17 Burst results for "Khalil Gibran"

"khalil gibran" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:33 min | 9 months ago

"khalil gibran" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Stretch of four relatively nondescript blocks There's a hotel a Starbucks a burger place But from around 1880 to 1940 this street was the hub of a thriving neighborhood called little Syria and that neighborhood gives its name to the show by the Syrian American rapper and poet Omar offendum We're on our way to little Syria Yeah I'm lucky see I have kind of transplanted myself into that time period as what I like to call the heca lati of the neighborhood And hakata essentially means a storyteller or the grio The story of little Syria is full of surprises and the biggest of all aside from the fact that they're even was a little Syria is that one of the most popular books ever published was written there Khalil gibran wrote the prophet on Washington street and he is one of the written sources for Omar offenders storytelling But so too are the newspapers groundbreaking Arabic publications from the neighborhood and wider circulation newspapers whose stories are uncomfortably familiar Some of these newspaper headlines honestly it's as if they were lifted from today Syrians must go back Syrians must be deported We don't want Syrian immigrants here et cetera Syrian to the call much like world history civilize their vilified shrouded in a mystery a brave misunderstandings like some tragic game of telephone The music in little Syria.

Syria Omar offendum Starbucks Khalil gibran Omar Washington
"khalil gibran" Discussed on Lex Fridman Podcast

Lex Fridman Podcast

05:55 min | 9 months ago

"khalil gibran" Discussed on Lex Fridman Podcast

"You go to wherever you go, but you can, it's good to squeeze in some weird, crazy sun, sunrise, rooftop dancing, or things like that when you can. If we can, if we may to some difficult dark places, I'll bring a flashlight. Maybe something find something that can warm your soul or inspires others. Is there a dark period dark times in your life that you had to overcome? Yeah, like many people had friends I've lost a friend when I was a younger who committed suicide. And that was actually I remember being so struck of I couldn't understand it. I didn't understand mental illness at the time. I was very young. I was only 11 at the time. And I really was confused more than anything else about how could someone take their life? And I actually, once I got over the grief of it all, I really, it's cemented in my head that I would never commit suicide. I could tell us to my wife, you know, if it looks like I hung myself, go find my killer because I would never do it. It's got to be staged. But at the same time, it began to appreciate. There are times where the suffering is so great and diseases can be so awful. That euthanasia is an actual exit, but I just have friends I've lost along the way, but that's not too different. Everyone else, people they've lost along the way, but actually was never too dark of a childhood or of a dark place. I mean, the hardest things have been really weird relationship breakups where I felt like love falling in love and then losing that person, just breaking up, not like they died. But where you felt like you just could barely move. You literally felt like your heart was moved in your body to a different location. And that sort of scraping sense of existence. But also at the same time, that's been where I've in some ways been the most alive where I lost what I thought at the time was the love of my life. But then was able to actually, I think, carve a deeper trench into my heart, which then could be filled more with joy. I would say, is what Pablo Neruda wrote about this and Khalil gibran is that the deepest deepest sorrows I think later have translated into my life as to places that can be filled with greater amounts of joy. I love thinking of sorrows as a digging of a ditch that can then be filled with more good stuff. Eventually. Not at the time of robots to giant empty cavern full of blood and tears in pain, but then that comes later. There is an element to life where this too shall pass. So any moment of sorrow or joy, it's going to be over. And. Treasure it, no matter what. I mean, I do definitely think of losing love. That's like a celebration of love in any living, I think, is better. That's why I just added it. I don't think I'd ever really commit suicide. Because anything I take is better than nothing. So the worst case scenario, so there's no heaven. There's no hell. It's just it. If you just die and that's really just it, then anything that you have in living is by definition infinitely better than the zero. Because at least it's something. And so I appreciate that. I haven't enjoyed sadness, which sounds like an oxymoron, but I sometimes even long for a good sadness, like a rainy day, and I'm staring out a window, squinting, and drinking some underpriced whisky, and then, you know, and just moping and like what are you doing? I'm just moping today. But I want at least one day where I do that or something..

Khalil gibran Pablo Neruda
"khalil gibran" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

03:08 min | 1 year ago

"khalil gibran" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"Anyway. I love the idea that the interviewing the two of you were having this deeper conversation about what is freedom, what is liberty? Because clearly these terms get thrown around, right? I mean, you know, the BC boy said you gotta fight for your right to party. And you know, princes they're idiots. Like what does that mean? They're like, you know, rich suburban kids who are pretending that they got a fight against the man and whatever. They're selling records. It's meaningless, blather, but that spirit of individualistic rebellion, there is a place where that is right and true. And you see it in the heroes of the faith. And so you kind of have to translate it for every generation. You have to explain what is good rebellion, Satan, the rebel. Yeah, that's bad, rebellion, but rebelling against oppressive systems when you know I am free in Christ that's good rebellion. And it's just fascinating to me that right now there's a sifting going on in the church. You guys must get this. There are a lot of people that they don't understand what you're talking about. They think the Christian thing is to put on ten masks and to hide and do whatever people tell them, like somehow that's honoring to God. And I understand in some context, I would get that. But in this context, if you're reading the season, if you're looking, you say, no, I have to I have to be brave. You guys are doing that in your message, which is beautiful. I want to ask you more about all that. But I want to just for folks who don't know, I'm teasing because there are people that know you well. But a lot of people wouldn't know you if they don't listen to Christian music, maybe they're not Christians, maybe they don't listen to your music. So when did you guys get started? And you are married legally. We are legally. We're going to need to see some paperwork, okay? I'm trusting, but come on, you know? We are married. We started in 1996. So skillet celebrated our 25th year give me 5 years of skill at last year and let's see in March 1st, me and Cory will have been married for 25 years. We have two kids, 19 and 16. Both of our kids thank the lord, are living for Jesus. They are born again. They are filled with the spirit. They are world changers and we're so thankful to God for what he's done for us. And we still get to play music. Music is a great way to open people's hearts to a message. Music is a great way to whatever that message may be. People listen to music all day long. So we've tried to create music, the glorified God, but also people that aren't Christians can hear it. They can dig it. Hopefully take it to the gym, lift some weights, lose a little bit of COVID weight. And then at the same time, they can hear this positive message and the more they listen, they will begin to hear, I believe the word of God because we sing so much about the word of God. And as we all know, the word of God is living and active. It's going to seep in and the Holy Spirit's going to begin to do what he does. I know you're quoting the Khalil gibran for those who are scoring.

Satan Cory Khalil gibran
"khalil gibran" Discussed on RISE Podcast

RISE Podcast

03:28 min | 1 year ago

"khalil gibran" Discussed on RISE Podcast

"Haven't it's not something that we feel deeply or aware of. I could still we're still broken in these ways. Yeah, and I think people just need to be vulnerable to learning things that they just didn't learn before because there is something a little embarrassing about not knowing enough of our history to feel competent to even have a well argued position on it. I meet adult students every single year. I teach 250 in our core program now. And a lot of these students, it's Harvard, you know, they have been well educated, oftentimes, and private schools. And it's often embarrassing to them when they encounter the material in the course, because they're like, how is it possible? How is it possible that I didn't learn this? And so they have this opportunity because they happen to be in school. But a lot of adults don't make time for it. It's kind of catch as catch can. You know, some listeners of this show will be like, man, that was really powerful. You know, I might look at The New York Times Best Seller list right now and see what titles are on there that might extend this conversation. You know, we are in a way in a golden age of content production. So a distribution company like Netflix is putting out so much documentary content that sometimes I feel like I might be put out of business literally. My students might just show up one day and be like, you haven't taught us anything. We didn't already learn on Netflix. Right. And that would be a good thing. But people still have to make the choice, right? You still have to choose to enter into these spaces into these learning opportunities into these conversations. And I would say as the resident white guy in our relationship that you also, you know, get over the sense of guilt and shame and all these other things. You know, that this is our history. Whether we like it or not, and to take a clear eyed look at it is is, you know, it doesn't mean that you're a terrible person or that you're being attacked or that, you know, you should you should feel shamed. It is the story we have to wrestle with. And it's a story we have to solve. And so you have to get past that. And I think part of that is thinking again, if you're only thinking individually, of course, you feel like everyone's talking about you. But we are part of this collective. And the notion of a multiracial multi ethnic democracy is really extraordinary and really, really, really difficult. And so if that's our project in this country, then it is going to be hard. And it's going to in the past that we have is one of a lot of failure. And you're allowed to look at that. And we're still allowed to think that that project is worthy. That's another good work. What's that Amy Winehouse song about relapse? How does the refrain? Rehab? I was rehab, right. Yeah. Yeah, because that to me is trying to make go to rap yeah. That's right. It's kind of a metaphor for the no. A metaphor for this nation, right? It's like, and the people in it. Like, oh, my God, really, we have to do this again. Have a friend.

Netflix The New York Times Amy Winehouse
"khalil gibran" Discussed on RISE Podcast

RISE Podcast

05:17 min | 1 year ago

"khalil gibran" Discussed on RISE Podcast

"Present and 1980s. Historically, you know, one step forward in two steps back or that the pendulum swings back in the other direction. I know I'm like, guys, yeah. So I wrote this essay a couple years ago right after Donald Trump was elected in 2017. And the argument I made was essentially that it's because we don't actually teach our history in the way that it happened. There certainly not as close to accurate. History is always a debatable. But the extent to which we actually erase and or whitewash our history is a matter of empirical effects. It's not and so what I was basically saying in this piece was that you could predict with reasonable accuracy, backlash movements that happen about every 50 years. So there's the Civil War, and then by about 1915, there's another backlash moment that is really a culmination of black people starting to leave the south. And there's a series of racist attacks on black communities in Chicago, Philadelphia, D.C., St. Louis. Dozens and dozens of them happened in that 50 year period after the Civil War. It's also another moment when confederate monuments are being put up all over the country. Fast forward, another 50 years, you've got the civil rights movement reacting to that backlash culminating in the successful moment. And within weeks of say the Voting Rights Act passed, you've got counties in the south filing lawsuits against Act. The same lawsuits that ultimately would win 50 years later in the overturning of the voting rights out in the Shelby versus holder decision. So 50 year increments is a decent way to think about change. And so here we are. We've just experienced this transition for Obama to Donald Trump. And what we disrupt this cycle and we spend the next four decades dealing with the damage done by the Trump administration, or will we set ourselves on a path to a new beginning to a moment to quote unquote began again? And I think that doesn't depend on who we elect in office per se. It depends on our capacity to come to terms with this history that I've just described. I was tripping out when you were talking because I just did a podcast yesterday, a solo episode where I was talking about deeply spiritual and very much a hippie. So just bear with me for a second, guys. That I feel like in life, this is just as individual human beings. The universe keeps trying to teach us a lesson that we're meant to learn. As me as Rachel, you has been U.S. Khalil. This is what I believe. And that if you don't get it, you'll just keep repeating that cycle again and again and again, like if you don't get it in your 20s, someone gonna show up and help you try and get that in your 30s or your 40s. You'll keep making the same mistake by being with the wrong partner, you'll keep, you know, putting yourself into harm's way or not holding boundaries or whatever it looks like to you, but there's a lesson you are meant to learn to grow and evolve. And as you were talking, I was like, that it's exactly what you just said. I never have thought of it that way. And I'm going to take this out of our conversation today, Khalifa. So I just really want to acknowledge this for a second. Because we're never taught actually what happened because we actually are not looking at the real history we're doomed to repeat it. Again and again and again. Because we're not there's no mirror. Dang. That's a good word. That's a good word. I love that. I love that. Yeah. Yeah. It's a really good perspective on just arming ourselves. And I don't think obviously we're having this conversation too, but I think of, you know, I live in Texas and I'm sure you guys are aware of what's happened here and sort of sneaking right. It's hard living. That's hard lemon Rachel. Do you live in an Austin? Please live in Austin, just for the little tiny bubble. What is it the blueberry and the tomato soup? That's awesome, Texas. But you know, seeing what happened here and abortion laws and how those things are being affected and sort of sneaking in. And it's a bigger conversation about what are the ways that oppression has been, you know, like wheedled into systems. And some ways overtly and in some ways when you're not looking. And again, because we think it can't happen because we're not paying attention to history. It's just going to keep repeating itself. So if people are listening to this, beyond listening to your podcast, whichever wants to do because they all want to be friends with you now. What are some of the ways that you I am a huge history nerd. So I love the idea of arming yourself with history. But what are some of the ways that you guys suggest just freaking being aware of what has happened what continues to happen actions you can take just any of it from a journalist perspective from a professor's perspective what's the advice you give? Yeah, yeah. I mean, I think it is.

Donald Trump Trump administration St. Louis Shelby D.C. Philadelphia Rachel Khalil Chicago Obama Khalifa Austin Texas U.S.
"khalil gibran" Discussed on RISE Podcast

RISE Podcast

02:17 min | 1 year ago

"khalil gibran" Discussed on RISE Podcast

"Sort of grappling with the country in both its complicated history and its mythologies. And when you guys set out to do this podcast, coming from the lens of both of you, are teachers and you have sort of gotten this information and then disseminated it and given it to your pupils in one way or another, how did that play into what you created in the show and the kind of content that you want to put out in the world in this way? Yeah, so the first thing I'll take a little on this one is we take it. We wanted the show to center around our conversation. Rather than around interviews because as you know, so so much a podcasting is about bringing smart people to other people to their attention. And we didn't frankly want to compete in that space because if we're going to do this together, we thought we make this show charming would be to sort of center our stories as the kind of set piece for these bigger conversations. And so we obviously draw upon the amazing ideas and the journalism and scholarship of other people, but we tend to summarize and tell why that work is important. And occasionally we bring in an amazing guest to kind of flesh out something that we're still working through. But we wanted to show to have the kind of energy a conversation that you didn't quite know where it was going to go at all times. And you could hear disagreement without it being disagreeable and that we weren't performing allyship or some kind of expression of authenticity because the relationship is 35 years going. We don't have to perform. It just is what it is. And instead of teaching, I think a lot of times we are discovering things actually while we're recording. And, you know, that we're working through ideas and we're kind of amazed by them at the same time. And sometimes we have different takes on them, but we sort of get to come to a place. We had a first episode about about interracial buddy films, which is, you know, sort of playful way to think about this interracial buddy podcast, too. And these are movies that we grew up on. And in a way we were seeing a kind of representation, but they're also really problematic films. And we're talking about them and we're excited to talk and we're also pushing each other to figure it out as.

"khalil gibran" Discussed on RISE Podcast

RISE Podcast

05:54 min | 1 year ago

"khalil gibran" Discussed on RISE Podcast

"Why don't you take it? Yeah. Yeah, yeah. So we met as freshman in high school. We grew up on. Yeah, yeah, yeah, we grew up on the south side of Chicago. I was working at a computer store that had just opened that year. More or less back in like 1984. We started high school in 1985. And the store was mostly employed teenagers, you know? Our kids. It was a small business. And so I was as I jokingly say, kind of the Doogie Howser MD of a retail computing at that time, like putting computers together, selling them to people, showing them the miracle of word processing when they were still using typewriters. Anyway, Ben, Ben was hired because I'd broken my thumb and I couldn't label the floppy disks that we used to sell for our customers. So Khalil was essentially my boss. That's how I was that first encounter. How cool? And so being friends with this long, did you talked about the idea of collaborating on a podcast before? How did this creative process come to be? Yeah, we so we've been close friends for 35 years. You know, so since that moment. And in a lot of ways, our professional careers have also overlapped. We've shared a lot of interest. We both work on issues of race and injustice and inequality, Khalil the historian. I'm a journalist. We trust each other. So deeply that we can talk very openly about our work and sort of showing what you might think of like first drafts when you're afraid to show it to the rest of the world or testing out an idea, or if, you know, somebody sends you an email to share it and say, what do you think about this? And so we've been having conversations about what's come up in the world and about what's going on in our lives. You know, so in a way we've been doing this work without the recorders on. And now we have this we have producers who are like, save it for the tape. In a way, we haven't been saving it for the tape for all this time, but we've been talking this way. And what I mean like about these issues. So like, you know, if a big, you know, something like the George Floyd summer, which really transformed America. And we're unpacking that together and we're experiencing in different ways and Khalil is giving talks and I'm doing writing. And we're also seeing things locally, and at the same time, we actually talk to one another in a way that is also being modeled on the podcast. You know, in some ways, it's maybe you could say it's very unfortunate that a white guy I'm white. This is audio and clearly black that we could talk so openly and intimately about our lives and all these things. And without a lot of the other sort of baggage. And I think we model that. And maybe also just two men who get to talk to one another with very caringly and jokingly in that way. Yeah, like you talking for too long right now. Yeah. No, you were supposed to give me the signal. No, well it brings me to a good point because I know the history of the work that you guys have done. But for listeners who are not familiar with you yet, will you take a minute and just give people an overview of the work that you've done and why that brings you to the show that you've created? Yeah, so I teach for a living. I mean, I'm a Harvard professor. I haven't always been a harder professor, but I teach at a policy school. So a lot of my day job is about helping people understand the past in a way that helps them be smarter about the decisions they're making today. And then the school I work in is John F. Kennedy school of government, all of our students close to a thousand a year come there with a very strong mission to be public leaders to be public service to make a difference in the world. But, you know, it is the case that so many of these very smart adults there anywhere from 20 to 50 depending on which program they're in. Haven't learned the full story. So much of American history is sanitized in our education. And so my job I take very seriously and I think it's really important. And I've grown into it having started out at Indiana University as a kind of traditional history professor, I spent 6 years running one of Harlem's oldest Harlem New York City, one of its oldest cultural institutions, something called the schomburg center for research in black culture as part of the New York public library. It's an archive and a museum and a community place for public engagement, something that most places don't have and is truly original. And so having led that institution, I also saw up close, how important it is for the public to be engaged in these important debates. And then finally, I'm an author, so I've written a book that really tells the story of how we talk about crime today, how we racialize crime, how we think about black people in a very different way about things that happen in their communities and the relationship to law enforcement and all these sorts of things. So, you know, it's a big, a big set of overlapping things that I do for a living that brings us to this podcast. I just want to say cool. I was timing you and I timed how long I spoke. That whatever. You talked 47 seconds longer. And in fact, I was much more efficient. You are so. Yeah, yeah. So I'll work backward. I'm currently working on a book about criminal justice about parole boards and criminal justice reform. And it's so directly.

Khalil Ben George Floyd school of government Chicago schomburg center for research John F. Kennedy America Indiana University New York public library Harlem New York City
"khalil gibran" Discussed on RISE Podcast

RISE Podcast

01:49 min | 1 year ago

"khalil gibran" Discussed on RISE Podcast

"Today I'm sitting down with the hosts of the new podcasts, some of my best Friends are. Khalil gibran Muhammad is a Harvard historian and author of the condemnation of blackness. And in every episode, he sits down with his childhood best friend award winning journalist Ben, Austin. They talk about their interracial friendship, using pop culture and history to explore the absurdities and the intricacies of race and racism. And today on the show, we are talking about a little bit of everything, exploring what it looks like to talk openly and honestly about the hard stuff. And about the good stuff, what makes us different what makes us alike. And what are the things we can learn from each other along the way? This is my conversation with Khalil and Ben. Hi. I'm Rachel Hollis, and this is my podcast. I spend so many hours of every single week, reading and listening to podcast and watching YouTube videos and trying to find out as much as I can about the world around me. And that's what we do on this show. We talk about everything. Life, and how to be an entrepreneur. What happened to dinosaurs? What's the best recipe for fried chicken? What's the best plan for intermittent fasting? What's going on with our inner child? How's therapy working out for you? Whatever it is, my guests are into, I want to unpack it so that we can all understand. These are conversations. This is information for the curious. This is the Rachel Hollis podcast. What I've really curious about is how you guys met. All right..

Khalil gibran Muhammad Rachel Hollis Ben Austin Khalil YouTube
"khalil gibran" Discussed on The GOAT: Serena

The GOAT: Serena

07:45 min | 1 year ago

"khalil gibran" Discussed on The GOAT: Serena

"In this episode, the Holy Grail of longevity part one will delve into how Serena has managed to remain dominant and relevant for over two decades spent at or very near the peak of the game. In this episode, we'll focus on the physical sources of Serena's amazing longevity. In a later episode, we'll also take a deeper look at the psychological and emotional demands of longevity, as well as the mental health issues that have become an important part of the tennis conversation. Joining us is the fitness trainer responsible for keeping Serena up and running, a remarkable but seldom highlighted man named Mackie schilt stone. He will tell us some amazing stories about Serena's strength and determination, as well as some priceless personal anecdotes. Also, we'll chat with the Hall of Famer who knows all about career longevity and the long journey to goat hood. 18 time Grand Slam champion, Martina Navratilova. But let's start with this. That quote from common that opens the show is amazing. Making your work and expression of love and to show your capacity for love in your work is a rare gift. It's also the ticket to the kind of deep, personal satisfaction that has lifted Serena to unimaginable heights. Motivating and sustaining her. The routine of tennis can be tiresome, even for the most diligent, passionate probe. But if your work is also your way of expressing your love, the challenging life of an elite athlete seems more manageable, more enriching. When your work is love, what you're doing becomes an art form. It's no accident that the source of that observation, Khalil gibran, was a poet. But let's face it, Serena is not a poet. She is first and foremost an athlete. Her work is often physical in the most basic way. Gritty, sweaty, painful. It demands stamina, recuperative powers. Plain old strength. Serena has shown those qualities in abundance. Despite brushes with mortality, depression, injury, and surgery. She's continued to win and win big through it all. Her work is love. We've all kept a close count of Serena's Grand Slam triumphs. We can tick them off one by one, sometimes with details like her final ground opponent, until we hit that magic number, 23. But set that aside for now and tell me this how many significant injuries has Serena dealt with. How many surgeries has she had to undergo? How many health challenges, including potentially fatal ones, has she navigated only to emerge triumphant yet again, champion and conqueror. It's remarkable, but even the NFL's goat, Tom Brady, hasn't compiled as deep a list of injuries and ills. Well, here's a rough count of the toll taken on Serena by injuries of one kind or another. Over her career, Serena withdrew before or during ten Grand Slam events. As well as 13 other top tier events. Nearly every part of her anatomy, feet, knees, back, and shoulders has failed her at some time, and she has had to recover from 5 different surgeries. The first at the end of the 2003 season. Bear in mind that the pain loss of form, the wear and tear on the athletic body and the nagging questions about the future that play in an athlete's mind during long layoffs are powerful negative agents that can narrow a player's vision and make longevity seem out of reach. Yet every time, Serena bounced back. Many times, she bounced back stronger than ever. Victories over those injuries are as much a part of her legacy as the winds she put up in all those Grand Slam titles. She has returned from near oblivion on a number of occasions. She crafted the most sensational of those rebounds in 2007 at the Australian open. We'll take a closer look at that tournament in an upcoming episode. But the essential details at the moment are that by the summer of 2006, her ranking had fallen to number one 39, her lowest since 1997, due largely to continuing struggles after the death of her sister, which kept her off the tour. She played a little at the end of the year, but went into the Australian open ranked number 81. The butt of criticism and cruel humor for appearing to be out of shape. Many of her fans were dismayed by what they perceived as her lack of focus on her profession. Suffering from a severe cold with blisters on both feet, Serena's struggled in the early going at the 2007 Australian open. She nearly lost in the third round, which, by most standards, would already be an impressive comeback. But not for Serena. She persevered, made some narrow escapes and allowed Maria Sharapova just three games in the final. Serena became the first unseated player to win the tournament since its renaissance as a major event. It was her first tournament win of any kind in 24 months. That major title was Serena's 8th, and it marked the greatest pivot point in her career. Although she was already on the rise again, she also made two important additions to her team in 2007. She hired Mackie scholl stone as her fitness trainer and Sasha bayen as her hitting partner. She'll stone has remained with Serena until the present day. Worked with Serena for 8 years. That epic performance in Australia helped set the pattern of expectations that would again mount as she continued to blaze her way into the record books. Serena's ability to manage rising expectations, including her own. And her willingness to handle the pressure that came with her growing status were key talents that help account for her longevity. ESPN tennis analyst Mary Joe Fernández, Serena's 2012 Olympic Games coach, put it into perspective very nicely when she told us. I feel like she does the impossible. I mean, she's been doing it for so long. And let's face facts. I mean, she's been through a lot. Remember with her health, she's had injuries, you know, she became a mom. I mean, she's gone through so, so much. And she still finds a way to persevere and come

Serena Mackie schilt tennis Martina Navratilova Khalil gibran Famer Tom Brady depression NFL Mackie scholl stone Sasha bayen blisters Maria Sharapova Mary Joe Fernández Australia ESPN Olympic Games
"khalil gibran" Discussed on 790 KABC

790 KABC

06:34 min | 1 year ago

"khalil gibran" Discussed on 790 KABC

"Here on another beautiful Sunday Fun day here from Los Angeles, the city of Angels. Who has been a world one week for me. It was my birthday week, actually, and this past week we celebrated hard with family and friends, Khalil Gibran said that the suite of friendship, let there be laughter and sharing of pleasures for the do of little things. The heart finds it's morning and is refreshed. And I was certainly refreshed with friendship and love this week, So thank everybody who came out and supported the birthday festivities was certainly a powerful and helpful week for me. We also had a photo shoot for my Gen X earlier in the week with a great Alex are dont some great models were in the house to manager over being one of them, and we got some great things coming from my Jennings with videos and other stuff for motivation fits ball and all that. Great stuff. We also had a very special VIP event this week with the Seine Antonio Spurs, who are partners in the NBA with my Gen X World class organization. Manu Ginobili was there who was one of the most underrated players? I think in NBA history, Uh and I think he's you know, very, very skilled. He's a gold medalist. He's four time or fighting five time NBA champion actually. Calvin Johnson. Was there. The new blood 21 years old, fresh off a gold medal from Team USA Olympics. And of course, we got Sean Elliott there who actually had a kidney transplant. So he was talking about his health issues and overcoming them through proper nutrition training, exercise all those kind of things, which was fan tastic. The funny part was Manu Ginobili said Something really interesting. He said that he hated to do cardio and this is an NBA elite basketball player. And he hated cardio. And he said, Listen, I hated it, but didn't mean I didn't do it. So that's what it boils down to. Sometimes it may be that you hate something, but it's good for you. So you just gotta force it, Uh, to achieve greatness as Manu did as well as we are looking forward to working with the Spurs at my Gen X as well. We've got incredible show for you today. Yesterday as some of you may or may not know was Batman Day Batman Day 2021. So we celebrate my man Ben Affleck, Who would my unbiased opinion or biased opinion, I guess was the best Batman of all time. I got to work on the movie Justice League as well. Which is great, uh, actually sat down with Ben and here's a short Clip from our interview. How it's right on here with the great Ben Affleck. Ben, you seem to stay in great shape your around your Allene Main muscle machine. What are some of your fitness secrets? You're very kind. Um I don't know how Lian man by them but one of my fitness secrets. Is to, um Stay in close contact with the Raytheon and listen to your radio program. Every day than that. I don't always saying Richard, unfortunately, but when I do when I'm successful at it My experience. Mostly it's uh, because of dieting, you know, and that's about, you know, problem more than 50% of it is, if I'm able to have some kind of discipline. In terms of, you know, just what I honestly and then you know, getting into gym three or four times a week, uh or more, But that's that's about enough. But really, the main thing is just, you know, like a reasonably includes it. You just heard a clip from my interview with the great Ben Affleck. Batman bat Fleck as we call them, the greatest Batman in my opinion of all time, who trained intensely for his role, gained £20 of muscle and did incredible. He was by far the biggest Lena's batter's bat man that ever lived. So kudos to my man Ben Affleck, who really, really worked his tail off to really achieve fitness success. Proud of him for that so well after Batman. We now go to Olympia Man. Dan Solomon is a long time industry leader, Media staple in the fitness and bodybuilding world. And he now heads up the Mr Olympia as well as muscle and fitness magazine. So I want to welcome the great Dan Solomon to the show. Hey, Dan. Raytheon. It's great, great to be here. You always listening to what you were saying about about managing. Hopefully I can tell you, me and mine who have a lot in common Among them is I don't like cardio, either. Um, but I do like going to the movies, and I like going to the movies because it seems like every time I go to a movie and as a ripped body on the screen, you seem to be the guy responsible. For having gotten in there, so and I love bragging to all my friends that I know the guy who's responsible for turning these out actors into these physical specimens, and it's always good to talk to you. Happy birthday, my friend. Thank you. Thank you Appreciate that. I appreciate the kind words I try to stay lower little bit and sometimes you know, it's good to see that results of their hard work at the end of the day. Like you said, you can give people knowledge, but until the implemented You know so on them, so they do all the hard work and I'm just grateful to work for them as you have. Actually, I know you've worked and and and met with a lot of celebrities for different types of things. Tell us how that has been like for you working with some of those peoples, and can you share some stories about them? Yeah, So it's funny to bodybuilding world years ago, used to be very disconnected from Hollywood very disconnected from really all other sports, And it was almost to the point where back in the day muscle was taboo in Hollywood, as you know, and leading men didn't have biceps and ripped ABS and Of course, over the years that has changed thanks to guys like are an old and Dwayne and then diesel and some of these other, you know, very talented actors who have decided to hit the gym and build their bodies up. So now we're finding that There's a real bridge between The world of Hollywood and the film industry and also other sports baseball football. It's gotten to the point where they all sort of lean on the fitness industry to get wisdom and counsel and inspiration on how to build their own bodies. So because of that, Of course, the Olympia Um which is the Super Bowl of the fitness industry, which is held every year. This year. It's coming up in a few weeks. Um we are in a position where celebrities like to come out and be a part of it and support it. We've been very fortunate guys like Mark Wahlberg and Dwayne Johnson and Shaquille O. Neil and Dave Batista and his guys They show up every year and they stood up front and they just love it..

Calvin Johnson Khalil Gibran Sean Elliott Manu Ginobili Dwayne Johnson Mark Wahlberg Dave Batista Shaquille O. Neil Los Angeles Ben Affleck Justice League £20 Dan Solomon Dan five time Dwayne Seine Antonio Spurs Super Bowl Ben This year
"khalil gibran" Discussed on Elvis Duran Presents: The 15 Minute Morning Show

Elvis Duran Presents: The 15 Minute Morning Show

07:56 min | 1 year ago

"khalil gibran" Discussed on Elvis Duran Presents: The 15 Minute Morning Show

"Percents. I'm like religion when they book like that. What how do you pronounce the disease. Arroni's perron rony epa. What is pulling episcopal. Yesterday it stuffy might tracks. I came back into the stadium. What the i think. We always talk about hackensack university medical center. And i go. Maybe this is another brand is some religion. We've never heard him say. Tell me it's time we went to time. We went to lunch and scary goes. Oh what are the pomace fruits. Can we all man what a day gotta love. You did scotty cry. i'm sorry. did we cry. I cry a lot. I'm a very emotional person when i watch. Tv or patriotic stuff. And i cry a lot. I'm a giant pussy. Nice word check the breath weekday that ed sheeran said the c word in the room but in britain. It doesn't mean the same thing. Because i'm married to a bread and it's funny because he always says to me you people make such a big deal over that word really doesn't context walked in while it was being sick again. No i know it has a different degree of in the uk is here. I know that but it's not a great work over there. A term of endearment because when you walked into the room i was repeating it back and you walked into me saying something with the hard see and i was like his first. Yeah okay he said. I said you know what he's been in america enough to know what it means that he may have meant that the old way what about the what about in england they also use the t word a lot because they say ted lasso. All the time is that bad twa. Yeah i don't think it's as bad there but it is. I talked about the queen's fan can't say national problem. I don't know they're there. They were lining up their missiles. Ready to shoot down. Just like fanny equal vaj. No i didn't know that either. So you're talking about the queen. I mean that. I'm sorry up. Nate and i learned a bunch of new one particular. yeah pedophile in britain. But you can also call your your mates nuts. Nonce and then mega megan's and then turbo nuts. It's like can i tell you something about pedophiles. 's i think you can. I was driving on the expressway yesterday and there was a jeep in front of us and other fac it's at only pedophile. Can read this. I mean i was very close. You know so. They like. It's one of their cars sad situation. Yes it is. I was able to read it. Oh does that. So what are you doing for your anniversary. Look actually you know what alex is. I'm at the apartment with the dogs tonight. I'm by myself. Here's the thing do not just a day. It's just a special day for two years. God you can move the day and make it mean something to you want day. That's convenient to your schedule. Actually had this debate with an ex boyfriend of mine because we didn't know one. Our anniversary was we kind of started like dating and he wanted to pick a day. And i said why would you pick a day instead of just randomly throughout the year. If we love each other just celebrate a day and he said no. That's just forget that anniversary brody workout as well as everything else works out for me. not so. according to today's anniversary teatime so we'll celebrate another day not going to go over the pick a day that works for both of us. That's a dumb i didn't. I didn't get alex card or anything. I saw this morning. Yeah kissed him. Goodbye came to work and make him something from sheeran. Cinema saw over. Wait a minute. You renew davao today. Which means you have to get an extra big gift newell gift. I didn't take those seriously as i would have had been here. Yeah it looks like cotton is the second anniversary gift they'll go world in. Hello my ears time frog. We got about three minutes off your anniversary. We have to go get. We have to go get kobe test. What we give a little extra yesterday dime happy anniversary fifteen minute morning shell looking for a new kind of rewards program one that includes rewards when you buy travel or food to check out the drop app where you can shop at the brands you love and get rewarded just for shopping at the places you already do. That's not all whether you're booking flights are getting food you can shop directly from the drop in for a limited time drop is giving you a chance to win a trip anywhere in the us. No purchase necessary. Just go to win with drop dot com download the app today the free app that rewards you for every day spending you did you woke up today. You even got out of bed. You deserve overboard recant. Ob morning people but we can all get dungs for breakfast right now. Mix and match chicken. Mac riddles or mcchicken biscuit for just three bucks order ahead on the mickey d's app. Price and participation may vary cannot be combined with combo meal single item at regular price mobile ordering pay at participating. Mcdonald's book it's a story that captivated the nation. Two brothers and their sister are the run from authorities tonight three close-knit siblings known as the dougherty. Gang go on a fifteen state crime spree evading police for eight days. Police say the trio have a stockpile of weapons and at least one of them has made it clear. He's not afraid to dot. They're like mars. Avon applied listen to the doctor. Gang on september twentieth on the iheartradio app apple podcasts. Or wherever you get your podcasts. I'm khalil gibran. It and i've been austin re two best friends one black one white. I'm a historian. And i'm a journalist and this is some of my best friends are as in. I'm not a racist in some of my best friends are dot dot dot dot dot dot in this show. We wrestle with the challenges and the absurdity of deeply divided and unequal country. Listen to supplement. My best friends are on the iheartradio app apple podcasts. Wherever you get your podcast good risings. What's up stuff. The good risings. Podcast is a collection of six. many shows. curated to give you a daily shot of inspiration. Motivation humor relationship advice and even astrology. You can choose to listen to one or all of the daily good risings offerings available on our feet. It's the perfect daily practice for anyone looking to lead a more intentional mindful and inspired life. Listen to good risings on the iheartradio app on apple podcasts. Or wherever you get your podcasts..

Arroni perron rony ted lasso hackensack university medical ed sheeran britain scotty epa Nate megan sheeran davao england newell uk us alex dougherty khalil gibran Mcdonald
"khalil gibran" Discussed on News O'Clock

News O'Clock

08:25 min | 1 year ago

"khalil gibran" Discussed on News O'Clock

"Good risings. I'm marie burns holes the host of the good risings. Podcast spoonful of spirituality. Good risings is a collection of six mini shows. Curated give you a daily shot of inspiration. Motivation humor relationship advice. And even astrology you can curate your own morning routine by listening to one or all of the daily good risings offerings available in our feet. It's the perfect daily practice for anyone looking to lead a more intentional mindful and inspired life for only a few minutes. every morning. i will help you release your anxieties. Nativity limiting beliefs with a positive dose of enlightenment and mindfulness drawn from the most influential spiritual leaders. Listen to good risings on iheartradio app on apple podcasts. Or wherever you get your podcasts. Nine eleven two decades later is a limited series. Podcast that looks back. Twenty years since the attacks of nine eleven and features those who were in the inner sanctum of our country's government. I didn't know if i was going to have a job. I didn't know it just seemed like the world is coming to an end. It was dot horrific nine eleven two decades later explorers the state of our security and ask the question. Are we safer today than twenty years ago. I don't think so. I wish i could answer differently. But i don't think so. I think those in charge these days need to spend more time. Communicating exclusive content with insight from security experts and aviation specialists ferris throw. He's gonna hit the weakest link and aviation at the time was the weakest link and no one you imagination that can be done like that and of course the screening was a big part of it. All the screen that we're doing now i'm khalil gibran muhammad and. I'm ben austin two best friends one black one white. I'm a historian. And i'm a journalist and now we have a new podcast is called. Some of my best friends are like. I'm not a racist. Some of my best friends are dot dot dot so we grew up on the south side of chicago together and here. We are look all grown up. I mean look at you ben. You are this incredible writer journalist. You've written for the new york times wired magazine hugh your youth somehow made it to harbor from from from ten harbor and in this show. We're going to wrestle with the challenges and absurdities of a deeply divided and unequal country. Listen to some of my best. Friends are on the iheartradio app apple podcasts. Ever you get your podcast. Welcome back. We're talking with writer. Page about charlie dixie. Demilio new hulu project. The nelio show. It's really hard to watch these. Young women struggle on camera. Especially after we've had this kind of reckoning as a society about the way the media treated stars like britney spears and megan fox in the past and with that pressure did to them. Does this feel similar in some ways. L. a. definitely feel completely similar to what britney spears went through and charlie even says throughout the series. He know if you keep pushing me if you keep pushing me. I'm just going to be done. I'm going to have a complete breakdown. And all of this will go away and achieve and says you know i have all of these people depending on me to keep their jobs. And it's a lot of pressure for a young girl to face and i mean it's definitely like sexists charlie says that her counterpart bryce hall. Who's a big tick. Tock star can basically get away with anything and he does not get the or the critique that charlie gets so yeah. This definitely feels very similar. I want to move onto addison ray. For a second. You know while charlie demilio is the most followed person on tick-tock. Addison is number three. You know she's also in the middle trying to transition her fame on the app to an actual hollywood career. She just started in the. He's all that reboot and it was quote unquote successful enough. That netflix signed her to a multi. Picture deal though lots of people online. Blame that on. All of the hate watching. How do you think that transition to a hollywood career is going for her so far. you know. i'm it's going well. I thought addison data a fine job on. He's all that. I don't think she deserved half the hate she guy i think people think that stars are celebrities have to click quota quote. Earn their spy on a movie and people think maybe addison raid. Didn't earn her spy on a netflix movie. But i think she did fine. I think she'll have a fine career if she just keeps pushing forward. Okay so i have a question. What's the line here between trolling these. Young women and holding them accountable. Because it is okay to hold these young stars to some kind of standard. Like when addison went on falun and perform tick tock dances without crediting the creators and then there was the time when she was caught sort of fawning. Over president trump. I don't know there's this line of calling them out for their actions but also wanting to make sure that you don't go too far because they are young and we are seeing the effects on their mental health. So what are your thoughts. Yeah i think these young white women. Like charlie and addison definitely got famous off of black creators dances and i think they need to be held accountable for that and i think they've been called out for it and i think that they've somewhat addressed it and try to move forward as best they can and try to better credit dancers on. Take talk and i think holding these creators accountable is totally fine. I think the line between holding them accountable controlling. is you know. Trolling his uruguay and fat. Go kill yourself and then holding them accountable saying hey addison. What you did wasn't cool. You got famous because you danced to. All of these dances that black creators created. And you're not giving them any credit you know you need to be better and do better. So there's a line. But i think trolling is very obviously wrong. But that doesn't mean that they're exempt from any critique. Well thank you so much for joining us today. Thank you for having me and remember if you have money to make a reality show about activism. You can just give it to activists in their causes. These do that instead. Be sure to subscribe to buzzfeed daily on the iheartradio app apple podcasts. Or wherever you go for your sound stories and please take the time to leave us. A rating and review. It helps us figure out what you like about the show versus what you love about the show and remember to come back for more of what you love about busby coming to you daily. It's a story that captivated the nation. Two brothers and their sister are on the run from authorities tonight three close-knit siblings known as the dougherty gang. Go on a fifteen state crime spree evading police for eight days. Police say the trio have a stockpile of weapons and at least one of them has made it clear. He's not afraid to dot. They're like potter. They applied listen to the doctor. Gang on september twentieth. On the iheartradio app apple podcasts. Or wherever you get your podcasts. Hey i'm robert evans and bad news. Everything's kind of collapsing. Good news collapse. Means we have some opportunities opportunities to maybe make a better world or at least a different one on my new show. It could happen here monday through friday. Luke chronicle the collapse in real time and move up at the people who have a vision for a better future so that you can make the new world better than the old one. listen to. It could happen here on the iheartradio app apple podcasts. Or wherever you get your podcasts. Don't miss out on the top stories from the best insiders around the nfl. I'm your host rent lewis. Send on the nfl inside. Report podcast. I'll go around the week for in-depth analysis in storytelling with a multitude of exclusive. Nfl insiders getting unmatched access game. Recaps the biggest news in in-depth storytelling that take you beyond the headlines. Multiple times per week all on the nfl inside report. Podcast listen to nfl inside. Report on the iheartradio app on apple podcasts. Or wherever you get your podcast..

marie burns addison charlie khalil gibran muhammad ben austin hugh your charlie dixie apple britney spears bryce hall addison ray charlie demilio netflix ferris hollywood Tock megan fox hulu new york times Addison
"khalil gibran" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:08 min | 2 years ago

"khalil gibran" Discussed on KQED Radio

"San Carlos 43 in San Francisco. Right now, it's 46 degrees. This is KQED public radio. The time is 8 46. This is morning edition from NPR News. I'm Layla fold in and I'm Steve Inskeep. Happy New Year. Among other things. January 1st is public Domain Day. That means copyrights expire on works from 95 years ago, so everybody is free to rewrite or remix or just play around with classic books and songs and more. NPR's Petra Mayer reports on what people have been doing with it all. So here's the thing with public Domain Day for 20 years. It didn't happen in 1998. Congress passed a law extending current copyrights from 75 to 95 years. And that meant that until two years ago, nothing new was coming into the public domain. That all changed on January 1st 2019. Since then, A flood of popular culture from the 19 twenties has become available early, silent movies, pop songs, books like the Prophet Mrs Dalloway in The Great Gatsby. So what are people doing with all this good stuff? You know, Like Gatsby, I was captivated by Nick That's author Michael Ferris Smith. His new novel, Nick comes out this month, and it imagines a life and a backstory for Gatsby's and it, Carraway. Smith says he was snagged by that moment at the end of the book, where Nick suddenly realizes it's his 30th birthday. And then right after that, he describes it as anticipating a decade of loneliness. And that is what really stuck me like When I read the decade of loneliness line I remember actually stopped there, and I said the book aside, Smith says he saw so many parallels between Nick's life and his own at that age that he decided to write next story, although he says he just assumed Gatsby was in the public domain. When he started writing five years ago. He was a little taken aback when his publishers told him the book couldn't come out until 2021. But Nick is one of the few really high profile works to surface from that flood of new public domain material. Jennifer Jenkins is the director of the Center for the Study of the Public domain at Duke Law School. She says. A lot of what's happening is on a smaller scale. I've had e mails from parents who say Hey, my high school kids, an amazing musician. And guess what, In another Rhapsody in Blue is free. He's going to play it. He's going to re imagine it and maybe we'll put it on YouTube. Some publishers have put out new editions of books like Khalil Gibran's The Prophet, Jenkins says the works become more available and in more editions, and that is self feeds creativity, So we do absolutely no, that happens. So why aren't there more Nick's out there? Glenn Fleishman is a journalist who's covered copyright issues. There's some very popular weird copyright cases that involved lots of lawsuits. And I think it makes people worry. Flashman has experienced some of that worry himself. He loves the classic song. Yes, we have no bananas, which entered the public domain on January 1st 2019. So he organized some friends at a New year's party to sing it, And they put the song up on YouTube. Moments after midnight on January 1st wait..

Nick That Michael Ferris Smith Jennifer Jenkins Gatsby YouTube NPR News Steve Inskeep KQED NPR San Carlos Flashman Glenn Fleishman Petra Mayer Mrs Dalloway San Francisco Duke Law School Congress Khalil Gibran Carraway
"khalil gibran" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:54 min | 2 years ago

"khalil gibran" Discussed on KCRW

"Inskeep. Happy New Year. Among other things. January 1st is public Domain Day. That means copyrights expire on works from 95 years ago, so everybody is free to rewrite or remix or just play around with classic books and songs and more. NPR's Petra Mayer reports on what people have been doing with it all. So here's the thing with public domain Day for 20 years. It didn't happen in 1998. Congress passed a law extending current copyrights from 75 to 95 years. And that meant that until two years ago, nothing new was coming into the public domain. That all changed on January 1st 2019. Since then, A flood of popular culture from the 19 twenties has become available early, silent movies, pop songs, books like the Prophet Mrs Dalloway in The Great Gatsby. So what are people doing with all this good stuff? You know, Like Gatsby, I was captivated by Nick That's author Michael Ferris Smith. His new novel, Nick comes out this month, and it imagines a life and a backstory for Gatsby's and Nick Carraway. Smith says he was snagged by that moment at the end of the book, where Nick suddenly realizes it's his 30th birthday. And then right after that, he describes it as anticipating a decade of loneliness. And that is what really stuck me like When I read the decade of loneliness line I remember actually stopped there, and I said the book aside, Smith says he saw so many parallels between Nick's life and his own at that age that he decided to write next story, although he says he just assumed Gatsby was in the public domain. When he started writing five years ago. He was a little taken aback when his publishers told him the book couldn't come out until 2021. But Nick is one of the few really high profile works to surface from that flood of new public domain material. Jennifer Jenkins is the director of the Center for the Study of the Public domain at Duke Law School, she says a lot of what's happening is on a smaller scale. I've had e mails from parents who say Hey, why high school kids, an amazing musician, and guess what, you know now that Rhapsody in Blue is free. He's going to play it. He's going to re imagine it and maybe we'll put it on YouTube. Some publishers have put out new editions of books like Khalil Gibran's The Pro. Off it, Jenkins says. The works become more available and in more editions, and that is self feeds creativity, So we do absolutely no, that happens. So why aren't there more? Nick's out there? Glenn Fleishman is a journalist who's covered copyright issues. There's some very popular weird copyright cases that involve lots of lawsuits, and I think it makes people worry Flashman has experienced some of that worry himself. He loves the classic song. Yes, we have no bananas, which entered the public domain on January 1st 2019. So he organized some friends at a New year's party to sing it, And they put the song up on YouTube. Moments after midnight on January 1st wait. Months.

Nick Michael Ferris Smith Gatsby Jennifer Jenkins YouTube Nick That Nick Carraway Glenn Fleishman Inskeep. Khalil Gibran Petra Mayer Mrs Dalloway NPR Congress Duke Law School Flashman director
"khalil gibran" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:00 min | 2 years ago

"khalil gibran" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And the listeners of KQED. This is morning edition from NPR News. I'm Layla fold in and I'm Steve Inskeep. Happy New Year. Among other things. January 1st is public Domain Day. That means copyrights expire on works from 95 years ago, so everybody is free to rewrite or remix or just play around with classic books and songs and more. NPR's Petra Mayer reports on what people have been doing with it all. So here's the thing with public Domain Day for 20 years. It didn't happen in 1998. Congress passed a law extending current copyrights from 75 to 95 years. And that meant that until two years ago, nothing new was coming into the public domain. That all changed on January 1st 2019. Since then, A flood of popular culture from the 19 twenties has become available early, silent movies, pop songs, books like the Prophet Mrs Dalloway in The Great Gatsby. So what are people doing with all this good stuff? You know, Like Gatsby, I was captivated by Nick That's author Michael Ferris Smith. His new novel, Nick comes out this month, and it imagines a life and a backstory for Gatsby's Nick Carraway. Smith says he was snagged by that moment at the end of the book, where Nick suddenly realizes it's his 30th birthday. And then right after that, he describes it as anticipating a decade of loneliness. And that is what really stuck me like When I read the decade of loneliness line I remember actually stopped there, and I said the book aside, Smith says he saw so many parallels between Nick's life and his own at that age that he decided to write next story, although he says he just assumed Gatsby was in the public domain. When he started writing five years ago. He was a little taken aback when his publishers told him the book couldn't come out until 2021. But Nick is one of the few really high profile works to surface from that flood of new public domain material. Jennifer Jenkins is the director of the Center for the Study of the Public domain at Duke Law School. She says. A lot of what's happening is on a smaller scale. I've had e mails from parents who say, Hey, my high school kids, an amazing musician. And guess what, you know now that Rhapsody in blue is free. He's going to play it. He's going to re imagine it and maybe we'll put it on YouTube. Some publishers have put out new editions of books like Khalil Gibran's The Prophet, Jenkins says the works become more available and in more editions, and that is self feeds creativity, So we do absolutely no, that happens. So why aren't there more Nick's out there? Glenn Fleishman is a journalist who's covered copyright issues. There's some very popular weird copyright cases that involved lots of lawsuits. And I think it makes people worry. Flashman has experienced some of that worry himself. He loves the classic song. Yes, we have no bananas, which entered the public domain on January 1st 2019. So he organized some friends at a New year's party to sing it, And they put the song up on YouTube. Moments after midnight on January 1st wait..

Nick Michael Ferris Smith Gatsby Jennifer Jenkins Nick That NPR News Steve Inskeep Nick Carraway KQED NPR YouTube Flashman Glenn Fleishman Petra Mayer Mrs Dalloway Duke Law School Congress Khalil Gibran director
"khalil gibran" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:54 min | 2 years ago

"khalil gibran" Discussed on KCRW

"And I'm Steve Inskeep. Happy New Year. Among other things. January 1st is public domain Day. That means copyrights expire on works from 95 years ago, so everybody is free to rewrite. Remix or just play around with classic books and songs and more. NPR's Petra Mayer reports on what people have been doing with it all. So here's the thing with public Domain Day for 20 years, it didn't happen. 1998 Congress passed a law extending current copyrights from 75 to 95 years. And that meant that until two years ago, nothing new was coming into the public domain. That all changed on January 1st 2019. Since then, A flood of popular culture from the 19 twenties has become available early, silent movies, pop songs, books like the Prophet Mrs Dalloway and The Great Gatsby. So what are people doing with all this good stuff? You know, Like Gatsby, I was captivated by Nick That's author Michael Farris Smith. His new novel, Nick comes out this month, and it imagines a life and a backstory for Gatsby's Nick Carraway. Smith says he was snagged by that moment at the end of the book, where Nick suddenly realizes it's his 30th birthday. And then right after that, he describes it as anticipating a decade of loneliness. And that is what really stuck me like When I read the decade of loneliness line I remember actually stopped there, and I said the book aside, Smith says he saw so many parallels between Nick's life and his own at that age that he decided to write next story, although he says he just assumed Gatsby was in the public domain. When he started writing five years ago. He was a little taken aback when his publishers told him the book couldn't come out until 2021. But Nick is one of the few really high profile works to surface from that flood of new public domain material. Jennifer Jenkins is the director of the Center for the Study of the Public domain at Duke Law School. She says. A lot of what's happening is on a smaller scale. I've had e mails from parents who say, Hey, my high school kids, an amazing musician. And guess what, you know now that Rhapsody in blue is free. He's going to play it. He's going to re imagine it and maybe we'll put it on YouTube. Some publishers have put out new editions of books like Khalil Gibran's The Prophet, Jenkins says the works become more available and in more editions, and that is self feeds creativity, So we do absolutely no, that happens. So why aren't there more Nick's out there? Glenn Fleishman is a journalist who's covered copyright issues. There's some very popular weird copyright cases that involve lots of lawsuits. And I think it makes people worry. Flashman has experienced some of that worry himself. He loves the classic song. Yes, we have no bananas, which entered the public domain on January 1st 2019. So he organized some friends at a New year's party to sing it, And they put the song up on YouTube. Moments after midnight on January 1st wait. Months.

Nick Michael Farris Smith Gatsby Jennifer Jenkins Nick That Steve Inskeep Nick Carraway YouTube Flashman NPR Glenn Fleishman Petra Mayer Mrs Dalloway Duke Law School Congress Khalil Gibran director
"khalil gibran" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:56 min | 2 years ago

"khalil gibran" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Possible. Rita Chatterjee. NPR news, among other things. January 1st is public domain Day. That means copyrights expire on works from 95 years ago. So everybody is free to rewrite or remix or just play around with classic books and songs and more. NPR's Petra Mayer reports on what people have been doing with it all. So here's the thing with public Domain Day for 20 years. It didn't happen in 1998. Congress passed a law extending current copyrights from 75 to 95 years. And that meant that until two years ago, nothing new was coming into the public domain. That all changed on January 1st 2019. Since then, A flood of popular culture from the 19 twenties has become available early, silent movies, pop songs, books like the Prophet Mrs Dalloway and The Great Gatsby. So what are people doing with all this good stuff? You know, Like Gatsby, I was captivated by Nick That's author Michael Ferris Smith. His new novel, Nick comes out this month, and it imagines a life and a backstory for Gatsby's Nick Carraway. Smith says he was snagged by that moment at the end of the book, where Nick suddenly realizes it's his 30th birthday. And then right after that, he describes it as anticipating a decade of loneliness. And that is what really stuck me like When I read the decade of loneliness line I remember actually stopped there, and I said the book aside, Smith says he saw so many parallels between Nick's life and his own at that age that he decided to write next story, although he says he just assumed Gatsby was in the public domain. When he started writing five years ago. He was a little taken aback when his publishers told him the book couldn't come out until 2021. But Nick is one of the few really high profile works to surface from that flood of new public domain material. Jennifer Jenkins is the director of the Center for the Study of the Public domain at Duke Law School. She says. A lot of what's happening is on a smaller scale. I've had e mails from parents who say Hey, why high school kids, an amazing musician, and guess what. Another Rhapsody in blue is free. He's going to play it. He's going to re imagine it and maybe we'll put it on YouTube. Some publishers have put out new editions of books like Khalil Gibran's The Prophet, Jenkins says the works become more available and in more editions, and that is self feeds creativity, So we do absolutely no, that happens. So why aren't there more Nick's out there? Glenn Fleishman is a journalist who's covered copyright issues. There's some very popular weird copyright cases that involve lots of lawsuits and I think it makes people worry. Flashman has experienced some of that worry himself. He loves the classic song. Yes, we have no bananas, which entered the public domain on January 1st 2019. So he organized some friends at a New year's party to sing it, And they put the song up on YouTube. Moments after midnight on January 1st wait..

Nick Michael Ferris Smith Gatsby Jennifer Jenkins Nick That NPR Nick Carraway Rita Chatterjee YouTube Flashman Petra Mayer Glenn Fleishman Mrs Dalloway Duke Law School Congress Khalil Gibran director