't thirteenth because that's where he is not high enough to justify just forgetting about. Well, no, it was one of those things where like, I think I know exactly what happened. I railed off my top twelve like immediately and then his name came up and I just didn't write it down thirteen I am thirty. It was the thirteenth name that came up, but I was like, let's let's try and start thinking about the guys like the fourteenth guy wrote down shot Marian..

Oscar Robertson Celtics Hickey Kevin Gardner Kevin Garnett Tim Duncan Kobe Kobus I Khan Academy Lakers Rome Philly Marian Dwayne Wade twenty years one year
"khan academy" Discussed on KBNP AM 1410

KBNP AM 1410

02:04 min | 2 years ago

"khan academy" Discussed on KBNP AM 1410

"Your board member of it so what happens still something like education it's one of my favorite topics you know when you think about what education used to be it was this master apprentice model you would take a vacation you loved and you would append concern under an expert in get great at it and then somewhere in the last one hundred fifty years we started evolving system where you have thirty kids that learn mathematics at eight o'clock in the morning and they're all the same age and it's one teacher teaching them at the same pace and and it does take is taken so far away from what the whole pat to learning used to be what needs to happen is services like khan academy enabling you'll be able to learn at your own pace and and change the role of the classroom itself so under the khan academy guidance we have this new school rebuilt cocaine lab school where my kids go and a lot of the core philosophy is about letting these kids self organiz learn at their own pace and so my daughter when she decided when she wants to learn right matt during the day and she opens up the airbase master and it helps teach it at at her own pace and the way she likes learn very individualized i we could talk hours with you we only have twenty seconds left but is it okay for amazon to be a huge company in this new environment that you talk about just got about fifteen seconds i think it's an enormous issue in how these companies are the platforms that enable sorry to rent skill role to be they can't be competing with the companies are being built on top of them pretty cool stuff hopefully you can come back again because i think this is a pretty cool topic taneja managing director general callous wellknown vc firm his book of course is called unscaled how a and a new generation of upstarts creating the economy of the future our nine sixty studio in san francisco bloomberg markets carol massar barry ritholtz bloomberg radio all money managers may seem pretty much the same but.

amazon managing director khan khan academy cocaine san francisco barry ritholtz one hundred fifty years fifteen seconds twenty seconds
"khan academy" Discussed on H3 Podcast

H3 Podcast

01:32 min | 2 years ago

"khan academy" Discussed on H3 Podcast

"Welcome everybody today sri podcast live today's episode is sponsored by honey and squarespace n viewers like you who subscribe on twitch prime you could connect it it's so easy it's free money i mean we go over this every week thanks guys today's guest is the canadian a record producer deejay musician composer streamer car racer gamer renaissance man anything else that's that's it it renaissance man khan academy a true renaissance man if i'm being honest new album is coming out where's the drop tomorrow right yeah that's really exciting i mean tomorrow's the thirtieth it comes out on the thirtieth that's really exciting thank you for being here now before we get to deep into her conversation i know that you're smoker did i not say you did dead was that a thing that people only said like at the beginning nobody really says dead mouse five do they still do i don't care i think it's just funny i and then when i started learning that nobody could really get it right i started saying it differently at different like events or interviews and stuff like that i'd say mao five dead mouse five i say hi this is dead mouse five and ios and then everyone would like oh take that to the bank you know there was like twenty year olds here chaos that's kind of why did you choose the five instead of an s we're kindred spirits in that regard h c on ethnic.

producer mao twenty year
"khan academy" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"khan academy" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"In very plain language it's very confrontational you see that the other told of the videos is very similar to the tolan but were using right now so i definitely in cars that we don't have a ton of content it's very appropriate proper your daughter especially in mathematics and the science is a we have a lot of even though some of the history content is developed for high school or college students i hear stories especially if prakosa she elementary school aged students were getting some of the history as well oh cool okay i will definitely check that out but i want to say was temper second because you've been like i said in the space for a really long time how have you seen science education maybe change or evolved in the past years i don't know how far back you wanna be able to go but i mean have you seen something new this seems to be more effective than we may have been doing a few years ago but you know what i was in school uh no guess l about you know twenty thirty years ago you know science curriculum was pretty standard is mainly lecture bay to do some homework and there'd be some labs and between i think over the last 20 or 30 years there has been a nights movement towards with often on his inquiry based learning where hey let's do it it's not as do allow that's kind of cookbook but really kind of push them to try to discover some things on their own and what they struggle with material than when they kinda get the explanation it's takes a little bit more so i guess see that trend is somewhat independent of khan academy where i think we've played a role is in the last five or six years or so before that it was kind of and that's cool teachers learn about the french it instruction personalization that look every students different they all vehicle are picked at their faces with it was really hard to do that if you have thirty kids in a room how do you give them each their own personalized progress of their their own personalized tafileh would tools icon academy one we're working on them they exist but also we we've been very vocal about hey look this is for teachers to help you differentiate and so we have seen a change in the conversation on the last four or five years because of khan academy.

khan academy twenty thirty years five years six years 30 years