35 Burst results for "Khalil"

Dr. Khalil Habib on John Locke and the Concept of Natural Rights

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:51 min | Last week

Dr. Khalil Habib on John Locke and the Concept of Natural Rights

"Habib, I want to ask about social contract theory and why Locke was different. I'm going to try to tie this to current events very quickly. People talk all the time. I have a right to this. I have a right to that. I have a right to housing. I've read the healthcare. I have a right to be happy every right to an iPhone. I write to TikTok. I write to all this. But Locke's view was different. Locke's view is that rights were given by a creator or from God, this idea of natural rights. Why is it important that we understand natural rights? Before we even begin to hear the complaints of somebody saying I have a right to all these different material things. Yeah, that's good. I mean, for Locke, he distinguishes liberty from license early on when he first introduces the notion of rights. The idea that a right is anything you want to do would be too permissive for Locke, even associates that would license. For him, liberty is working within what he calls the law of nature. And not law of nature is known through reason and it's given to us by God and by nature. And so it's really a right to self govern. And that when one on the one hand means a form of government, you want a government in which the citizens get to self govern or at least represented fairly, but it also means the self govern your appetites. So if you define a right as just the indulging of one's license, Locke would not consider that a form of liberty. For liberty for him means self rule and moral virtue is the command of reason over the appetites. If you can't self govern your with respect to your appetites, then it's highly unlikely that you can be self governing in a form of government. So before he moves us in the direction of forming a civil state that will protect the rights that we have, yes, the first explain what a free human being is. And a

Locke Habib
Dr. Khalil Habib Joins Charlie to Discuss Montesquieu

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:31 min | Last week

Dr. Khalil Habib Joins Charlie to Discuss Montesquieu

"At hillsdale college. I thought it'd be fun to kind of get a series of experts from hillsdale college so you could get an idea of why am I always bragging on hillsdale college. Well, just the couple of awesome people we have doctor Khalil Habib, we did a whole series with him. I want to get back to that. I missed that. And so we're working on getting that back. He's really special. We had him on to talk about Nietzsche and many other things, and it's doctor Habib joins us right now. Doctor Habib, welcome back to the program. Charlie, it's good to see you a long time. Yes, it has been long, and we have to do it more often. So I understand you're teaching a course on montesquieu, Locke and many other things. So my montesquieu is, let's just say, not as sharp as it should be, at least I did remember he wrote a book called spirit of the laws when Kyle mentioned it. Why is it important for us to know montesquieu or understand montesquieu to properly understand the American founding and tell us who montesquieu is? So montesquiou was an aristocrat from France and he had published the spirit of the laws in around 1750. And many of our early founders had actually read it in French. And it was quickly translated into English, and he's one of the second or third most quoted authority among the early American founders when it came to debating what exactly is the purpose and role of government. Now, to be sure, Locke is central to that debate and where the founders take locks understanding of natural rights, very seriously and Locke's idea that consent of the governed is the only legitimate form of government, but where montesquieu comes in is log has a very early version of the separation of powers. So he separates the executive and the legislative branch. And it's a bit of a mystery where he puts the judicial branch. It's somewhat shared by the executive and the legislative. For law with respect to domestic issues, the legislative branch does have some control over the judiciary, whereas when it comes to international relations, the executive. Now, when montesquieu writes the spirit of the laws, he's very reluctant to go down that path. What he wants is a far stricter. That's a word. Separation. And so he identifies three powers that any government has, whether it's a tyranny or whether it's a republic, there's three powers. The question is, how would they organize and assemble? Who has control over them? The executive, the legislative and the judicial.

Hillsdale College Khalil Habib Habib Joins Doctor Habib Locke Montesquiou Charlie Kyle France Montesquieu
Smith INT sets up game-ending FG as Bears beat Texans 23-20

AP News Radio

00:37 sec | Last week

Smith INT sets up game-ending FG as Bears beat Texans 23-20

"Cairo Santos drilled a 30 yard field goal as time expired to give the bears a 23 20 win over the Texans Roquan Smith picked off a pass that they used in 30 and brought it back to the 12 setting up the game winning kick Khalil Herbert ran for a career high 157 yards and two touch dance for Chicago We were just trying to find a way to win any way we can you know Holland is a great job at block and help open up holes for me So I was just able to punch it in Justin Fields also ran for a score but was just 8 of 17 for 106 yards and two interceptions Davis mills threw for 245 yards completing 20 of 32 passes He had a touchdown and two interceptions I'm Dave ferry

Cairo Santos Roquan Smith Khalil Herbert Bears Justin Fields Holland Chicago Davis Mills Dave Ferry
"khalil" Discussed on Monday Morning Critic Podcast

Monday Morning Critic Podcast

05:43 min | 2 weeks ago

"khalil" Discussed on Monday Morning Critic Podcast

"A lot of the fights, especially the one with Miguel and Robbie. Yeah. When they got cool and stuff like that, I read that it read so much different than it played on screen. Yeah. It's amazing what you guys do. I want to take a pause before you go into Cobra Kai. There's a bunch of stuff I want to talk about. You know, you guys getting into acting. I'll start with you Aiden faster you were in faster, which is fantastic. That's The Rock's best movie. Anybody argues that's wrong. It is The Rock's best movie. You know, hang over two young Allen Ted and Khalil, my God, beats the most underrated show on television as a child. It's one of the best shows on TV. I can't believe more people don't talk about that show. And you guys are both established actors. And I see that. And I was watching a YouTube clip just before I got on here. And a guy was breaking down both of your characters. And he says, you know, you guys are kind of the heartbeat of the show, right? We have our characters that everybody knows, you know, Robbie and Miguel, I get it. But it's like, you guys with those moments that drive the show. It's a really underrated thing that the two of you do. And I hope people notice. I think they do. I hope they notice what the two of you do for that show. I feel like people would definitely notice what we do on that show. Yeah, yeah. We get a lot of love both of us get a lot of and it's well deserved love too. I mean, you know, and I have to say, you know, there was a lot of love in season 5 'cause I feel like I saw a lot of each of you in season 5. It wasn't like, okay, this episode were not that episode. I really feel like the two of you were on my screen quite a bit. Did you feel there was a, was it a change from other seasons? Or was it about on par for view? It was strange, because filming wise, it didn't feel like we were there as much, but unlike just how smooth the story went and just like this season, like it did feel like it was just like one continuous story. Apparently this is supposed to be our longest season yet. Time wise, but everyone who I've been talking to, they're like, it was so quick. It was over so quick. He was just like, it felt like, yeah. Yeah, there's some shows where I look like there was no filler gap that felt like it just felt like everything had a purpose, like all the whole way through that.

Allen Ted Robbie Miguel Cobra Kai Khalil YouTube
"khalil" Discussed on Monday Morning Critic Podcast

Monday Morning Critic Podcast

04:03 min | 2 weeks ago

"khalil" Discussed on Monday Morning Critic Podcast

"I play Chris on Cobra Kai and you're watching Monday morning critic. So Khalil, let me ask you, what's it like you and I sharing the sharing the screen with a trader? That's crazy. Yeah, I mean, and we're gonna get it to your characters. How do you guys spend your downtime? Well, we pretty much just, yeah, we just like hang out after like, well, we like to go to the gym sometimes, or we'll just chill in each other's rooms and watch TV and crap. And I find that with Nathan and oh, and I feel like their friendship offscreen develops on screen. Do you guys feel like because you guys are such good Friends? I don't think it's a secret. You guys feel like it adds to what goes on on screen or is that a reach you think? Yeah. I think it definitely does because, you know, we were very comfortable with each other offscreen, you know? We were very touchy people and we say whatever we want to each other. So I think the fact that we're just so comfortable with each other off screen. It is kind of probably. It is sometimes counterproductive on scenes where we're supposed to be like fighting and hating each other because like there's the one scene at the water park where like we're young at each other and like I was going at it like I'm literally saying I love you. I'm a kiss you right now. Do you just like see me going so we play around like that? Like whatever we're supposed to be playing, he's like oh yeah oh yeah when we were doing fighting scene on oh my God. It was like the big bra, I promise you some of that got cut 'cause we were laughing. I promise you some of the guy 'cause we were laughing because it was just so because the camera wouldn't be on us and we'll literally start pinching each other like that. And then I bet you guys off camera let it fly.

Cobra Kai Khalil Chris Nathan
"khalil" Discussed on Crime Junkie

Crime Junkie

07:46 min | 2 months ago

"khalil" Discussed on Crime Junkie

"So easily. And so she called the police and then she texted Khalil and said that the car he had wasn't hers, and if he brought back the keys, she wouldn't call the cops. Basically, she was hoping that both the police and Khalil would show up at the same time and they would arrest him. But unfortunately, they missed each other, though Khalil did come back to drop the keys off at the bottom of the stairs leading up to her room. So the prosecutor is wondering what you are probably screaming right now, which is like, why the wasn't this guy arrested? If Tiffany called the police, what happened here? She knew his name, and one of the handcuffs was literally still hanging off her wrist. How is he free to then go and murder Sarah? Well, what Tiffany tells him next makes him believe that Sarah's murder could have been prevented altogether. This episode was made possible by Etsy, where special doesn't have to mean expensive. I don't know if you guys have met me before, but I adore sequin. And I used to say that I own way too much for someone who lives in Indiana, but I've got this whole new attitude about it now. I have stopped waiting for an occasion to wear it and now I wear a sequin to the office. It's a real moira rose vibe. You would love it, trust me. So I am always on the lookout for new and unique sequin pieces to mix into my wardrobe, and I have found some of the cutest stuff on Etsy. Like I just got this light sequined duster jacket with fringe on the ends that is adorable. But Etsy isn't just clothing, sellers on Etsy have handmade items in every category, like home decor, kids toys, jewelry, and more. If you're new to Etsy, use code hello ten at checkout to get 10% off your first purchase. That's code hello ten. Maximum offer value of $50 ends October 31st, 2022. See terms at Etsy dot com slash terms, extraordinary, handmade, affordable. Etsy has it. Shop Etsy dot com. Now a word from our sponsor better help. Recently, I had a physical, and it was like this long three hour process where I did blood work, and they checked my skin and my organs, and I mean, everything, except my mental health, which seems bananas since quite literally, you use your brain for everything and how you experience the world around you, how you input information, how you react with people completely affects your life. So it's important to invest time and care into keeping your mind healthy. Better help is online therapy that offers video phone and even live chat only therapy session. So you don't have to see anyone on camera if you don't want to. It's much more affordable than in person therapy, and it's available worldwide. Better help will assess your needs and the can match you with your own accredited therapist in under 48 hours. Visit better help dot com slash crime junkie and join the over 2 million people who have taken charge of their mental health with the help of an experienced professional. Our listeners get 10% off their first month at better help dot com slash crime junkie that's better HELP dot com slash crime junkie. Tiffany tells the prosecutor that when the police showed up, she told them everything that had happened to the best of her ability. But according to body cam footage, from the three police officers that responded to Tiffany's call, which was published in a video from north Jersey dot com, it is obvious from the very beginning that none of them believed the story she told. Here's actually a part of Tiffany's interaction with police that night. What injuries do you have? You look at my face and I just see. For the what? When did it hit you? In the car. So you let him duct tape you or what happens. I just need to put the handcuffs on me first. What was happening all happened in the car? Yeah. This to me is absolutely outrageous. For them to say, you let him duct tape you? Like, who the says that to a victim? What about this woman makes you not believe her story? But not only did the officers not believe her, they accused her of being a sex worker and placed all the blame on her. And again, she literally still has one of the handcuffs hanging off her wrist. And so even though she gave them Khalil's name, she literally gave them his Facebook profile, his phone number doesn't matter. They just left. So when the prosecutor learns all of this, he is infuriated. Because Tiffany's attack happened just a week before Sarah was murdered and sure enough, Khalil cell phone data corroborates Tiffany's story. As does security footage that they pull from the motel. So had even one of the three officers who answered Tiffany's call, done even the teensiest bit of their freaking job to try to corroborate her story, Sarah butler would still be alive today. Khalil is charged with Joanne's murder and Tiffany's assault over the following weeks, to which he pleads not guilty on all charges. But even though he can't hurt anyone else behind bars, investigators continue trying to uncover the full extent of his reign of terror. They take a look at murders that occurred in and around the cities of montclair, specifically if the victim was a female sex worker, and it doesn't take them long to focus on the murder of another young woman whose body was found on September 1st. Her name is Robin west, and according to more reporting by Rebecca panico for NJ dot com, her badly burned body was found by firefighters after they put out a fire at an abandoned house in orange, New Jersey. The fire appeared to have been started either on or very close to her body. In fact, Robin had to be identified through dental records because of how badly damaged she was. The woman she was last seen with told police at the time that she saw Robin getting into a silver sedan and she even wrote down the license plate number. So police had a solid place to start. And wouldn't you know it? When they check who own that car, it was none other than Khalil. Like literally, this guy was doing nothing to cover his tracks, but he knew he didn't have to because police are doing nothing to take this guy off the streets. Now, to be fair, at the time, they did bring him in for questioning, but I'm sure by now you can guess exactly what he said, he's like, yep, sorry that night dropped her off a few hours later, she was fine, no idea what happened afterwards. And so, they let him go. He was free to leave, and after that, the investigation stalled. Khalil did remain on the radar as a possible suspect, but I couldn't find anything stating if he was ever re interviewed. So by now, he's been charged with the murders of two other women, the assault of a third, and they have a feeling that Robin could have fallen prey to him as well. So they go back to those trusty phone records and look at his location on the night that Robin was killed, which, by the way, they could have done when Robin was killed. And according to those records, they can see that after he picked up Robin, which remember he admitted doing. He drove to the house that she would later be found in, and then he left shortly before the call came into 9-1-1 reporting the house fire. But his phone records also show that he didn't go straight home. According to more reporting from Julia Martin

Khalil Etsy Tiffany moira rose Sarah Sarah butler Indiana north Jersey Robin west Rebecca panico Robin Joanne montclair Facebook New Jersey orange Julia Martin
"khalil" Discussed on Crime Junkie

Crime Junkie

08:28 min | 2 months ago

"khalil" Discussed on Crime Junkie

"Get an answer. And as time went on, she got more and more worried about her friend. No one else in their circle of Friends were able to get in contact with her either. And so a few days later, Amaya decided to report her missing. Now, unfortunately, I can't find much information about the investigation into Joanne's disappearance. If they're even was one. Because here's the thing I know amiah gave police the number of the guy who'd picked up her friend, but I have no idea if they even looked into it. Joanne remained missing until December 5th when two construction workers found the body of a woman in an abandoned home in orange, a town right next to montclair. They called the police and when they arrived, they found the decomposing body of a woman laying on the second floor of the home. She had a jacket wrapped around her neck and duct tape wound around her nose and mouth. Now it was difficult at the time for them to tell how long she'd been lying there. But an autopsy would later determine that she had been deceased for about a month. Her autopsy also found signs of sexual assault and her cause of death was strangulation. But unfortunately, they weren't able to find any DNA at her crime scene or on her body. And I also couldn't find out if the jacket that was found around her neck was determined to be hers or somebody else's. Because of that missing person's report filed by a Maya Newark police were able to identify the woman in the house as Joanne. But until now, they say they didn't have any suspects or leads. Again, phone number aside, I can't even with that. But here they are now. They learn about Sarah's murder, they notice enough similarities between her case and Joanne's that they get in contact with montclair police, as well as the prosecuting attorney to try and figure out if Khalil could have been the one to pick up Joanne that day. So just like with Sarah, they check his phone's location data and sure enough, all the pieces start coming together. On the day that Joanne disappeared, they see that he went to the same area where she was picked up, then drove to the house where her body was found. They also look at his call logs, which corroborate what Amaya said in her original statement, which can I take a minute here? They literally had this guy's number from her friend as soon as she was reported missing. I, for the life of me, can not figure out why it took Sarah's murder for them to connect the dots and get to Khalil. The only thing I can think potentially in my mind is that this is like a burner phone, so they couldn't necessarily connect it to him, but then once they had it in their possession, I have no idea, but I get very worship thinking about it. Now, Khalil's confronted with this information in jail. But the explanation he gives is almost a word for word copy of what he said when he was arrested for Sarah's murder. He admits to seeing her that day, but after their date, he says he drops her off, she's safe and sound, has no idea what happened to her afterwards. But investigators aren't buying it, especially when his phone literally places him at the scene of the murder on the day it happened. So by the time he's arranged for Sarah's murder on December 13th, they're already preparing to formally charge him with Joanne's murder as well. But before they can, the prosecutor on Sarah's case is approached by a woman who says that she knows Khalil and just a few weeks before Sarah went missing, he tried to kill her too. The woman's name is Tiffany Taylor, and she tells the prosecutor that once she heard the news that Khalil had been arrested, she knew that she had to come forward and tell her story. And that story is a harrowing one. Tiffany says that on November 15th, she agreed to meet up with a man who had been relentlessly texting and calling her for the last few months offering to pay her for sex. Even though she had previously worked as a sex worker, she says that she wasn't interested in that lifestyle anymore, but recently she'd fallen on some hard times and was living in a car. So even though she didn't know his name, she agreed the next time he reached out to her. But according to more reporting from Christopher mog for north Jersey dot com, she wasn't actually planning on going through with it. She says that she just wanted to take the guy's money and get out of there before anything happened. She had done it before, so she was planning on doing it again. She says that she and the man agreed to meet at the Ritz motel in Elizabeth, which is a town a little to the south of montclair. And so at about 7 50 p.m. on the 15th, this guy showed up, handed her $80 and then drove away in a car that she was borrowing from an acquaintance. Now right away, there were a few red flags that stuck out to Tiffany. Not enough for her to stop the car and get out, but enough to catch her attention. Like how the guy was wearing a ski mask and gloves, even though it was 50° outside, for instance. But again, she desperately needed the money and she was planning on making her escape soon before anything could happen. And just as like a crime drinky life role, I highly recommend avoiding men in masks offering you money. Tiffany says that before they could make it to wherever they were planning on going, he asked to pull over so he could go to the bathroom. She agreed, and then the next thing she remembers is waking up in the back seat of the car, head pounding with her neck caught in a chokehold and duct tape wrapped around her mouth and nose. She says that her hands were cuffed behind her back and even though she was completely disoriented, she started thrashing and crying. She bit her tongue and the mixture of tears and blood was enough to help loosen the duct tape so she could scream. And that's when the man asked if she recognized him. And at first, she didn't, because he still had that ski mask on. But then she realized that she knew exactly who he was. Khalil Wheeler, weaver. She tells the prosecutor that the two had met a few months before and he had become obsessed with her, texting her nonstop and asking to pay her for sex. Eventually, she said yes, but she took the money and ran instead, changing her number so he couldn't contact her anymore. But in that moment, she realized that he must have found her new number because he was the guy who had been texting and calling her over the last few months. Now, as Tiffany is being attached, she tried to appeal to Khalil. Doing it in any way she could think of. Desperately, she said that the handcuffs were too tight and asked if he would loosen them. She said she was trying to think of anything to get him to stop and to her surprise he actually said yes. So he literally stops trying to kill her and loosened her handcuffs and in those few seconds she was able to come up with a plan. According to an article by Rebecca panico for NJ dot com, Tiffany told Khalil that she had left her phone back at the motel, which was a problem for him because she had saved their entire conversation on it. And that kind of seemed to snap him back into reality because he realized that if he left that phone, the police would see that he was the last person she talked to. So he climbed back into the driver's seat and drove the two of them back to the motel. And it was in that moment, Tiffany says she realized that she could get out of that situation alive. When they got back to the motel, Khalil got out and removed the duct tape from her face. He then draped a jacket around her shoulders to hide the handcuffs and told her to lead the way that he was going to follow a few feet behind her so he didn't look suspicious. And then he let her out of the car. Tiffany tells the prosecutor that what Khalil didn't know at the time was that Tiffany didn't actually live at the motel. The guy that she worked for did. They had this arrangement where she would buy this guy drugs and in exchange he would pay her and let her sleep in his car. And so when Khalil led her out, she went straight to his room and kicked the door. Hearing that kick, the man opened the door right away and she rushed in and slammed the door behind her. The deadbolt locked automatically leaving Khalil outside banging on the door and yelling for her to come out. Tiffany slipped one of her hands out of the cuffs and pulled open the window curtain next to the door to show him that she had gotten free. And at that site, he bolted. But she goes on to say that she wasn't about to let Khalil get away with this

Joanne Khalil Sarah Amaya Tiffany Maya Newark police montclair police montclair Christopher mog Ritz motel Tiffany Taylor Khalil Wheeler north Jersey Rebecca panico Elizabeth
"khalil" Discussed on Crime Junkie

Crime Junkie

08:01 min | 2 months ago

"khalil" Discussed on Crime Junkie

"Slash podcast. When the officers spot the man that they think is Taj pulling into the parking lot, they stop him and confront him with the messages that he sent on tagged. The guy admits, yes, he is the man behind the account, but his name isn't actually Taj. It's Khalil Wheeler weaver. Police ask him about his interactions with Sarah on the night of the 22nd where they met where they went and where he last saw her. Now, the specifics of the story that he tells them varies depending on which source you read, but he admits that the two did meet up that evening for a date. However, he insists that when they parted ways she was alive and well. He even says that he has a friend who can verify this whole story. Now I'm not sure what police thought of Khalil in that first meeting. But at this point, they really don't have a solid reason to hold him for any questioning. So they have no choice but to let him go. But they still do their due diligence and double check his alibi with that friend. According to reporting by Tom Nobile for the Herald news, his friend's name is Richard isaacs. And when police ask him about Khalil's whereabouts for the night of the 22nd, he confirms that Khalil was with him pretty much that whole night. He says they were in his garage working on Richard's car when this girl that he didn't know picked up Khalil in a minivan at about 7 p.m.. He doesn't know where they went, what they did, but he verifies that that same woman dropped him back off at his house by like 9 p.m. that evening. So for the time being, Khalil's story checks out. But the question of what happened to Sarah still remains. Investigators are finally able to get into her phone records. And in particular, they're interested in taking a look at her location data to get a play by play of where she went that night. And based on the data they see that the last place her phone pinged off of was a tower near eagle rock reservation, which is a nature preserve that spans across montclair Verona and west orange, New Jersey. So on December 1st, they head over to the 400 acre reserve to look for her, and they don't have to search long, because hidden behind a trailer that sits near one of the parking lots, they see what looks like hands and feet sticking out from under a pile of brush. When they move it aside, they find the body of a young woman. The bottom half of her head from just below her eyes all the way down to her chin is wrapped in duct tape. And there's a pair of sweatpants wrapped tightly around her neck. Once they remove the duct tape, they confirm what everyone already suspected. It's Sarah. Sarah's odd topsy is completed in the days following her discovery. And according to an article by Lisa Marie sagara for the montclair times her cause of death is determined to be strangulation. But her family confirms that the sweatpants found around her neck weren't hers. They also find evidence of sexual assault and the pathologist is able to get a DNA sample from underneath her fingernails. An investigators already have someone in mind that they want to compare the DNA to or take a closer look at. According to Sarah's cell phone data, Khalil's number was the last one she called, and even though he had a friend back up his story, there's just something about him that isn't sitting quite right. So what police decide to do is they actually get a warrant for the location data on Khalil's phone. They're thinking since Sarah's phone was what gave them the information they needed to find her body, maybe his phone will give them some insight on where he really was that night and wouldn't you know it for the night of the 22nd the locations where his phone pinged are almost an exact replica of Sarah's, including a stop at the eagle rock reservation a little after 10 p.m., which is way after his friend Richard said that he was back at his house. And speaking of Richard, investigators want to talk to him again since he confirmed Khalil's alibi, so they go back to him and ask him if he was really telling the truth, and he admits that he wasn't. He tells the detectives that Khalil had called him and told him that if police showed up and asked about his whereabouts for the 22nd, he should say that he was with him. But Richard is clear that he had no idea what he was covering for. He was just trying to help out a buddy. Now that police know Khalil was lying about his whereabouts and his phone can place him in the same location as Sarah's body on the night that she was killed, police have enough to bring him into custody. He's arrested on December 6th and charged with Sarah's murder and desecrating human remains. Now after his arrest, Khalil's story about what happened that night changes multiple times. He says that Sarah actually picked him up from his house not Richards, but then he changes his tune and says that he was actually the one who picked Sarah up, but when police asked where he picked her up, Khalil gives them two different locations. And they know all of this is just like lie after lie after lie because again, they have his phone records to prove that he wasn't at any of the places he's talking about that night. They also have uncovered a series of really disturbing searches, including one very specific search, which was for quote how to make homemade poisons to kill humans. But bizarrely amidst the searches, they also find that he was researching how to become a police officer. And the more they learn about Khalil, the more everyone starts to wonder why he killed Sarah in the first place. According to an article for the Herald news by Christopher mog and Julia Martin, they learn that he grew up in a comfortable middle class neighborhood with two relatives in law enforcement. He had a few close friends, worked as a security guard, and actually wanted to follow in his family's footsteps and pursue a career on the police force. So his friends and family are shocked that he's been charged with murder. And his mother, in particular, is absolutely heartbroken. But even though he seemed like a perfectly harmless, upstanding guide to everyone who knew him, it's like we always say, you never truly know anyone, no matter how close you think you are. With Khalil staying silent, the question of motive remains at the forefront of everyone's minds. Investigators determine that he and Sarah didn't know each other before they connected on tagged on the 19th. So from what they can tell, it seems like he met up with her for the sole purpose of killing her. As they're putting together this bigger picture of who Khalil is, they start to worry that Sarah might not be his only victim. I mean, the text, the searches, it all seems so cold and calculated. And after news breaks that Khalil has been arrested, police in Newark, New Jersey, can't help but notice the similarities between Sarah's story and an unsolved murder of their own. This episode is made possible by sleep number. You guys I officially have it dialed in. Last night, my sleep IQ score was 83, and that was with my sleep number set at 75. Now I'm a bit of a perfectionist, so even 83 isn't perfect to me. I'm using the sleep IQ data that I'm given from my bed to continually dial it in even more. I am determined to get my sleep IQ into the 90s. You see, sleep IQ data shows sleepers who use their 360 smart bed technology get 28 more minutes of restful sleep per night. That is up to 170 hours per year. So why choose proven quality sleep from sleep number? That's because every great day starts the night before. Discover special offers now for a limited time at your local sleep number store, or at sleep number dot com slash crime junkie.

Khalil Sarah Khalil Wheeler weaver Tom Nobile Richard isaacs Richard eagle rock reservation Herald news Lisa Marie sagara the montclair times Taj west orange montclair Verona New Jersey eagle rock Christopher mog Julia Martin Richards
American Express Goes 'Woke'

The Larry Elder Show

00:52 sec | 7 months ago

American Express Goes 'Woke'

"American Express Kenny has disavowed capitalism, talk to me about that. American Express brought in a Harvard Law professor, no surprise. His name is Khalil Muhammad, he came in and spoke to all of the employees. This is based on the sources that I've witnessed. He came and spoke to the employees about how capitalism is racist. And by the way, how American Express should lower credit requirement for black Americans. That's what he said. And so if American Express takes their advice and judging by how woke they've gotten a majors do that, they're going to become an explicitly racist company in the name of wokeness. This is why we have to stop this is why we have to fight back. We have to organize the ordinary Americans against American expresses woke

Harvard Law American Express Khalil Muhammad Kenny
Judge exonerates two men convicted in 1965 killing of Malcolm X

AP News Radio

00:57 sec | 11 months ago

Judge exonerates two men convicted in 1965 killing of Malcolm X

"The charges have been dismissed against two of the men found guilty in the slaying of civil rights leader Malcolm X. in a New York courtroom Manhattan district attorney Cyrus Vance junior declared that Mohammad Aziz and Khalil Islam did not get a fair trial in nineteen sixty six because evidence that would've cleared them was deliberately withheld orders on the record J. Edgar Hoover himself the FBI Wilson this is not to tell police or prosecutors have anymore in fact FBI informant the judge granted the request conditionally vacated Mohammad Aziz who was paroled with his co defendant in the eighties hopes the criminal justice system that unfairly put him in jail makes restitution the same system that responsible for this travesty of justice all of the responsibilities he cites racism behind his prosecution and conviction for the

Mohammad Aziz Malcolm X. Cyrus Vance Khalil Islam FBI J. Edgar Hoover Manhattan New York Wilson
2 men convicted of killing Malcolm X expected to be exonerated

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | 11 months ago

2 men convicted of killing Malcolm X expected to be exonerated

"Hi my cross your reporting two men are set to be cleared of the killing of Malcolm X. two men convicted of the nineteen sixty five assassination of civil rights leader Malcolm X. are set to be cleared Thursday according to their attorneys at Manhattan's top prosecutor eighty three year old Mohammad Aziz at the late Khalil Islam had always maintained their innocence a nearly two year reinvestigation about authorities withheld evidence favorable to the defense Manhattan district attorney Cyrus Vance junior tweeted his office will join the beds attorneys and asking a judge to toss out the convictions of third man Bushe he'd Abdul haleem also notice tell the chair or Thomas Hagen was also convicted of the murder in March nineteen sixty six Hagen who admitted he was one of the three gunmen who shot Malcolm X. testified either Aziz nor Islam was involved Haygood was paroled in twenty ten hi

Malcolm X. Mohammad Aziz Khalil Islam Manhattan Cyrus Vance Bushe Abdul Haleem Thomas Hagen Hagen Aziz Haygood
The One Unforgivable Sin in America? To Deviate From the Accepted Script

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:18 min | 1 year ago

The One Unforgivable Sin in America? To Deviate From the Accepted Script

"Say, let's be honest. No one gets canceled for abandoning their children. Betraying their country, or committing any number of indecent immoral or criminal acts. No, today in America, there really is only one unforgivable sin and that is to deviate from the accepted script when speaking of protected protected identity groups. It is to say something whether intentionally or not that either offense protected identity groups or that the elites find offensive on their behalf, and before that paragraph, you wrote something that just like clicked and it's so true because we did a whole we did a whole segment with your colleague, doctor Khalil Habib on Nietzsche, and I kept trying to find where it is, but you could just share with the audience, Nietzsche said that every society has something you don't make fun of. A piety that you don't, can you explain that please? Yeah, at the heart of every society is something at which it is your categorically forbidden to laugh. And so if you think about it, you know, humor, comedians at their best are subversive. Because look, I see humor comes in one of two varieties. Either it's kind of slapstick absurd you fall on a banana. Or you make fun of things you're not supposed to make fun of. So look at the recent brouhaha with Dave Chappelle. You know, he is touching one of the pies that the claims of the transgender are sacred and holy. You know, even in his first show, you may be too young. I don't know if you remember that Dave Chappelle show when it was on. I do. He did, there was one skit. I won't say what it was, but it was incredibly politically incorrect. But it was hilarious. He was quite subversive. I mean, he made fun of black people, not in a malicious way he's black. But we're not allowed to laugh today. You know, you know, how many women does it take to change a lot to screw in a lightbulb? That's not funny. That's kind of the view, and then you could say the same thing for days for black people, you name it. So the central piety in America is pertains to the protected aged identity groups. We're not allowed to laugh, we're not allowed to contradict them, the claims made on their

Khalil Habib Heart Of Every Society Dave Chappelle Nietzsche America
Fields throws 1st TD pass, Bears' defense dominates in Vegas

AP News Radio

00:34 sec | 1 year ago

Fields throws 1st TD pass, Bears' defense dominates in Vegas

"Justin fields threw his first career touchdown pass in the bears defense was stellar in at twenty two nine downing of the raiders in Vegas just for a horse that caught the first TD pass by fields who was twelve of twenty four one hundred eleven yards in his third career start Chicago went ahead for good early in the second quarter and fields two yard TD pass to Horst added traffic Derek Carr passed for two hundred six yards and Josh Jacobs rushed for a late touchdown in the raiders second consecutive loss Khalil Mack with the bears defensive dominance of his former team with eight tackles plus a sack of Kerr on the two point conversion I'm the ferry

Justin Fields Raiders Bears Derek Carr Josh Jacobs Vegas Horst Khalil Mack Chicago Kerr
How to Examine Nietzsche's Work With Dr. Khalil Habib

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:51 min | 1 year ago

How to Examine Nietzsche's Work With Dr. Khalil Habib

"Way to really look at nietzsche's works is sort of two categories. He's got some that. I would call. Sort of a wrecking ball approach. They're really designed to clear the deck so to speak younger will be an example. It's a very destructive. Book is primarily focuses on destroying the prejudices of of the Of the philosophers. You know trying to push nationalism out and make way for some new horizon. Zero fish tug would be sort of more of a constructive work. Okay so it necessarily follows his other works and endure deir through strove what he essentially wants. The obermann mentioned simply means the overmanned can be translated as superman but it's it mart Accurately overmanned and the question is over. What and essentially in network over the nihilism that has engulfed europe and so he has this image of a tight rope walker who stretches a wrote across an abyss and he wants to cross it meaning wants to carry civilization over this abyss that he falls and dies doesn't have the spirit necessary to lift europe up and so what so. What the uber. Mitch is designed to invoke or inspire our men who see the problem of modern europe as essentially nihilism. We've we there's nothing meaningful left in man's life anymore. I mean when you think about how pop culture most likely has more influence over most people's lives today than say god or family our country you can see need just point. The three things had historically always been A portal through which human beings can gain some sense of continuity or meaning have been replaced essentially bigest the market and so the overman is designed to connect a link between this world and something over the nihilism of contemporary contemporary europe. And sort of serve as a bridge to some kind of ideal

Nietzsche Europe Walker Mitch
Is God Dead? Making Sense of Nietzsche with Dr. Khalil Habib

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:05 min | 1 year ago

Is God Dead? Making Sense of Nietzsche with Dr. Khalil Habib

"Back by popular demand doctor khalil habib from the beacon of the north the last college. How college is meant to be hillsdale. College you guys can find all things hillsdale. Charlie for hillsdale dot com doctor. Great to see you again. Likewise charlie how you doing. I'm doing great. So i asked you this question right before we got started which actually is a perfect segue into the type of philosophy that nietzsche helped advance or birth. Which is who knows what the truth actually is. How do you pronounce nietzsche either some nietzsche but my teachers always referred to him as So well that's i guess it's the truth isn't it's all real. That's that's the point. That's what i was getting to is. What difference does it make right. It's whoever has more power determines how to pronounce his hard to understand german name. So let's start with it. Is god dead professor. And where did that question come from. Well it took to be a paradox. Because as anyone knows of god by any reasonable definition is eternal so the idea that god is dead is just a paradoxical statement in mutuals intending to get us to reflect on what what he means by that and what he means by that is. He's dead in the hearts and minds of europeans. And what that essentially suggests is that the belief in god existence of god rests on the opinions of the faithful and in the same context in which you see that phrase uttered Major says that god has been replaced by the newspaper. And if you wanna think about what that means when you contrast god who is eternal who gives us a transcendent ideal port which we can aim and be dutiful towards with the newspaper which is essentially ephemeral. What essentially saying is that. The modern world has shifted away from a longing for eternity in greatness in some capacity to here now get immediacy of one's sensations in to the just newspapers to the ephemeral and he thinks that that diminishes man's longing for greatness ultimately impoverishes civil

Hillsdale Khalil Habib Nietzsche Charlie
Who Was Nietzsche and How Did He Influence the Nazi Movement?

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:10 min | 1 year ago

Who Was Nietzsche and How Did He Influence the Nazi Movement?

"Every soldier that was deployed in world war. One was actually given nietzsche And the german front and so they read this idea of the importance of the will which we're going to get into and this idea of becoming the superman or the overman or the uber manche and then they come back to kind of war torn germany and these ideas kinda laid the philosophical trans Foundation four hitler's most popular speech the triumph of the will. And if you read that speech it sounds a lot like nietzsche's ideas so let's let's work our way backwards from there and so can you just give us some biographical context of who this guy was and how he was able why he published ideas at the time that were so different than some of the metaphysics and philosophy. That was considered to be the consensus. Well he was a prodigy. Who's obviously a german philosopher. He died in nineteen hundred at a very young age of was teaching philosophy. He was trained as a philology which means essentially somebody who studies languages in price to think about their meaning and in one of his works. that gay homo. He tells us that he essentially abandoned his post as a professor so that he can become dot and what he meant by that is that he was horrified by what he describes as buddhism for europe which is just code for certain kind of nihilism. You believe that. Europe in particular has lost its capacity in meaning any kind of sense of identity and he was looking to try to inspire certain aspects of european instance that he thought could still breed some kind of idealism or transcendent that was transcendence that was just essentially close to being buried For example industrial era through strength in a very famous speech entitled the last man speech he is characters. Few strokes mentioned that our soil is still thick enough to perhaps a plant a grants Tree some kind of some kind of the ideal but it's getting a increasingly more difficult to find anyone in the world interested in anything beyond just a here

Philosophical Trans Foundation Nietzsche Germany Europe
What Was Machiavelli's Position on War?

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:39 min | 1 year ago

What Was Machiavelli's Position on War?

"A quote here That i wanted to ask you about that. Machiavelli said which segues beautifully there is. No avoiding war. It can only be postponed to the advantage of others now. I suppose you could take that a variety of different ways to mean war in the sense that we mean war or is he writing this advice to a political figure. You're saying like if you have you have to crush your political opponents now or else they're only gonna grow stronger. Both you're referring to a quote that comes up from chapter three of the prince. At least the next chapter. He lays out the differences between ancient rome in the way modern politics in its business in modern politics. Machiavelli says there's an inclination that you think that somehow wars avoidable that if you just avoid war it won't come to you. In the context of the coat you're mentioning machiavelli talking about foreign enemies for machiavelli. It's it's natural for human beings to want to expand into acquire and so it's the natural inclination of all governments want row a net means imprint in in japan your own borders and national interests. So then you're caught in arms race so to speak of expanding yourself so machiavelli. He thought that the seeked wrong a classical rome was they never thought war was it. Avoidable always took the fight to their enemies now in the discourses he talks about the same phenomenon domestically he says. Sometimes you're gonna find you have enemies within you better stripe while they're still week before they grow and become a faction and which as you're going to have to have either a civil war even

Machiavelli Rome Japan
"khalil" Discussed on The Charlie Kirk Show

The Charlie Kirk Show

06:00 min | 1 year ago

"khalil" Discussed on The Charlie Kirk Show

"Up here. We go charlie. What you've done is incredible here. Maybe charlie kirk is on the college campus. We are lucky to have. Charlie can run the white house. I wanna thank jollies. Incredible guy his spirit. His love of this country country's done an amazing job building one of the most powerful youth organisations ever created turning point. Usa not embrace the ideas that have destroyed countries destroyed lives and we are going to fight for freedom on campuses across the country. That's why we are here. Hey everybody welcome this episode of the charlie kirk show. We are so thrilled to have this episode. Brought to you by hillsdale college remember. It is charlie for hillsdale dot com charlie f. o. r. hillsdale dot com. I am currently working to the constitution to a one course started to see us louis course and we took a little bit of a pivot away from that and so it's dr khalil. Habib back from the beacon of the north hillsdale. College doctor habib. Welcome back to the charlie kirk show. Charlie's fit to be with you so we kind of stumbled into machiavelli. Last conversation and i promised our listeners. We will get back to it commonly you'll hear on cable television with almost no explanation. Someone say well. That's very machiavelli by this politician. Or that's very maquiavelian. And i think people at best have a very surface knowledge of machiavelli Who was this man. And why was he so important. So machiavelli was born in florence italy and you lived during the middle of fifteenth century. And he lives at a time during the renaissance where there was growing frustration with politics with the church Time for corrupt and it was a movement known as the renaissance that wanted to revive classical virtue stress. The emphasis of moral education on restoring civic harmony and restoring as states crap essentially machiavelli comes in and crashes in on this party and says that's a no go. You can't restore politics on classical moral virtue. And so what. He wants to spread in books like the prince which bookies most famous for today although does this is many years ago was one that people mostly focused on. He presses that of politics requires a cunning. You have to be manipulative. You have to be willing to use force there when you're gonna have to break with traditional moral virtue To essentially affect transition in politics for example One of his many critiques of the renaissance and the attempted to bring christianity in classical moral virtue. Together in a modern republic machiavellian. The prince talks about a situation in which a group of christians in a small town wanted to deal with criminals unchristian grounds and he says well this guy treasury borja who was a brutal dictator essentially showed mercy to the innocent by crushing. These people not turning the other cheek so in other words you measure your your use of force in relation to your end goal and if it's to bring about law and order you don't do it by a holding some kind of classical moral virtue forces necessary and so that forced burns the reputation of some kind of gangster Sort of a low philosophy a politics but It's incredibly influential and foundational in many ways. And so let's dive deeper into that. You know you mentioned how Machiavelli basically you know critics criticized socrates and plato and mostly plato saying why trying to build these imaginary republics. We know what we want. Let's just go get it. Can you talk about how machiavelli in some way liberated this conversation. Not in a good way of the will of kind of how the political will should triumph good. Yeah that's excellent. Actually you're referring to chapter fifteen in prince and it's one of those chapters that are so crucial that anytime i ever teach machiavelli. Distracter has to get almost a full day of line by long line. Reading will in chapter fifteen of the prince machiavelli says he's going to depart from all classical writers. So forget the debate. Whether or not machiavellian was Doing something new was just sort of an ancient and modern clothing. He tells us that he's doing something new. What is it that he's doing new. Just so happens. Charlie that i have that chapter in mind. Let me just read it to you. He says because. I know that many have written about this politics friendship etc. I fear that in writing of it again. I may be helped presumptuous. Especially since in disputing this matter i depart from the orders of others so he tells us he is not gonna follow anything that had been written about before regarding moral philosophy and politics and then he says the following since my intent is to write something useful it suggesting that classical fodders not useful to whoever understands it appeared to me more fitting to go directly to the effectual truth of the thing than to any imagination of it so he makes a distinction between philosophy. That is simply imaginary and philosophy. That is actually factually true. Which is a unique phrase. No one's ever used that. Before now that in a moment but what is he talking about. He says that many have imagined republics he's referring to plato and principalities and kingdoms say saint augustine kingdom of god to have never been seen are known to exist in truth why because they are so far from how one lives to how one should live that he who lets go of what is done for what should be done learns his room and rather than his preservation so now he tells you what philosophy really should be. The factual truth is that which preserves your life and preserves your republic and imaginary truth moral or political. Is that which leads to your ruin. So if turning the other cheek in a political circumstance leads to your ruined and it's an imaginary teach and in that same chapter. He gives.

charlie kirk charlie f dr khalil north hillsdale Charlie charlie hillsdale college treasury borja hillsdale Habib habib machiavelli white house prince machiavelli florence Usa italy
Machiavelli Demystified With Dr. Khalil Habib

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:24 min | 1 year ago

Machiavelli Demystified With Dr. Khalil Habib

"Habib. Welcome back to the charlie kirk show. Charlie's fit to be with you so we kind of stumbled into machiavelli. Last conversation and i promised our listeners. We will get back to it commonly you'll hear on cable television with almost no explanation. Someone say well. That's very machiavelli by this politician. Or that's very maquiavelian. And i think people at best have a very surface knowledge of machiavelli Who was this man. And why was he so important. So machiavelli was born in florence italy and you lived during the middle of fifteenth century. And he lives at a time during the renaissance where there was growing frustration with politics with the church Time for corrupt and it was a movement known as the renaissance that wanted to revive classical virtue stress. The emphasis of moral education on restoring civic harmony and restoring as states crap essentially machiavelli comes in and crashes in on this party and says that's a no go. You can't restore politics on classical moral virtue. And so what. He wants to spread in books like the prince which bookies most famous for today although does this is many years ago was one that people mostly focused on. He presses that of politics requires a cunning. You have to be manipulative. You have to be willing to use force there when you're gonna have to break with traditional moral virtue To essentially affect transition in politics for example One of his many critiques of the renaissance and the attempted to bring christianity in classical moral virtue. Together in a modern republic machiavellian. The prince talks about a situation in which a group of christians in a small town wanted to deal with criminals unchristian grounds and he says well this guy treasury borja who was a brutal dictator essentially showed mercy to the innocent by crushing. These people not turning the other cheek so in other words you measure your your use of force in relation to your end goal and if it's to bring about law and order you don't do it by a holding some kind of classical moral virtue forces necessary and so that forced burns the reputation of some kind of gangster Sort of a low philosophy a politics but It's incredibly influential and foundational in many

Charlie Kirk Habib Machiavelli Charlie Florence Italy Treasury Borja
What Can We Learn From Machiavelli?

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:07 min | 1 year ago

What Can We Learn From Machiavelli?

"Can you talk about how machiavelli in some way liberated this conversation. Not in a good way of the will of kind of how the political will should triumph good. Yeah that's excellent. Actually you're referring to chapter fifteen in prince and it's one of those chapters that are so crucial that anytime i ever teach machiavelli. Distracter has to get almost a full day of line by long line. Reading will in chapter fifteen of the prince machiavelli says he's going to depart from all classical writers. So forget the debate. Whether or not machiavellian was Doing something new was just sort of an ancient and modern clothing. He tells us that he's doing something new. What is it that he's doing new. Just so happens. Charlie that i have that chapter in mind. Let me just read it to you. He says because. I know that many have written about this politics friendship etc. I fear that in writing of it again. I may be helped presumptuous. Especially since in disputing this matter i depart from the orders of others so he tells us he is not gonna follow anything that had been written about before regarding moral philosophy and politics and then he says the following since my intent is to write something useful it suggesting that classical fodders not useful to whoever understands it appeared to me more fitting to go directly to the effectual truth of the thing than to any imagination of it so he makes a distinction between philosophy. That is simply imaginary and philosophy. That is actually factually true. Which is a unique phrase. No one's ever used that. Before now that in a moment but what is he talking about. He says that many have imagined republics he's referring to plato and principalities and kingdoms say saint augustine kingdom of god to have never been seen are known to exist in truth why because they are so far from how one lives to how one should live that he who lets go of what is done for what should be done learns his room and rather than his preservation so now he tells you what philosophy really should be. The factual truth is that which preserves your life and preserves your republic and imaginary truth moral or political. Is that which leads to your ruin.

Prince Machiavelli Charlie
When the Effects of the Climate Crisis Hit Home

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

01:31 min | 1 year ago

When the Effects of the Climate Crisis Hit Home

"Do you start with the economic effects of the weather and the climate in this country the past week or so hundreds of thousands of people without power along the gulf coast. They've had to evacuate and leave their property and their jobs behind the flooding last night along the east coast. More than twenty people killed in new york and new jersey and pennsylvania. The subway system the biggest and richest city in this country underwater literally. I'm sure you've seen the videos. The insurance claims shirley in the tens of billions of dollars the investment. That's going to be needed to manage and to adapt to the effects of climate. Change as we've seen this week. We're not ready sorting. As marketplace's amy scott reports with much of our housing stock nearly a third of homes in the us are at high risk of natural disasters. According to core logic and low income communities are especially vulnerable these homes haven't been updated haven't gotten consistent reinvestment rehabilitation retrofitting over the years khalil. Shaheed is a senior policy adviser with the natural resources defense council. He says there is federal funding. To help weather is homes by switching out single pane windows for sturdier double pane glass but shaheed says roof repair one of the most expensive and important fixes isn't eligible once the roof goes. And you know you get the wind damage and you get rain damage so it just really compounds. The severity of a storm. Like this one.

Amy Scott Gulf Coast East Coast Shirley New Jersey Pennsylvania New York Shaheed Khalil Natural Resources Defense Coun United States
Taliban Kill Squad Hunting Down Afghans Using US Biometric Data

John and Ken on Demand

01:54 min | 1 year ago

Taliban Kill Squad Hunting Down Afghans Using US Biometric Data

"That the taliban has a special unit called out ishaq hoop and they hunt down. Afghans who helped the us allies and they are now using us equipment at data that tracked down the afghans because we left behind a lot of hand held scanners which tap into a massive biometric database all the afghans who helped us We took their fingerprints. We took a photo of their irises and collected biographical data and seven thousand. Handheld scanners were circulating. We don't know how many we left behind. And but now al says they have the information so There's there's at should the sister al qaeda who's alicja. Al is part of the hawk connie network which is well. This is part of the problem. It's a terror group aligned with the taliban and the taliban's aligned with al qaeda right but not isis right economy and And the taliban are intertwined and Let me see here. There there's a hi. Connie family and one of the family members is now zoot hakim. Oh honey of course. He revealed the history and command structure of out. East asia It's a brigade of more than two thousand fighters that is named after khalil. Connie who had a five million dollar bounty on his head and he leads a unit Is he's the brother of the late to jolla in her. Connie who was osama bin laden's mentor and later served as cabinet minister for the

Taliban Ishaq Hoop Al Qaeda Zoot Hakim Connie AL United States East Asia Khalil Jolla Osama Bin Laden Cabinet
Afghanistan Crisis: Who Are Isis-K?

The 11th Hour with Brian Williams

02:01 min | 1 year ago

Afghanistan Crisis: Who Are Isis-K?

"Been discussing tonight. The president repeatedly insisting he's got to stick to this thirty. One august evacuation timeline deadline because of the threat posed by isis k. That's this terrorist. Group said that today claimed responsibility for this attack in kabul that has killed over a dozen. Us servicemembers nbc news. Chief foreign affairs correspondent andrea. Mitchell has our report tonight on this group in their motivations have been warning for days about the threat from isis k. Culminating in a red alert last night for americans to stay away from the airport gates a warning that all too true today. What is isis k. Off-shoot in afghanistan of the islamic state that originated in iraq created six years ago in pakistan an avowed enemy of the us and rival to the taliban is extremely real. We've been talking about. This is manifest here last few hours. Thousands of hardcore islamic state commanders were released from jails across afghanistan by the taliban in recent weeks since the taliban takeover easily melting into the teeming masses in kabul only yesterday the secretary of state warned it was a high risk threat were operating hostile environment in the city and country now controlled by the taliban with the very real possibility of an isis attack. And i says kay isn't the only terror threat. The taliban is name the leader of its most radical branch. The connie never to be in charge of security in kabul khalil. Connie a five million dollar bounty on his head. Brazenly showing up at friday prayers in kabul last week and the connie's have strong ties to al qaeda also in the mix. What's clear is that the taliban either couldn't defend against today's bombings or won't now the question is. How will the president deliver the forceful response. He's promised after the us withdraws

Taliban Kabul Nbc News Afghanistan Andrea Mitchell United States Pakistan Kabul Khalil Iraq KAY Connie Al Qaeda
"khalil" Discussed on Entrepreneur on FIRE

Entrepreneur on FIRE

02:09 min | 1 year ago

"khalil" Discussed on Entrepreneur on FIRE

"Khalil. Say what's up to fire nation and cleland. You have something to share that you believe about becoming successful that most people disagree with yes. What's up fire nation. So when it comes to real estate and entrepreneurship people think that you always have to work hard to accomplish your goals and your dreams. The reality is you gotta work smart. You gotta be able to delegate and and make sure that you are sharpening the saw and just be very efficient with your with your habits. Yeah what was that. Abraham lincoln quote that if he had an hour to cut down a tree he's been the i fifty five minutes sharpening the blade so thick above that fire nation. You're going through your process ends. As i mentioned in the introduction we have both kierra in khalil on the mike today. We're gonna be talking all about building a seven figure real estate business using other people's money so before you turned thirty you had a seven figure business. You owned an entire city block and baltimore. I mean how the heck does this even happen. I barely have my driver's license at thirty. Yeah i mean it was really when we were about a year out of college. We really trying to figure out what this whole thing was gonna look like. It was around the time period when we were talking about there not being enough funds for social security in people taking about their pensions or started. Put money in retirement funds our full-time jobs and we realized that this was not probably going to be it for us and that we really needed to figure out how to take the reins on what our future was going to look. Like and real estate became that space or we decided to get really focused and intentional about building our portfolio there for that long term flow being able to that appreciation but also be able to impact the community in the neighborhoods in which we are investing And so you know. We didn't have a trust fund. We weren't legacy you know real estate developers but really Decided to work smart and be intentional about how he's been our time to be able to build that portfolio

kira gray khalil baltimore
Building a Seven-Figure Real Estate Business Using Other People's Money

Entrepreneur on FIRE

02:04 min | 1 year ago

Building a Seven-Figure Real Estate Business Using Other People's Money

"Something to share that you believe about becoming successful that most people disagree with yes. What's up fire nation. So when it comes to real estate and entrepreneurship people think that you always have to work hard to accomplish your goals and your dreams. The reality is you gotta work smart. You gotta be able to delegate and and make sure that you are sharpening the saw and just be very efficient with your with your habits. Yeah what was that. Abraham lincoln quote that if he had an hour to cut down a tree he's been the i fifty five minutes sharpening the blade so thick above that fire nation. You're going through your process ends. As i mentioned in the introduction we have both kierra in khalil on the mike today. We're gonna be talking all about building a seven figure real estate business using other people's money so before you turned thirty you had a seven figure business. You owned an entire city block and baltimore. I mean how the heck does this even happen. I barely have my driver's license at thirty. Yeah i mean it was really when we were about a year out of college. We really trying to figure out what this whole thing was gonna look like. It was around the time period when we were talking about there not being enough funds for social security in people taking about their pensions or started. Put money in retirement funds our full-time jobs and we realized that this was not probably going to be it for us and that we really needed to figure out how to take the reins on what our future was going to look. Like and real estate became that space or we decided to get really focused and intentional about building our portfolio there for that long term flow being able to that appreciation but also be able to impact the community in the neighborhoods in which we are investing And so you know. We didn't have a trust fund. We weren't legacy you know real estate developers but really Decided to work smart and be intentional about how he's been our time to be able to build that portfolio

Kierra Abraham Lincoln Khalil Baltimore
"khalil" Discussed on TODAY is a Good Day Podcast

TODAY is a Good Day Podcast

01:54 min | 1 year ago

"khalil" Discussed on TODAY is a Good Day Podcast

"Welcome to the today's a good day. Podcast a podcast to bring you a new point of support as you navigate your journey. Today's a good day is here to be a part of your conversations whether your baby was born. Prematurely has special needs or if your family is grieving a loss the voices you will hear on. The today is a good day. Podcast our personal stories from people who've been there. Please don't forget to subscribe and leave us a review on your favorite podcast listening. We frequently speak with parents about their experience of having a baby in the nick you today we get the incredible opportunity to speak with a former preemies coming into the world at just one pound four ounces. At a time when a premature baby his size had a very small chance of survival. Colo- muneer did survive and thrive after an extended. Stay in the nikki. Today khalil is a noted theater artists choreographer and arts educator he conceived and stars in the auto biographical stage production one pound four ounces combining dance hip-hop percussion and monologue to convey a raw yet inspirational series of vignettes from his complicated childhood. The show has been mounted at freedom theater. The first person the suzanne roberts theatre and through an ongoing residency at the national museum of american jewish history. This production is the inspiration for the documentary. What's in a name. Which highlights self determination and intergenerational healing among black men he is co producing and co writing. The film close been cast in numerous stage and screen productions as an actor and dancer including. Carl dice. rolls the last jimmy. He has served on the faculty at philadelphia's historic freedom theatre delaware valley friends school and temple university and he.

"khalil" Discussed on Entrepreneur on FIRE

Entrepreneur on FIRE

07:28 min | 1 year ago

"khalil" Discussed on Entrepreneur on FIRE

"Today we'll be talking about how to stand out in a fitness revolution because we are parts of a fitness revolution. I can tell you that right now. I mean i've got peleton in my gym right here on thinking about getting a mirror i mean. There's there's a lot of things that are going on. In this world it is a revolution so khalil. That leads me to my first question of why boxing like did you see a trend in the boxing space or is this more born from a passion for the sport. Yeah it's a great question. You know our story really tells that answer well so a lot of people know us for fight camp today but we actually originally started with a product called hicks so h. y. k. S which was like a terrible name <hes>. But basically are. I started boxing in my life. Pretty late when it was about <hes>. Twenty one years old and you know my background is actually more in soccer. But i really wanted yet. I fell in love with the sport. And i wanted to compete in studying competitive sport. The twenty one years old. It's it's you know you're kind of behind so at that point. I really wanted to shortcut my way to the east of lucien possible. That was very really adamant about you. Know having the best training regimen possible really tried to optimize single aspect of it and that led us know me to do you want to measure myself on a regular basis and there was not a lot of measuring out there for boxing specific stuff so we created this first version of the product. That's our punch trackers you with them on your race. The calculate the types of country throw measures the speed of every punch and you could recreate performance profile it and that went on to be a very successful product elite community you know. We had multiple olympic teams using it a lot of pro boxers in pro ufc fighters using it <hes>. And then because boxing anime kickboxing <hes>. Is a very special sports. Where ninety five percent of. It's not like ninety nine percent of the people that engage in it actually don't entering the ring and get hit but just do it for the fitness aspect of it so we can you know our initial products stuttered to spill two very different. You know typical customer and that kind of drought. It drew us into the fitness world. Fire nation. i really want you to just think that. Hey there's multiple ways to kind of make your start. make your splash. Is it because of a trend or is it because of a passion can it. Maybe be a combination of both. I mean that can kind of be where a zona fire lies. And they can really be a spark. And then of course lease to we can flag ration- and khalil for you. Since you started fight camp how have you seen the connected. Fitness industry evolve. How would just are connected to other people live or you know whether we've got stuff strapped on this. This is kind of connecting all of our stats. What we're doing here. I mean are people working from home. Instead of gyms is actually become the norm. Absolute thing it. It will be for portion of the majority of the portion of the fitness community. I think we're still you know like obviously with covid things have been accelerated loved. But you know we really believe that in the long run working out in a workout room makes a lot more sense to have in your home the same way. You actually have living room in the same way. You have a home theater in a big screen. Tv and a kitchen. We think it's going to be an extension part of our living spaces just because it's not something you you you're doing only once a month you know like a good fitness routine will engage in it at least at least three times a week so you know having to add friction every time that you have to do this with the commute and having to hit the class right on time where it starts. We just don't think it's aligned with the frequency in which you have to engage with it so that's one aspect. The second aspect is like home fitness. Home fitness is very popular today but it started a long time ago <hes>. You know. And i'm sure some people remember jazzercise tai-bo that was really like the the beginning of the category but you know it led to a lot of like scan products especially specifically like in the late nineties. A lot of infomercial at the end of the night like black and white. And you don't train trying to target people that really wanted to buy a dream but now this silly inc a fitness and a healthy lifestyle and i can feel that this new generation of companies are lot more thin. -tic they're genuine. They're offering a better way and they're not targeting someone who's you know trying to press on the fact that you know you may not feel good about yourself. Look at all these people in shape. But they're they're targeting a healthy lifestyle. And i think they're building the products accordingly as well. I mean khalil. It's critical these days to stand up above the noise to be unique from your competition. I mean that just every industry a hundred percent across the board and let's be honest. Cop is fierce in the fitness space. So what specifically have you done to make fight camp standout. We're yet to see a serious competitor in boxing and kickboxing right. Like we. You know we. There's some concepts out there but you know when we started it was not about. You know trying to beat the competition. It was more. You know like there's a very unique opportunity here and being the first to bring a connected experience to boxing and kickboxing from home. And you know. We thought the power of teaching people how to do boxing. Well was also like you know a statement for you. Know the growth of boxing with a lot of franchise that were growing as well. You know like pre covid. Boxing gyms and kickboxing gyms. The nation were growing very very fast. It was becoming a very big fast-growing exercise that was gaining in popularity. But you know. Boxing is not easily. You know it's not easily accessible in terms of flake. There's a lot of technique you can just get a bag and hit it but it is not proper boxing. You actually have to develop the foundation you have to. You know work on your reflexes and then you have to know why you through a certain bunch and why you don't throw that certain bunch and how to move so we wanted to provide in the centric experience and at the same time naked interactive and. There was nobody else that was doing that at a time. Fire

ninety five percent ninety nine percent today each east of lucien first question first version twenty one years old single aspect khalil two Twenty one years old every punch olympic every single one
"khalil" Discussed on 20 Minute Fitness

20 Minute Fitness

05:45 min | 2 years ago

"khalil" Discussed on 20 Minute Fitness

"Guys that's Martin from shape. . We're here right now in San Francisco Studio and unconnected to aid today on with the founder of fights cab Saha. . Could you why don't you deduce yourself? ? It'll. . Yeah. . Awesome. . First of all, , thanks a lot for receiving me on the PODCAST. . Martin. . So my name is Lil- I'm the CO founder, , CEO Camp and weekly started Fi Kim about a year and a half ago. . So. . If I is an interactive corn boxing gym, , it comes with everything you need to start boxing and actually follow videos that are built by the best trainers of all the west coast they all fighters they all have obviously a tremendous fight expands but they're also great fitness instructor general for the listener on on our show that has never seen. . It's what should be should be mentioned punching back and a pair of gloves. . So what be? ? Yes. . So it comes with a free standing bag. . The best standing back on the market with a pair of didn't win leather gloves made an approved by fighters with a workout Matt, , a pair of with be called quick grabs and the special sauce is who? ? Motion trackers that you put into quick wraps Ma and detract your hands a thousand times per second trek speed and my my punches. How . many punches I'm doing per minute of what should I expect? ? Yes they tracked the type of country throw the measured the speed of the bunches basically build your output profile from one round to the other. . What about impact? ? Not The impact is really the velocity. . Okay. . The of your hand and which actually throwing and how does like the coaching look like you were mentioning that you have coaches of all over the place and should I imagine like watching them like on my TV or iphone ourselves for me? ? Yes. . So it comes with an APP you can the. . Myriad on a large screen TV or you can watch the workouts on an IPAD whatever you prefer, , and then from there, , it's Kinda like all you can eat buffet. . Really. . So if you're advanced, , you can jump straight into the advanced workouts right away we go and deep into the complex combinations. . We'd practice footwork and the workouts very intense. . Otherwise, , it can literally start at the very first time. You've . you're you're throwing your first punch. . So we have what we call the prospect <hes> where it takes you from zero boxing experience teaches you to six inches and then at the end of the prospect path which. . is about a four weeks program you actually know how to six months probably you know how to stand you know the basics Balkan it's mostly regular boxing the offer classes for a time boxing mma Nelson actually were focusing on boxing at the moment but <hes>, , we're having a lot of internal conversations around providing kickboxing as well as a kickboxing in multi, , really as a as a an expansion and so so who's like you you're right now is it really like what you just mentioned on <hes> the beginners or is it like somebody that's been into boxing all their life or hundred, , seventy, , four for you Guys. . Yeah, , it's really seventy five percent beginners, , but it's actually very interesting to see like a lot of them are now not beginners anymore <hes>. . So you know we kind of took a bunch of them. . You know through the program <hes>, , you get to see videos online and on the social media and they're getting very proper form on have the basics of boxing. . Of course, , they don't have the in ring experience right visit steely it's a home virtual experience. . Yeah. . You can't really compete against somebody else right right. . So Yeah, , you actually can compete but on up put and precision <hes>, , you can't compete on. . Actual defense offense. Of . course, , you're not going to get him. . You know and does like a class look like, , is it one on one coaching tailored to me or is it like a big class like pedal tone style or yet is really a group class? ? So it's <hes> you'll have usually the video stream will be divided into not that it's divided on the screen per se but vary between having the camera centered on the coach, , and then you're getting bureau that is very dynamic. . The camera moves around in the class and focuses on the participants taking the class live at our studio in Newport beach. . For for me, , you know like <hes> me having like an iphone like my supposed to put up my iphone like somewhere like on a on a counter, , and then look at it while I'm like <hes> punching out on my back or how should I mention it? ? Yeah. . That's a very good question like there's not a lot of people use it only with the with the iphone unless they're traveling aren't as they're actually using it in a gym gym or their apartment Jim the vending most people digging each day my cable upload, , the Stream directly on on a big screen. . TV. . Your accent. . Yeah. . Oh we have a portion of our users. . We actually are doing it on the night pat about Apple TV, , that works as well <hes>. . Yeah. . You can mirror exactly. . You can use apple TV to mirror the the stream directly on a big screen TV as well. . That's definitely the best experience you're getting very loud sounds and music. . You hear the voice really really properly, , the nose of the bag doesn't supplant the voice of the trainer lifts. . Your stats are displayed very big for you. . So like you're really into it, , you feel like you're you're being tracked in. . Really part of a group experience and it's both IOS and android os mostly s right now. . Saying. . It's only on ISLA, , its and so why are people doing it <hes>? ? Do they just WanNa, , get a workout and they are not happy with you know like an experience like Peleton or maybe the half a pedal tone and want to supplement it with something else or do they actually want to get into boxing learn those skills forward let's say self defense. . Yeah it's interesting. . So. . Like calm, , we have two types of customers. . The first type of customers really just will always intrigued boxing <hes>. . They want to do it because it's a work of that Jesse get something out of it even though you would stop working out after a year like you would still acquire the skills and those are self defense skills. . You know a lot of people are mystified by you know. . How to actually throw a punch and Hudson do properly. . So that was one of our customers the other portion of because there is actually coming from the idea that boxing is the best workout to get in shape and the discovered the fundamentals and techniques through fight Cam. . So the first reason they joined is for fitness purposes really assuming that boxing is the best workout out there the. . Other portion come straight because they want boxing, , but they can't attend to have a busy lifestyle. . Their young parents hitting the gym is increasingly harder would a busy schedule? ? so that's the other proposition that they really resonate with and

Khalil Saha boxing engineer CEO founder city-khan Valley Toronto Canada
"khalil" Discussed on Sibling Revelry with Kate Hudson and Oliver Hudson

Sibling Revelry with Kate Hudson and Oliver Hudson

06:51 min | 2 years ago

"khalil" Discussed on Sibling Revelry with Kate Hudson and Oliver Hudson

"Which I have been doing, but at the same time I texted back and I said look you educate you did teach me something and I said I. Don't expect you to read all the books, but you pointed me to. Where the library was. You know and So you know you hesitate in asking the question? What's it going to take? You know as far as wight people go. What is it going to take to keep pushing this forward? Aside from taking taking into the streets, which I agree with that keeps it. That keeps a president. But what what can white people do on the day to day? They can see the victims of police violence, the victims of housing discrimination as their own flesh and blood. I mean. You know if you felt like this were happening to someone who you cared about because you had empathy for them, because you identify with them why people are perfectly capable of shoring outrage. At the things that happened to other white people, so for example we know this is not meant to be controversial, but we know the sandy hook shooting of all of those children who were killed. By young man who was mentally disturbed you know may not only make the president cry, but I'll admit when I heard the news. That that day. I cry, because I had small children a museum, stating the shooting at Parkland. which then led to a group of young student activists who helped to spur some more legislative activity, but still not enough, so there's some people call this empathy gap I. Mean there's a way in which white people don't think about black suffering as something that is meaningful to them. And again I've tried to suggest that there's some psychological wiring I mean you know when your entire society has been built to say? The white lives actually matter in everything else is optional than that's the message that people have even twenty twenty. So. How'd you unravel that I've suggested that you have to do with very small children. They have to be built differently because it's hard for adults to see things differently because they've been seeing them the same way the whole time it's not impossible, but not only does it take a lot of re education for the adult, but they gotta own it like you gotTa. You have to actually push back against your instincts, because at some point, your stomach for fighting racism will give out your appetite for being treated like a pariah with around your white peers counterparts, and you're the only one sticking up for what you're seeing saying like look, this is not okay like. You you end up in the craze totally. Oh, I've been I have been that guy so many times, and I think this goes to the psychology of just wanting to be liked. Just generally. We were talking to this girl Kate Shots I. Don't know if you heard our talk with her. And she was, but she uses great thing that I loved her. There's like calling out in calling in. You know when you call someone in. And I really loved that man was good, and I am really loving this time of. People wanting to learn all people wanting to learn more about our history and how it has brought us to where we are today. But. That's what I'm. My hope is it that is we keep the momentum and everybody starts really holding themselves accountable to how they're going to be a part of change that we continue to call each other in you know instead of. Calling everybody out. I think that's the right formulation I mean look I'm a professional educator in so I can't do my job if it's about calling people out in embarrassing them about what they don't know the job. My job is to people where they are to help them. Find Path that they can own journey that they need to take. And then meet them on the other side, if if they choose to stay on that journey That's the only way this work. And I would say oliver like you know the experiences. You've DESCRI- I. Think for the most part I think. A lot of the action is really in all white spaces. So, the offense won't be directed towards an African American. Listener whose hey didn't say that right it. Really the the empowerment should come in how white people socialize each other to understand how racism works as there just ain't enough black people to spread around. And more lat next I mean you know in the white? People are still sixty five percent of the American population, so often You'd get at best the one. One person of color for every two. That's right three to white people. That's the ratio. So a lot of the action really is about how white people on their egg Mari- owned the problem. Educate and then organize themselves to to change this country for the data while this. Sell our. Absence you're the best. I know learn so much and I just. This has been a great hour and a half I. Mean for real. I actually have one more question just. Real quick just about the silver lining of this administration. If there is one it has sort of. It's almost like smoking out the cockroaches in a way. This has this has made. People feel this administration has made. People feel racist. People feel more comfortable in coming out. We get to see the real sort of festering of this country. The people in it I think a lot of times these people are silently feeling this way, and now it. Their voices are louder, and we get to understand how deep this problem really is, and now now it's out. We can start. The process of making it better. Is there any silver lining there in that? This administration has brought up a lot of shit and people are in the streets right now and really vying for change. Yeah, I mean short answer is absolutely and no-one no-one that I know would have wished that any of this would have happened since two, thousand, sixteen or a certain as star, two thousand seventeen even the pandemic No one is really responsible for..

president Parkland. Kate Shots DESCRI oliver Mari
"khalil" Discussed on Sibling Revelry with Kate Hudson and Oliver Hudson

Sibling Revelry with Kate Hudson and Oliver Hudson

07:49 min | 2 years ago

"khalil" Discussed on Sibling Revelry with Kate Hudson and Oliver Hudson

"If they don't want to work for us. They are vagrant Crimin- criminal offense. If they challenge authority razor voice at us, that's assault. That's offense. If they try to go vote for political representation, This not technically in offense, but will intimidate them in benefited pissed off about it. That's a so will put them back in jail. And so you have this incredible moment where basically things look a whole light like they had just looked in the midst of a civil war before the civil war and black people who had been free are now being sold at sheriff's auction back to their former plantation masters, not as slaves, but as criminals to work off their fines. It's incredible. And a lot of that gets overturned because we have a radical congress these Cuarto radical Republicans. They see this for what it is, they pass. The fourteenth amendment gives everybody equal protection under the law due process under the law birthright citizenship the most important legislation in the constitution that some people call the second founding is the fundamental basis for all the freedoms Americans and newcomers to this country take for granted women's rights. lgbtq rights marriage equality, immigrant rights so on, and so forth all happened because these radical Republicans say we have to pass a constitutional amendment to keep these former confederates check and so the point is though the criminality becomes the most elastic a useful way to. Put Black people back in their place to make sure they don't have the full access of their freedom. And it land or Hundred Years Right That's what I was about to say, and then that's it. The die has been cast now because of that, the black black people have been sort of label just criminals in general, and and in my wrong in thinking that that has just kit that has carried on. Just carried on through time. Trying to I'm just trying to get to the point is i. sit and I listen as I'm listening to this I'm just shocked that I am a forty one year. Old Woman who has never learned this I grew up going granted i. I didn't go to college, but with private education. By the way, it is super liberal arts school as well. I only until now I mean I you know I. It's not something that I ever sought to understand either. No, you're you're. You're having that moment that my students have. Jacked up, they feel like they're angry about it because they like something. Something's not right here so I'll. Because you know the basics you see the movies you know and you you read. Certain books are beautiful and become very popular, but you don't really understand the INS and outs of what really happened I. Think though too is is is what I was trying to get at with. Just it's it's understanding the whole picture. There's a lot of people who when when I post certain things. You know you read the comments right and. Yes, there's a lot of just straight up racism. Then there's some ignorance, and then there's react with people who are just reacting without understanding, and that is the frustrating part for me right now and I'm a newbie right I've been inspired by this like I never have before. And now I feel like I want to at least. On the small platform that I have to just at least get people to just think before they react. There's a lot of reaction and when you really understand the truth of the criminal justice system, and where it all came from understanding the patterns that have existed throughout. Black History! And it's like how how was how was there? Even how is there a chance? How did anyone have a chance? When it was this oppressed for this long? And now it's become part of the fabric of America. It is now the DNA, which needs to somehow be stripped out, and it feels like a big undertaking, but there is a shift I. Think you know I mean that's my interpretation now new res and Laurence Fishburne to come up with a That we can all take. The Matrix. The Matrix. Right! Alison! We were on this dock and she's. She's pointing me into this direction of of this question. So by the eighteen ninety S as a way to suppress black freedom, white social scientists presented the new crime data as objective, colorblind and incontrovertible incontrovertible right for my book. That's from your buck. How did they do this? Oh? Man, so this is fascinating. So, it was never fashionable to claim to be a racist. This is counterintuitive all right so. Every generation of white Americans consider themselves to be better than the one that came before. So by the time we get to the end of the nineteenth century right right around the end of slavery that generation of white leaders. These were people that I write about who who were Harvard professors. They were northern politicians. They were people Jane Addams, who was a famous social worker? Basically said like we're better than our forebears and a lot of the shit that we've inherited a round racing. Racism is not our fault. It's our job to do better right. So their sense of what had come before them kind of let them off the hook. For owning the ways that society had already set up Ormes of privilege. And, so what they said is like. Because we're not responsible for what's happened before, we can be more objective because we know that we're not as bad as they were. And in a nutshell, they thought of themselves as post. Racial I mean again I know it sounds crazy, but we had the civil rights laws now. They're like black. People can kind of do their own thing, so even though we know share cropping. Cropping was shitty deal for black people in second class citizenship. They were a little more ambivalent about it. Just like we've known for a long time that mass incarceration and the Crime Bill, the nineteen ninety s built the biggest prison system in the world by the lot of people were like it's full of criminals. Why should I feel bad about this gigantic criminal justice system? So when you go back one hundred years, so the eighteen nineties for the first time. Northerners and Southerners Liberals and conservatives are all kind of like. Well the crime statistics tell us the black people commit warcrimes than white people. And if the crime statistics are just as bad in Chicago, as they are in Birmingham, then, it can't be about southerners. It's gotta be about them. And that becomes the most dominant. In favor of segregation that links that moment one hundred years ago to our time today. The crime statistics show that black people have a crime problem. That's why we put all the police in their community. The crime statistics show that black bullies. You know are dangerous. So why should I send my kid to school? With a bunch of bike is so they can get beat up. The Crime Statistics emerged in eighteen ninety for the first time as a way of talking about black people as inferior and dangerous without appearing to.

assault Laurence Fishburne Jane Addams America Harvard Alison Chicago Birmingham
"khalil" Discussed on Sibling Revelry with Kate Hudson and Oliver Hudson

Sibling Revelry with Kate Hudson and Oliver Hudson

08:37 min | 2 years ago

"khalil" Discussed on Sibling Revelry with Kate Hudson and Oliver Hudson

"For Policy in a lot of conservatives will say since the Great Society with the world poverty. Americans have spent all this money trying to help black people. They already got their reparations well. I can see why people might think that, but a policy solution that is primarily universal where you're targeting poor people rather than black people because that's what Medicaid did. That's what. New Housing, policies did headstart wasn't just for black kids. Only it was for a whole lot of low income white kids all over the country, the bast recipients of great society big government money going back to the sixties. We're actually low income. White people will. You can call great society programs reparations for Black People, even though it is true that African Americans have benefited from those programs, so we haven't done reparations and so I resist people saying well. We just need new policies. The best way I could put it is if we started a green new deal, you would actually start with as a policy matter. Both a check. We'd have to agree on what that is, and you would say we're GONNA put as many of the people at the at the most vulnerable in the people have been most victimized by history at the starting line or these infrastructure jobs so that we can rebuild this contract Yeah and how do you find those people though have? What's the system in? In you know finding the people who have been subjected. You know the most. That's that's not hard I. mean they'll. They are like thirty five million African Americans. Will whose roots go back to slavery, in some of whom their roots don't go back to slavery, but they've been here three or four generations. They've dealt with the same matrix of white supremacist policies et CETERA. There you know we. We all check the box on the census. African American you start with that like the notion that we ought to spend a lot of time, scientifically surgically identifying the most deserving population. Makes about as much sense as it made to a white southerner to pick apart whether the very light skinned person in front of them is is one eight, black or full black like they didn't give a shit in bed. You know we think you're black. Get to the back of the bus or get off the side of the street or call me Mr United so it's a bit of an ironic thing. assistant that basically said the one drop rule means any identifiable form of blackness. You have mix you a second class citizen now on the back end of the reparations debate, which suggests that we need to be really very specific of the deserving black people, because we don't want to make sure that cheaters in the mix. yeah. Sixteen thirty, six. Oh! Rien was breeding the timeline and it talks about the nightwatch. Yes, that in sixteen thirty six, Boston created the nightwatch which led to the first police force in America. Yeah, so the boss. Nightwatch was kind of like Berry, low level enforcement. The the basic idea was less make sure. Some food doesn't set anything on fire in. Wipe us all out. That's that's it. So that's that's the that's the origin story of a kind of vigilant. Even call the Romans call them vigils, because enrollment time those same people. Their job was to keep an eye on things when everyone else was sleeping. Because last again, someone decided that they wanted to burn down the chapel, or the the of the mill. In ruin, everyone's lies most of what we would consider policing function in place like New England with. A population of black people in indigenous populations were still small relative to the European colonists once they rooted out all the people they want in their community where religious beliefs in they treated people. As. Heretics. They focused on a lot of morally contemptible behavior, so the policing was neighbor to neighbor minister to petitioner. It wasn't so much a a uniformed group of people who were like you just broke the law. You're going in now. Read a bunch about some some interviews you know talking about the north talking about the south. You know that that that that loophole. Loophole. Let's just let's talk about that. Just just a little bit. You know. Get into that so to be fair to Kate so the sixteenth thirty six night. Boston I watch is happening at the same time. As berries, parts of the country are starting to figure out like. How do we keep people from getting together? So that they don't plot insurrection a rebel. Now. Because, things are much more fluid in the early sixteen hundreds. It takes awhile for places like Virginia in south, Carolina to pass become known as Negro acts or slave codes, and the first of them really kick off around sixteen, Sixty sixty seventy, but in a nutshell they slave codes has said that any black person is presumptively a slave, and all slaves need to be checked for their papers to make sure they have a right to pass, because any slave that is found without permission on any road will is either suspect of insurrection rebellion, running away, and can be subject to corporal punishment on the scene, and there was a lot of inter mixture between white indentured in black folks, the slave. Began around sixteen seventy s whether it's rolling colony or a southern Cali are really like we need to separate out or whites and enslaved people. Because if they get together, we won't win. Like we won't win, so the slave codes began to penalize inter mixture. They began to decide they decide for example that any child born to a black woman is a sleigh that was the first time in the world that ever happened because the status of the child using followed the status of a father in other societies, and that was obvious because that meant that white. Men as slave owners could rape their up property and the Charles L. Within at their assets, would become a sleigh as opposed to a free person. And so those those black codes essentially said that three or more black people gathered was a threat. And they put in place a a force of people men of both landless and landowning status. Elite men and working class white men They had to serve in some cases up to a year they were duty now. If they didn't perform the duty, they could be arrested and they had the full power of colonial government and later antebellum states to dispense corporal punishment against any African American on site including killing them. And, that's pretty much the infrastructure southern law enforcement. For one hundred sorry for two hundred fifty years until we get to the end of the civil war so you asked about the sloops the. Loophole so so the thirteenth! Amendment is the amendment that abolishes slavery. Right is this is transformative this this is a big deal. At the moment. We've all been waiting for right except in an amended. That's really pretty short. It says that. Slavery, nor did servitude. To the United States except as punishment for crime, anti like Whoa. Wait a minute like. It actually says slavery shall not exist except for punishment for crime so. We can have slaves as long as they're criminals, and and that's exactly what happens is in the earliest days after the civil wars over the south has lost its not clear how they're going to be brought back into the government, so they go about their business. They like you know war's over. We lost so be. It will just get our lives back together, so they pass a bunch of crime bills in every southern confederate state and these crime bills basically say everything. Black people would WANNA do is free. People is now a crime. The only thing black people get to do. That we think okay.

Boston Medicaid Nightwatch United States New England Cali Rien Mr United America rape Kate Virginia Berry Charles L. Carolina
"khalil" Discussed on Sibling Revelry with Kate Hudson and Oliver Hudson

Sibling Revelry with Kate Hudson and Oliver Hudson

06:02 min | 2 years ago

"khalil" Discussed on Sibling Revelry with Kate Hudson and Oliver Hudson

"Private lenders banks participated in keeping black people out of white communities for most of the twentieth century, New Long Island New York just did a major investigation about six months ago and real estate. Brokers are still steering black people into black neighborhoods in white people into white once so that's probably the most obvious of our more recent time understanding what systemic racism we could talk and was. The was the reason that that happened. Where you know, you cannot sort of integrator, Co mingle because you're you're not going to. You know you're not gonNA. Be Able to borrow. Is the reason that that happened? Because black people were considered a criminals, was there criminality attached to black people? Then which obviously you go back in history again to catch up to the reasons why this was happening in the first place in the thirties. So, we're. This is complicated right? Yeah, we're getting into the weeds here a little bit, and so you know if it gets too much, pull me out, but. Blackness like the very symbol of blackness was both a form of attraction. It made America unique It's shaped our culture like the obvious way to understand that is the most popular form of entertainment that America produced the first form of entertainment, not before we get to jazz or blues. It was black face. Black face by the eighteen thirties was a overwhelmingly white performance tradition that literally captivated the hearts and minds of urban European descended. Immigrants and Americans. So we moved from black face in eighteen thirties to the first major motion picture w griffiths film is about white people in black face. Telling the story about race emerges of the Ku Klux Klan. Then we moved to the first talking picture, which is about Al Jolson performing Black Bass in the jazz singer. American popular culture with a fascination about black people. So what Martin Luther King said in nineteen, sixty seven. His last book was that America has always had a love hate relationship with black people. This form of love hate meant at the same time that white people found their grew. They got their swag on the international stage. They then were captivated by jazz. They were engaging in trying to be like black people. This wasn't just some new thing that happened recently. This was going way way back. Also meant that what happened on the stage was not supposed to happen in the home with natural to happen in school was that's what's happened in? The neighborhood was happened at work. Because those two things were considered separate things, you couldn't actually you could perform like a black person. You could make fun of a black person. You could try to be a cool white guy by being like a by person, but you could not have actual equality with the black person. You couldn't have a black neighbor. You couldn't go to a black doctor. You couldn't accept black blood when the person who invented blood transfusions Charles drew. was able to save tens of thousands of people it during World War Two because of the prospect of Negro blood getting White Baynes so I can't tell you exactly. The psychosis behind all of that that means. It's really in some ways. It's unexplainable, but it is why black people were subjected to these systemic forms of discrimination to keep them out. Because the fascination was one thing, the quality was something else. How do you explain why people going to watch? Black people pay play on football fields. One hundred thousand people gathered in one of the takes a knee and all of a sudden. You know a good chunk of the fans say that guy in great. He doesn't deserve to be in this country if he doesn't like America like it S. why does to get the hell out like? It doesn't make any sense. So crazy, who good! Going back to slavery Khalil. What was the justification for slavery Oh man, this is an easy one. Slavery was always been about the was always about making money. So you know you're. The first colonist the new world quote unquote that Columbus discovered quote unquote was always about profiteering. Nobody came. Nobody crossed the Atlantic to to set up some idyllic. Utopia that everyone would chill chill the hell out and have a good time. That wasn't the point. The point was to explore for wealth creation for natural resources in so Columbus can for goaded center. We all know that story long before we get to sixteen nineteen for example, the French the Spanish the Portuguese the Dutch had been looking in the united in North America South America for various profitable arrangements, and what they settled on by large with sugar, sugar brought Europeans into the new world like gangbusters, and so they they took the land. They harnessed the productive capacity of indigenous populations from Brazil. Of something like eleven to twelve million people who supposedly came to the new world. The vast majority of them ten million or so went to Brazil the six hundred thousand. If I had my latest estimates right came to North America it was always about the money, it was always about the money. Never anything else. So that's slavery. They settled on a system of Chattel slavery in the United States. What would become the United States because that was the best way to ensure that everyone would know that the poor white people weren't the slaves because there were a lot of them, and if they were treated like slaves, they might just kill all the colonial elite me. You know because these folks were far away from home. But, if you could, if.

America North America Ku Klux Klan United States Brazil New Long Island Al Jolson White Baynes Martin Luther King South America New York Atlantic football Columbus Charles drew.
"khalil" Discussed on Sibling Revelry with Kate Hudson and Oliver Hudson

Sibling Revelry with Kate Hudson and Oliver Hudson

07:31 min | 2 years ago

"khalil" Discussed on Sibling Revelry with Kate Hudson and Oliver Hudson

"Earth is about to explode and shrivel up into dried up raisin because of greenhouse emissions. So how do we fix that while we have to build an infrastructure? To rollback the impact of carbon emissions and to sustain the future, so that grandchildren will have s not going to happen because Michael Bloomberg writes. A big check can certainly contribute to the cost, but we have to agree that care enough about this collectively in order for that to happen, and doesn't that translate to what we're? What's happening now as far as race I mean? Have to get hip to what it is to understand history a lot more to go a little bit deeper instead of just being reactionary to some of these things that are happening I mean. Does this moment feel different to you than in in in in your lifetime? Anyway? And how do we continue this shift? Absolutely so I've been asked so yes, it's moment feels different. Yet I've never seen anything like this at every level that I could measure what. What I'm watching on television what I'm reading in the newspaper. The conversations I've had with my own daughter who has been to protest last six seven days in a row. The teachings that I'm doing as historian. The conversations I'm getting at every level of civil society from folks in Hollywood community who have gotten to know in various things that I've done over the years to people who are part of a berry leak tanks in this country. They're all asking the same question. How do we move forward? How do we deal with this moment? You ask the question. How do we take that momentum and sustain it and be frank I think that mostly the longer people stay in the streets. The more momentum will be sustained a kind of apple. Is that as soon as people move into discussions behind closed doors? Until as soon as people hand off all of their power back to elected officials, the less likely we are to see the kind of transformation that is required at this moment. I WanNa add one quick thing though on the climate change issue, you compared to race in your original response. You're exactly right because if we think about the word ity of not only a set of politicians, but also their constituents, saying climate change is a hoax. That scientists are in some kind of liberal media conspiracy to convince us to do these things I mean. We elected a president who pulled out of an international climate change agreement. It's not it's not. This is not like just partisan malarkey. As as Joe, Biden might say this stakes could not be higher. So explain people who really believe that climate change is a hoax. Well part of it is that they have religious beliefs that trump science. They are trusting of authoritarian figures. Who Tell them what to believe? Race is an equivalent problem. People's beliefs about race are trumping the evidence of racism. Trumping the evidence of systemic white supremacy. And so it's hard to change people's beliefs once they reach a certain age, because just like learning a foreign language or learning how to play an instrument, it gets really tough after certain point, so you have to invest a younger age in order to educate me. We need kids to be more respectful of science, obviously on we kids to learn or truthful history about what happened in this country in other parts of the world. I mean I know this is what everybody's talking about and it simple and you see it on social media, but I mean. The simple question. WHAT IS SYSTEMIC RACISM? Oh. Man, West, yeah, both the stem is becoming this buzzword. Just, using it now without understanding the meaning the definition. You have the slides and people slide over, and there's a couple statistics at talk about systemic racism and what it is, and it's informative and I think it's I. Think a lot of people have done their own looking deeper into it, but while while we have you here. Is Stem. Yes, let's do it. Exhibit Slavery Right doesn't take much. To convince someone like Oh. Yes, slavery was a system. It was the dominant economic engine of the colonies until the revolutionary period, and then it became a major appendage to increasing industrial economy that emerges the NAR, so if you have a hard time thinking of slavery as systemic racism than everything else I'm GonNa. Say from now on. It's going to be even tougher. Okay, that's Exhibit A. Exhibit. B. would be most people would say okay. A system in the south that emerges that basically says that most black people men will work sharecroppers and they will. Be cheated systematically by white landowners, because if they try to negotiate fair terms, they might be lynched or hauled away. By the local sheriff and women will work in white people's homes, taking care of their babies as domestics and the children and the spouses of those farm workers will not be able to go to school would not be able to move freely through some southern society, because the dictates of segregation say that's an affront to white people, so that's systemic racism. Right not in abstraction. So We get to. The nineteen sixties in the present right now start to get a little squishy for people because they're like well. It's the worst movement. Solve that, so we don't have systemic racism anymore. All those laws fix it. But actually now go to the north to see a better example of what system racism looks like so a lot of people know now that this thing called redlining. IS PART OF WHY African Americans have don't have. The same wealth is whites that on average. The average by family has about seventeen thousand dollars. The average white family has about one hundred seventy thousand dollars. Why because most white people's assets are bound up in their house? Why don't black people? Why aren't more people homeowners? Why don't they have more assets tied up in real estate because? Crowded lenders in the early. Twentieth Century made buyers. And homeowners sign restrictive covenants. It said you cannot sell this house to a black person. Why would they do that well one? They were practising another form of segregation like their southern counterparts, but also because the real estate market believed that black people were an inherent risk to property values, not because black people did anything, but because the idea of white supremacy meant that the more social. Intimacy between blacks and whites, the less desirable was the community. So that move from the private market to the federal, government by the Nineteen Thirties, the federal government sanctioned redlining by building into its underwriting policies when it gave money to builders or gave a reduced. Interest rates to homeowners said you can have this money. You can have a piece of the American dream as long as people don't live in that neighborhood. As long as you don't sell the by people, and so the term redlining captures how the federal government and.

federal government Michael Bloomberg Nineteen Thirties Hollywood younger age apple president NAR Joe Biden
"khalil" Discussed on Sibling Revelry with Kate Hudson and Oliver Hudson

Sibling Revelry with Kate Hudson and Oliver Hudson

09:49 min | 2 years ago

"khalil" Discussed on Sibling Revelry with Kate Hudson and Oliver Hudson

"And Americans have been very prickly about coming to terms with that because they see it as a zero sum story, if we tell more about slavery and racism, and what happened to the native populations will be telling less about how great we are. And and that's cost us in many ways, but it's most especially cost of people of African descent. It's cost you know in different chapters. People have Mexican ancestry in certainly cost indigenous populations of this country. Yeah, it's like the more you. The more we learn about like I remember when I first read the People's history. You know and. Yeah well I mean we went to such a progressive school, and so it was the cool thing if you read it from front to back. But you know you start reading it and I remember. We used to argue and senior year in school like everybody used to argue about why. We're not taught these things and you realize that. It does it sort of breaks down all these things that are celebrated and have been celebrated for so long arduous destroyed immediately when you start to recognize what they're really founded upon I, was watching an interview that you did and this I think it was bill, Bill. MOYERS and he. He was talking about history as interpretation. What is truth and what isn't? How do we know what it? What? which interpretation of history is the correct interpretation where I wanted to see if you could speak to that a little bit, it was really a point on this question about interpretation of the past so one one easy way that I tried to. Describe how history is nothing more than a disciplined interpretation of collection of facts about the past, because it's hard to recreate all the conditions of the past, and the further we get away from it, the harder it is to see everything unfold as it did. But if you could, if you could understand that, then you certainly can relate it to the fact that we could all read today's newspaper. Right journalists. Generally particularly mainstream journalists are bound by the professional standards of journalism to get the facts right. The opinion writers interpret the Reading Public Interprets, but the facts are supposed to be accurate and yet, and still we could read the same newspaper in come away with a completely. View of what the Hell is going on at any given moment. Imagine when you're looking back three hundred years that it many ways it. It was never easy in the present to figure out what the hell just happened or how to make sense of it, and it doesn't necessarily the facts. Don't get any clearer. What gets clear is that you have a sense of hindsight, so what you have is like Oh like people thought that was going to happen in a didn't turn out. Out to be that way or people assumed that this kind of president was gonNA lead in this way turnout they didn't so. History gives us perspective in hindsight, but we still debate over the facts, we still debate over how much weight to give to the facts, and in that sense, it is like a lawyers debate between two advocates fighting over how to best interpret what's happened so then how do you? How do you pick? How do you discover the truth? And and and and this question that I. I wrestled with even today because I watch all news. The different angles to see where everyone's coming from. Yeah, how do we interpret the truth? Even today you know. So so me, probably the best standard will be would be the preponderance of evidence standard in a civil trial as opposed to a criminal case where you know beyond reasonable doubt So if you think about the preponderance of evidence, standard historians rely upon. The Cross examination of different kinds of evidence are evidence is what we describe as the paper, the private thoughts letters places where people tend to be more honest because they're not subject to public scrutiny. All of us say things that we know the public listening that is slightly more beneficial to our personal reputation than we might say. We know no one is listening. Historians apply the same standards to different kinds of evidence, and you try to come away with enough cross examination of different kinds of evidence that you say we have pretty good sense of what Alexander Hamilton intended or Thomas Jefferson intended. Some things are also easy to document. It is easy to know what the founding fathers generation thought about people of African descent because they said a lot of things publicly. You don't actually have to dig beneath the surface into it. They're real hearts and minds, white supremacy as an idea the United States of America as colonial idea as a founding ideas, antebellum idea was a robust defence of the fundamental idea that there were hierarchies diff'rent kinds of races with a certain. Northern European type at the top and then southern eastern Europeans closer to the middle, and then people of Asian ancestry, and then people of African ancestry at the bottom I mean that's the way things were until the kind of the middle of the twentieth century. So you need to be a detective out what people were thinking about races, but most of American history? So when you when you think of the constitution like how does that sit with you just generally just that document? Yeah, so so the Constitution is a brilliant document predicated on a universal idea that didn't apply to everybody right, and so, what's brilliant about? It is as Frederick Douglass Mo. most famous nineteenth century abolitionist said is that in the worst themselves captures the idea of a society that I wanna live in. A We don't live in that society. Because at the end of the day, the founders adopted a language in a set of ideas that privilege them as property men of elite standing because what they were really pissed off. About was the way that their peers in in Great Britain mistreating them. Treating them like slaves take advantage of them, not allowing them the political rights and liberties that they felt they were endowed with and. The language they captured was brilliant, but it was always serving. It was self interested, and of course there was a degree they were anti slavery believers. There were pure hearted what we call progressive today who were among the founding generation? But they were, they were not the dominant voice, but these are some brilliant men. How are they not understanding or if they are? They're just sweeping under the rug, their hypocrisy. Yeah I know like you know what I mean. It's hard to get into their heads, but a lot of them understood the contradiction but in contradiction that many of us live with right, so if I'm a liberal. New Yorker. And I moved to Brooklyn in bed Stuy. They used to be working class in black, and reflected years of systemic neglect. And now I feel good about living in this community because safer. There's cool black people each array you know running around. And in all of a sudden, I'm like Oh, where am I going to send my kid to school in not like? Oh, I'm not going to get just we will, because all those black people that go there I want a special school just for my kid, so I just give that example because we live with contradiction, all of us make choices that don't match our principles, or at least the self that we want people to to know about us That's deep. That's hard to route that shit out. When you're teaching, you know when you're starting a class. Where do you even begin? Man Well. It's been really easy lately. I'd be. What courses do you teach? Yes, I teach so at the Kennedy School. I teach a course called race inequality in American democracy. And I start with believe it or not breed newsome who took down the confederate flag? On the steps of the Columbia South Carolina. Courthouse back in two thousand fifteen, just after the Emanuel nine were killed in in In South Carolina Charleston. I also connect her to Frederick. Douglass who gave a stirring speech on July for What is your fourth of July to the slave, which is a piercing Jeremiah critique of the founding contradictions of American society? He gave that's. Fifty two in Rochester I then. Connect him to trump. Who has articulated all of these robust ideas about making America great, which are in total contradiction to what Frederick. Douglass thought one hundred fifty years ago with the little fun part. Donald Trump was praising Frederick Douglass as the great American when he visited the news with Sonian of African American Museum, so like so like make any sense right, yeah, and then the final person. I Open with Jerry. Maya right now. You may not remember who Jeremiah Wright is, but he was Barack Obama's pastor of twenty years. Who are Ian Michelle Who Fox News turned into a caricature as a reverse racist of black man who hated white people, but what I showed them as if you listen to the actual speech that got him in so much quote, unquote. Trouble with you know not God bless America God Damn America. All his facts were absolutely correct the critique he made of American..

Frederick Douglass America Jeremiah Wright Rochester United States Donald Trump African American Museum MOYERS president Barack Obama Great Britain Frederick Ian Michelle Jerry Jeremiah Brooklyn
"khalil" Discussed on Sibling Revelry with Kate Hudson and Oliver Hudson

Sibling Revelry with Kate Hudson and Oliver Hudson

02:06 min | 2 years ago

"khalil" Discussed on Sibling Revelry with Kate Hudson and Oliver Hudson

"I was really excited about this because I just want to talk to a professor. I WanNa talk to historian, someone who lives and breathes and understands and studies teaches it in school, and I really was just excited to be is never. Did we got to talk with Dr Khalil Muhammad? He's professor. History race in public policy at Harvard. Kennedy School is author. He wrote the condemnation of blackness race crime in the making of modern urban America. You know it was we went to school. You know went to school I I went from Boulder two years in Boulder to Harvard Yeah. I think. I even say that in the episode. A far cry from Harvard Yeah. I didn't even go to college. But you know what look we're learning as we go. Honestly, this was one of those moments where when we were done with this I kind of got off of the of the call and I was like you know. Why am I never learned this? It does make you kind of realize there's just a lot that we don't know. There's a lot that we're not taught in school and and I really appreciated him. Taking the time to discuss matters of race in America and well, we talked about systemic racism. Really you know not just the Buzzword of systemic. Down what that means of immigration in America means. Slavery how it went policing began how literature in statistics were used to sort of push this narrative. It was a lesson. It was a lesson where we got to be one on one with a Harvard professor. And pick his brain and it made me want to read more it also. It also made me want to go to Harvard South. And I want to go to Harvard I. Just WanNa take his class zoom. US just just me, that's it. Anyway here after Khalil Mohammed. You're a professor at.

Kennedy School Harvard Dr Khalil Muhammad Harvard South Khalil Mohammed America professor Boulder