36 Burst results for "Khan"

Fresh update on "khan" discussed on Charlie Brennan

Charlie Brennan

00:32 min | 12 hrs ago

Fresh update on "khan" discussed on Charlie Brennan

"We're rounding the corner is going away. We're learning how to live with it. No, he expects us to learn how to die with it. That's what I told him. He's doing nothing. We're learning to die within Donald Trump has waved the white flag. Abandon our families and surrendered to the virus. We just tell you so much. You tell him. He's got a microphone already. He doesn't have to scream at us every day, and the few times he does speak, David. Go learned her. Glor. Enter. Of works full time at Yale was computer science, But he wrote a column in The Wall Street Journal today, and I want to speak to him about it. The headline tells it all Joe Biden's covert fairytale that what he would do is anything much different than what the president's doing. And David. Thanks so much for joining us. First of you're not saying the president's been perfect, But you're trying to say the word Joe Bynes presenting is not different, right? Well, really presenting nothing at all. But way conclude from what he sang that what he would do is exactly what the president has done. It's very hard to make him out. I mean, it doesn't have a lucid plan, but that's what we conclude He has no new ideas. Certainly. Hey, has no strategy in mind other than what the president has already put in place successfully, by the way, so you talked about, for example, he had much more credibility if tell us what you do different but also salute which working Operation Warp Speed is working the statue on line. We're on the precipice of having maybe three vaccine's ready to go, and they're all pre made for lack of a better term. So if one gets the green light, we already have it produced. This is stuff that Trump didn't come up with himself. But he empowered the people to think out of the box, right? Even the New York Khan has noticed that works plead has been an enormous success, not your counseling, essentially the center of Uh, lefty liberal thought in this country, So it's there's no way to argue with it. The president laid out a plan and the plan is working, and we still have a lot to handle a lot to deal with. What we've got a way to do it. We've gotta wait on to move forward that that proves that it can cut down the mortality rate. It can cut down hospital admissions and in general Right. So as we're seeing overseas, you could do everything and you do the opposite of us and man I wish we were like Angela Merkel and looking McCrone seems got ahold of it in Italy was so bad now there reading out and they're enjoying their life again. And I'm looking watching international news and things have gotten worse in all those nations might be out of humility to the critics who sit on the sidelines of a zip this pandemic. Doesn't come by once every 100 years. Well, humility is not part of the vocabulary of the left eye. Ay, tio apologize her toe. Look back self critically something the conservatives do all the time. Uh, something that in my bearings left liberals never do. At least I never do in public. So I'm not expecting any comments by way of saying Well, maybe maybe what we were advocating was not a brilliant idea. After all, maybe the president had the right idea. That's what the statistics tell us. But, uh, we're going to read in the statistics. We're not gonna hear it from the nation's rain stream press or My.

President Trump Donald Trump Joe Bynes Joe Biden David Angela Merkel New York Khan Yale Italy The Wall Street Journal
"khan" Discussed on The WoMed

The WoMed

05:36 min | Last week

"khan" Discussed on The WoMed

"All Right Dr Khan thank you so much for taking the time to speak with me today. . Welcome to the woman I've actually been wanting to have you on here for a while now Oh thank you for inviting me truly. . I'd been following you for a while from the woman account but I feel like I really started taking in more of your post like win Kovic hit. . All of us have become a little bit more inwardly thinking yes route. . Ourselves in our house will yeah. . Yeah. . It's been amazing and you'd have a really incredible way of delivering information that I feel like even a non medical person could digest it but like you explain it in a way that it makes it so easy. . Well I'm the only doctor in my family. . Really. . I at. So . always <hes> have to explain everything to everybody my mom my sister has been in their words. . So I, , my husband's not a physician either so. . So I'm used to explaining things to. . So I always think how they explain this to my mother and my sister. . They would be able to grasp it. . So God so And also. . You know I think that <hes> I love to teach. . So I always wonder why people follow me because I'm not exactly sure has with the code you know most of what I do is cardiology related on meet related but you know I have been reading. . So a Lotta Times something I'm like, , Oh my God this is so interesting I have to tell everybody I love that. . So the. . Air Purifier. . I Call I people need to know this are people need to so anything that thing with the heart is everything affects the heart rape stress air quality, , <hes> Kovac, , so really because. . I kinda tie almost anything in because <hes> you know it will always have a downstream effect to the heart. . That's really true. . That's really true. . Well I think it's such a gift that you have and I feel like if I ever were in need of your services, , I would really want you to be my doctor in that because the just the way you presented I mean you're taking the time and you're reading all these different studies, , which honestly makes my head hurt like trying to like analyze and take in different like research studies but the way you present it, , it's like Oh my God. . Okay. . That makes sense in. You've . just become a very trusted source for me of information. . So you know part of the challenges. . You know the instagram format is visual right? ? So I myself an experimental so there has to be a pitcher right rail. . That's why I have the you know like a board or something 'cause now I need to be able to find my own post all where is fish oil post? ? Right yeah. . Yeah. . But then I, , it's Kinda creative. . How do I get the the main parts of the data? ? Visually interesting way <hes> that succinct. . 'cause you use only the caption I don't know about you but like sometimes my is just cross like reading that. . Yeah option Oh. . Yeah. . So The caption is the attention grabber. . I've been playing around with a like a slide deck. . It's almost like a slide show yet <hes> <unk>. . Some things I need to say, , so it needs to be a chalk talk. . Has after dry or and it's just me and my iphone. . So. So . part of it is is. . It's create. . It's creative for me right has I have what I want to say, , how can I do it in a visually interesting way? ? Also to be succinct. . 'cause you know doctors go on and on and on and lectures can be like on and on and on right yeah. . Yeah How do you get a key point? ? Get it across in an interesting way people like Aha I got. . Yes. . I felt that way after your I mean you you broke down the hydroxy clear Quinn steady and like you're like your chalk talk, , you know you're nearly everything I was like Oh my God I want to learn from you every day. . Yeah. . So that's the thing. . So it's fun for me because I have to pivot to different formats right depending on what I WANNA do <hes>. . Whether it's the easy thing for me to do an inspirational pokes grab insure of my family, , right something inspirational I'm done in like fifteen minutes, , right? ? Right. . But to an educational pulsed. . I would already do the reading. . So I'm already rigged article and I think, , Oh, , this is really interesting. . Then breaking it apart, , figuring out how to deliver what a cute little emoji. . Duo Voice. . So that's the fun. . That's the creative and fun part to make. . Take a while. . So. . Yeah, , I know. . It's part of the brain that I don't normally use when I teach follows you know for that during a dry board lecture with the facts, , right? ? Right. . So this involves visual creativity, , which is for me using the other part of my brain which. . Is Fun and interesting to

Khan rape Kovac Quinn
The Heart of the Matter with Dr. Hafiza Khan

The WoMed

05:37 min | Last week

The Heart of the Matter with Dr. Hafiza Khan

"All Right Dr Khan thank you so much for taking the time to speak with me today. Welcome to the woman I've actually been wanting to have you on here for a while now Oh thank you for inviting me truly. I'd been following you for a while from the woman account but I feel like I really started taking in more of your post like win Kovic hit. All of us have become a little bit more inwardly thinking yes route. Ourselves in our house will yeah. Yeah. It's been amazing and you'd have a really incredible way of delivering information that I feel like even a non medical person could digest it but like you explain it in a way that it makes it so easy. Well I'm the only doctor in my family. Really. I at. So always have to explain everything to everybody my mom my sister has been in their words. So I, my husband's not a physician either so. So I'm used to explaining things to. So I always think how they explain this to my mother and my sister. They would be able to grasp it. So God so And also. You know I think that I love to teach. So I always wonder why people follow me because I'm not exactly sure has with the code you know most of what I do is cardiology related on meet related but you know I have been reading. So a Lotta Times something I'm like, Oh my God this is so interesting I have to tell everybody I love that. So the. Air Purifier. I Call I people need to know this are people need to so anything that thing with the heart is everything affects the heart rape stress air quality, Kovac, so really because. I kinda tie almost anything in because you know it will always have a downstream effect to the heart. That's really true. That's really true. Well I think it's such a gift that you have and I feel like if I ever were in need of your services, I would really want you to be my doctor in that because the just the way you presented I mean you're taking the time and you're reading all these different studies, which honestly makes my head hurt like trying to like analyze and take in different like research studies but the way you present it, it's like Oh my God. Okay. That makes sense in. You've just become a very trusted source for me of information. So you know part of the challenges. You know the instagram format is visual right? So I myself an experimental so there has to be a pitcher right rail. That's why I have the you know like a board or something 'cause now I need to be able to find my own post all where is fish oil post? Right yeah. Yeah. But then I, it's Kinda creative. How do I get the the main parts of the data? Visually interesting way that succinct. 'cause you use only the caption I don't know about you but like sometimes my is just cross like reading that. Yeah option Oh. Yeah. So The caption is the attention grabber. I've been playing around with a like a slide deck. It's almost like a slide show yet Some things I need to say, so it needs to be a chalk talk. Has after dry or and it's just me and my iphone. So. So part of it is is. It's create. It's creative for me right has I have what I want to say, how can I do it in a visually interesting way? Also to be succinct. 'cause you know doctors go on and on and on and lectures can be like on and on and on right yeah. Yeah How do you get a key point? Get it across in an interesting way people like Aha I got. Yes. I felt that way after your I mean you you broke down the hydroxy clear Quinn steady and like you're like your chalk talk, you know you're nearly everything I was like Oh my God I want to learn from you every day. Yeah. So that's the thing. So it's fun for me because I have to pivot to different formats right depending on what I WANNA do Whether it's the easy thing for me to do an inspirational pokes grab insure of my family, right something inspirational I'm done in like fifteen minutes, right? Right. But to an educational pulsed. I would already do the reading. So I'm already rigged article and I think, Oh, this is really interesting. Then breaking it apart, figuring out how to deliver what a cute little emoji. Duo Voice. So that's the fun. That's the creative and fun part to make. Take a while. So. Yeah, I know. It's part of the brain that I don't normally use when I teach follows you know for that during a dry board lecture with the facts, right? Right. So this involves visual creativity, which is for me using the other part of my brain which. Is Fun and interesting to

Dr Khan Rape Kovac Quinn
Show 37 "Laughs" TV Show  w/Bruce Baum - burst 1

Standup Comedy "Your Host and MC"

02:01 min | Last week

Show 37 "Laughs" TV Show w/Bruce Baum - burst 1

"We got time for one little magic trick here you do magic, you know, if I do cuz I'm kind of fat. I don't know me off. Maybe I'm doing it wrong. But lately when I make love to my wife I pretend I'm somebody else when I'm done. I go into a jealous fit of rage comes off. Anyway, what I'm going to do now is something Off key. Maybe everybody now, is that okay? Right or wrong song Chaka Khan, Chaka Khan drum. Solo pregnant I Gotta Devita. Thursday Bomb

Chaka Khan
Women have been disproportionately impacted by covid-19

Forum

05:57 min | Last week

Women have been disproportionately impacted by covid-19

"Been disproportionately impacted by the job losses during the pandemic to the point that some are referring to today's recession as a she session. Many of the pressures women already face in the work force, such as the gender pay gap barriers to advance. Men and lack of flexibility have been exacerbated. The crisis could, however, usher and new policy standards and support systems for women across industries and income levels. Here with me to talk about all this is Alexis Crib. Covic, senior partner with McKinsey and co author of Women in the Workplace. 2020 report. Welcome to the program. Alexis Crisco, Vic Chris. Covic. I'm sorry. I'm getting that right. Thank you for having me and we also have in helicopters. Litwin, clinical psychologist and founder of Latinos Think Big a network of professional women and Lumina. Modern psychotherapy practice. Welcome in helicopters. Littwin. Thank you. And Serena Khan, chief executive officer of Women's Foundation of California. Welcome to the program. Serena Con. Thanks so much, and Alexis Krukov itch. I'd like to start with you and some of what the McKinsey Workforce study told us. Why are women facing greater job loss than men? And where are we seeing the biggest impacts? Salute Lee. So the headline here is that we're facing a crossroads in corporate America today, and the reason for that is on one side this pandemic while a humanitarian crisis at its heart has created An opening for flexible work, and that's a good thing because that's the number one thing. Women have said. In the past, they need to advance more in the workplace environment. On the flip side, one in four women today is saying because of the pandemic and the context it's creating in their workplace environment and their home environment. They may need to step back or step out of the workforce. And one and four equates to two million women that would unwind years of progress of women's advancement in the workplace. And it's just something we can't afford to lose. And we're really seeing the gendered nature of work here to right Serena Khan, not only where Caretaking responsibilities end up falling when push comes to shove, but also who falls into this essential worker category and the disproportionate impact on black and brown women's who We're looking at a really layered intersectional issue here. That's exactly right. All of us are being impacted by the pandemic, but we're not all being impacted in the same way. Oh, the gendered impact of the pandemic are particularly profound for especially women of color working moms, gender non conforming folks this pandemic. Highlighting problems that we've needed to work on together to solve three the pandemic, So we know, for example in California. Freak O bed, two thirds of tipped workers, part time workers, minimum wage earners where women and primarily women of color even though California Is the wealthy of state in the nation. It's also has the highest rate of poverty and the people who are living in poverty in California are women of color and their kids. And so when we think about this pandemic, whether It's women who are the essential workers who are making up 80% of our healthcare workforce, or the retail and grocery workers. The essential workers that Are still working or on the flip side. They're the ones that have lost their jobs because the majority of us are working in the restaurant industry. Oh, our other retail industry that have lost significant Numbers of jobs, so it's a very gendered epidemic and Serena Con you've spoken about how there's no going back to normal that that normal wasn't that good to begin with, when it came to gender equity in the workforce. That's right. You know, this pandemic is shining a light on all that was wrong with Our country, our world, our state, and so you know, as hundreds of thousands of women leave the workforce to manage what is really an unmanageable amounts of caretaking remote schooling. You know, our child care costs were making up. Ah, upwards of, you know, 60 70% of the single moms income that's not sustainable and So you know, we have an opportunity here to think about what is the future that we want on. DWI can change some of those systems that we have an opportunity to really Think about care, work into value care and compensate that work fairly as we figure out howto move forward, But the pandemic has really forced us to reckon with how much care we all need, whether we're caring for our Children. For each other for ourselves for our elders on DH so we can build some new solutions for us that the women Foundation California we have believed Since our founding in 1979 that people who are closest to the problems in their communities are also closest to the solutions. And so we have innovative ideas coming out of community. Based leaders about what we can do post pandemics. I think it's important for us now, Tio You know, make sure that people are getting their basic needs met. So you know, one of the other things that we saw very early on in the pandemic is that not everybody was safer at home. That rates of domestic violence were spiking upwards of 40 to 80% and all of California 58 counties. So we and yet so as the need went up the Situation for the shelters was that they had to that They had actually left physical space because of the need to do physical distance event. Soon, though, there's a lot that Yeah, so there's just a lot that we're seeing and that we can think about solving. Yes,

California Serena Khan Serena Con Women's Foundation Of Californ Women Foundation California Mckinsey Workforce Alexis Crib Mckinsey Alexis Krukov Alexis Crisco Covic Senior Partner Founder America Lumina LEE Chief Executive Officer
Interview with Amir Khan

Monocle 24: Meet the Writers

04:54 min | 2 weeks ago

Interview with Amir Khan

"Dot Com. Thank you so much for for coming on the show. Georgina. Thank you for having me on. Now this is a fascinating book because it's also about your life and the human connections and you speak about the impact, the Sir, your gp Dr George had on your family growing up how important was he a role model for you in your career? Dodger George was was like a really big part of our family life ready because my mom, my mom holds doctors in really high regard. From a working customary, my mom worked away at from a cleaner to a social worker. My Dad was a bus driver and so doctors were really revered. Dr George will issue with the lady she was fear degeorge and. She she was just like the pinnacle of everything my. Doctor should be she. She knew is really well, she knew individually, she asked about those when we went to see her, she's got other family members that nick without really kind of old fashioned family. That we all kind of dream of having which is really hard to kind of get. But. But you know it was really important and I I really I remember really clearly when when Dr George Retired and she had a bit of a tea party in the waiting room. which which again, we never do that now. Kind of infection control Pepsi's but but she had she had a tea party patients mom will have wedding sorry to it was such a big deal and. I remember getting dressed up putting going to erase accuse US really sad but really excited to be invited to this. You know it was that kind of movement that I thought. Wow you know don't just can have a real impact on people's lives particularly cheap please we don't often hear about that side from from General Practitioner we a lot of the drama we imagine happens in hospital and a lot of impact league we imagine happens in hospital, but so much can happen in general position in the community. Absolutely. It's an completely integral part of our day. To Day life is not by my mother was a doctor and she was talking about how things had changed. She was a doctor for fifty years and she said one thing she really noticed now is that that people never touched you she says her main job as GP was to lay her hands on people and for people to feel that contact and cheap felt when she was a patient in her later years that just never really happened. No. No I trained GP's as well at she. I G P now full for over ten years have been adopted for. Sixty years I think now and you know you have to gauge the situation. It's not. We don't touch people complete know if if there's an elderly lady, an elderly person, you're a child. Gentle handle may have this is always you knew appropriate as needed. We go to be very careful of course, and I were give advice to my GP trainees but you're absolutely right things have have changed and there's a lot of pressure on GP's now not just through the volume of demand also the volks ticking exercise and when when it's just the doctor and the patient when it's just me and my patient in the room that coal pot of general hasn't changed in all the years that it's been around but it's everything else around not not puts pressure on that situation and can take away from those nuances are so important. Now you'll book the doctor will see now follows your fifteen years working as a GP from rookie to becoming a partner in one of the busiest surgeries it tell me about the surgery and and you're working. Patton, there, I mean, presumably the numbers are pretty overwhelming. Yes. So so it is the Biz in in inner city Bradford and we have a very kind of multicultural patient base, which is, which is brilliant. It's why I wanted to work. we have twenty, five, thousand patients registered our our our practice is incredibly jaws can. Before then there's always a big cured stations has a big rush on the phones when when the phone lines open and with admits, Yoyo Clinic lists will be full than extras will be added on because patients need to be seen, and so from the moment you get it and it doesn't matter how you getting nearly bad and I get in very early about seven quarter seven the minute you get working flat-out right through to the end of the day. But you I say all of this in my book, the kind of things that that really helps you keep you going mongst pressure is is your colleagues. Michael. Just amazing. I. Asked I went with some of the best GP's and I. Them every day the best nurses again, I learn from them as well and it makes a big difference in friends outside of work and I think that's really helped me because he is so much about GP's bailing out healthcare professionals bidding out and I think that would be a real risk if I didn't have the support of my colleagues in the friendships of my of my colleagues and so that makes a big difference for me,

General Practitioner Dodger George Dr George Retired Yoyo Clinic United States Bradford Pepsi Nick Michael Patton Partner
Paris Under Curfew: Europe Reacts As Countries See Highest-Ever Coronavirus Numbers

Bloomberg Surveillance

02:49 min | 2 weeks ago

Paris Under Curfew: Europe Reacts As Countries See Highest-Ever Coronavirus Numbers

"In this segment will turn to the price action the moment down. 9/10 S and P 500 futures off the back of more decisions. Out of Europe to lock things down a little bit more headlines across the continent negative the reaction to them by policymakers, adding to concerns of market participants, chats home is joining us now. Out of Berlin. Good morning Tea chat. What are we hearing from Germany from France from Spain from Italy from the UK on what's the difference between the approaches? Hi, John. Well, we're hearing leaders across Europe sounding alarm. In the last 24 hours. We've seen several countries, including Italy and Germany, reporting record cases and, of course. French president Macron announcing this curfew for cities across France, including Paris. In Germany. We have a situation where Chancellor Merkel is urging state leaders to I haven't even stricter locked down in the one that they've agreed to last night. But she's AA meeting resistance from these leaders. You know, Germany is a federal system very similar to what viewers in the U. S. Would think of in terms of the federal government versus the States and the state leaders here in Germany are resisting some of these measures that Merkel is pushing for. For example, disagreeing with her on measures such as restricting travel within the country, and it really all boils down to the economics. Everyone's very concerned here on the continent about another lock down on what that could mean you know, not just for the health of people here, but for the economy as a whole. The local pushback is something we saw in Spain just a few weeks ago. We sing in the United Kingdom plan in the last 24 hours, with perhaps the exception of Sadiq Khan, who's asking for it, which is a unique situation right now for anyone in the local authority, But what I want to know Chad is whether wasting the outcome here the result. Off a poor adherence to social distancing and mask wearing just the very fact we're moving into the cold of part of the year. I think John. It's a little bit of both. What's interesting is the German health minister Yan Chiffon. He has said. What Germany needs. It's not necessarily more restrictions, but people to adhere to the restrictions that Germany has already in place and in miracles. A pew last night when she held this Very late night press conference. She basically said. People need to wear masks. They need to wear them in public where there are a lot of people and they need to adhere to the social distancing. We're going to be hearing by the way from Jens Spahn in just about an hour speaking exclusively to us here. At Bloomberg talking to our colleague, Matt Miller. And so we'll be hearing more on that from him a little bit later this afternoon. Thank you so much. Ed Thomas in Berlin and the moveable Feast of Pandemic News. On the continent of

Germany Chancellor Merkel Sadiq Khan Europe Berlin Spain John France Matt Miller UK Italy Yan Chiffon Federal Government Jens Spahn Ed Thomas Bloomberg Paris Pandemic News Macron
How Aimee Garcia Took Charge of Her Hollywood Career

Latina to Latina

05:03 min | 2 weeks ago

How Aimee Garcia Took Charge of Her Hollywood Career

"Amy thanks for doing this. Thank you for helping me. I want to start with Scrappy heart Productions because while I am sure that we have some listeners in our midst who are aspiring actors says I'm going to guess that more are trying to figure out how to go from worker to owner from performer to Creator. So take me back to the moment where you decided that you wanted to have your own production company. It kind of happened organically with glow so they asked my writing partner and I who's also bodiqua. She's Puerto Rican and wrote A New York Times bestseller called crazy is my superpower. We were talking. We love superheroes and we love comics and we never saw ourselves represented and they asked us to write glow the comic based on the Netflix series wage. And that was the first time that we thought let's highlight the Mexican character in there that we felt could have been more mature dived into during the series. What if we pitched that relationship between Yolanda's character and the Muslim character and we pitched it to Netflix and they loved it off and they got their own covers on the comics. And that was the first time I thought oh my goodness. This is so cool that I was able to with my writing partner highlight a Mexican carrier. And have her be the center of the story even though she's a peripheral character on the show. So I have been following your writing partner and now your production company. Mendez for years because she and I both grew up in Union City, New Jersey and so years ago when she was in the WWE. My mom was like my mom's always on the lookout for Union City kids. So she was like a Union City kid in the WWE and it's like oh and she's Latina like this is amazing. We're so you guys were writing Partners before you were producing Partners, correct? We were writing Partners, we wrote Globe which we love doing and then we started writing Dungeons and Dragons and she's like, hey, I found this article on this badass female viking who had a hero's burial and we were like, let's highlight her and she had like this huge scar on her face. And then we did this Disney writers program and they said you should start a production company because you guys have so many ideas and you guys run off. Dammit with comedy and drama and T and you guys should create your original material and then we were like, yeah, we we should do that and then the kicker was really the, Khan's that is when our fans I would go around for Lucifer and she would go around for WWE and they'd ask us what's next like what are you doing? Next? We love your character and we thought well, let's check them an answer. Let's say we're creating our own characters and making these peripheral diverse characters the centers of their own stories. And then we just did it. I think this was all the love in my life, which is I am genuinely surprised that it took that long for you to realize that you wanted and needed a production company. I know, you know what it is. I've been really lucky as an actor. I recorded Modoc while I was shooting Lucifer and I filmed El Chicano while I was shooting Lucifer and I've always worked as an actor. I've had a bunch of failed pilots and I've had success with Dexter and shows that were supposed to be big and only lasts a year like rush hour and Trauma and I just throw myself all in and I think I didn't have the bandwidth to think outside of that kind of singular horse race track. I wish I would have done this sooner. I write 8 hours a day. I just dedicated myself for the past three years to writing every day. I have off and any time I finish a take I'll just run to my computer and right. So what was the first thing you did once you in a j decided that you wanted to start a production company content content is King whether it's you getting the rights to an article or writing it yourself off. Of or putting together a pitch for an existing IP like a j did with crazy as my superpower IP is everything and if you can have original Ip, that's the most important thing. So I really think putting pen-to-paper is the first step whether it's an article a book a script. I mean a g and I both wrote Our Own scripts and then with my show I was looking for a showrunner to help me write this pilot for a family Latino comedy that I want to write. I just ended writing it myself life. That's why we call the scrappy heart cuz we when we got the job for glow we didn't even know how to write a comic book. We literally YouTube how to write a comic book and like DIY like we're total DIY.

Partner WWE Scrappy Heart Productions Netflix Union City Dexter New York Times AMY Writing Partners Youtube Yolanda Mendez New Jersey Khan King Trauma Globe
How Aimee Garcia Took Charge of Her Hollywood Career

Latina to Latina

04:01 min | 2 weeks ago

How Aimee Garcia Took Charge of Her Hollywood Career

"Amy thanks for doing this. Thank you for helping me. I want to start with Scrappy heart Productions because while I am sure that we have some listeners in our midst who are aspiring actors says I'm going to guess that more are trying to figure out how to go from worker to owner from performer to Creator. So take me back to the moment where you decided that you wanted to have your own production company. It kind of happened organically with glow so they asked my writing partner and I who's also bodiqua. She's Puerto Rican and wrote A New York Times bestseller called crazy is my superpower. We were talking. We love superheroes and we love comics and we never saw ourselves represented and they asked us to write glow the comic based on the Netflix series wage. And that was the first time that we thought let's highlight the Mexican character in there that we felt could have been more mature dived into during the series. What if we pitched that relationship between Yolanda's character and the Muslim character and we pitched it to Netflix and they loved it off and they got their own covers on the comics. And that was the first time I thought oh my goodness. This is so cool that I was able to with my writing partner highlight a Mexican carrier. And have her be the center of the story even though she's a peripheral character on the show. So I have been following your writing partner and now your production company. Mendez for years because she and I both grew up in Union City, New Jersey and so years ago when she was in the WWE. My mom was like my mom's always on the lookout for Union City kids. So she was like a Union City kid in the WWE and it's like oh and she's Latina like this is amazing. We're so you guys were writing Partners before you were producing Partners, correct? We were writing Partners, we wrote Globe which we love doing and then we started writing Dungeons and Dragons and she's like, hey, I found this article on this badass female viking who had a hero's burial and we were like, let's highlight her and she had like this huge scar on her face. And then we did this Disney writers program and they said you should start a production company because you guys have so many ideas and you guys run off. Dammit with comedy and drama and T and you guys should create your original material and then we were like, yeah, we we should do that and then the kicker was really the, Khan's that is when our fans I would go around for Lucifer and she would go around for WWE and they'd ask us what's next like what are you doing? Next? We love your character and we thought well, let's check them an answer. Let's say we're creating our own characters and making these peripheral diverse characters the centers of their own stories. And then we just did it. I think this was all the love in my life, which is I am genuinely surprised that it took that long for you to realize that you wanted and needed a production company. I know, you know what it is. I've been really lucky as an actor. I recorded Modoc while I was shooting Lucifer and I filmed El Chicano while I was shooting Lucifer and I've always worked as an actor. I've had a bunch of failed pilots and I've had success with Dexter and shows that were supposed to be big and only lasts a year like rush hour and Trauma and I just throw myself all in and I think I didn't have the bandwidth to think outside of that kind of singular horse race track. I wish I would have done this sooner. I write 8 hours a day. I just dedicated myself for the past three years to writing every day. I have off and any time I finish a take I'll just run to my computer and right.

Partner WWE Union City Netflix Scrappy Heart Productions New York Times AMY Dexter Writing Partners Yolanda Mendez New Jersey Trauma Khan Globe
"khan" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

08:02 min | Last month

"khan" Discussed on How I Built This

"'cause if schools have to shutdown physically in the United States people are going to need something clearly, online would have to cover multiple subjects in grades would have to efficacy research behind it. It would have to be trusted you. It should be accessible on mobile devices and computers everything. It was clear. We're GONNA we're have a big role to play. So we started you know acid engineering team to stress test servers make sure we can handle more server load and then the next week you know California was one of the first states to say that they were going to close and then. By the week, pretty much most of the country and the world had shut down. You know we normally see about a pre cove. It was about million students were coming per month and that increased to thirty million. Then they were also spending fifty percent more time on the site Registrations went through the roof they those ten of of normal on a daily basis and I think right now we're sitting at around one hundred, ten million registered users. What, what is your? What is your operating budget? Your annual operating budget? Our annual operating budget now is in the high fifty million which every time. I, say it gives me a cortisol bike. Yeah But about a five, million of our of our funding comes from a few hundred thousand people donating on average twenty thirty dollars. So there's a lot of people donating because coal donate button on site. Yeah. I asking people for money is a very humbling thing to do My hope was always let me show people how great this is I have to become a little bit more explicit saying that I have a need and then hopefully people would show up. Yeah. I think less than a check. It's more than this. Now Khan Academy videos have been viewed like. Almost two billion times. Which is Insane I have to imagine sal over the last few years as the kind of Ed tech sector has exploded right and lots of schools by these programs, dream box and other four prophet. Programs that are available to help children with math and other language skills, etc I mean I'm sure people can't even sow. Let's spin off a for profit channel here. You've got something big here. You know there's there you know, and then you won't have to worry about raising money for for Khan Academy you know you can still do that but let's let's do that. I mean that must have happened must still happen. You know we do. oftentimes you know sometimes I'll go to a potential. PHILANTHROPIES will. I'd rather invest than donate. Something like that. People, I think there's some creative ideas that I would entertain. They're like Khan Academy is brand valuable. What if we could take that brandon? Do it in this tangential spaces and Khan Academy can have equity and maybe it can help build an endowment for. I'm always open to. Ideas. But what? I always remind myself and look I'm I'm not someone who has transcended material desires I tried to transcend material desires but. I have go to a friend. Who's you know done well with a Po or something and they've got the new tesla or living. You know they're living slightly upstream the income gradient. And living a little higher up the hill. But I remind myself. One I consider myself incredibly fortunate to be able to do what I I am doing, and the way I think about is I've done my philanthropy in reverse order and I stayed in the Hedge Fund world and you know maybe one day become a multimillionaire or larger and then but then what I've done with that money. I, you know I'm not. Someone who who wants that much I I want to be able to you know have have a backyard be able to best support the family you know go on vacation once or twice a year right and anything above that. If I did become a billionaire I would have donated it to an effort like Khan Academy. So you might as well just cut out the middleman. Time, shift it and work on and and I do generally think that it has benefited the mission and the vision because once people hopefully are viewing it as an institution they do they're they're they're rooting for it because they they realized that it's not it doesn't have an ulterior motive. You know the the everybody I've had on the show over the past four years that you are most like Jimmy Wales. Jimmy. Wales had an incredibly enormous influence on the world with wikipedia. Right? Had they done this as a for profit? He could have been a multimillionaire his argument was it wouldn't have worked. You had to make a nonprofit and by the way he said look I don't really care about having lots of money I. I have a really interesting life. I. Get to meet really interesting people, Interesting People WanNa, meet me I get to have. Get exposed to all these ideas that to me is worth more than any amount of money I could ever have and I that's really stuck with me because I. Think. He's right I think he's right. I agree with I mean I. Like Jimmy, Wales, by virtue of this adventure, I've been on I get lenses into really interesting parts of the world which for the most part have made me more optimistic about the world you know I every now and then I'm you know get invited to various conferences that you know where you know very powerful people are talking about the problems of society and how to fix them, and when when you when you when you get into these circles, you realize most of these people are honestly just trying to help you might not agree with everyone etcetera etcetera but it's it's actually been very It's made me more optimistic about the world not less. When you think about this just this incredible journey in the amazing success of of Khan Academy. How much do you think it has to do with you know your skill and how hard you worked in intelligence and how much do you attribute it to lock It's all. All of the above I mean it's you know one person can call it. One person might call it benevolent aliens working in your favor to prepare humanity for first contact. But yeah, there's something. That I I can't i. mean there's a lot that I can't take credit for I mean and above and beyond luck. Sir I. Guess It's luck where I was born where I was born a had the teachers I had had a the friendship supports that I had and then. Fell into things at the right time and but every now and then you see a door crack open, you save I think there's something interesting on the other door and you've got to sprint through it, and so I try not to overthink when when there are signs in my life that that doors open don't don't don't make someone have to force through the door. Like, run through that door. And Sal Khan founder of Khan Academy. By the way if you google his full name Salman Khan, you will find at least one other famous person who has exactly the same name. That other Salman Khan is one of the most popular Bollywood Actors in the world and actually I was I was in India five years ago and I met him I think it's just because you know people from this kind of get a kick out of things like that. Let's get this guy and that guy. So, there's there's some youtube videos of US having getting co interviewed. He's a he's a big star. He's he's a big heartthrob. He's major Maitra. He's also very well known for his physique. He's kind of the guys that that that taught bollywood that. Indians all have to look like software engineers. And thanks so much for listening to this show this week, you can subscribe wherever you get your podcasts. You can write to us at H. I. bt NPR DOT Org. Our twitter handles are at how I built this or at Iras are instagram accounts are at guide dot Roz or at how I built this NPR. Our show is produced this week by Jan Andersson with music composed by routine Arab Louis thanks also to Julia Carney candice limb, Derek Gaels JC, Howard Grant, and Jeff Rodgers..

Khan Academy Salman Khan Jimmy Wales California Wales United States NPR cortisol Hedge Fund sal twitter PHILANTHROPIES brandon instagram google Jan Andersson
"khan" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

14:33 min | Last month

"khan" Discussed on How I Built This

"Each other a little bit and I was just like, what do I do now? I could do do I. Do I, call him how do I contact I'm sure he's not listed. Contact Bill. Gates. Was An obvious and. Simultaneously a reporter from fortune. Had reached out actually before this happened saying Oh you know. There's this thing you're doing. It's really interesting. We'd like to do a story about it, and so I was already talking to the reporter and that reporter calls and he's like, did you know that bill? Gates uses Khan Academy as I had no idea and then the reporter Robert Kaplan with fortune he says. I'M GONNA Call Bill Up. I'm like if you think you can call bill up and do that, and so he calls me like two days. He's like bill took my call he I just interviewed Bill Gates about you and and it's like this really surreal thing because. This person this obviously like a lifetime hero. Up In computer science reading about Bill Gates and and then the fortune article came out. And I still had not met bill yet or even had any contact with them and the article said something like the title was Bill Gates is favorite teacher. Wow. The press sometimes rights hyperbolic headlines to I always felt insecure as like my favorite teacher. Did he say that they misrepresenting? Serious Imposter Syndrome, and then I got a call a cell phone rings. Record a video and I answer I say hello and I hear you know this is Larry Cohen, Bill Gates of Staff. You might have heard that bills a fan and I was like, yeah, I heard that. And if you're if you're free over the next couple of weeks, would love to fly up to Seattle and learn more about what you're doing. Maybe ways we could work together and I was looking at my calendar for the month Completely Blank and Said maybe next Wednesday. Cut My nails do some laundry. I'm happy to meet. Happy. Happy to meet with bill can make that work So yeah, I flew up and we had that meeting. What was that like? and. It was a little bit awkward. Wasn't like an obvious like. Oh, you know what you're doing. It was like Oh. So you know Y- There's a little bit of a prompt I. Think Larry Medicine Tell Bill what you're up to, and then I just started into into. My laminated slides. And with me love it, you didn't bring laptop. You brought laminated slides I love that. I mean there's an irony to it that I'm obviously someone involved in technology counterfeiters based on technology. I'm presenting to the creator of powerpoint. So. Yeah. I went through an and and at the end and he didn't give during the presidential lot of feedback. So I just kept going and it's one of those moments where you know. Twenty percent of your brain is trying to do what it needs to do, and then the other eighty percent of your brains saying. You're talking to Bill Gates that's Bill Gates. He's three feet away. Don't mess this up south don't mess up your about to mess this up don't mess up And then when I was kind of done he kind of he's like, yeah, noticed a ton of sense. This is great. This is great and I'm like, Oh, my God you know. And then I got overconfident I, I, remember I throw another. That doesn't make sense you're right. Wow. But was there any like end? Here's a plan on how we could collaborate. was there any of that at all? They ask they bill said, well, what would you do with more resources and you know I think this is the question I have to answer really well and I said look you know it's just me and closet right now with more resources. We could translate this to the languages of the world. We could build out the software platform. Some more people can access it. We could tools for teachers and I said I think we could were reaching hundreds of thousands now I think we could reach a million folks by the end of the year and it could be ten or one, hundred, million. You know by the end of the decade this need for that and you know I said look if I if I. Could hire up about five six engineers and educators and content folks I. Think we'll be up and running So you know fully loaded costs in silicon valley be million million and a half dollars a year and so this and yeah, we'll. We'll. We'll think about that. That seems reasonable. So and then a few days later they said Yeah that's they could do that. So I started talking to the Gates Foundation about about that that grant and simultaneously. Folks from Google had reached out. Google had made this promise in two thousand eight, which was a ten year anniversary of Google that it would donate ten million dollars to five projects that had the potential to change the world, and they determined that one of those projects has to be a project that has a chance to educate the world and. They on their own said, we've done a lot of research and we think what you are doing has the best chance of helping to educate the world. Okay well, I'm glad you've been listening in on my delusions and by fall of two thousand, ten about the Google and the gates foundation each gave about two million dollars So we had four million dollar initial funding for that first two years to hire team internationalize and start scaling. Khan Academy. Wow more than four million dollars. So now you've got to. Grow. You've gotTa Build. You've gotta get office space, but a higher people you've got to really turn this. Thing, that was just you into. Thing. So what did you? Do I mean that's kind of overwhelming a bright. Isn't it. Yeah, it was I. Mean I'm usually call. One of my closest friends Shaath Newson, how he was someone I met actually in Louisiana he beat me at a math competition in tenth grade, and then we were on the same team representing Louisiana. Academic Game. So that's how I got to know him. He ended up becoming my roommate freshman year at. Mit. We're pretty much like brothers and I said, he shot the new help like I. Know This wasn't on your career path to to start to help me kind of get the sing off the ground but like I need your help and I think it'll be fun and. You know he he took a couple of days to think about it and. He decided to take the plunge with me, and so he quit his McKinsey job and joined. Khan. Academy is as the President and COO essentially help me turn into a real organization at the same time. There were these two engineers it's what's really eerie how these people came out of the woodwork to engineers that summer. Ben came into Jason Rozov did volunteered for Khan Academy and I assume there are some young kids are looking for some experience. But when they were volunteer, I'm like these are incredible. These are some of the best engineers and designers I've ever worked with in my life who are they, and then I realized that actually known figures. Like. A really well known engineers and designers. and. So they were something my next call Said Hey would you guys WanNa work fulltime for Khan Academy? I, think we're going to get funding and They after a few months, we were convinced them. They worked initially remotely from New York. Then they were able to to move out to the bay area. So as you began to grow and scale and more people I'm assuming you kind of wanted to professionalize it a little bit more and maybe kind of start to replace some of those early screen capture videos. That you've made in two, thousand, six and seven. Yeah the interesting there's a constant tension as an organization grows. Of How do you make sure you do what's right from a professionalization point of view from scaling from a managerial point of view. But how do you make sure that you're not just doing the things that everyone else does that ends up creating these large bureaucratic organizations that? Aren't always the most innovative and how do you make sure you don't lose whatever secret sauce you had that made you success initially and a lot of con- academies. I say not. So secret sauce I believe was its ECCENTRICITY has quirkiness. It's in formality coupled with its depth, an intuition and desire to. Show. The wonder in the universe and the curiosity and So you know the last ten years for me have just been how do I? How do I balance that you know? Can I bring in other people who also compliment us but we do not lose that entrepeneurship that creativity that curiosity eccentricity that the quirkiness that made Khan Academy what it is. What's the I mean at that point you were still. You're offering still math and. finance. Was the ambition to. To offer as much as you possibly could offer in as many subject areas as possible. Yeah I remember writing these envisioning docs back in two thousand, eight, two, thousand, nine says, okay. We want to create a world where anyone on the planet has access to all the core academic learning they need from pre k. through the core of College Subjects in grades it was part of the initial vision that yeah one day we would try to figure out you know language arts, humanities, etc because they're important early learning. And then we'll just keep running experiments to see how they go and and You know we're we're still on that journey. Yeah. I interview dumb. The founders of head space different. Obviously a for profit company is a meditation APP but initially, all the meditations were Andy Andy Party Com-. If you're familiar with it, I'm very I'm very familiar with right and initially all the videos were were Sal Khan but sal Khan is not scalable. You cannot make tens of thousands of videos was that clear to you pretty pretty soon after you started the funding started come in that you needed to get other people to make videos to your standards. Now, we don't have a lot of folks making videos I still make. A lot of them I pretty much all of the math and science video and we have a few other folks who are doing some history videos and some language arts videos. And one of the reasons why we were we became a little sensitive of like not just outsourcing it to five hundred folks. We got a lot of feedback that. Education even what is done in this kind of distance way synchronous you have to trust your teacher. You have to trust that they're going GonNa get to someplace that I I know is going to be insightful, and there's going to be an a Ha moment that you're willing to invest in it, and we've had moments where you know there's a video for me a video from me, and then there's video from someone else just even though they might be explaining that better than I could have it could be dissonant for the student where they're feeling wait I really got catch it that my teacher now substitute showed up. So what we've been trying to. Balance that. It's amazing. I met David Coleman, a couple of years ago the head of the College Board and he talked about the partnership that they did with Khan Academy where you offer free sat prep which. Is. Essentially. Really. Had a pretty big impact on the four prophet sat prep industry because you're essentially offering this product and service for free. Yeah. You know. I think all of these players they're trying to do what they can in the context that they're doing it but David Coleman reached out. and it was really I think David's brainchild when he took over the College Board that you know the cod were the folks who administer the sat and the AP exams. It was the cause was a non for profit that came into existence to try to level the playing field that yeah, a hundred years ago. The only kids who are getting into Ivy League schools where kids of legacy kids who have scored to the rights knows exactly and the notion of the sat is, let's give a chance for the kid in Louisiana to to to to compete with the kids from an Dover or Chote or deerfield. As we know this whole industry billion dollar industry came up around what look like creating a perceived and maybe actual advantage for the for the you know upper-middle-class or or a fluent and David said, look we've been. Secretly observing Khan Academy and what we really like about. Khan. Academy is y'all about really learning the material I had actually made some sat videos for navy and my cousin facts you went through the sat practice book and I did every problem in the book on video for my cousins. That it was a four hundred something problems and I was afraid that the college would was going to sue me because I didn't take their permission to like screen capture their problems. Davis I watched that and what I really liked about it is and no point. Did you say, Oh, this is how you guess you always said Oh this is a concept you need to learn to be ready for college. This is where you learn it. This is how you learn it. There's a little bit of test-taking strategies. He's like that's what test prep should be. It should be something that generally makes you better generally makes you more prepared for college and and how you perform the sat's going to be a byproduct product of that. Yeah. So he said how about we partnered create the world's best test prep that happens to be free and It made sense to me, and over time the relationship volved were they actually pay US resources To Create Free Test Prep which is, you know that's that's the type of revenue I love it sustain us, but it's it's free those student. This year the most challenging year for school age kids For many decades. And it's looking like this year probably will be remote mostly, it will be remote for many many if not most kids in the United States. I have to imagine that you have seen a dramatic uptick in user's usage this year. Yeah. Yeah we we I caught wind in February this past February that you know something interesting was happening. We got a letter from a teacher in south. Korea telling us that he was heavily dependent on Khan Academy is they had their their nationwide school closures and that was the sounds like, wow. A whole country's closing schools because of this Cova thing that's that's and. A few weeks later. I live here in Santa Clara County, which is I think it was the first community spread happened to your hand local private school had to shut down due to contact tracing. That's what it I don on us. It's like, wow, this hit the US at which even then seemed like science fiction in early. March. But you know it was one of those. Moments where you look left and you look right you realize I think this is us..

Bill Gates Khan Academy Sal Khan Gates Foundation Google reporter President and COO Louisiana United States fortune Seattle McKinsey David Coleman Santa Clara County Korea New York Robert Kaplan
"khan" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

01:43 min | Last month

"khan" Discussed on How I Built This

"So. Start getting text messages for man. Would, you can imagine I now take very seriously and she four or five of them and kind of cryptic as text messages often are, and they said, this is an writing I'm at the Aspen Ideas, festival main pavilion. Walter. Isaacson Interviewing Bill Gates. Gates. Last five minutes talking about Khan Academy. Wow and Let's just kinda stared I was like, what is she talking about and I started doing a web search for Aspen Gates Khan. Academy. After about ten minutes actually found like the.

Bill Gates Aspen Gates Khan Khan Academy Isaacson Walter
"khan" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

07:15 min | Last month

"khan" Discussed on How I Built This

"Hey welcome back to how I built this from NPR and. So it's two, thousand, nine and sal has just left his high paying job at a hedge fund to focus on Khan Academy full time. And since it's just him, no other coders, no other teachers this new venture is not costing him a lot of money. But what is costing him is the fact that he's no longer making any money. You know the first three months you're euphoric. You're you're super excited about your new lifestyle is this nonprofit do-gooder? In fact, ACT I would say by months seven or eight, I couldn't sleep. I I. Literally Could Sleep I, I. I was yeah I was getting anxious I was waking up in the middle of the night cold sweats I was I would I would look at my bank account for over Kennedy You know, look at our expenses, I would run financial models for my family. And my wife say. Nothing like. I. Mean in hindsight I was like I shouldn't have been so. Kept it to myself but I wasn't I was in a really bad place mentally and the stress and the anxiety was was killing me was there. May Be residual fear of like. Failing. I think there's you know we talked a lot about childhood in you know not having a lot of resources growing up think I I frankly still have. A fear of being one catastrophe away from financial hardship. Yeah and In two thousand dollars like? I made the catastrophe happen like I. Wasn't like a hurricane or something that that's ruined our finances on a fire. It's like I quit a good job and like the type of job. Is. Not Easy to. Get. A highly sought after jobs. If I really had to I could probably go get a job but what I be able to get as good of a job as what I had that that actually probably was was unlikely and. Try to channel whatever nervous energy or anxiety I had into the work is let me make more videos. Let me Let me make more content. Let me write more code and and hope that eventually someone will notice. I guess, like sort of maybe it was a kind of a low point that you hit and. A. Wealthy. Very wealthy person. We checked his end or the wife of John Door the. Billionaire venture capitalist CA reached out to. Make a donation what what was the story? Hey this is you know I I have this theory that benevolent aliens are are helping me so that Khan Academy can help prepare humanity for first contact and you know the end door coming into my life, and then you know what happened shortly afterwards was may two thousand ten and you know I was getting these donations off pay pal if people donating ten dollars, twenty dollars every now, and then a fifty dollars donation come in that was pretty exciting and then. I saw a ten thousand dollars Asian come in so. Ten thousand dollars just like that. Yeah it was I. Just like I got an email notification from like pay pal donation it's come in I was like Oh this is going to be a fifty like ten, thousand and. Dan I immediately did a Google search I was like Oh. Wow. Like and doors she's like a real philanthropist and I immediately e mailed her and I said no thank you so much for this incredibly generous donation. This is the largest donation that Khan Academy has ever received. I've tried to project like a real institution and if we were physical school, you have a building named after and and and immediately emails back and says well. You know I didn't realize you. You weren't getting this kind of donations i. see that you're based in mountain view You know I've been using your stuff with my daughters. I've been using it even myself to understand the financial crisis and accounting and finance. If, you have time I would love to grab lunch with you and. I was like, yeah, absolutely and so a week later. Maybe, a few days later, we were in downtown Palo Alto at an Indian Buffet restaurant she asks me over lunch. So what what, what's your goal here and I told her when I filled the paperwork with the IRS to become a nonprofit that little part of the forum with mission Colon, they give you the line and a half I filled out a free world class education for anyone anywhere. and. She looked at me. She's like well. That's ambitious. How do you see yourself doing that and I told her you know be very clear mission. I don't think. I'm just going to be able to check it off this weekend and then move onto healthcare or something. But I showed her she was already familiar with the content I was making I showed her the exercise, a software pot from making I said look videos are nice and I wanna keep making videos I really enjoy that I want to translate into the languages of the world but the real learning happens when students are able to work on exercises get immediate feedback. Ideally, teachers and parents can get dashboards to understand where their kids are and how to do more interventions. By, this point been rejected by so many major foundations probably about twenty of them. But, in preparation for all of them had a binder of of testimonials from around the world I. Mean it was Louis. Several hundreds, pages thick and these letters I showed it to her showed her how the the usage was growing exponentially and I like you know I think this could eventually reach like all of humanity. And she's like well, you've made a lot of progress a how I only have one question how are you supporting yourself and as? Proud of a way as possible I said. I'm. Not. She kind of processes that and she's thinking you're a big shot. You're like doing TV interviews and Hundreds, thousands of people using this like, right? Yeah. No I mean I had been on. And I didn't realize there was actually there was a buzz about Khan Academy in Silicon Valley at the time but I didn't know about no one. But I wasn't in the No. I wasn't even the right circles to be experiencing the buzz and so anyway, she she she she offered to pay the bill and I said Oh if you insist. And ten minutes later I'm driving into my my driveway and I get text message from an and it says. You really need to be supporting yourself. I've just wired you one hundred, thousand dollars. How That was just one of those moments where you just stare at the phone and you sit in your driveway for like the next half an hour. Wow. Like you know. Holy Crap. I mean I think. I might have cried like it was that type of You know all that stress built up over the months all of a sudden. It just gets released. You know inside that one, hundred thousand was all of a sudden change everything forever but it's like, okay I can now pay my bills. Were Not GonNa have to dip into savings. It gave a like. I. Can do this for a few more months for.

Khan Academy Dan I NPR sal Palo Alto Kennedy Google John Door Indian Buffet Louis IRS
"khan" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

08:11 min | Last month

"khan" Discussed on How I Built This

"Matter of months? I would love to believe that I'm some type of super tours something but I think the reality actually a lot of research to back this up that if you do have one on one tutoring and that Tudor's able to identify what your gaps are and fill in those gaps especially in subjects like mathematics that most kids can actually probably all could be accelerated dramatically and That's all that was happening with the I. Mean there was some of it was just motivational. She'd almost given up on herself so at to just remotivate her a little bit and I think. A little bit of the secret. You know this might sound a little bit of like, what's IT GONNA Tiger cousin or Tiger parent thing to do. But when you get when you allow us to get a little ahead of their class, a two things happen one when they see it in class, they're like, Oh, I've seen this before. So they builds a little bit of cushion and also builds confidence. There's just you know once you start to realize that you can actually get a little ahead of your class. You're like Oh maybe this is my thing maybe I'm a math person. And I guess like the word gets out. On the family in Louisiana and other relatives like, Hey, can you help mike hit or can you help me? Is that sort of what happened? Yeah I mean puts it exactly as you described word spread that free tutoring was going on. Before you know and I was getting requests. From from from family members all over the country and by by two thousand six I was tutoring on a given day anywhere between five and fifteen cousins. Family friends are around day on a given audit they would all get on the speakerphone together. Would answer questions they had and. One thing I my cousins. The way that math is often taught and especially learned is it's like these fragmented concepts that you have to memorize formulas and patterns and things like that and what the thing that really served me well growing up is that if you just ponder the math a little bit it, all connects it. All makes intuitive sense. It's all just a way of thinking, and so I was really trying to do what I what I could do to support them all and meantime we're still working a hedge fund, right? I was and I have to give extra credit to Dan because in the early days when I was working for wool capital dance. Startup Hedge Fund. It was just meet him I had bought into the stereotype that you have to work eighty hours a week to make it in finance. So I was ready to do that and I remember miss probably a month or two into starting my job. Dan's like why are you still here? Aren't you going home has gone on Dan I'm I'm ready to I'M GONNA look for more investment ideas. He's like go home it's like okay I was like okay I'll go home and I'll look for investment ideas like no south you're not gonNA help anybody by just Having the appearance of motion, it's not about just churning yourself and tying yourself out because then you're just more likely to make bad decisions our whole goal is to avoid bad decisions and the best way to do that is when you're at work and have your game face on your game energy. But to do that, you're going to have to have other things in your life. You should read interesting books. Recharge and actually recharging is going to keep your mind open and keep you creative and not fond to the group think that a lot of people do so Dan forced me to have a life and that's what gave me the space in my life to offer obviously. Yeah. You know after close I'm I'm actually pretty free to to work with you. So you're doing this tutoring these kids in it's over the phone. And this is like around two thousand six. And somebody suggests that you make videos and you put it on Youtube is that that happened around that time? Actually even before the videos happened around late two, thousand five. This background in software and in the back of my mind, I have always been fascinated by. Ken. Software, play role in improving human potential and when I was in college. Almost every job I did was in some way related to education or how tech education could be useful I remember I worked for the some Spanish professors to help teach people Spanish, than the the next summer I worked on some software to help kids with attention deficit disorder. Learn. Math. And I created this little thing called math planet. So my brain was throughout for longtime and so when I started working with my cousins like, wow, you know it's hard for me to find good practice problems for them on the Internet, let me write some software for them that could generate practice problems and Then can give them hints and solutions and immediate feedback that could give me as a tutor data on how they're performing and how long things are taking them and I wrote it. As a hobby and that was that was the first Khan Academy I. I set it up as a website, and you just was not very expensive. Presumably, you just kind of do yourself and offered it to. These kids. Yeah and I remember a lot of friends like this business. I was no no not a business. I'm not start up I'll never do that again. This is this. This is my family project that was my way of frankly protecting it emotionally, and yeah, I was at a dinner party and my friend has Zulu Zulu. Him full credit he's like. Well, this is cool sal but how he's killing your actual lessons and I said you're right. It's hard to do with ten cousins what I was originally doing with just nausea and her brothers and he says record some of your lessons is videos and upload them onto youtube for your family and I immediately. You know my technology site that's such a low tech solution and I-, vocalized him I was like no, that's like Youtube for. Cats playing pianos for dogs on board. It's not for learning and I went home that weekend and I think I probably had explained least common multiple to a cousin for the eighth time and I was like maybe he's always got a point maybe I should make a video on multiples where my cousins and then it was just a how do I make the video back in two thousand six a cell phones weren't particularly good I didn't have no camera and You Google Search, oh, there's something called screen capture software, and so I downloaded some free screen capture software and I started just essentially recording some of my digital scribbles using my pen tablet Yeah. You can hear my voice over while I'm talking here and there were done very extemporaneously from my cousins and I started uploading them onto youtube and telling them watch this at your own time and pace, and then we can. We can dig deeper when we get on the phone and after about a month some for feedback and they they famously told me they liked me better on youtube than in person. Yes. They just really liked having an on demand version of their cousin that they could watch as much as they want. There was no shame reviewing a concept that they should have learned in fourth grade and I started to realize you know this co this type of thing especially math and I was doing math and I started doing some physics and chemistry and biology. Well, it's pretty evergreen content. If once you have a good explanation of adding fractions with unlike denominators. Pretty much everyone in the world could use it and you don't really have to refresh it unless you figure out a better way of explaining adding fractions with unlike unlike the nominators. I'm trying to figure out how you were thinking about this because clearly you were added to help your. Relatives and and these kids in here extended family and friends of friends but after think that a part of you was like. Maybe, there's something bigger here or were you just not even thinking that at all? Oh there was the first or something my my brain it at oscillates between these like mega delusional. You know. Space Operas Science Fiction ideas and like sal you're being crazy focus on what you can do in the here now and so. The reason why I was always fascinated by software technology education is that. It's not hard to imagine that if you you make something that can increase human potential by ten percent twenty percent or one hundred percent, and if it scales technology can there's no reason why it can't affect all of all of humanity one day and I was super inspired when I was young in seventh grade I read. I read the foundation series..

Youtube Dan Hedge Fund Tudor Khan Academy Louisiana Operas Science Fiction nausea Google Ken mike
"khan" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

08:00 min | Last month

"khan" Discussed on How I Built This

"So. Most of the products and services we've talked about on the show have been innovative or disruptive in some way. But some of them and you've heard me say this before have fundamentally changed the way we live I mean lift AIRBNB starbucks. Shop Affi-. wayfair. These brands have transformed the way that many of us shop and travel and work. But every now, and then a founder comes along that seems to want to do something even more ambitious, even more transformative like remember. Pat. Brown, he founded impossible foods to create meet out of plants meet. So meet like that even the most die-hard carnivores would want to eat it. Pat Wants to put a stop to meet production period because of the damage, it's doing to the planet and essentially and I don't think I'm overstating this. He set out from day one to change the world. But still. Pat Brown stands to make a lot of money from his company same with most of the founders who've been on this show and I don't think any of them are motivated primarily to make money but it is part of the story they make a product or offer service, sell it to you and me, and they also get rich perfectly fine. But what about someone who makes a product or offers a service that is equally transformational maybe even more so but makes it one hundred percent free To do that, you have to make personal sacrifices starting by earning a lot less money. which is just part of what makes Sal Khan. So incredibly remarkable. Over the past twelve years, he's built Khan Academy into a powerhouse, a massive online learning platform that offers free tutorials to anyone anywhere. And from the very beginning South sided, his academy would be a nonprofit that it should never be tempted to compromise on its values. But before he launched Khan, Academy Sal didn't anticipate any of this. He was just trying to help a younger cousin with her sixth grade math lessons at the time he was working for a hedge fund. But from those early days of doing one on one to toils sal gradually built a platform that offers hundreds of classes in dozens of languages. Nearly thirty million people use Khan Academy. Every month to learn math science arts even sat prep all four free and Khan. Academy has inspired the launch of many other online learning platforms, but many of them are for profit operations that charge money. But we'll get to all that moment first. Let's back up just a little bit sal Khan grew up in metairie Louisiana his mom was from India and his dad was from Bangladesh and the marriage ended when sal was pretty young. My parents. Had issues and so they separated when I was probably about eighteen months old two years old and then I had really never seen my father and I saw once four an evening when I was thirteen and then he passed away the next year so it was really might. mother who raised us as as a single mother. While was there a community of South Asian families in imagery? Growing up. Yeah my you know when my parents separated. We actually live with my young at the time they were in their twenty s, and so they all were kind of like father figures and almost like older siblings to to me as well and and a lot of ways they were not your stereotypical you know. Just come to the US study. Get a job save money kind of prudent immigrant story they were. They were much more embracing of New Orleans. Culture. And I would say they're the most new ORLEAN South Asians. You will ever find it in your life. I had a very colorful childhood. You know late night parties, people, singing, and dancing. For me it felt like a I remember my third birthday that my uncles got a belly dancer. I still remember Habiba you know So it was definitely a different type of childhood, but it was a in some ways a really rich one. So what did your mom do for a living? The first job that I remember her having she she was the person who takes the change out of the vending machine at the at the local hospital actually the hospital where I was born and she took me to work a couple of times 'cause she didn't have childcare and I thought at the time I remember watching her do that. I think it was like the coolest job on earth because you have the key that you can open up the vending machine and like quarters just pour out of it. So she did that for a little bit and then essentially was a cashier at a series of convenience stores is kind of doing you know one minimum wage job after another and then I was in high school she had remarried her my Stepdad at the time were able to. Kind of cobble together to get a a small convenience store in. Your book you write. Louisiana was as close to South Asia as the United States could get. It's spicy food. Giant cockroaches in the corrupt government which is both funny but somewhat true true. I guess right I mean. You grew up at a time when. Like David Duke was the. The representative in steel her. The part of Mary where we had our store, it was called seminole convenience store on Seminole Avenue, and it's called a parliamentary called on that was kind of the heart of David Dukes base. So to speak I remember in a right outside of our our store across the street was the largest David Duke for president signing I've ever seen and so it was A. You know the the folks who lived in the neighborhood who were frankly know Super David Duke supporters in some ways it was lucky. This is pre nine eleven They didn't really know what to make of my family at at the time We've had a few conversations I remember with people the store where they they openly told us that they were trying to decide whether we were white or the N. word to you know we were confusing them but you know growing up I was the only Brown kid in in the classroom. But I never felt in school at all like folks were in any way biased or racist against me. If anything I have to give the the school system to Jefferson parish school system, a lot of credit you know I think a lot of what I am today is because they gave me opportunities there were teachers that believed in me. I had a really good friend circle So so I have no. You, know I I don't feel like it was a a tough childhood. So. Was your mom Did she have very strict expectations for you I? mean she had come from India to the United States of sacrifices to cheese sort of. You know would say you have to be an engineer doctor lawyer like would was there any kind of talk like sat at home when you were a kid? You, know, my mother. Definitely did instill some really strong values. You know just seeing her operate. My mom is a very courageous person and we were the only family that that in our friend circle where you know we were kind of not well off or at least not middle class. But I think that was helpful to because. The family friends we had many of them were the stereotypical doctors and engineers and you obviously can see where you live and you see where those kids live and you can see kind of our financial insecurity. I still remember I must have been eight or nine years old at Kmart and I was being a brat. I really wanted to be by this.

Sal Khan Pat Brown United States Khan Academy David Duke Louisiana founder AIRBNB India Affi-. New Orleans David Dukes South Asia Kmart Bangladesh Jefferson parish school representative metairie Mary
Khan Academy: Sal Khan

How I Built This

06:58 min | Last month

Khan Academy: Sal Khan

"Most of the products and services we've talked about on the show have been innovative or disruptive in some way. But some of them and you've heard me say this before have fundamentally changed the way we live I mean lift AIRBNB starbucks. Shop Affi-. wayfair. These brands have transformed the way that many of us shop and travel and work. But every now, and then a founder comes along that seems to want to do something even more ambitious, even more transformative like remember. Pat. Brown, he founded impossible foods to create meet out of plants meet. So meet like that even the most die-hard carnivores would want to eat it. Pat Wants to put a stop to meet production period because of the damage, it's doing to the planet and essentially and I don't think I'm overstating this. He set out from day one to change the world. But still. Pat Brown stands to make a lot of money from his company same with most of the founders who've been on this show and I don't think any of them are motivated primarily to make money but it is part of the story they make a product or offer service, sell it to you and me, and they also get rich perfectly fine. But what about someone who makes a product or offers a service that is equally transformational maybe even more so but makes it one hundred percent free To do that, you have to make personal sacrifices starting by earning a lot less money. which is just part of what makes Sal Khan. So incredibly remarkable. Over the past twelve years, he's built Khan Academy into a powerhouse, a massive online learning platform that offers free tutorials to anyone anywhere. And from the very beginning South sided, his academy would be a nonprofit that it should never be tempted to compromise on its values. But before he launched Khan, Academy Sal didn't anticipate any of this. He was just trying to help a younger cousin with her sixth grade math lessons at the time he was working for a hedge fund. But from those early days of doing one on one to toils sal gradually built a platform that offers hundreds of classes in dozens of languages. Nearly thirty million people use Khan Academy. Every month to learn math science arts even sat prep all four free and Khan. Academy has inspired the launch of many other online learning platforms, but many of them are for profit operations that charge money. But we'll get to all that moment first. Let's back up just a little bit sal Khan grew up in metairie Louisiana his mom was from India and his dad was from Bangladesh and the marriage ended when sal was pretty young. My parents. Had issues and so they separated when I was probably about eighteen months old two years old and then I had really never seen my father and I saw once four an evening when I was thirteen and then he passed away the next year so it was really might. mother who raised us as as a single mother. While was there a community of South Asian families in imagery? Growing up. Yeah my you know when my parents separated. We actually live with my young at the time they were in their twenty s, and so they all were kind of like father figures and almost like older siblings to to me as well and and a lot of ways they were not your stereotypical you know. Just come to the US study. Get a job save money kind of prudent immigrant story they were. They were much more embracing of New Orleans. Culture. And I would say they're the most new ORLEAN South Asians. You will ever find it in your life. I had a very colorful childhood. You know late night parties, people, singing, and dancing. For me it felt like a I remember my third birthday that my uncles got a belly dancer. I still remember Habiba you know So it was definitely a different type of childhood, but it was a in some ways a really rich one. So what did your mom do for a living? The first job that I remember her having she she was the person who takes the change out of the vending machine at the at the local hospital actually the hospital where I was born and she took me to work a couple of times 'cause she didn't have childcare and I thought at the time I remember watching her do that. I think it was like the coolest job on earth because you have the key that you can open up the vending machine and like quarters just pour out of it. So she did that for a little bit and then essentially was a cashier at a series of convenience stores is kind of doing you know one minimum wage job after another and then I was in high school she had remarried her my Stepdad at the time were able to. Kind of cobble together to get a a small convenience store in. Your book you write. Louisiana was as close to South Asia as the United States could get. It's spicy food. Giant cockroaches in the corrupt government which is both funny but somewhat true true. I guess right I mean. You grew up at a time when. Like David Duke was the. The representative in steel her. The part of Mary where we had our store, it was called seminole convenience store on Seminole Avenue, and it's called a parliamentary called on that was kind of the heart of David Dukes base. So to speak I remember in a right outside of our our store across the street was the largest David Duke for president signing I've ever seen and so it was A. You know the the folks who lived in the neighborhood who were frankly know Super David Duke supporters in some ways it was lucky. This is pre nine eleven They didn't really know what to make of my family at at the time We've had a few conversations I remember with people the store where they they openly told us that they were trying to decide whether we were white or the N. word to you know we were confusing them but you know growing up I was the only Brown kid in in the classroom. But I never felt in school at all like folks were in any way biased or racist against me. If anything I have to give the the school system to Jefferson parish school system, a lot of credit you know I think a lot of what I am today is because they gave me opportunities there were teachers that believed in me. I had a really good friend circle So so I have no. You, know I I don't feel like it was a a tough childhood.

Sal Khan Pat Brown Khan Academy David Duke Louisiana Founder United States Airbnb David Dukes Affi-. New Orleans Jefferson Parish School South Asia Bangladesh Mary Representative President Trump Metairie India
McConnell: Trump pick to replace Ginsburg on Supreme Court will get Senate vote

KNX Weekend News and Traffic

00:52 sec | Last month

McConnell: Trump pick to replace Ginsburg on Supreme Court will get Senate vote

"Are flying at half staff this weekend in honor of Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, who died yesterday of complications from metastatic cancer. She was 87 reaction to her death is pouring in from across the country, including here in Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti calls it a huge loss for the country. For all Americans of every background was a hero, somebody who was a Trailblazer when women weren't supposed to become lawyers. Let alone to become law professors at some of the most important cases that we saw before she became a Supreme Court. Justice begins work, Death highlights and immediate vacancy on the Supreme Court, which Senator Majority leader Mitch McConnell wasted no time and addressing Justin Hour After news of her death, Khan will declare that Trump's nominee would receive a phone. Republican controlled Senate did not give President Barack Obama's pick a vote in the months ahead of the 2016 election.

Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg Eric Garcetti Metastatic Cancer Mitch Mcconnell Barack Obama Los Angeles Justin Hour Senate Senator Donald Trump Khan President Trump
Trump and 2015 McCain comments

The Young Turks

10:30 min | Last month

Trump and 2015 McCain comments

"Donald trump is vehemently denying allegations made in a shocking Atlantic piece, which claims that trump refused to visit a US military cemetery near Paris in two thousand, eighteen because the fallen soldiers were in his words, losers and suckers. Now I say it was a shocking piece but to be honest with you not so shocking when you consider all the different times, he transparently brazenly said terrible things about members of our military who happen to disagree with him politically. But here he is denying it and then I'll give you what the facts are to think that I would make statements negative to. Our military and our fallen heroes nobody's done what I've done. With the budgets with the military budgets with getting pay raises military it is a disgraceful situation. By a magazine that's a terrible magazine. I don't read it by disagreed with John. McCain. But still respected him and I had to approve his funeral is president. We lowered the flags I had to approve that nobody else I had to approve it when you think I'm just thinking back. I had to approve either Air Force One or military plane. To go to Arizona to pick up his casket and I approved it immediately. So. Let's take a look at a trump tweet from two thousand fifteen because there's always tweet. This is from July two, thousand fifteen where trump referred to John McCain as a loser. I mean he tweeted an article about himself calling John McCain loser. So he was bragging about it also when McCain died in two thousand, eighteen trump refused to lower the White House flag back to half staff even though it's become customary for presidents to sign a proclamation calling for the flag to remain at half staff for members of Congress until the day of interment, and then one other piece of evidence to Kinda refute trump's narrative in that video take a look and I said somebody should run against John McCain who has been. In my opinion not so hot I supported him. I supported for President I raised a million dollars from a lot of money. I supported him. He lost he let us down but he lost. So. I never liked him as much after that because I don't like to lose. But. But Frank Franklin we're get doing. He hit me he's a war hero. He's a war hero he's a war hero presumed captured. I like people that weren't captured. Okay I hate to tell you. That was from twenty. Fifteen event in Iowa. So. I don't know how to talk trump supporters anymore. That's why I'm done with them in my personal life and everywhere else because the guy. Ridiculous Liar. Does he know that he tweeted on John McCain's loser does he know he said on? Massimo you guys all remember when he said for people who weren't. But earlier, he said, I don't like losers referring to John McCain. So why did he come out yesterday and say no I never malsor. Each just unbelievable he's capable and so if you say, Hey, know what I love people who are Liars Okay again I mean do you boo okay. and. And look again. I. Blame the media. And Because So many politicians lie and they never call it out. They'd never they enabled politicians lies for decades. So eventually, you got one that. So over the top that even. Though. And remember you guys remember it took them like a couple of years before they finally gather up the nerve to say, well, what Donald Trump said, there was not correct. I'm forgetting the name of the CNN analyst who finally just said it and then went on this three minute rant fact checking trump. Fact checking trump's RNC speech but he started that three minute rant by saying trump lied he's a liar and I was like. Is. This CNN what's going on? And so yeah, you're right Jangling the fact that that excited me because it's so rare I think mean something and we'll get you the name of the person I'm talking about because he deserves all the credit I'm kind of blanking right now but look I actually think with this particular story and a few others. The media has done a decent job. So for instance, business insider had a very lengthy list highlighting all the different times, Donald trump attacked members of the military right and fallen soldiers. So I wanna read a few of them right now in fact, as you guys can probably remember in July of two thousand, sixteen trump attacked the family of captain who mine con a slain soldier someone who died. Fighting for the country dismissing a speech his father Kaiser Khan made because he said Khan's mother hadn't been allowed to speak the family said she had not spoken because she too emotional to talk about her son's death. And he just kept going after that family. It was it was honestly disgusting in October of two thousand seventeen trump forgot the name of slain US Army Sergeant La- David Johnson while he was on the phone with his widow, Johnson was killed in an ambush in. Niger. While while in active service. Misha. Johnson said the call was trump made her cry and trump told her that her husband knew would he had signed up for in November of two thousand Eighteen Fox News is Chris Wallace asked trump about his thoughts on retired Admiral William mcraven a former navy seal been. who was behind the mission that killed Osama bin. Laden. He interrupted Wallace and said Hillary Clinton. Fan. When Wallace continued trump did to excuse me Hillary Clinton Fan trump went on to repeat that mcraven supported Clinton which by the way he hadn't as well as former President Barack Obama and said frankly wouldn't have been nice if we got Osama bin Laden a lot sooner than that. I mean, there's so many more examples Jank but I mean I want to give you an opportunity to respond to some of them. By the way Daniel Dale is the CNN reporter that I was referring to earlier go ahead. So we've seen him call the generals, losers, thousands of times and so. I guess people are shocked at that. He would go and call the fallen soldiers losers as well, and not just stop a general's or veterans or captured soldiers. But is it really shy at all? He calls everybody lose them in his denial. He called the military people who were the sources for this story lowlifes and liars. If you're trying to deny that you'd ever call anybody in the military losers you shouldn't then turn around in your denial and call them lowlifes. Buyers. So I look. Landing brokers story with four sources. Then Washington Post back it up with three sources and the Associated Press also found sources all saying the same thing. I actually want to read a few excerpts from the Washington Post piece. Again, these aren't the same sources. These are additional sources who also spoke to the Washington Post about. Their experience with trump and what he had to say about fallen soldiers in one account. The president told senior advisors that he didn't understand why the US government plays such a high value on finding. Oh. This is so disgusting finding soldiers missing in action because they had performed poorly and gotten caught in deserved what they got according to a person familiar with the discussion. Okay. That That part of the story like I don't know all of it is gross but that part hit me the hardest because he just doesn't value people's lives and think about losing a family member that way and knowing that the president of the United States does not care to find their bodies. A trump believes people who served in Vietnam War must be losers. They hadn't gotten out of it according to a person familiar with the comments. Trump also complained bitterly to then chief of staff, John Kelly that he didn't understand why Kelly and others in the military treated. McCain, who had been imprisoned and tortured during the Vietnam War with such reverence isn't he kind of a loser? Trump asked according to a person familiar with trump's comments. So. Look at Donald Trump says, this is outrageous synonymous sources. Donald Trump also, just a couple of days ago said that there was a plane full of thugs who are gonNA come and disturb. His, acceptance speech and caused violence and when asked, who told you that he said? I can't tell you basically it's anonymous. So. I'm supposed to believe your anonymous source of a trust me to go. You would know trust me. But we're not supposed to believe now it looks like about a half, a dozen military sources for that talked to three different publications all saying the same thing and all saying things that are very similar to what you said before and by the way yesterday show before the Washington Post Associated Press stories came out I said I guarantee you. that. He thinks that they're suckers 'cause he out of be fake doctor's note because his daddy bottom one and he thinks they're suckers for not being able to get out of the war his spoil less and it turns out. That's exactly what he said according to the military sources that heard him say. And remember when sources are anonymous to the general public that doesn't mean that there are anonymous to the reporters. Reporters have to vet their anonymous sources and corroborate what they're saying So maybe they're anonymous to us, but they're not anonymous to the reporters.

Donald Trump John Mccain President Trump United States CNN Washington Post Sergeant La- David Johnson John Arizona Washington Post Associated Pre Paris Osama Bin Laden Hillary Clinton Admiral William Mcraven Frank Franklin Kaiser Khan Chris Wallace Iowa RNC
How I Built Resilience: Sandra Oh Lin of KiwiCo

How I Built This

09:26 min | 2 months ago

How I Built Resilience: Sandra Oh Lin of KiwiCo

"On these episodes, we talk with entrepreneurs and other business leaders about how they're coping during this very challenging time and today we're gonNA hear from Sandra. Olen, the founder and CEO of Kiko Kiko makes arts and science projects for kids and ships them out in monthly subscription boxes or crates in March when students began learning from home Sandra's company a spike in orders, and it's now shipped over twenty million boxes around the world I spoke with. Sandra from her home. In the bay area is trying to keep up with demand. Tell us a little bit more about Kiwi Co for people who don't know what what you do tell us about your your company. Yeah. So we design and deliver hands on experiences for kids, kids of all ages. So we have different experiences and products that we develop for Newborns and infants alway through to kids at heart. So teens and even grown ups and these hands on experiences they range. So science experiments, games, kids making play projects that encourage imaginative play. And they're all center around this idea of how can we encourage kids to see themselves as makers And I. Think the the best known as the Kiwi crate and inside like you get pipe cleaners and different OV- like Styrofoam balls and I think that's probably the best known product that you guys make. Right the Kiwi crate. Yeah. Yeah. I mean that's our flagship line. So qe crate is geared for early elementary age kids. So five to eight and it's very project base for Kiwi crate. There are at least two different projects and it's usually one that's a science and engineering focused project and one. That's more be more of an art in creativity designed focus project. So let's say one project overall. It's about arcades and one project might be you create a mechanical arcade cloth that you can actually grab things with and the other side of the crate might be a project where you're making your own yarn pom Pom Creatures, and then you're actually taking your claw, you're trying to grab those creatures as well as whatever else is around your house too. So it's a combination of discoveries along with hopefully A. Little Bit of delight and a whole bunch of fun which I love and tell me I i. know that you launched this in twenty eleven and at the time I guess you were like you were in charge of the fashion portfolio. For Ebay. How did the idea come to you? So it was born mainly out of personal needs. So my my career has spanned consumer products and technology mostly ECOMMERCE. So it started my career in India proctor and gamble and then had been at pay pal at. Ebay but when we started the company, so two thousand eleven, my kids, my oldest two kids were almost three and almost five and I really want to give them especially the hands on activities. It was a way for them to really see themselves as producers and not just a passive consumers as kids who could actually kind of problem solve and make something, and so I started to pull together different and inspiration and I was like, Oh, my gosh, is taking a long time like I need to. Amortize. My effort and so I would invite friends and their kids, and one of the MOMS actually said, you should start a business around this and it was one of those things where I think long story short is that we found that there are a lot of parents who are well intentioned very busy. They want enriching activities for their kids and if it can come. To them in a convenient format from a trusted brand, and that's something that actually really resonates and then if you think about it from a business perspective, if you can get a subscription service to work, it works really well right and so if you consider all the elements of subscription service or you're considering lifetime value if you're able to drive down their cost of Acquisition then you're able to provide something that is not only valuable to the customer, but ends up being something that works really well all the business side to I I imagine when the Middlesex business for a moment I mean I imagine that when it became clear that the pandemic was GonNa shut down huge parts of the economy like most business owners you probably. Anticipated a downturn for Your Business and first of all, how did you prepare for that possibility? Well, to be completely frank, it was a little bit of madness say kind of the beginning. So we were a little bit ahead of the curve and having folks work remotely. But then as people started to shelter in place was definitely a scramble you know we had to see. What the impact would be to the business, and so we've definitely became more conservative. So very quickly we decided to basically pull back or remain conservative on marketing spend. We were looking at things like hiring and figuring out what we wanted to do that. So we held on hiring but then we're also tracking the business and what we actually started to see pretty. Quickly is a pretty decent uptick in the business. I think the combination of parents being home needing something to engage kids we happen to be a good solution, and so we started to see an uptick in the business and then accordingly had managed to the business based on that demand at a pretty dramatic to I think, right? Yeah. So I think you had mentioned. I kind of in the beginning that we shipped out over twenty million crates now, and so if you look at the first ten million crates, we hit that Mark Actually in January twenty nineteen, and then in the next eighteen months or so we actually shipped out another ten million crates and you can imagine kind of the celebration of the business and some of that. Is Because of acceleration that we saw on the business given the pandemic and the demand that was their I'm not surprised spoke with the CEO of dream box who told us that they have seen a doubling of on boarding on onto their platform it's a math platform for elementary school kids. I spoke to Sal Khan a few days ago of founder, the Khan Academy. I mean, they're seeing record numbers of students on their platform I mean as you have seen this kind of surge in demand, how have you been able to meet that demand? I mean, for example, have you had any challenges sourcing supplies? Yeah. So we've definitely had different challenges associated with with meeting the demand I. Think the great thing is that our team has been incredibly responsive and making sure that we shoring supply chain putting in the appropriate orders to make sure that we had the inventory available and I think when it's kind of regular times. To a certain extent, it's almost like your utilities or you know you expect the water to be there in the electricity work and similarly expect that you're going to have product to ship, and so we had to be very proactive about making sure that some of these things that we may have taken for granted and pass were there available to us that we could actually serve the community fulfillment was definitely another area that we had to really shore. Up and make sure that we have the capacity and then customer care I. Mean Obviously we WanNa do an excellent job of serving the customer and making sure that their questions are answered etc and so there was a certain amount of capacity that we were planning for in March April Etcetera May June, and so we had actually scaled add up pretty significantly. Let's go to some questions we're getting in from folks watching system cows, Zimmer he asks via twitter. How do you develop your kids and how do you test them with kids? Yeah. So we have interestingly to product design and development teams. So we have a physical product design and development team, and then we have a digital. So the digital is creating ecommerce platform or content platform. So the software and then our physical product design team is really comprised of folks with mechanical engineering backgrounds, industrial design. We have someone who actually worked on space satellite system. This is, and so these are the folks who are accepting the different projects that could to the kids prototyping testing, etc, and a big part of what we've done at Kiko even since you started it in my garage actually is that we are always testing but children. So in every office that we've had, we have a sizable room and four to eight times a week kids are coming in to test the products at various stages and that is. Something that is absolutely critical for us. We may assume that a project may be engaging. It may not. We may assume that a material is something that is malleable enough for preschoolers hands, but it may not be, and so it's just a critical step in. So as we've actually been working remotely, that was a big challenge to figure out, and so it's been pretty amazing. We quickly decided to actually purchase three D. Printers, laser cutters, etc that we. Then distributed to different product designers, and then on the testing side, we ended up actually either shipping or having a hand off locations for kids to pick up and test materials, and then do them via video conference and so we actually ask for different camera angles to see what the kids are doing because depending on the age of the kid it's not so much that they're going to tell you what's going on you actually have to observe. What's going on in? So that's definitely been an area where we've had to figure out how to get things

Sandra Mark Actually Ebay Kiko Kiko Kiwi Co Founder And Ceo India Olen Sal Khan Khan Academy CEO D. Printers Frank Twitter Zimmer
Tesla stock rally accelerates

Squawk Pod

02:44 min | 2 months ago

Tesla stock rally accelerates

"Tessa says on the move this morning at pairing gains up to the company Equity Distribution Agreement to sell up to five billion dollars of sheds. Joins us with more on that Phil Not enough to put it into negative territory though this morning pre market. No. Because I think when you look at this Agreem- in, what did Tesla has essentially done is it has formed an agreement with a series of bank and I haven't counted how many exactly I think there are seven or eight where from time to time at Tesla's direction, they will sell test shares to raise up to potentially overtime five billion dollars. Now, we don't know exactly what the schedule is going to be how frequently these sexless stock sales will take place the money is going to. Be, used according to the eight K. that they announced this with to sure up the balance sheet and provide a liquidity for the company which raises the question. HOW IS TESLA'S LIQUIDITY? It ended the second quarter with about five billion dollars in liquidity. But remember they've got some strong capital commitments that are coming. They're still building the gigafactory outside of Berlin they've made the commitment to build a gigafactory outside of Austin Texas they're constantly investing in the GIGAFACTORY which is expanding and adding more battery production outside of Reno Nevada. So I think when you look at this TESCO investors will look at this and they'll say look. We don't know exactly what they're going to be using this money for in the future but we do realize that they're going to have these big capital commitments and so now they have said with this series of banks look from time to time we will ask you to take advantage of the market and sell our shares at our direction and Phil we was saying. It's a sign of. The progress of this company that they can re raise five billion. So easily, it's a percent or so just just over a percentage of the market cap today the shares on even flinching and eighteen months ago, two years ago. This would have been nylon impossible correct and remember the reaction that we've seen over the last couple of years whenever Tesla has raised capital, it's been more muted with each capital raise there was. A big reaction. I remember to a capital rate what are they? Two or three years ago and the big question is oh. My goodness what are they doing? Is this an indication that these guys will never be able to make money for just always going to be spending money we have seen less and less of a reaction from the market with each subsequent capital raise or an indication that they will be selling shares. And the share price gains again, not just to mention the eighteen percent since August eleventh announcement of the stocks yesterday up double digit percents off the first of the stock split Phillips thanks much

Tesla Phil Tessa Tesco Reno Nevada Phillips Texas Austin Berlin
Micheal Alago interview

Feast of Fun

00:46 sec | 2 months ago

Micheal Alago interview

"I, knew that I loved music that was hard and fast. So when I heard about all these records coming out on sire records like dead Gauloise and The ramones and talking heads and Richard Hell in the voids I thought to myself Oh, I got here this stuff and I wound up loving but yet coys and I would go to see every time they came in Cleveland Ohio and one night they were doing a three night stand when the British invasion of Khan came to New York with a group called the damned I went all three nights to that so I was just I was just creating my own way, my own path because I was curious and I was so curious it was out all the time

Richard Hell Cleveland Ohio The Ramones Khan New York
Gold star father Khizr Khan returns to DNC stage and condemns Trump

Larry Elder

00:32 sec | 2 months ago

Gold star father Khizr Khan returns to DNC stage and condemns Trump

"Talking about the Democratic National Convention. And Mr Khan is the father of the Muslim soldier. Who was killed And here's what he said. Last night at the DNC Virtual convention Three years ago, my beloved city, Charlottesville, Virginia, was attacked by white supremacists and a young woman was killed. We were attacked again when Donald Trump praise those racist, turning his back on a community that just wanted peace.

Mr Khan Donald Trump DNC Charlottesville Virginia
Hurricane Genevieve to brush Baja California peninsula late Wednesday

Forum

00:52 sec | 2 months ago

Hurricane Genevieve to brush Baja California peninsula late Wednesday

"Residents of ATLEAST eight states in Mexico are being urged to take extreme measures as Hurricane Genevieve strengthens along the country specific coast. NPR's carry Khan has that story. Genevieve is strengthened to a level for hurricane heading north toward the Baja California Sur peninsula will expected the skirt most of the Pacific coast. Forecasters have issued a tropical storm warning for most of the southern tip of the peninsula. Mexican officials say Genevieve is not expected to hit land, but the region will see several inches of rain, wind gusts and high waves. Electricity officials have staged equipment and personnel preparing for adages. In the resort region of Kabul. Son Lucas already hit hard by the loss of tourism because of the Corona virus. Pandemic streets are empty, and officials are considering opening shelters several low lying areas prone to flooding or preparing for high water.

Genevieve Baja California Sur Peninsula Hurricane Genevieve NPR Mexico Kabul Khan Lucas
How To Make Sure Your Child Learns This School Year

Parenting: Difficult Conversations

06:41 min | 2 months ago

How To Make Sure Your Child Learns This School Year

"Once we've thought through our own needs as workers if people in the household, you know the next question is what about our kids what our kids need now's a great time to ask how did my kids? Do when they were learning online in the spring Howard they feeling about the possibility of doing more online learning. Are they self directed learners or was it a real struggle for them? You know younger kids especially in some kids with disabilities. humbling learning is tough. You know what I'm hearing is that a lot of families are taking this enforced pause to trying to think through what their kids need you. Know you kind of have to assess what are your kids really have to have right now to get through this year in a positive way and for a little more perspective on this, I talked to someone who's really an expert in self directed learning. Crystal Dillard. She's the director of natural creativity, which is a homeschooling resource center in Philadelphia and what that means is that she helps children from really diverse backgrounds. kind of design learning experiences that really meet them where they're at. So that can mean anything from studying. Physics to woodworking photography and she told me that often even within the same family, you'll find children have really different needs. There may be one young person who is responsive to what is being given. You know in terms of. Schooling right now, but there's almost always one who is just not responding to. It doesn't WanNa do it, and the parent is really put in a position that either I'm going to be forcing a young person to sit down and do something they don't WanNa do or I'm going to really think about whether is as important as what I even though it wasn't. So. Don't forget to sit down with your kids and ask what would they prefer an an unpack it yeah I mean. So let's talk about the actual options, right what is your day? What is your week? Potentially? What is your semester going to look like if you're in a public school district and we know many of them are going to be online only in the fall Then that's really going to be the backbone or the default for many of you out there. So obviously staying. Enrolled will keep you supporting your Public School District It is free besides obviously the cost of a Wifi device and the time it takes to oversee it. Yep, and you should know that in our reporting, what we've come across is that a lot of districts really feel like what they have to offer is going to be a little bit more robust than what they had in the spring. Maybe more live instruction may be more sophisticated in terms of what the teachers are doing you know. And, that might be better or worse for you. Right because live instructions sometimes means more to coordinate and getting different kids and multiple different zooms. But we also know is that your school's remote learning is not going to fill the whole what would be the school day So then what do you do and I have been collecting lots of information and resources some you know summer gonNA use free courses paid courses live recorded. There's so many different options if you're looking for places to fill in. Gaps, I think a really good tip is to look at your own states learning standards that can be really detailed for the grade especially in things like science think about what topics you might want to cover for a particular grade with every of energy for there's there's a wide range of things I want to mention. You know there's also kind of prefabricated home school curricula in a box. There's a Montessori ones or some other ones that are really kind of everything you need to know to homeschool. There's individual online live classes, right? Your your kids trying out school year my eleven year old is taking a class on out school. Ethics in sports. And it was just like you know there were there were list of hundreds of classes and a buddy of his is just taking this for an hour a day. He did one just today he loved it. It location is no longer an object, right? So so what could you do in terms of alive class? One out of the box resource is a fiber. I know some people that are looking for tutors for their kids including international language tutors who could be really cheap by our your local. Dancer IOS and places. Piano teachers are probably all offering versions of what they do online now. So that's an interesting option to consider that socially distanced There's always software based learning resources like Khan Academy to Supplement and don't forget your networks. My mom is teaching art to my daughter's once a week they really get into that. That's like an hour long activity they learn about different artists and they. Make work. There is high school students and college students all over the country that are banding together to offer tutoring sessions and I would recommend picking one or two. You know a great interest for your kids or something that they really need to work on or both to kind of supplement what's going on with with the remote learning once you have a handle on your own needs and your kids needs. then. It's time to kind of look at your broader community and think about bringing other kids into the mix so that your your kid can have some social interaction, right? Yeah and obviously you're GonNa want be on the same page with the. In that circle you'RE GONNA. WanNa talk about you know how big is your circle? How much exposure do you have on a regular basis to other families in their habits and obviously you're also GONNA want to double down on the basics handwashing mask wearing again, the honor system anytime you start thinking about spending time with other families you need to have a conversation, those families you need to be able to discuss and bring up what precautions everyone's taking. If there's been any exposures, are you comfortable asking someone to take a test one mother I talked to who is thinking a lot about forming a pod because she has? An only child is prudence. Carter, and she also has some respiratory health issues herself. So she needs to be extra careful really really be able to like talk openly about testing and taking temperature washing hands and social distancing and everybody has to be admitted to that. You know let through kind of the different options you have as a household or with family or friends What about if you decide you need to and can afford to pay for childcare What are we looking at here? I? Mean some families are talking about sharing a tutor or a sitter. Some districts are starting to open up subsidized care. And we know there are lots of childcare centers that have reopened although they may have fewer slots, available and then of course, there in home daycares that are interestingly you know opening their doors to slightly older kids who you know they. They might have previously focused on pre kindergarten kindergarten. and. Now maybe they are taking second third fourth

Public School District Crystal Dillard Howard Khan Academy Director Philadelphia Carter
Military helicopter shot at over northern Virginia, crew member injured

KNX Afternoon News with Mike Simpson and Chris Sedens

00:23 sec | 2 months ago

Military helicopter shot at over northern Virginia, crew member injured

"During a training exercise in Northern Virginia. McClatchy's Tara Khan. The bullet struck the helicopter and also injured an air crew member. In that hand, the helicopter made an emergency landing at Manassas Regional Airport. Paramedics greeted the crew treated the crew member and took the crew member on to a local hospital for treatment. Stocks were higher across the board today, with the S and P

Manassas Regional Airport Tara Khan Mcclatchy Northern Virginia
Washington DC - FBI investigates shooting of military helicopter over Virginia injuring crew member

The Mungenast St. Louis Honda Sports Open Line

01:44 min | 2 months ago

Washington DC - FBI investigates shooting of military helicopter over Virginia injuring crew member

"Investigating the shooting of a military helicopter during a training exercise in Northern Virginia. McClatchy's Tara Khan. The bullet struck the helicopter and also injured an air crew member. In that hand, the helicopter made an emergency landing at Manassas Regional Airport. Or paramedics greeted. The crew treated the crew member and took the crew member on to a local hospital for treatment. Stocks were

Manassas Regional Airport Tara Khan Mcclatchy Northern Virginia
"khan" Discussed on Blind History

Blind History

01:47 min | 5 months ago

"khan" Discussed on Blind History

"Can you imagine <Speech_Male> ver the Caspian <Speech_Male> Sea and Bhakkar? <Speech_Male> which is closer <Speech_Male> to Europe into <Speech_Male> Jonah that <Speech_Male> possession of the birthplace <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> of in that area, <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> of Stalin, and it's <Speech_Male> incredible that that's <Speech_Male> where the wind <Speech_Male> at massive <Speech_Male> massive <Speech_Male> really hull <Speech_Male> of Asia. <Speech_Male> They say that the <Speech_Male> air is that he <SpeakerChange> conquered <Speech_Male> was the size of Africa <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> while <Silence> <Advertisement> unreal. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> It's <Silence> <Advertisement> incredible <SpeakerChange> what he did. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> In two thousand <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> and three, they did a groundbreaking <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> historic <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> genetics paper, <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> which reported <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> results that <Speech_Male> indicate that a substantial <Speech_Male> portion <Speech_Male> of men <Speech_Male> in the world <Speech_Male> direct <Speech_Music_Male> male line descendants <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> of Genghis Khan. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> And that means they carry <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> y chromosomes, <Speech_Male> which came from <Speech_Male> an individual who <Speech_Music_Male> lived almost a thousand <Speech_Music_Male> years ago. <Speech_Music_Male> Makes this <Speech_Music_Male> amazing. <Speech_Music_Male> Is that effectively? <Speech_Music_Male> One, in <Speech_Music_Male> two hundred men <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> in the <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> world today, <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> direct male descendants <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> of Genghis <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Khan I do like <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> that, it's <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> amazing. It's <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> just amazing that that <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> many people <SpeakerChange> alive today <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> who can claim that he <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> is a great, great, <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> great, great, great great grandson. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Line history is brought <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> to you by Taylor <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> blinds and shutters. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> All the episodes <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> are available in <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> the cliff, central dot, com <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> website and <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> APP as well as <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> apple podcasts <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Google podcasts <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> defy <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> or wherever <SpeakerChange> you <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> get your pod costs. <Music> <Advertisement> <Silence> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> Kublai Khan <Speech_Male> was descended <Speech_Male> into his and <Speech_Male> there's a great poem <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> by Samuel <Speech_Male> Taylor. Coleridge, <Speech_Male> in which <Speech_Male> he says in <Speech_Male> Xanadu, <Speech_Male> another famous name <Speech_Male> in Xanadu, <Speech_Male> did Kublai Khan <Speech_Male> a stately <Speech_Male> pleasure Dome decree <Speech_Male> where else <Speech_Male> the sacred riverine <Speech_Male> through Kevin's <Speech_Male> measureless <Speech_Male> man down <Silence> to son to see. <Speech_Male> And apparently <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> in Mongol, culture. <Speech_Male> If you're a powerful <Speech_Male> man, you can have as many wives and concubines as you like.

Kublai Khan Taylor Genghis Khan. Europe Stalin Africa Coleridge apple Asia. Google Kevin
"khan" Discussed on Blind History

Blind History

05:57 min | 5 months ago

"khan" Discussed on Blind History

"While it's worth mentioning you talk about succession, so he had three famous sons. The eldest son was junkie and Jodi might not have been his son. because. His wife had been abducted, and then he rescued her. Genghis Khan. And when she came back, she was pregnant, so it may or may not have been his child, but he was I. Suppose Good enough to adopt the child. Anyway and Jackie was by far the eldest, but the problem was the his other sons refused to submit to jokey now the eldest of his other sons, with cooled chugging by and chugging, apparently had this really bad attitude, he was very aggressive and violent, not particularly common, not very clever, the second son on that side in the woods, his third eldest son altogether was cold August day and they appointed him. Him as the success during Genghis Khan's life, because he reckoned, he was the most temperate, sensible and moral of all of the children that he had, so he really did think it. Through is also some dispute over the fact that might have been poisoned by Genghis Khan's orders, because he died during his father's life, and he'd become something of a political problem to him at that stage, so it is a complex story, and obviously like any great empire. It's just never as good off to the great conquer. Themselves has died. I'll agree with that. He was definitely impressive. But at least they was dissembling edge, but what I really enjoyed about Ganga's is he had so many different facets to him. Lockup mentioned earlier, military genius tactician, but also administratively he was so so good at taking the based out of the regions in the trump, said he conquered, and just making the Mongol, impossible, impressive and successful. Well, it was exactly that and they had a code was called the Yesica, and that was created by Genghis Khan and they didn't really care about your ethnicity or your race. It was very much based along the lines of meritocracy as I mentioned earlier, and the exception was Genghis Khan,.

Genghis Khan Jodi Ganga Jackie
"khan" Discussed on Blind History

Blind History

05:47 min | 5 months ago

"khan" Discussed on Blind History

"If you someone who was very good at sourcing food, you would make the administrative full for agriculture and that kind of thing, so he was a real stickler for merit and paps. That's also why his empire expanded as far as it did. He was hugely religiously tolerant to he didn't. Didn't mind what religion you had. He believed religion was a personal issue. He didn't force his own religion down on anyone will he believed in the Sky God, which was kind of a a religion that all of his adherents of his tribes mostly took to later cons became Christians he quite notably with the Schoff Persia that stage and he was Muslim, but he didn't. Didn't have a problem with the religion. I think what people have termed is a hero monster. Because I mean he could be absolutely brutal if you resisted him in any way, up every single piston slick their threats, but if you didn't if you surrended and if your loyalty music incredibly loyal to you, and said it was matched to him, been just a brutal killer. Very, very tactically astute, brilliant in psychological Wolfe's to create massive fear, just lipper rumors. Garad has scary. They actually are at a what people used to do that. Draw the gun killed themselves. Some of the women you suggest gun jump off buildings because I didn't want get conquered by the Mongols because that be raped and murdered. He created that sock logical will fit interest in the NFL tactical Saudi Lynch so much from the tribes and the regions that he conquered, and he brought that inches fall the quite as skills say he was never scared to learn, and rotting was a big. Big Part of his. If you can call it administration people to do that. One of the things that he learned from the Chinese was siege warfare, and they made use of its at the battle of semiconductor defeated that city, using siege warfare, they managed to conquer place up to then had not been conquered, but I do want us to pay attention to some of the Agley, vicious, spiteful and nasty brutal things that he and his army will well known full. He had a way of deciding who would live, and who would die when he conquered nations, and it was cold measuring. Lynch Pin. Have you heard of this? Not Haven't so apparently what they would do is they would line up all the male captives, and they would walk beside a wagon. Wheel is a big wagon wheel, and if they heads will higher than the pin, which is a pin inserted at the end of the Axel. They were immediately executed, so it was a huge wheel. They used to transport. And the technique used to preempt against revenge texts that were coming between the tribes of the time, so if you toll and taller than the linchpin tough lack for you. You were executed immediately. If you were short, lived you live because you were probably less dangerous? So, that's amazing. There's this guy called Jim Muka who had been a friend of Genghis Khan, and then turned against him and Genghis Khan I think very nobly said to the guy look. Let's be friends again. He refused and wouldn't submit himself, said we could only be one sun in the sky and so concert vitamin have to kill you. And he said please give me a noble death, and they would do this without spilling blood. They would break someone's back. I. Don't know about you, but that sounds like a pretty horrible way to die. It is, but I think what the was is. There was no blood spilt vets. Watt was honorable. Having your back, broken and Strangulation Gareth was another honorable web dying..

Genghis Khan Lynch Pin Garad Wolfe Watt Gareth NFL Jim Muka Axel
"khan" Discussed on Blind History

Blind History

03:56 min | 5 months ago

"khan" Discussed on Blind History

"During his short, but expensive rain, he brought millions of souls under the banner of the Mongol Empire. Writing and fighting on horseback, he and his horde advanced into Persia Eastern Europe and China with such veracity that even long after his reign ended, the mere mention of his name would make men shudder women. We and children hide. Such was the reputation of the great Genghis Khan. His real name was ten Jin Borgen, but he was officially Genghis Kahn or the gingas Emperor Fonda and I emperor of the Mongol Empire which became the largest contiguous empire in history of his death. He came to power by uniting many of the nomadic tribes of northeast in Asia after finding empire USA launched Mongol. Invasions that conquered must've Eurasia campaigns initiated in his lifetime, included those against many different tribes, even the Shah of Iran and raids into medieval Georgia all the way in eastern Europe. These campaigns are accompanied by in historical records massive massacres of civilian populations, so we'll talk about those when we get into the nitty gritty of it, but by the end of his life the Mongol Empire. A substantial portion of central, Asia and China. Due to his exceptional military successes, Genghis Khan is considered one of the greatest conquerors of all time. Anthony Metros with me. It is time for us to explore the world if you con in about the year twelve hundred to twelve twenty seven, when he supposedly died on August the eighteenth, and isn't this terrific guests incredible lock? You already enjoyed the history of Attila. The hatton and they were rumors. Will some talk about possible links? Maybe were born in some areas when lost area of of Central Asia. But this guy was phenomenal. I mean he was much bitter. Comparable to Alexander, the great and really phenomenal well I find it fascinating to read about his conquests, but he started off life nut particularly gloriously in Apure put tried will the his father was chief. He was married off at age nine and sent to live with his S, while would be wife's family where he worked basically for them, and then eventually was marriageable at around twelve, and he got married. A woman called butter. And it turns out that his father had been poisoned by these people cold. The Tata's and that started the whole story for Genghis because he went back to vengeance father's death, but he was a kid and use like twelve years old. And he found his brothers, and they rallied together, but the tribe actually cost family out, and they were abject poverty that to live off of terrible things like Bison caucuses an. An. And my son and mom, it's which alike like bolts, and that's what they had to eat, so his life was difficult when he was a kid. I think that was quite interesting was approach that he's father took to? His wife to be. His father was out on a raid and if that's what they did, and he saw this beautiful women in a carriage being taken with this particular. Say kidnapped two metres off so that's the way they operated it does. and. That was Ganga's Mum, but this year rocks the dance have looked. You need to marry Boorda and the customers. He needed to go to his family..

Genghis Khan Mongol Empire Asia Iran China Europe Central Asia Anthony Metros Boorda Ganga hatton Apure Eurasia USA Emperor Fonda Tata Georgia
"khan" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

04:26 min | 7 months ago

"khan" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

"Oral folklore and legend, the empire went to great lengths to erase the location of the Khan's tomb from the world as you mentioned. The funeral escort killed people. They encountered all the way to and from the site, which is a little complicated because the WHO knew the way they're got killed when they were there, and then the other people who killed the slaves and the soldiers who killed the slaves They probably never saw the to at least according to the story so again well well well before this and three fifty three BC we had Greek cultures were than rating, their dead with these ostentatious monuments that were there for everyone to worship, and see totally different style of burial here they're killing their countrymen to keep them from spreading the word of where this leader would have been buried, and for what reason we'll, we'll get to that. Yeah, then for another cultural reference killing people who construct a tomb of a leader is unfortunately not uncommon. There have been other cases and ancient cultures where slaves were killed, not to keep a secret, but as a sacrifice to serve the leader in the afterlife. You think they were surprised. Or are they going into this knowing? They probably weren't gonNA come back. That part is lost to history and stuff that it's you know it's easy for us to say well I wouldn't do that if I knew what was going to happen. You know with the benefit of looking back from twenty eighteen, but the fact of matter is we don't have documentation that tells us anything about the understanding or the motivation of the slaves or the soldiers, because there's very little documentation about con at all, right? There's the secret history of the Mongols which is. Often considered not one hundred percents accurate, and it leaves a lot of things out, but it's you'll leave this far back. In history there's a constant search for sources right put together based on artifacts and just kind of like finding stuff and putting the pieces together, and saying this is probably how it went down and based on what the people who what kind of frame of Reference or cultural perspective..

Khan
"khan" Discussed on Dictators

Dictators

11:16 min | 7 months ago

"khan" Discussed on Dictators

"Welcome to dictators apar- cast original. I'm Richard and I'm kate on this show. We're going deep into the minds of some of history's most hated despots. You can find all episodes of dictators and all other podcast originals for free on spotify to stream dictators for free on spotify. Just open the APP and type dictators in the search bar at podcast. We are grateful for you our listeners. You allow us to do what we love. Let us know how we're doing reach out on facebook and Instagram at podcast and twitter at podcast network? Today we're examining Genghis Khan's brutal. Dictatorship will explore. How espionage influenced his nation building military strategies finally will unpacked the transfer of power to his complicated air and the unlikely ally that helped consolidate their empire by twelve o six Genghis Khan had united the disparate tribes of the Mongolian Steppe. The feet was unprecedented. It was the first time. The Mongols had seated sole authority to a single con. The era of Packs Mangala was set to begin by the end of his reign. The Mongols would controlled virtually all of Asia and parts of Eastern Europe. During that time Genghis would oversee a massive espionage. Operation Create the first international postal system and encourage religious tolerance over his subjects at his empire. Zenith the conqueror reigned over one of the most ethnically and culturally diverse domains. In the world. The question became now that the Mongols were united could their new con- lead them out of centuries of conflict and into an era of progress. Genghis was concerned about the long term needs of his growing tribe. The Mongols harsh landscape yielded limited natural resources and war with their more civilized. Neighbors seemed inevitable. If Ganga's were to have a lasting impact he would have to harness all the instruments of Mongol strength. He'd need to change his strategy and he needed to do it soon. By twelve O six. His rival and blood brother Jamaica was dead. The clans were united and with this came the ability to form intelligence networks. That would play a key. Role in the evolution of the Mongol Empire Genghis oversaw an intricate and growing spy network where information regarding troop movements supply caches weather and other critical. Intel was relayed by horseback rider according to author and historian John Zombie Genghis Khan's ability to mass forces communicate over long distances achieve intricate synchronization of operations manipulate and exploit enemy. Weaknesses and effectively employ psychological warfare. Tactics was unrivalled in the thirteenth century. It was a fascinating uniquely Mongolian system in which a typical spy looked after three to four horses. When a horse was fatigued the traveler would rotate it. Out Giving the stallion freedom to run without the rider's weight. This system allowed riders to travel over one hundred miles a day for Genghis Khan. This would become integral when he ultimately faced off against civilizations with greater numbers and more advanced technology. The leader was brilliant at identifying and gaining advantage and the knowledge he could cultivate with this network proved incredibly important. In finding the enemy's weakness it also proved useful in non-military matters this spy. Route was re purposed into an elaborate postal service connecting the east to the West by the thirteenth century. The Mongol Empire utilized a postal station that delivered continent wide correspondents. These relay stations or yams as they were known. We're the heartbeat of the empire. The Yams were used for the dissemination of official mail for correspondence between foreign dignitaries and traveling officials and for delivering tributes as the Mongols acquired new lands and neighbors merchants became important intelligence sources as well they provided unique insights into the countries where they traded especially when it came to dealing with the customs of foreign actors. This intelligence allowed. Genghis to develop a multi pronged approach to fighting battles utilizing diplomatic and economic strategies rather than his previous scorched earth policy even when he deployed units across large swath of land. He could still communicate efficiently allowing the army to coordinate in a way the enemy simply could not this very much came in handy when youngest con switched his focus from consolidating his power in Mongolia to conquering neighboring lands. It's unclear why Gingas Kahn turned his attention. Outward historians give many reasons revenge. Power drought more fertile lands etc but the most common one is the simplest plunder. Genghis Khan wanted more wealth for his people and the Chinese contingents to the north and east had it first. He attacked the weaker. Toungoo empire to the north in a land known as C. SIA. He did so. With what would become the trademark tactics of the Mongol Empire surprise them so chaos and decimate their lifelines show around twelve? O Seven Ce. Genghis Khan led his army to the Gobi Desert. No Sane person would expect an attack from such a place. The desert was nearly one thousand miles across and had the most dramatic daily temperature shifts on earth. It was a daunting task. Especially when done with some tens of thousands of soldiers however one of the great strengths of the Mongol army was it's incredibly efficient movement. Instead of traveling in columns like armies of the period the Mongols spread out wide horizontally. This allowed for the horses to openly grays and the soldiers to move more freely. It was also one of the primary reasons they needed an efficient messaging system with an army so spread out. It was immensely important to get orders from one end to the other in a timely fashion. The Mongols were also incredibly adept at survival. They stored milk for meals. Drank their horses blood and ate the meat of any animals that died of exhaustion. They sent out scouts that thoroughly mapped every resource. They came across an wore clothes. Ideally made to protect them against the harsh weather. According to Marco Polo any Mongol soldier could survive up to ten days on the move requiring an incredibly small amount of sustenance. Perhaps more importantly the Mongols were incredibly disciplined. They followed orders precisely and rarely would even consider rebelling. This was due entirely to Genghis Khan's rigid and ruthless laws. Not only did he have Azero strike policy breaking the rules. Meant losing your head but he had zero strike policy for everyone in a single army faction that meant that. If in your group ten fellow soldiers one of them fled the battle early. All ten would be executed. This not only instilled fear but accountability and the Mongolians quickly learned to act upon their leaders every demand. The Mongols invasion of the Ottoman Empire took place between twelve o seven and twelve o nine and was not the cleanest of affairs nomadic tribes were woefully unprepared to storm the fortified city walls. Their bows and arrows. Had little effect against concrete slabs and it didn't matter how efficiently they could move if every entry point was sealed but something Genghis Khan was always willing to do was experiment. He began to learn about siege weapons from the locals took prisoners to teach him the weaknesses of cities and used his spies to instill discord amongst the local populations. He even tried to divert a river to flood a city but accidentally ended up flooding his own military camp despite the hardships. The campaign was relatively successful ultimately resulting in the Ottoman empire becoming a sort of vassal state to the Mongols but the Ottoman empire was merely a warm up around for the enemy. The Mongols were about to face by twelve ten another con took notice of Genghis Khan success a ruler known as the Golden Khan of the Jin Dynasty had recently risen to power the Empire to the East considered the unification of the Mongol tribes a blessing. They thought they could make the barbaric nomads into a vassal state. And use the ascension of the young Golden Khan as an excuse to send an emissary but the ruler the messengers met with was not some ignorant fool to be bullied. He was a ruthless conqueror. A brilliant strategist and most importantly a wily opportunist. When the emissary made their proposal to Genghis Khan he is said to have turned spat on the ground and then hurled nasty insults about the Jin Dynasty in their pathetic Golden Con. It was a clear declaration of war and had gave Genghis Khan a chance to solidify the tribes once and for all if he called them to march on the Jin Dynasty and they answered with loyal dedication he would know that the Mongols truly recognized him as Khan fortunately for him. The Jin Dynasty in the Mongols already had a caustic relationship. The golden kings had meddled in Mongol Affairs for decades they had demanded taxes dominated trade routes and treated the tribes like Barbarians. All while hiding behind their luxurious city walls rallying. The troops against them wasn't difficult after consulting with the eternal Blue Sky of the tenure ISM religion for three days and nights genghis. Kahn gave word. The Mongols would attack Jin Dynasty and the great city of Chengdu was to be invaded all of the difficulties. They faced so far hailed in comparison to the enemy on the other side of their journey. The Jin Dynasty was composed of approximately fifty million people including a splattering of tribes.

Genghis Khan Jin Dynasty army Mongols Mongol army Mongol Affairs spotify Gingas Kahn Ottoman Empire facebook Asia Richard Mongolian Steppe Jamaica Instagram Intel Chengdu Ganga Eastern Europe Gobi Desert
"khan" Discussed on Dictators

Dictators

06:53 min | 8 months ago

"khan" Discussed on Dictators

"Following year boar taste fears were realized in eleven eighty seven Jamaica attack timid in with an army of thirty thousand troops from Sixteen Tribes Jamaica's men caught his old friend by surprise Temesan and his forces fled scrambling to defend themselves from the onslaught as intended. Jamaica's attack prompted a crisis in leadership. The spotlight was back on the royal and many wondered what his next move would be however he handled Temesan it had to send a signal. Jamaica decided that for crossing him Temesan. Seventy captured supporters would be boiled alive. This made a massive miscalculation. In an era of wife stealing pillaging and infanticide boiling soldiers. Alive was a bridge too far. Even for Jamaica supporters. His brutality backfired and his once. Loyal soldiers switched sides to back Temesan. The end is Fisher created a power vacuum for the plateau. Some wanted to elect tim agendas con of all the Mongols others could never put their support behind the son of a minor chieftain when democracy couldn't solve the leadership question. The step erupted into a civil skirmish the war between the N. Does came to a head at the battle of Delon Ball Jute ultimately. Temesan was outmaneuvered and overwhelmed by the belligerence. He refused to surrender but victory wasn't in the cards TEMESAN had to flee. It was a humiliating defeat for the inexperienced ruler. A defeat that would cost him political capital and the lives of allies. The eight years between eleven eighty seven and eleven ninety five are somewhat of a black box intimations life. The shepherds of the step were mostly illiterate and left behind few records further. The sole account of the time was the secret history of Mongols at historical narrative written post mortem by Genghis Khan's devout followers. It begs a curious question. What was up to one theory was that? Temesan was captured and forced to serve as a mercenary for a Chinese military leader. This suggestion comes from the fact that in eleven ninety five tension returns to historical record with unfamiliar Chinese Military Tactics Operating Inside. The Chinese military would have likely introduced. Tim Agenda Vulnerabilities he would later exploit shortly after. Temesan reemerged eleven ninety five another shamans vision foretold that he would unite humanity under one kingdom reignited by the prophecy. Thirty five year old Timothy. Jin was back to winning hearts and Minds Jim. Muka was not angling for a rematch. With his blood brother. He had used the past decade to consolidate power in twelve. O One thirteen tribes of the step elected him. Khan ling the universal ruler of the Comma. Mongo Federation Jim. Uca's rivalry with. Tim Again was now a distant memory. Among the tribes. Now loyal to Jamaica. Where board as former kidnappers the market the fact that his own end would realign with the men who raped his wife in sense damaging this was. Jamaica's final act of betrayal. The Conley's fate was sealed in late. Twelve Oh won a battle. Erupted BETWEEN JERRY. Muga intelligence forces it would be known as the battle of thirteen sides. It was a mobile fight. Cutting through the Altai Mountains. At the height of Winter Jamaica and his troops retreated to the foothills damage followed on horseback in close pursuit. It was a trap. Temesan was surrounded and outnumbered but his men held the line and charged the risky maneuver. Put Your Muka on his heels. Tensions cavalry flanked his blood brothers elite guards and captured Jamaica to execute mucus followers temesan employed a barbaric method known as measuring the linchpin. The men were forced to stand alongside wagon wheel if they were taller than the linchpin in the wheel. They were beheaded. The soldiers would then divide the women and young girls amongst themselves to serve as slaves as for the coddling himself damaging grappled with Mucus Fate. The two had shared a sentimental bond once before but politics and jealousy had twisted beyond recognition in the end. Temesan offered forgiveness but only if Jamaica would bend the knee Jamaica declined at this point. There was too much water under the bridge for him. He said there was room for only one son in the sky by twelve o one his son had set since he was a Mongol prince he demanded to give him a royal death. It meant taking his life without spilling blood. Damaging agreed to his anders. Lastly a group of soldiers broke Jamaica's back effectively ending the rivalry five years later in twelve. O Six Temesan was elected leader of the Comma Mongol Federation from this point forward he was Genghis Khan free of Jamaica. Genghis Khan was able to quickly unify the remaining tribes ending a long chapter of petty tribal infighting. Now Genghis Khan commanded all the pieces necessary for an offensive war machine. His sons were of military age and ready to be loyal generals. He supervised a burgeoning spy network in part to. We'll unpack how. Even the weather was uniquely. In the dictators favor Genghis Khan sites were beyond the plateau now. His subjects were growing in number and needed suitable permanent fortifications to call home as his armies spent more time abroad. Genghis Khan realized there was a whole lot more to empire-building than raiding and pillaging by twelve. O six the rulers bloodthirsty had yet to be quenched in order for his empire to grow beyond the Mongolian Steppe. Millions would suffer..

Jamaica Genghis Khan Temesan Winter Jamaica TEMESAN Delon Ball Jute Muka Altai Mountains Comma Mongol Federation Mongolian Steppe Tim Fisher Uca Jin Timothy Conley
"khan" Discussed on Le Batard and Friends - South Beach Sessions

Le Batard and Friends - South Beach Sessions

12:18 min | 10 months ago

"khan" Discussed on Le Batard and Friends - South Beach Sessions

"My Dad owns foam. We've had ups and downs there but certainly from when I took over. Were much much better shape. And I've had the great days at the club since then and in a much better place than we were when I took over as a director of football a couple years ago but really I've been here since two thousand twelve and I've never been the head of football and anybody who's obsessive with football. I will tell you that most stuff in the NFL. Like there's so many things that do not jive with what they analytics guys. Probably saying. And I think a lot of your nerdier listeners. A lot of my fellow football football outsiders readers and people who are into the next Gen stats that the league puts up and sabermetrics. People are probably all nodding along and they know that. That's not what I'm saying in all and you know for all these years because I've you know had had that time where I I can put together the stats for the game. Put together reports for the coaches on the draft picks. You know the time I really enjoy the most in the NFL for me. Outside of the Games themselves in the season is The undrafted free agency. 'cause I'm not. In charge of the draft picks I can't make draft picks but generally have been able to sign undrafted free agents and if found some pretty good players using stats in analytics. Identify good undrafted talent. That's one of my favorite things things to do but again you know. These are things that I should have a little bit of time left in my life and rather than like get a social life or personal life or whatever I chose go Out and try and do some other things like then and make some other businesses and and build other things up and I'm really glad I have because you know if I was still beating my head against the wall I probably wouldn't Have Gotten to where I got where they W and probably wouldn't have had this great day. We had to form a couple of years ago where we got promoted at Wembley Stadium. What's your back story though? When you go back to your childhood I would you explain to the people listening? Who Don't know or have any idea how you grew up? What are the important details? I mean probably the most important thing you want to go back in a nutshell is that I Love Sports Statistics and I love wrestling and when I was like I lost a lot of weight like if you look at me now. You probably wouldn't picture me as I was when I was like fifteen From like fifteen to sixteen and especially from fifteen to seventeen I really did like major transformation. So I'm the same person inside but outside you know I got braces. Glasses lost about fifty pounds in the span of about a year and a half so it was like a physical transformation in highschool. But if you saw me at my Natural Habitat Kinda before. I went through this puberty spurt. That was it in a nutshell. Like just watching tons of football and basketball and wrestling and obsessed with those things. We didn't have a football team where I went to high school so there was no team to keep stats for but our basketball team. I would be stats keeper and sit on the bench with the coach and each year. I got more and more involved. And by the end they stopped hiring Coach for the Varsity and I would just be like a sophomore in high school junior in high school and I would be coach of the Varsity and keeping keeping the stats and looking for stuff that you know interesting breaks in the game and this is the four basketball analytics. It really broken out. I mean we. We knew like so much a lot about the game of basketball back then. People know about it now but yeah that that would be meeting a nutshell. I would like go to basketball. Practice after school keeps his stats. Talk to the coach And then go home and watch wrestling and procrastinate on my homework or anything else in my life and that's pretty much it. I always loved sports and wrestling. And I'm really fortunate and to be able to work in it and I it's it's not exactly the same way it's very very different paths. You Talk to be able to work with your dad. But I'm also really fortunate that I get to work with my dad had and he's been so open to bring me into his businesses and giving me chances to do things but my dad wasn't worth eight billion dollars like what was normal and not normal about your childhood could be honest. I think I had a pretty normal childhood. I grew up in a mid western town. The big change in my life which was awesome. I'm for many reasons is when my dad got involved with private aviation probably around twelve because at first it was great because I would see more because he used to go away on trip to Detroit or la on business and it was you know commercial travel. He wouldn't be back for days and then all of a sudden the trips were a lot quicker when he started taking private plane When I was a kid and then we started to take some vacations on private planes and stuff but until I was probably twelve thirteen fourteen? I really didn't understand a lot of differences in my upbringing from anyone else. I went to school with to be honest with you. You Know My dad was not a billionaire when I was a kid. He was becoming a multimillionaire. All Time millionaire and He's business really grew through my childhood and I watch it grow But he definitely was not worth all those billions of dollars and I was a kid either but you know certainly I also didn't want for anything and he was like the hardest working best add anybody could ask for. Did you want for a dad. who was home more? Was He home enough. Did he have worked like ally. Maybe maybe before I was like twelve but then like I said when he got the private plane I saw him so much more. Because you know if you spent the day in Detroit well you come home if you had to have dinner in Detroit while he could still be home and you also get an hour back on the flight so he would like get home at the same time he left. Basically you know what I mean I all of a sudden you start to see him a lot. More so No that was. That was good. He was there as much as I possibly could have been. What makes him special as a businessman? He's got really good instincts. He's a really hard guy to bullshit. I think in football hopefully now that he's learned more about football. I hope this serves him in US better because has certainly as he learned about businesses. He's like a really smart person. He wasn't football guy he was not an XS and Os guys. He got into it but I do think the longer. He's in it the more you've learned about it and he's going to get better at that too but certainly in the businesses. He's grown up in and that he has like an encyclopedic knowledge of specifically the automotive automotive business. I mean he's a legend in that industry and what made him a legend in that industry I think is a combination of his instincts and The fact that he's somebody who keeps his word and he's got an integrity and those are all things that really rubbed off on me. I think I'd like to believe that I'm a person and who has good instincts and also has a lot of personal integrity and you know for whatever this is worth. I people have told me in the different businesses. I'm in that I'm the most honest person in those businesses in the world of English football and soccer in general. I've been told I'm the most honest man English football and I don't know if that's a good thing or a bad thing but but I generally don't like people and I think a lot of times in teams and sports trust is a major issue and When when you have players or wrestlers or whatever your Rosser is they trust you? I think that goes a long way. What has landed on your doorstep that you weren't expecting acting in any way that came with this wrestling venture? Jon Moxley. I never in a million years was expecting that Jon Moxley would be wrestling for us this year and that he that he would have come in especially so quickly in the year he was on our first show When we look to launch eat view I knew that there was going to be a good possibility ability? I've got another answer for you tonight. Awa but my Awa answer is John and What happened was we launched at the beginning of the year? I knew we were GONNA GONNA launch with Chris. Jericho one of the biggest names in the history of wrestling. Chris is one of my all time favorites. My Dad when I got into the University of Illinois Laboratory High High School When I was thirteen years old he said you can all you can basically have whatever you want one time? What do you want and literally when I asked him for was to take take me to Philadelphia for a weekend to go to EC? W are you kidding me. Wait a minute he offers you A. What was it? He's offering you a genie's wish y just because is your thirteen. I got into the University of Illinois Laboratory High School which is one of if not the top academic high school certainly in the Midwest in West If not the United States and my graduating class and the class before us and I'd probably Wan after us to I don't know because I was gone by them but Certainly certainly up pretty much. Every year we had the top. Att Average In America per student and my graduating class so we had the number one ACT The average in America for any class is more than thirty students and he offers you as a reward. Anything you want in the world and you choose stories. And he's like well. What do you want like you know? And I'll do something for you where you want like and I really did not WanNa go to this school and I got kind of tricked into taking the test and then I took the test and I got in end and I was told all I had to prove that you can do it and then my mom pulled a little bit of a bait and switch in McDonald's parking lot on me and started crying when I told her I did when I got the letter that was going to get in and then I said I got in but I don't WanNa leave all my friends. I WANNA stay. Finish out my eighth grade year with is You know all the friends I grew up with and she said well you know this is such a huge opportunity and she started crying and my dad said well you know. Why don't you just do this and and look like you can have anything if you could have anything? What would it be and I said I really wanted to go meet all my Internet friends? which is kind of crazy? 'cause this is nineteen ninety six so I was thirteen years old old and I had all these people that I traded tapes with to watch all the different wrestling from around the world like Japanese wrestling of of the nineties and Lua libra wrestling thing from Mexico and the nineties and also a lot of older rustling tapes from the seventies and eighties. So that I can learn more about it and it was going to be Chris Jericho's last weekend and he's he w before he went to go work for. WCW and so. I saw Chris his last two matches. NCW which is funny. Because now Chris and I've talked about this. A bunch of my dad and Chris talked about this is a bunch but my dad had no idea what he was walking into. Like E. T. W. in Philadelphia was like the demilitarized zone and And he was so oh cool about it. That was like to me one of the biggest things ever so but when you go back to like go let me go back to your previous question which was got off way off subject subject you asked me about what is falling in my life that I didn't expect well. Chris is one of my favorites of all time and he's so many people's favorite wrestler. I think he'd be on a lot of people's Mount Rushmore and a lot of people's top five top tens and whenever people ask me about e w they wanNA talk about Chris. But I knew when we did this part of my business case was we could get Chris like Chris and I spent a lot of time together and I knew that if I could make all the pieces fit Chris would come and we had all these exciting young wrestlers that were the fastest paced most exciting guys and they were building their own huge independent fan bases with the young bucks. Cody Rhodes and Kenny Omega. what I never expected with Jon Moxley would get out of. WWE and be available to us from our very first show because he's you know somebody huge in the world. The wrestling that I'd never met I'd never talked to when we started this and That was a huge surprise to me. Another by the way thing that fell into my lap. That is totally unrelated to aws but just to put my foam hat on for a second talk. A little English football with you is L. Alexandrovich who is a the top top top player in not just in English football but in the world of European football soccer worldwide Alexander Metro which is one of the best strikers and the way we acquired him is actually pretty crazy story. If you've never heard it I have not so. It's I know it's off subject. But the way metro came into our team. It was originally on the loan. He had originally agreed to go back to one of his former clubs onder locked in Belgium and at the last minute basically the transfer window in England in madness and at the end of the night. If you haven't ended up somewhere then you're stuck until the next window and the only windows are the summer and the month of January so on the last day of January..

football Chris Jericho Jon Moxley basketball wrestling NFL Detroit US Wembley Stadium Philadelphia director University of Illinois Laborat WWE puberty soccer Mount Rushmore University of Illinois Laborat Cody Rhodes WCW America
"khan" Discussed on Global News Podcast

Global News Podcast

03:10 min | 2 years ago

"khan" Discussed on Global News Podcast

"Problem with low carb diets is to keep your calorie intake up. You're going to be having more fat, a more protein good Apopka diet be shortening lives. That's all coming up. But first to Pakistan. These. National assembly and Buxton is the cricketer-turned-politician in run. Khan was elected as the country's twenty-second. Prime minister who's took Khan leader of the country's largest party the PTI comfortably won with the support of smaller parties. He secured one hundred seventy six votes with his sole challenger for the post shabas Sharieff of the opposition PM l. party taking just ninety six Rebecca Cosby spoke to our Islam about correspondent sick Kunda CRA money. And that's Tim about the difficulties which Imran Khan now faces. He's quite a journey for him. I mean, he got into politics twenty two years ago in two thousand and two. I think you only his body and you got one seat in parliamentary elections. Now, of course, he's prime minister always due to be sworn in officially tomorrow morning in a in a ceremony in Slama about as you say for the past five years. 'cause party have governed the northern KP Cape province, Pakistan. Now they'll have to govern the whole country. He has a slender very slender, very slim majority. That's only really been given to him because he's a formed a coalition with a number of other smaller parties, including some parties who he's been very critical of the past the end cwm party from Karachi the PM l. q. party. One of whose senior leaders Imran Khan once called the biggest thief in the whole job. He's now actually being pointed to a fairly prominent position in job government. So there's a lot of discussion about how free Imran Khan will be to implement the kind of the structural reforms that he says. He really wants to do. He, he's promised to create a a nail Pakistan in new Bacchus, STAN one that's corruption, free one that's more equal one where whether you're rich or poor, you're held accountable and he's beholden to his coalition allies. And he's also behold into a number of candidates who who joined his party in the six months or so leading up to leading up to the election from some of these other status quo. Oh parties. And and some of these politicians often called electable switch allegiance to shoot depending on on on who they think is going to win, not people who necessarily ideologically motivated very briefly. Of course, he's got other massive challenges to has navy economies in a bit of a state. And of course, the constant problem of the militants absolutely. The economy will be his priority at the moment. The country needs a ten to twelve billion dollar bailout that could come from the IMF. It could potentially come from a friendly country like China or Saudi Arabia. And yes, as you say, the levels of militant activity in Pakistan had decreased over the significantly over the past few years, but it still remains a challenge for for him. So Kundu money in Pakistan authorities in India, say the number of people known to have died in the current monsoon season has now reached more than eight.

Imran Khan Prime minister Pakistan KP Cape shabas Sharieff National assembly Rebecca Cosby IMF Saudi Arabia China Buxton CRA Slama Bacchus Karachi India twelve billion dollar twenty two years twenty-second five years
"khan" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"khan" Discussed on Fresh Air

"And they they got a less than a mile or two before they came under heavy fire turns out they were marching straight toward the central command post for the north vietnamese and via khan and literally endou of thousands of enemy soldiers so they ended up pin down in the fields of being mortared of being attacked and then the enemy surrounded them so they were literally out there on an island and i should add they had no air support the weather was so bad that they couldn't get aircraft up an over them they were stranded without the kind of artillery and air support that they dependent on and when they and these other units that were being decimated reported to the commanders what was the response the attitude was they were panicking under fire the things couldn't be as bad as they claim they were uh they wanted them to continue attacking and the commanders on the ground who could see exactly what was going i knew that it would be suicidal press on so they eventually organize themselves and managed over you know through a long night to walk out through the darkness very daringly walk straight through the encirclement half of them managed to escape the rest of them had either been killed or wounded and evacuated so the communist forces took control of the city and for a while the american counterattack was undermanned because commanders didn't didn't realize how serious the situation was eventually they did and it's fascinating you write that.

khan