17 Burst results for "Khalistan"

"khalistan" Discussed on KYW Newsradio 1060

KYW Newsradio 1060

02:33 min | 2 months ago

"khalistan" Discussed on KYW Newsradio 1060

"9 30. From Kate. What will be news radio? All news and all that matters to you. This is flash point. Once ignited debate online and in your community cable w Community affairs reporter Cherry Greg and we'll walk you through the big issues of the week that are getting folks hot under the collar. Coming up, moving out Racism in small towns and suburban America took something like this to realize how many people actually felt racism is wrong. How important is light participation? It's absolutely way have to have a really hard ongoing conversation. We talked Ally ship being allies for each other in reciprocity, what it means and how we all can step up. Then she's the first woman to ever get a major party nomination for governor. You've got boots on the ground in Pennsylvania. You know what's coming, So let's be ready to beat the game. The Abrams talks their fight with voting right first traffic weather in a couple minutes, It's nine. No one hears what's happening. The nation mourning Friday's passing of Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg is the politics surrounding naming her replacement already hitting a fever pitch. Philadelphia is remembering Ruth Bader Ginsburg, and shots were reported fired at a mall in White House Whitehall Township this evening in sports Phillies win their third straight beat The Blue Jays three toe one at Citizens Bank Park, Vince Velazquez. Six strong innings to earn the win. We've got a few clouds 56 headed down the 47 in center city. My name is Matt Leon. Good evening. Flashpoint is coming up, but first, let's check traffic. As we check in with Troy Morris. Thank you met and we begin with the look at 95 in Delaware County on 95 in the South bound direction. There's construction, taking out the two left lanes as motorists travel from the Commodore. Very bridge exit for one down. Pass exit to root for 50 to Market Street. Watch out for that two left lanes. Close Stop down 95 in Delko. We also have roadwork that's just popped up on the blue route. I make that on the Turnpike Northeast extension. 4 76 South bound approaching interchange 31 Lansdale Construction in the left lane there, we've got some slowing still on the westbound fine as you make your way towards the school Khalistan school called the tap of the brake Spring garden into divide 95 seconds in good shape until E and things were quiet in South Jersey. On your major's area, bitches check out okay at Mass, trying to sort of close to schedule Next update in less than 10 minutes. I'm Troy Morris. The K y w 24 Hour Traffic Center..

Blue Jays Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg Troy Morris Cherry Greg Kate Matt Leon Supreme Court Pennsylvania Lansdale Construction Flashpoint school Khalistan school America Abrams White House Whitehall Township Citizens Bank Park reporter Phillies Philadelphia brake Spring garden Vince Velazquez
"khalistan" Discussed on Dumb People Town

Dumb People Town

07:28 min | 1 year ago

"khalistan" Discussed on Dumb People Town

"He does not have a great silky smooth voice so I know this is going to be painful for a lot of people. He is part of the milk carton kids which is the band that I absolutely love and he is going to grace you with just the most beautiful music about dumb dumb people. Would you please welcome Joey Ryan everybody. Oh God very much. I'm so honored to be part of this night. I can't believe them sharing the stage with these people look up to them so much scars. I think are geniuses. I play in a duo their duo. Tell them they're like a band. Only funnier and I've gotten to know gotten pretty friendly Jason Right. That's the one A- and since we met he's telling me you've got we have this podcast. You've gotta come do it. It's called dumb people town and you would be perfect for so this is a long time coming. I'm honored hard to hear Canada ban. Is the milk carton kids. We were musical guests quite a lot on comedy shows and so I know thing thing or two about getting these things kicked off so I'll start with a down tempo number about sort of an existential crisis set the tone you could look CEELO spinning. There used to walk <music> out arena tonight feel so into my hair back sworn hit it somewhere fancier only noon eastern on new own K.. Just look at us now. Eh just look and now a kid you could look to terminal or coming on who is Xena law history. The dust is settled down. It was a new dawn we wanted to truly or something specially knew in our harse. We weren't the only ones some our return. We were just little cats. Eh just will care snow. They choose to share <music> record. When I met you could look in my eyes and Ceelo we love light burning? They're used to walk up the hills at dawn. Seal coming up for and you could never in nothing ever come between such too good friend Megan promise if a few just look at us just a little care. It's not just look I just <music> the and supposed to sing the theme song now for the podcast. Oh I think I'll just do it in the same style that last song as though it never ended I assume everybody will take the stage page very morosely and have an uphill battle and Dan Ran J. will share tales of folks so we're lacking Grayson sometimes shoot the last they choose make the news Brigand Downey chip failed in Florida. There's half price bail. Fail say we couldn't me this of dum dum dum dumb dumb dumb Dun Dun Dun Dun Dun so listen to podcasts Coho star in Kirk. Don't be injure news. It quits funny hits. We are going to pay down. Stick around you sound down. It's dumb people. Ah Joey Ryan of the Milk Carton Kids Doc you ready. Hey townies weather do alive episode of population. You Guys Largo Daniel. How are you sir very good my friend I wasn't that beautiful by hunting ponting and again? We apologize that he's not better looking. I'm sorry Louis Ryan to look at listen to join nine. That's the next album tough to look at tough to listen to Joey Ryan. We we love doing this show. I love doing it at Largo a special place always special things happen. We have a great guests before we get to our guests. We like to just sort of loosen up. Do are sort of our Khalistan. It's almost I like comedy jumping Jack Ass like it's almost like it's Prada Yama breathing for this show to the patron taints they were talking about our friend and your friend Jan Flato. There is Jan Flato again quick recap personally people who are coming. I've been here for the first time..

Dun Dun Dun Dun Dun Joey Ryan Jan Flato Jason Right Louis Ryan Canada Khalistan Ceelo Megan Brigand Downey Dan Kirk Grayson Florida milk Milk
"khalistan" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

10:36 min | 1 year ago

"khalistan" Discussed on KGO 810

"And of course, his latest work is called superbugs the race to stop epidemic came out just a few weeks ago, and we're talking about antibiotic resistance. It's one of the biggest public health challenges of our time. I didn't realize that I started looking at your book and everything else. How bad the situation really is. Oh boy. We'll, thanks for having me. Yeah. This is this is what's going to be eating up. A lot of conversation moving forward. It's going to be one of the biggest medical issues. We have to confront the next ten fifteen years when we talk about. About a superbug, what is that exactly? Yeah. Superbugs are drug resistant microbes that includes bacteria fungi Harris sites, and even viruses, and any one of those pathogens in our environment, when they become resistant to the treatments that we usually use, we call them a superbug, and we've been seeing more and more superbugs popping up and what I've been focusing my career on is how do we treat them? If we looked at them under a microscope, doc. How would they look they look just like every other viruses, and fungus, you can't tell that it's a superbug by looking at it under a microscope? You know, we didn't even realize that this was a problem until really the nineteen ninety s when we finally had sophisticated equipment to detect the gene, mutations that were allowing the us microbes to evolve in a way that they could evade. The treatments that we had. And our best antibiotics we find aren't working as well as they used to. And it's because the bacteria and the fungi outsmarting us interested. We'll talk about that in a second, but anybody onyx do not work on viruses, though. Do they? Point they do not. So we have anti viral medications. So if you get influenza, we would not give you an antibiotic we would give you a drug called tamiflu, which is an antiviral. What's the difference between an antibiotic and anti viral well, antibiotic is for period. And antiviral is for virus and anti fungal is for a fungal infection. So they each have a different subset of pathogens that they can be used for. But big picture here is that an antibiotic is to tweet a bacterial infection. If you think of an insect as a living being obviously critter would the bacteria in the viruses, be categorized almost the same thing. I mean do they do they eat and breathe and do everything else that anything that's a, that's a great question. They don't quite do all of the functions that a little critter. 'cause do, but we're learning more and more about the remarkable things that these these microscopic. Organisms can do. I'll give you two examples that are about my book is that they bacteria have developed these things called e flux pumps, which are microscope, vacuum cleaners which can suck up any antibiotic that we give them and spit it out. And the other thing that they can do is they've developed these enzymes where we give an antibiotic to bacteria in that bacteria can chop it up faster than we can pump it in. And so what has happened is that we've used antibiotics inappropriately for the last thirty or forty years, and that is exposed these organisms to our treasure trove of antibiotics, and they've figured out ways to help maneuver them and to destroy the drugs that we've relied on for so long. I can't remember what I had an antibiotic. But when I did years ago, I always remember the doctor sane, take them all everything I prescribe. This little bottle, take them all don't stop it. Two or three. Three take them all. Why would he say that you nailed it? Well, this is a this is a big question that people ask me, why did we end up with all these super bugs and part of it is the doctors have over prescribed them part of it is that patients haven't taken the drugs as directed. And I'll give you an example. If you were prescribed an antibiotic seven days and you only take two days, you're not going to kill all the bacteria. And in fact, you're going to just expose them to the drugs just enough that they can sense it, they can see what it's made of and they can figure out ways to evolve around it into mutate so that they can survive in the presence of the drug. So if the doctor recommends ten days of an antibiotic you're supposed to take all ten days so that you wipe out that superbug completely, and we've failed to communicate that to patients effectively, and that's something that I've been worth a lot on. It's just explaining why we prescribe things for the duration that we do. And why? Enforce the follow those wrecks because people get to a point doctors where they start feeling better and they figured, okay, the antibiotics kicked in, I don't have to take any more in than this virus, or this, this Beccaria comes roaring back. Exactly. Right. And I'll tell you, I'm a I'm a physician, but I'm also a patient, and I've had that feeling where, you know, a couple of days in and feeling better. I, I don't know if I really have to take this and you know, it's really important to follow the directions as prescribed because, again, the bacteria in the fungi are constantly evolving. And if we don't wipe them out with the full course of treatment, they will survive and they're gonna come back stronger and more difficult to treat the next time around. Where would Dr Matt McCarthy, his latest book is called superbugs the race to stop an epidemic. He's got a couple other books out there. One is called odd. Man out the other is the real doctor will see you shortly. I'd met office at about baseball team. That's about my year in minor league baseball. So I thought, yeah. I went to Yale, I was in molecular biophysics major, but I was also left-handed pitcher. And I got fasted and played a year of minor league baseball. And so it was a look at what's it like to be you spend your whole life. Dreaming of playing professional sports. You get drafted you show up and you realize you're just not that good. Did you not not to digress here? But did you know how to throw a knuckleball with your left arm? I, I was a lefty pretty good curve ball. But I ran into the likes of guys like prince fielder hit the ball four hundred seat off. And let's just say that's why I ended up a pretty big scope amazing. I know his father played for the Detroit Tigers. Yeah. Absolutely. I thought it would be a games. I actually wanted to I wanted to be in when I was younger a pitcher I was fascinated by Wilhelm who used to play for the Baltimore Orioles. He was great knuckleball pitcher. So that's what I tried to play in perfect and everything. And then I was going to go call up the Detroit Tigers and say, try me out. I just want to throw this one pitch. And if your guys can't hit it sign me up except I couldn't get it over the plate. Knuckleball play for a long. Picking the right way. I sure can anyway. Let me ask you about an infection that I hear so much about these days in. It's called sepsis. What the heck is this? Ooh. That's a good one. Sepsis is just an infection of the bloodstream so in contrast to alive, these infections where we talk about a particular bacteria or virus, you know, we'll say Mersa, or we'll say influenza sepsis is a broad category. The captures all of this. So any bacterial infection in the bloodstream we call sepsis. And that's a really dangerous condition because it can cause your blood pressure to drop, and you can die very quickly at the hospital where I work half of the admissions to the intensive care unit are patients who have with sepsis. So we have a whole protocol that we follow it, when we identify with that says that we have proven will save lives and will improve care. But the key is to diagnose it quickly and it can be sometimes tricky thing to find out that somebody has a bacterium in their blood, and you have to have civic type of blood tests, and other types of tests. But if you diagnose it quickly, you can, you can treat it appropriately, but a lot of times, it gets missed with these anybody attics that basically are not any good anymore, tetracyclene, and things like that they pass a or they still have some power to it. Well, I tell you, I start my book with me, having to treat a patient with a superbug infection with an antibiotic called Khalistan, and Khalistan was a drug that fell out of favor thirty years ago because it was so outrageously toxic. But we're reaching to drugs like, Callisto again, because many of the antibiotics that we've relied upon I no longer working, and we're trying to find rugs, that's still work and for better or worse where reaching for drugs, like collision, which can chew up the kidneys. It can affect your brain has all kinds of side effects, but it actually works as an antibiotic and so some of the conversations I have with patients are saying you have a severe infection and we've got to use a pretty harsh drug. I'm going to get you through this, but it's not gonna be easy and what I wanted to call attention to how important it is for us to make new antibiotics and why that's such a challenge now. And in fact, the pharmaceutical companies are increasingly saying, we don't wanna make antibiotic. In tell us how they do that. We're gonna take quick break. Dr Matt McCarthy with us. His book is called superbugs his website is linked up at coast to coast, AM dot com. Sign up now for coast zone are free Email newsletter. Get it today. Coast to coast, AM dot com. Capital. One knows life doesn't alert you about your credit card. Also, Karen.

superbug Sepsis Dr Matt McCarthy Detroit Tigers baseball us influenza prince fielder Baltimore Orioles Karen Yale Khalistan Wilhelm ten days ten fifteen years
"khalistan" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

106.1 FM WTKK

10:06 min | 1 year ago

"khalistan" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

"Of medicine wheel, Cornell and a staff physician at the New York Presbyterian hospital. He serves on the ethics committee as well. His work has appeared in Sports Illustrated, slate the New England Journal of medicine deadspin his reviews for nonfiction for USA today, and it's editor in chief of the current fungal infection report. And of course, his latest work is called superbugs the race to stop democ came out just a few weeks ago. And we're talking about antibiotic resistance. It's one of the biggest public health challenges of our time. I didn't realize that I started looking at your book and everything else. How bad the situation really is. Oh boy. We'll, thanks for having me. Yeah. This is this is what's going to be eating up. A lot of conversation moving forward. It's going to be one of the biggest medical issues. We have to confront the next ten fifteen years when we talk about a superbug. What is that? Exactly. Yeah. Superbugs are drug resistant microbes that includes bacteria fungi Harris sites, and even viruses, and any one of those pathogens in our environment, when they become resistant to the treatments that we usually use, we call them a superbug, and we've been seeing more and more superbugs popping up and what I've been focusing my career on is how do we treat them? If we looked at them under a microscope, doc. How would they look they look just like every other viruses, and fungus, you can't tell that it's a superbug by looking at it under a microscope? You know, we didn't even realize that this was a problem until really the nineteen nineties, when we finally had sophisticated equipment to detect the gene, mutations that were allowing these microbes to evolve in a way that they could evade the treatments that we. We had and our best antibiotics we find aren't working as well as they used to. And it's because the bacteria and the fungi outsmarting us interesting. We'll talk about that in a second, but anybody onyx do not work on viruses, though. Do they point? They do not. So we have anti viral medications. So if you get influenza, we would not give you an antibiotic we would give you a drug called tamiflu, which is an antiviral that what's the difference between an antibiotic in an anti viral? Well, antibiotic is forget period, and interval is for virus and anti fungal is for a fungal infection, so they each have a different subset of pathogens that they can be used for, but big picture here is that an antibiotic is to treat bacterial infections. If you think of an insect as a living being obviously critter would the bacteria in the viruses, be categorized almost the same thing. I mean do they do they eat and breathe and do. Everything else that anything. That's a, that's a great question. They don't quite do all of the functions that a little critter. 'cause do, but we're learning more and more about the remarkable things that these, these microscopic organisms can do I'll give you two examples about my book is that they bacteria have developed these things called e flux pumps, which are microscopic vacuum cleaners, which can suck up any antibiotic that we give them and spit it out and the other thing that they can do is they've developed these enzymes where we give an antibiotic to a bacteria in that bacteria can chop it up faster than we can pump it in. And so what has happened is that we've used antibiotics inappropriately for the last thirty or forty years, and that is exposed these organisms to our treasure trove of antibiotics, and they've figured out ways to help maneuver them and to destroy the drugs that we've relied on for so long. I can't remember when I headed. Antibiotic. But when I did years ago, I always remember the doctor sane, take them all everything I prescribe. This little bottle, take them all don't stop it. Two or three. Take them all. Why would he say that you nailed it? Well, this is a this is a big question that people ask me, why did we end up with all these super bugs and part of it is the doctors over prescribed them part of it is that patients haven't taken the drugs as directed. And I'll give you an example. If you were prescribed an antibiotic seven days and you only take two days, you're not gonna kill all the bacteria. And in fact, you're going to just expose them to the drug just enough that they can sense it, they can see what it's made of and they can figure out ways to evolve around it into mutate so that they can survive in the presence of the drug. So if a doctor recommends ten days of an antibiotic you're supposed to take all ten days so that you wipe out that superbug. Completely, and we've failed to communicate that to patients effectively. And that's something that I've been working in a lot on his just explaining why we prescribe things for the duration that we do. And why it's important to follow those wrecks because people get to a point doctors where they start feeling better and they figured, okay, the antibiotics kicked in, I don't have to take any more in than this virus, or this, this bacteria comes roaring back. Exactly. Right. And I'll tell you I'm. I'm a physician, but I'm also a patience. And I've had that feeling where, you know, a couple of days in hand feeling better. I, I don't know if I really have to take this and you know, it's really important to follow the directions as prescribed because, again, the bacteria in the Sunday are constantly evolving. And if we don't wipe them out with the full course of treatment, they will survive and they're going to come back stronger, and more difficult to treat the next time around, where would Dr Matt McCarthy, his latest book is called superbugs the race to stop an epidemic. He's got a couple other books out there. One is called odd man out the other is the real doctor will see you shortly. I'd made out of Santa about baseball team. And that's about my year in minor league baseball. So I yeah, I went to Yale, and I was in molecular biophysics major, but I was also left-handed pitcher. And I got fasted and played a year of minor league baseball. And so it was a look at what's it like to be you spend your whole life. Dreaming of playing professional sports. You get drafted you show up and you realize you're just not that good. Did you not not to digress here? But did you know how to throw a knuckleball with your left arm? I knuckle ball, a lefty. Pretty good curve ball but I ran into the likes of guys like prince fielder hit the ball four hundred seat off. And let's just say that's why ended up trading. Scope amazing. I know his father played for the Detroit Tigers. Yeah. That would be the games. I actually wanted to be. I wanted to be in when I was younger a pitcher I was fascinated by Wilhelm who used to play for the Baltimore Orioles. Great knuckleball pitcher. So that's what I tried to play in perfect and everything. And then I was going to go call up the Detroit Tigers and say, try me out. I just want to throw this one pitch. And if your guys can't hit it. Sign me up except that couldn't get it over the plate. Knuckleball play for a long. They sure can anyway. Let me ask you about an infection that I hear so much about these days in. It's called sepsis. What the heck is this? Ooh, steps is a good one sepsis is just an infection of the bloodstream so in contrast to a lot of these infections where we talk about a particular bacteria or virus, you know, we'll say, versa, or we'll say influenza sepsis is a broad category. The captures all of this. So any bacterial infection in the bloodstream, we call sepsis, and that's a really dangerous condition because it can cause your blood pressure to drop, and you can die very quickly at the hospital where I work half of the admissions to the intensive care unit are patients who have with sepsis. So we have a whole protocol that we follow it, when we identify says, that we have proven will save lives and will improve care. But the key is to diagnose it quickly and it can be sometimes tricky thing to find out that somebody has a bacterium in their blood, and you have to have specific types of blood tests, and other types of tests. But if you diagnose it quickly, you can feed it appropriately, but a lot of times, it gets missed with these anti-biotics that basically are not do any good anymore. I mean like tetracycline and things I got they pass a or they still have some power to it. Well, I tell you, I start my book with me, having to treat a patient with a superbug infection with an antibiotic called Khalistan, and Khalistan was a drug that fell out of favor thirty years ago because it was so outrageously toxic. But we're reaching to drugs like, Callisto again, because many of the antibiotics that we've relied upon I no longer working, and we're trying to find rugs, it's still work and for better or worse where reaching for drugs, like collision, which can chew up the kidneys. It can affect your brain has all kinds of side effects, but it actually works as an antibiotic and so some of the conversations I have with patients are saying you have a severe infection and we've got to use a pretty harsh drug. I'm going to get you through this, but it's not gonna be easy and what I wanted to call attention to how important it is for us to make new antibiotics and why that's such a challenge now. And in fact, the pharmaceutical companies are increasingly saying, we don't wanna make. Antibiotics. And tell us how they do that. We're gonna take quick break. Dr Matt McCarthy with us. His book is called superbugs his website is linked up at coast.

sepsis Dr Matt McCarthy Detroit Tigers baseball USA editor in chief New York Presbyterian hospital influenza Sports Illustrated Cornell Khalistan New England Journal of medicin prince fielder tetracycline Yale Baltimore Orioles Santa
"khalistan" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

09:54 min | 1 year ago

"khalistan" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"Medicine deadspin his reviews for nonfiction for USA today, and it's editor in chief of the current fungal infection report. And of course, his latest work is called superbugs the race to stop an epidemic came out just a few weeks ago. And we're talking about antibiotic resistance. It's one of the biggest public health challenges of our time. I didn't realize that until I started looking at your book and everything else. How bad the situation really is. Oh boy. Thanks for having me. Yeah. This is this is what's going to be eating up. A lot of conversation. Moving forward can be one of the biggest medical issues. We have to confront the next ten. Fifteen years when we talk about a superbug, what is that? Exactly. Yeah. Superbugs are drug resistant microbes that includes bacteria fungi Harris sites, and even viruses, and any one of those pathogens in our environment, when they become resistant to the treatments that we usually use, we call them a superbug, and we've been seeing more and more superbugs popping up and what I've been focusing my career on is how do we treat them? If we looked at them under a microscope, doc. How would they look they look just like every other viruses, and fungus, you can't tell that it's a superbug by looking at it under a microscope? You know, we didn't even realize that this was a problem until really the nineteen ninety s when we assigned, we had sophisticated equipment to detect the gene, mutations that we're allowing us microbes to evolve in a way that they. They could evade the treatments that we had and our best antibiotics we find aren't working as well as they used to. And it's because the bacteria and the fungi outsmarting us interested. We'll talk about that in a second, but anybody on x do not work on viruses, though. Do they point they do not? So we have antiviral medications. So if you get influenza, we would not give you an antibiotic we would give you a drug called tamiflu, which is an antiviral that what's the difference between an antibiotic in an anti viral? Well, antibiotic is for period and into viral is for virus and anti fungal is for a fungal infection, so they each have a different subset of pathogens that they can be used for, but big picture here is that an antibiotic is to treat a bacterial infection. If you think of an insect as a living being obviously critter would the bacteria in the viruses, be categorized almost the same thing. I mean. Do they do they eat and breathe and do everything else that anything does it? That's a, that's a great question. They don't quite do all of the functions that a little critter to do, but we're learning more and more about the remarkable things that these, these microscopic organisms can do give you two examples that are about my book is that they bacteria have developed these things called e flux pumps, which are microscope, vacuum cleaners which can suck up any antibiotic that we give them and spit it out. And the other thing that they can do is they've developed these enzymes where we give an antibiotic to bacteria in that bacteria can chop it up faster than we can pump it in. And so what has happened is that we've used antibiotics inappropriately for the last thirty or forty years, and that is exposed these organisms to our treasure trove of antibiotics, and they've figured out ways to help me do. Over them. And to destroy the drugs that we've relied on for so long. I can't remember what I headed anti-biotics, but when I did years ago, I always remember the doctor sane, take them all everything I prescribe. This little bottle, take them all don't stop it. Two or three take them all? Why would he say that you nailed it? Well, this is a this is a big question that people ask me, why did we end up with all these super bugs and part of it is the doctors over prescribed them part of it is that patients haven't taken the drugs, that's directed. And I'll give you an example if you were prescribed an antibiotic for seven days, and you only take two days, you're not gonna kill all the bacteria. And in fact, you're gonna just expose them to the drugs just enough that they can sense it, they can see what it's made of, and they can figure out ways to evolve around into mutate so that they can survive in the presence of the drug. So if a doctor recommends ten days of an aunt. Antibiotic is supposed to take all ten days so that you wipe out that superbug completely, and we've failed to communicate that to patients effectively. And that's something that I've been working a lot on has just explaining why we prescribe things for the duration that we do and why the follow those wrecks because people get to a point doctors were they start feeling better and they figured, okay? The antibiotics kicked in, I don't have to take any more in than this virus, or this, this Beccaria comes roaring back. Exactly. Right. And I'll tell you, I'm a I'm a physician, but I'm also a patient, and I've had that feeling where, you know, a couple of days in feeling better. I don't know if I really have to take this and you know, it's really important to follow the directions as prescribed because, again, the bacteria in the fungi are constantly evolving. And if we don't wipe them out with the full course of treatment, they will survive and they're gonna come back stronger and more difficult to treat the next time. Around, where would Dr Matt McCarthy? His latest book is called superbugs the race to stop an epidemic. He's got a couple other books out there. One is called odd. Man out the other is the real doctor will see you shortly. I'd met set about baseball team. And that's about my year in minor league baseball. So I thought, yeah, I went to Yale, and I was in molecular biophysics major, but I was also left-handed pitcher. And I got drafted and played a year of minor league baseball. And so it was a look at what's it like to be you spend your whole life. Dreaming of playing professional sports. You get drafted you show up and you realize you're just not that good. Did you not not to digress here? But did you know how to throw a knuckleball with your left arm? I threw a knuckleball. I was a, a lefty pretty good curve ball. But I ran into the likes of guys like prince fielder at the ball four hundred seat off. And let's just say that's why ended up trading at the scope. Amazing. I know his father played for the Detroit Tigers. Yeah. Absolutely. It'd be a games. I actually wanted to I wanted to be in, when I was younger a pitcher. I was fascinated by Hoyt Wilhelm who used to play for the Baltimore Orioles. He was great knuckleball pitcher. So that's what I tried to play in perfect and everything. And then I was going to go call up the Detroit Tigers and say, try me out. I just wanna throw this one pitch. And if your guys can't hit it. Sign me up except that couldn't get it over the plate. Knuckleball compla- for a long. Thinking the right way. Sure. Can anyways let me ask you about an infection that I hear so much about these days in? It's called sepsis. What the heck is this? Ooh. That's a good one. Sepsis is just an infection of the bloodstream so in contrast to a lot of these infections where we talk about a particular bacteria or virus, you know, we'll say Mersa, or we'll say influenza sepsis is a broad category that captures all of this. So any bacterial infection in the bloodstream, we call sepsis, and that's a really dangerous condition because it can cause your blood pressure to drop, and you can die very quickly at the hospital where I work half of the admissions to the intensive care unit are patients who have with sepsis. So we have a whole protocol that we follow it, when we identify issue, that says that we have proven will save lives and will improve care. But the key is to diagnose it quickly and it can be sometimes a tricky thing to find out that somebody has a bacterium in their blood, and you have to have specific types of blood tests, and other types of tests. But if you diagnose it quickly, you, can you can feed it appropriately, but a lot of times, it gets missed with these anti-biotics that basically are not any good anymore. I mean like tetracycline and things like that they pass a or they still have some power to it. Well, I tell you, I start my book with me, having to treat a patient with a superbug infection with an antibiotic called Khalistan, and Khalistan was a drug that fell out of favor thirty years ago because it was so outrageously toxic. But we're reaching to drugs like, Callisto again because many of the antibiotics that we've relied upon I'm no longer working in. We're trying to find drugs. It's still work and for better or worse where reaching for drugs, like collision, which can chew up the kidneys. It can affect your brain has all kinds of side effects, but it actually works as an antibiotic and so some of the conversations I have with patients are saying you have a severe infection and we've got to use a pretty harsh drug. I'm going to get you through this, but it's not going to be easy, and what I wanted to call attention to how important it is for us to make new antibiotics. And why that's such a challenge now. And in fact, the pharmaceutical companies are increasingly saying, we don't wanna make antibiotics interested in tell us how they do that. We're going gonna take quick break. Dr Matt McCarthy with us. His book is called superbugs his website is linked up at.

superbug Sepsis baseball Dr Matt McCarthy editor in chief USA Detroit Tigers influenza Knuckleball compla tetracycline Yale Hoyt Wilhelm Khalistan Baltimore Orioles ten days
"khalistan" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

09:54 min | 1 year ago

"khalistan" Discussed on KTOK

"Of medicine deadspin his reviews for nonfiction for USA today, and it's editor in chief of the current fungal infection report. And of course, his latest work is called superbugs the race to stop democ came out just a few weeks ago. And we're talking about antibiotic resistance. It's one of the biggest public health challenges of our time. I didn't realize that until I started looking at your book and everything else. How bad the situation really is. Oh boy. Thanks for having me. Yeah. This is this is what's going to be eating a lot of conversation moving forward. It's gonna be one of the biggest medical issues. We have to confront the next ten fifteen years when we talk about a superbug. What is that exactly? Yeah, superbugs are drug resistant microbes that includes bacteria fungi Harris sites, and even viruses, and any one of those pathogens in our environment, when they become resistant to the treatments that we usually use, we call them a superbug, and we've been seeing more and more superbugs popping up and what I've been focusing my career on, how do we treat them? If we looked at them under a microscope, doc. How would they look they look just like every other viruses, fungi? You can't tell that it's a superbug by looking at it under a microscope. You know, we didn't even realize that this was a problem until really the nineteen ninety s when we finally had sophisticated equipment to detect the gene, mutations that were allowing these microbes to evolve in a way that they could evade the treatments that we had. And our? Best antibiotics we find aren't working as well as they used to. And it's because the bacteria and the fungi outsmarting interested. We'll talk about that in a second, but anybody on x do not work on viruses, though. Do they point? They do not. So we have antiviral medications. So if you get influenza, we would not give you an antibiotic we would give you a drug called tamiflu, which is an antiviral. What's the difference between any biotic in an anti viral? Well, antibiotic is for periods. Anti-viral is for virus and antifungal is for a fungal infection. So they each have a different subset of pathogens that they can be used for. But big picture here is that an antibiotic is to treat bacterial infections. If you think of an insect as a living being obviously critter would the bacteria in the viruses, be categorized almost the same thing. I mean, do they do they eat and breathe, and do everything else that ending living? That's a, that's a great question. They don't quite do all of the suction that a little critter to do, but we're learning more and more about the remarkable things that these, these microscopic organisms can do. I'll give you two examples that are about my book is that they bacteria have developed these things called e flux pumps, which are microscope, vacuum cleaners which can suck up any antibiotic that we give them and spit it out and the other thing that they can do is they've developed these enzymes where we give an antibiotic to bacteria in that bacteria can chop it up faster than we can pump it in. And so what happened is that we've used antibiotics inappropriately for the last thirty or forty years, and that is exposed these organisms to our treasure trove of antibiotics, and they've figured out ways to help maneuver them and to destroy the drugs that we've relied on for so long I can't remem-. What I had an antibiotic, but when I did years ago, I always remember the doctor sane, take them all everything I prescribe. This little bottle, take them all don't stop it. Two or three. Take them all. Why would he say that you nailed it? Well, this is a this is the big question that people ask me, why did we end up with all these super bugs and part of it is the doctors over prescribed them part of it is that patients haven't taken the drugs as directed. And I'll give you an example. If you were prescribed an antibiotic seven days and you only take two days, you're not gonna kill all the bacteria. And in fact, you're going to just expose them to the drug just enough that they can sense it, they can see what it's made of and they can figure out ways to evolve around it into mutate so that they can survive in the presence of the drug. So if a doctor recommends ten days of an antibiotic you're supposed to take all ten days so that you wipe out that. Superbug completely, and we've failed to communicate that to patients effectively. And that's something that I've been working on is just explaining why we prescribe things for the duration that we do and why the follow those because people get to a point doctors were they start feeling better and they figured okay? The antibiotics kicked in, I don't have to take any more in this virus, or this, this Beccaria comes roaring back. Exactly. Right. And I'll tell you, I'm a I'm a physician, but I'm also a patient, and I've had that feeling where, you know, a couple of days in feeling better. I don't know if I really have to take this and you know, it's really important to follow the directions as prescribed because, again, the bacteria in the Sunday are constantly evolving. And if we don't wipe them out with the full course of treatment, they will survive and they're gonna come back stronger and more difficult to treat the next time around. Dr Matt McCarthy, his latest book is called superbugs the race. Stop in epidemic. He's got a couple other books out there. One is called odd. Man out the other is the real doctor will see you shortly. I'd made out about baseball team that's about my year in minor league baseball. So I thought, yeah, I went to Yale, and I was in molecular biophysics major, but I was also left-handed pitcher. And I got fasted and played a year of minor league baseball. And so it was a look at what's it like to be you spend your whole life. Dreaming playing professional sports. You get drafted you show up and you realize you're just not that good. Did you not? Not not to digress here. But did you know how to throw a knuckleball with your left arm? I threw a knuckleball. I was a lefty pretty good curve ball. But I ran into the likes of guys like prince fielder hit the ball four hundred seat off. And let's say that's why I ended up trading the baseball at the scope amazing. I know his father a played for the Detroit Tigers. Yeah. Absolutely. It's it'd be a games. I actually wanted to I wanted to be in when I was younger a pitcher I was fascinated by Wilhelm who used to play for the Baltimore Orioles. He was great knuckleball pitcher. So that's what I tried to play in perfect and everything. And then I was gonna go call up the Detroit, Tigers and say, try me out. I just wanna throw this one pitch. And if your guys can't hit it. Sign me up except that couldn't get it over the plate. Knuckleball compla- for a long. Thinking the right way. Sure. Can anyway. Let me ask you about an infection that I hear so much about these days in. It's called sepsis. What the heck is this? Steps is a good one sepsis is just an infection of the bloodstream so in contrast to a lot of these infections where we talk about a particular bacteria or virus, you know, we'll say Mersa, or we'll say influenza sepsis is a broad categories, the catchers, all of this, so any bacterial infection in the bloodstream, we call sepsis, and that's a really dangerous condition because it can cause your blood pressure to drop, and you can die very quickly at the hospital where I work half of the admissions to the intensive care unit are patients who would sets of so we have a whole protocol that we follow it when we identify with, that we have proven will save lives and improve care. But the key is today agnostic quickly and it can be sometimes a tricky thing to find out that somebody has bacterium in their blood, and you have to have civic types of blood tests, and other types of tests. But if you diagnose it quickly, you can treat it appropriately, but a lot of times it gets with these antibiotics that basically are not any good anymore, tetracyclene, and things like that they pass a or they still have some power to it. Well, I start my book with me, having to treat a patient with a superbug infection with an antibiotic called Khalistan, and Khalistan was a drug that fell out of favor thirty years ago because it was so outrageously toxic. But we're reaching to drugs like, Callisto again, because many of the antibiotics that we've relied upon I no longer working, and we're trying to find drugs, it's still work and for better or worse where reaching for drugs, like Callisto, which can to the kidneys. It can affect your brain has all kinds of side effects, but it actually works as an antibiotic and so some of the conversations I have with Asians are saying you have a severe infection and we've got to use a pretty harsh drug. I'm going to get you through this. But it's not gonna be easy and what I wanted to call attention to how important it is for us to make new antibiotics. And why that's such a challenge now. And in fact, the pharmaceutical companies are increasingly saying, we don't wanna make antibiotic and tell us how they do that. We're gonna take quick break. Dr Matt McCarthy with us. His book is called superbugs his website is linked up at.

Superbug Dr Matt McCarthy baseball USA editor in chief influenza sepsis Knuckleball compla Detroit Tigers Detroit prince fielder Yale Khalistan Baltimore Orioles Tigers Wilhelm
"khalistan" Discussed on KCBS All News

KCBS All News

03:27 min | 1 year ago

"khalistan" Discussed on KCBS All News

"We bought ciprofloxacin and among Cicilline both vitally important antibiotics used to treat infections all over the world and then without even discussing symptoms. We asked for a bottle of Khalistan the same powerful antibiotic that saved David Ritchie and the babies in the intensive care unit. Mrs clinton. The loss line antibiotic nuclear. Humans aren't the only ones the dosed with Callisto Roman on Luxembourger. Ryan took us to this poultry farm outside Delhi. What's up with a mixed feed with food different types of antibiotics, including Khalistan antibiotics make animals grow foster and stave off infection. It's a practice pioneered in the United States where over a dozen different antibiotics are approved for use in farm animals. So what is the problem with giving these chickens antibiotics? We look around us the chicks heating constantly antibiotics in that feed, which means they have back to being exposed to be antibiotics on a constant basis and constantly selecting for resistance. What does that mean selecting resistance? It means that the bacteria in those chicken of being exposed to antibiotics which kill all the bacteria that sensitive to the antibiotics leaving behind only resistant bacteria, which don't respond to antibodies. So it means these chickens obeying accidentally read to create super bunks because they're being antibiotics every single day of LA's and once a superbug evolves in animals, it can spread to humans through soil mortar and the handling all eating of neat. That's exactly what happened in China when peaks that were fed Khalistan developed to genetic mutation cold MCI one it makes bacteria resistant to Khalistan. The findings were first published in two thousand fifteen just three years later. MCI one was found in more than forty countries in two thousand seventeen sixty nine year old Jeff Regan became one of the first Americans to be found with MCI one. He arrived at Massachusetts General Hospital delirious and with a fever of one hundred six so they discovered that you'd been infected with bacteria carrying the gene MCI Juan. Became like, a famous person at the hospital facts change within a day or two of that a lot of different doctor for coming into. Visit me asking me a lot of questions. What are they asking? You were asking me where I've been in the last six months what my travel this, you know, everything about my life microbiologist and infectious disease. Doctors Saratov was worried the infection could spread so she put a Regan in isolation. Had you ever seen MCI one before we had not this was the first one that our lab at isolated MCI one was first spotted in pigs in China. How does it end up in Jeff?.

MCI Jeff Regan Khalistan Mrs clinton China ciprofloxacin David Ritchie Saratov Massachusetts General Hospital Cicilline United States Luxembourger LA Ryan Delhi fever superbug two thousand seventeen sixty n three years
"khalistan" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

03:55 min | 1 year ago

"khalistan" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"The university of California system, and it's the same one. I think it's called United Healthcare. I did call them and tell them that we had a good news story for them. I don't think they've really twigged onto it yet. I think we should send them a copy of the book. Maybe maybe we should pick commercials. Great. Yes. The middle. Oh, yes. That's my colleague from Twitter, high guess nice to see you. Yes. It's over your head. You know? Thank you, first of all the lights to the thank you very much of a shooting star is incredible. Enjoy reading your book every page is fool. If this story of science medicine love and really incredible story as we know overuse of undeveloped as all. Use of antibiotic is eating cruising Baabda, but in developing country, like you traveled India, China book is now being translated into Chinese Chinese and other languages. You'll is has been translated. I wish more people. I hope more readers can enjoy from your book. Well, thank you very much. In fact, you've raised a really important issue that we haven't talked about tonight, which is the global superbug crisis. And one of the reasons we decided to write our book was that if I'm blindsided as an infectious disease epidemiologist to the dire situation, we're facing with the microbial resistance problem than most people in the world, probably are too. And so it's our overuse of antibiotics not so much and people in hospitals, but in livestock, that's the biggest problem. So seventy percent of the antibiotics that are used in the US and in most of. Countries are used to promote growth and chicken and cows and pigs, and it's not actually treat their disease or even prevent their diseases to use antibiotics as growth promoters. And so there have been attempts to kind of clamp down on this Europe has done. I mean, western Europe has done a great job. And so the care leaders in this, but several countries the US is one of them China. India some South American countries are really problematic in this area. So in November twenty fifteen when Tom fell sick, the the gene that confers resistance to Khalistan collision is the last resort antibiotic was discovered and was reported in pigs in China. It was reported in the journal Lancet, which is the top medical journal in the world that you know, because you're scientists, but. By the time that that one antimicrobial resistance was reported. It was in thirty other countries. I mean, so here we are we're where you stuff up suffer from a problem of undetected undiagnosed and then being untreatable and those three different problems are facing us now that by the year twenty fifty one person every three seconds is going to die from his superbug infection unless drastic turnaround has taken. So I hate to leave you with some dire news, but we all need to take efforts to you know, if you're going to eat meat, antibiotic free meat and to put pressure on our legislators to stop using antibiotics right now, there's an effort to try to stop easy antibiotics and citrus because the federal government has is allowing this to happen. And there's no need for it. So anyway, that's that's that's the spiel. But hopefully, if you read the. Book you'll you'll enjoy it. But you'll learn a few things along the way. Thank.

China Europe US India university of California United Healthcare Twitter Baabda Lancet federal government Tom Khalistan seventy percent three seconds
"khalistan" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

760 KFMB Radio

03:25 min | 1 year ago

"khalistan" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

"To create superbox because they're being asked about every single day of their lives. Superbug evolves. In animals, it can spread to humans through soil. Mosa and the handling or eating of meat. That's exactly what happened in China when pigs that were fed Khalistan developed to genetic mutation cold MCI one it makes bacteria resistant to Callisto. The findings were first published in two thousand fifteen just three years later. MCI one was found in more than forty countries in two thousand seventeen sixty nine year old Jeff Regan became one of the first Americans to be found with MC one he arrived at Massachusetts General Hospital delirious and with a fever of one hundred six so they discovered that you've been infected with a backdoor carrying the gene MC one. Became like a famous person at the hospital. Thanks change within a day or two that a lot of different doctors coming into visit me asking me a lot of questions. What are they asking? You were asking me where I've been in the last six months, what my travel is, you know, everything about my life microbiologist and infectious disease. Dr Sarah was worried the infection could spread so she put a Regan in isolation. Had you ever seen MCI one before we had not this was the first one that our lab at isolated MCI one was I put it in pigs in China. How does it end up in Jeff? It's a great question. It's not completely clear how it ended up in Jeff it's entirely possible that he picked up during his travel. I know he's been to the Caribbean and one has been reported in the Caribbean. And so it's possible that when he was there he ate something. That maybe wasn't well cooked or picked it up, and it just colonized his gastrointestinal tract the centers for disease control is now tracking MCI one and told us they have found isolated cases in nineteen states. This superbug is still in a Regan system and with Callisto now no longer an option. He's relying on the one antibiotic lift that can fight it. And if that bacteria became resistant to that one antibiotic that still would what would happen then right now, that's my last line of defense. So you wouldn't survive without it? I've been told that. Some people might hear this and think well, the the best way to protect myself is just not travel to India not travel to other developing countries resistant bacteria that developed in the United States of that you're susceptible to you know, this is a global problem. It doesn't stay confined to any single case as an individual. Can I have any impact on this problem using individual can have a huge impact by recognizing that taking antibiotics inappropriately too far more harm than good? So even if you didn't care about resistance for other people might consider the fact that the antibodies won't work for you. When you really.

Jeff Regan MCI Superbug China Massachusetts General Hospital Caribbean Mosa gastrointestinal tract Khalistan fever Dr Sarah United States India two thousand seventeen sixty n three years six months
"khalistan" Discussed on WBBM Newsradio

WBBM Newsradio

05:22 min | 1 year ago

"khalistan" Discussed on WBBM Newsradio

"Here is the money to pay the Bill. Just a few dollars. We bought ciprofloxacin and amongst the ceiling. Both vitally important antibiotics used to treat infections all over the world and then without even discussing symptoms. We asked for a bottle of Callisto the same powerful antibiotic that saved David Ritchie and the babies in the intensive care unit. Mrs clinton. But lost line antibody. Aren't the only ones be dosed week Callisto Roman on Luxembourg Ovalles and took us to this poultry farm outside Delhi? What's up with a mixed feed with four different types of antibiotics, including Khalistan antibiotics make animals grow foster and stave off infection. It's a practice pioneered in the United States. Where a dozen different antibiotics are approved for use in farm animals. What is the problem with giving these chickens antibiotics? Around us, the chicks heating constantly antibiotics in that feed, which means they're back to being exposed to be antibiotics on a constant basis and constantly selecting for resistance. What does that mean selecting for resistance? It means that the bacteria in those chicken being exposed to antibiotics which kill all the bacteria that a sensitive to the antibiotics leaving behind only resistant bacteria, which don't respond to about. It means these chickens obeying accidentally read to create superbox because they're being antibiotics every single day abilities. And once a superbug evolves in animals, you can spread to humans through soil mortar and the handling all eating of meat. That's exactly what happened in China when pigs that were fed Khalistan developed to genetic mutation cold MCI one it makes bacteria resistant to Khalistan. The findings were first published in two thousand fifteen just three years later. MCI one was found in more than forty countries in two thousand seventeen sixty nine year old Jeff Regan became one of the first Americans to be found with MCI one. He arrived at Massachusetts General Hospital delirious and with a fever of one hundred six so they discovered that you've been infected with bacteria carrying the gene MC one. Became like a famous person at the hospital. It's very strange within a day or two of that a lot of different doctor for coming into. Visit me asking me a lot of questions. What were they asking? You asking me where I've been in the last six months what my travel this, you know, everything about my life microbiologist and infectious disease. Dr Sarah was worried the infection could spread so she put a Regan in isolation. Had you ever seen MCI one before we had not this was the first one that our lab had isolated MCI one was forced boated in pigs in China. How does it end up in Jeff? It's a great question. It's not completely clear how it ended up in Jeff it's entirely possible that he picked this up during his travel. I know he's been to the Caribbean and share one has been reported in the Caribbean. And so it's possible that when he was there he ate something. That maybe wasn't well cooked or he picked it up then colonized his after intestinal tract the centers for disease control is now tracking MCI one and told us they have found isolated cases in nineteen states. The superbug is still in a Regan system and with Callisto now no longer an option. He's relying on the one antibiotic lift that can fight it. And if that bacteria became resistant to that one antibiotic that still woods what would happen. Then right now, that's my last line of defense. So you wouldn't survive without it? Told that. Some people might hit this and think well, the the best way to protect myself is just to not travel to India not travel to other developing countries resistant bacteria that had developed in the United States. So that you're susceptible to you know, this is a problem. It doesn't stay confined to any single case as an individual. Can I have any impact on this problem using individual can have a huge impact by first recognizing that taking antibiotics inappropriately to follow home than good. So even if you didn't care about resistance for other people, you might consider the fact that the antibodies won't work for you. When you need them. Every morning. The McDonald's kitchen is a symphony fizzling toasty mcmuffin symphonies. To.

Jeff Regan MCI United States superbug China Khalistan ciprofloxacin Mrs clinton Massachusetts General Hospital David Ritchie Caribbean Luxembourg Ovalles fever Delhi McDonald Dr Sarah India two thousand seventeen sixty n three years
"khalistan" Discussed on Kickass News

Kickass News

04:46 min | 1 year ago

"khalistan" Discussed on Kickass News

"If someone prevented more terrorism prevented another September eleven or another Shali Abdul, Obama Cloyne fronts idiot decals because the held the line. I saw that. This is the beginning of my book. I was there. I was on the frontline with them I share their life and their hopes, and they can tell you that they wear our unpacked preventing other September eleven number one. So I I would like a reward for them for this. First reason reason number two, I believe and and you lot of people believe that in this middle. List, which is so Couty. There is one pole of stability. You know, what it is? It is Israel because it is the democratic states. It is a pole of stability. There could be too Paul of stability and two is better than one. And the second one would be an independent co this than it is the wish of his I'll by the way, it is a Scottish of Zeile, by the way, it is the reason why Israel were the only country in the world to support though FM under which was organized two years ago, by the way, but it is in the best interest of the democracies and of the west this reward to the Kurds these worlds to their bravery and always would be as often because the world is not so badly Shaban would be as of an also in our best interest, and then my friend when morale when ethics. Means interest the best. That's honestly, the best. And this is what happened with this topic of Khalistan not mentioned in the introduction that you were also very instrumental in persuading former President Nicolas Sarkozy to support the Arab spring in the overthrow of Libyan dictator Moammar Qaddafi looking back at what's happened in Libya, Syria, Egypt and elsewhere in the region. Do you still feel that the Arab spring was a net? Positive what I know is that when a any people on the planet shows signs that he wants to push the door of democracy and enter in the in the room of democracy. We have to open the door not to close it. We have to open the he enters or does not enter, but we Democrats cannot be those who say no the door is locked their responsibilities to opponents. Our responsibility is. Is not to lock the door number one number two Arab spring. I don't know what I can say when I look back is what happens in Syria, and what happens today not back today in Syria and in Libya, compel the two situations in Syria. There was no involved. No intervention of the waist, okay? In Libya, there was intervention of the west, partly because of my the role of few individuals, including me, okay? What is the difference in Libya where there was intervention? You have these older you have some cows. You have a sort of a low intensity cows, which is not bad, which is which is not good. But which is not a comparable to what happens in Syria because Syria where you had no intervention in Syria. You had no intimate. What do you have high intensity cows millions of refugees and your cities bombed than they are raised from the face of the author, and you have this Newell Kedah, which is ISIS which to birth my dear friend, if I dare. You say not in Libya it to birth in Syria until Bashar Al Assad and in Iraq and probably because in Syria, probably in partner for certainly impact because we did not intervene. So when you have the fact of sheets the result of intervention and nonintervention issue. Compel to the situation is much more preferable in the play in the country where winter win than in the country where we did not. Well, I also want to ask you about the state of the EU these days, I know that last year you wrote and performed a one man play in London urging the UK to haunt the Brexit plan..

Syria Libya Moammar Qaddafi Israel Bashar Al Assad Newell Kedah Shali Abdul Obama Cloyne EU Nicolas Sarkozy Couty Paul Iraq Khalistan London Shaban partner President Egypt UK
"khalistan" Discussed on Science for the People

Science for the People

04:09 min | 2 years ago

"khalistan" Discussed on Science for the People

"So hopefully with surveillance, looking for this knowing where it is and very close use on Khalistan use very close tracking of Clinton use in hospitals. We can keep this at a low level as it is right now, but but you just you just never know. Bacteria are ancient. They're smarter than us in many ways. And you know, they've outsmarted us at every step and you study this stuff. You've seen that the FDA now has voluntary Messer measures in the United States, asking farmers not to use antibiotics as growth promoters, specifically, what does that mean? Is there? Is there still opportunity to use antibiotics on the farm right to there still are so growth promotion use is using these at these low doses to make animals, grow faster, to get them to market sooner. So this has been concerning for for many years as Erin discusses it in her in her book. And we've been trying to get policies introduced to try to regulate these and try to eliminate them as many other countries have long before us. So finally, producers and pharmaceutical companies decided voluntarily to to eliminate the use of growth promotion, antibiotics and Tunis's Tate prescriptions for. Or some other type of antibiotic use on the farm. So farmers will still be able to use antibiotics for disease prevention or prophylaxis purposes. So you know, at certain times during an animal's life cycle, like for example, when when pigs may be moved from a nursery, where they were born and raised for a few weeks to a growing barn, where they may be the rest of their life that stresses the pigs, and it can cause disease to break out. So farmers, some points will give into x. prophylactically to prevent these disease outbreaks in the heard. So those will still be able to be used. You can definitely still use antibiotics for treatment. Treatment is something that you know, no one really argues with animals are sick, they need to be treated. But what we're concerned about is that this will be instead of really a real elimination of growth promotion, antibiotics. It will kind of be a relabeling so that there may be more prophylactic use, even if. Growth promotion antibiotics technically aren't allowed. So we're not sure yet, and we won't have the numbers for for quite a while to know if these restrictions will actually lead to a reduction in the overall use of antibiotics on farms or not were a little skeptical at this point, but but we'll see. What do you think is the eventual future for antibiotics in livestock? I think they have to be phased out, you know, even more than they're doing now. Many people have had suggested that, you know, these livestock antibiotics really aren't that profitable anymore. They're not giving the profit margins that justified their use. You know, obviously, there are still controversial areas about the effect that they have on on human health and disease. Even though those of us in public health would say, it's been pretty well proven. There are still hold outs in industry agriculture that suggests they don't. But I think consumers really are the ones that are that are driving the bus anymore that you know, they don't want to to consume animals to purchase animals that have been raised with these types of antibiotic use. So as you see more companies moving towards animals that have been raised without antibiotics, I think that's really going to, you know, and we're already seeing this shift the markets, especially in chicken as as Merrin discusses. So hopefully that will move it also in larger animals like pigs and cattle, and will really see this market push to animals that are raised without antibiotics and our talk a little bit about this with Merrin. But one of the issues with that is a lot of people may say, well, you, you help fight this with your dollars. You can say, okay, I am going to purchase only antibiotic free meat..

Merrin Erin Khalistan FDA Clinton United States Messer Tunis Tate
"khalistan" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

01:37 min | 3 years ago

"khalistan" Discussed on PRI's The World

"The condos at odd affiliated to trump tower as will get a chance to a meet and dine with donald trump jr in the united states of america so i think that there's a definitely a question of conflict of interest sort of written in to this very visit but many because it doesn't impact us here in india directly we've been somewhat milder on him that his own people who would be so a prime minister justin trudeau returns to canada tomorrow if you had to summarize his weeklong trip to india in one word what would that be disaster gray pretty straightforward there what what are some of the gaps that stood out well it started all wrong the relationship was already mired intentions even before trudeau got yard and this is slightly complex and as they committed to explain it it kind of goes back to the 1980s in the 1980s in india we had in one of our northern state job a terrorist movement which was basically secessionist and that wanted a separate state called khalistan for the seeks now india india's turned the page on that and there is absolute peace in punjab many decades data but there were a series of bloody events that emerged from that including the assassination of a former prime minister indira gandhi and riots against the secret will in delhi and then an aeroplane that air india garnish cut that was blown up by these terrorists mob in 1985 now in canada one point four percent of the population half a million people are seeks and the perception in endeavour is strongly is that trudeau is pandering to the extremists among them two groups that have actually remained closed.

united states india prime minister indira gandhi trump tower donald trump america justin trudeau canada four percent
"khalistan" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"khalistan" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"Well let's move on to angela merkel and how she's faring in her coalition negotiations with the spd got a piece picked out of the financial times for germany faces defeat from surgeon s p d applications will settle best yes the the the negociations as you say to perform a grow co a grand coalition cross the coliseum another one yes exactly a groin dawn painfully it not in germany it took it looked like they take a step forward on sunday when the party voted in in a destroyed free meeting to uh to at least open talks anyway with mrs merkel and get this grand coalition going but the ft point sat to reports today that there is a big increase in membership that said the youth wing in particular which has been opposed to for me this next grow grow gross called khalistan has seen an incredible drive to take on the members and i'm very successfully say fall in an attempt to scupper any coalition deal and the paper points out the the fact that it's so easy inside cheap to join the politi you can vote against this uh the coalition proposition of there is a strong car a comparison hey we what happened with the late night while to say where we are in august pray we have shares is familiar isn't it entities quite and let's move on to the times now in an interesting story set in the context of what the uk foreign secretary boris johnson at blurted i the of the week about building a bridge from front from britain to france and from page of the times now the northern irish onto bridge built from scotland yet a boris johnson office he has a bit of thing about bridges he bought remember that he did attempt to get a garden bed a bridge built in london which was which met a sticky end unfortunately while i i thought it was a nice idea right stupid any way was rejected last year now then as you say he suggested a bridge over the channel.

angela merkel khalistan boris johnson scotland germany mrs merkel uk secretary britain france london
"khalistan" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

02:39 min | 3 years ago

"khalistan" Discussed on KOMO

"Taiwan one hundred thirteen miles an hour to the tires about one hundred twenty five miles an hour but carter where under typically work you apply under a massive coordinator damage it dangerous and life threatening and we just hope everyone had to lower key cook akashi said that about about you'll hear it we hope that they're in an interior room some were about covered at a mattress wanted to ask where are you right now i'm actually in key worked at so thirteen key whites turner coworkers cinnabar facility it was built in two thousand five by the federal government in order to keep us here for this particular situation iterative khalistan uttered search five miles an hour winds that we also have a storm augur internal eu the great it there two hundred twenty mile an hour winds and finally were elevated to a high of fifteen feet above sea level will stay afloat already rejected storm surge record possibly up and just an incredible when you think about the force of this storm and in key west really hasn't been tested like this in a very long time oh absolutely i would i would think guarded legal or in to a key what's what this type of ferocity were in 1919 so nearly a hundred years was it hard for you to stay behind i know it's part of your job you know what it water believe it or not the hardest part for me would leading up to the then and then top it you know i added inkling on labor day but uh i might be in for a long weekend the week aren't too are already flirted airport on labor day dark spot all the grassroots agreeing to work with me the hard part premiered feted grant where where did that on went back and it's just me down here and degrom working twelve hour shifts that are third my parents are way up the one that's also you know preparing my own personal property for this know gathering all by belonging glaring turning to curb clothing but shudder and when i get back and it's something that so many on key western and elsewhere in the keys have had to endure would do you think that people took this storm seriously enough i believe they did you leave their kinda hard to get people to evacuate here in the florida keys and of a laidback place to live people you know have learned about.

carter akashi eu Taiwan coordinator florida hundred years fifteen feet twelve hour
"khalistan" Discussed on FRONTLINE: Audiocast | PBS

FRONTLINE: Audiocast | PBS

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"khalistan" Discussed on FRONTLINE: Audiocast | PBS

"Last year the warnings became even more dire drug resistant bacterial infections are on track to kill more people than cancer one international report predicted by 2050 superbugs could killed ten million people a year now we are seeing the bacteria that are resistant to theld absolute last stop on the train khalistan and so for those patients there are no options laughed so those patients are truly have gone back in time they are back in the pre antibiotic era and they will recover from those infections or will die from those infections and there's nothing we can do for them as we reported in 2013 then i never did fully rid itself of the deadly superbug kpc a europe to the outbreak a young men came to the hospital because of complications from a bone marrow transplant while he was there he contracted kpc and died the seventh victim of the outbreak dr don anderson i guess if i if i had a major message it will be that it's never going to end so this organism and organisms like this are gonna be with us tillich come home and we have to learn how to deal with him if the change our culture and the hospital kpc has been found in hospitals in all but two states and that's just the hospitals that are voluntarily reporting it.

europe bone marrow dr don anderson
"khalistan" Discussed on FRONTLINE: Audiocast | PBS

FRONTLINE: Audiocast | PBS

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"khalistan" Discussed on FRONTLINE: Audiocast | PBS

"Lab results confirmed lynch's worst fears richie had brought n d m one into the united states it was one of the first cases to ever be identified here ann lynch had little to go on there's not a lot of clinical experience which reading these bacteria anywhere in the literature there's no books there's no things i'd so we had a figure out what to do for david right dan in there david richie idea this knock on my on my door and they open up the door and there's these doctors they tell me we need isolation we need to put you on your own according reaching was in the throes of the mbm one nightmare the gene was spreading resistance to other infections in his leg david's mother they showed us and the list of them there about five bags and they say all these infections resistant to antibiotics and and when they said that that's what worried me because i unlike has he to get rid of him lynch drudge several powerful antibiotics issue but they didn't work on this he had only one option left a 1940s antibiotic called khalistan we went away for because of his talks is inability to use new antibiotics the problem now is we don't have a lot of new options and we're going back to some over older antibiotics the hardest part was watching to see what the antibiotics did to him certainly eat away ally oregon's only inside you know i i i could feel it just.

united states oregon ann lynch david richie lynch drudge