17 Burst results for "Key Driving Force"

"key driving force" Discussed on Today in Focus

Today in Focus

08:05 min | 4 months ago

"key driving force" Discussed on Today in Focus

"And people were chanting slogans like democracy now really passionate. And in that kind of moment, you really feel the power of people and it kind of mates. Strong impression in my mind is like faith imprinted in my head I have that momentum and the drive to continue to fight for the democracy of the city even though the path has been very turbulent. Did you feel optimistic at that point in that fight? Did you feel positive that you were able to? See those democratic aims in Hong Kong. Worth of. Undoubtedly when you when you saw so many people coming out. For. The same coast and very tournament. That was definitely a moment that you saw. We are going to make history will going to make a change. But reality he's you back. Quite rapidly after emotional flush, your realized at. Your opponents is so strong. We'll talk about the largest. -Tarian country in the world now, you'll soon realize. Change. Is. Difficult. But by the time you have a choice, you can be pessimistic give up. Or you can be tenacious continue. So I think most people have chosen the second one. In. Many ways protests with Sina. So unsuccessful they were broken up by the government off the sort of just a two month. But if you speak to anyone from low suggest you want to to any of the other kind of prominent figures who part in his movements. They were really important kind of fooling grabbed in terms of tactics techniques. Row then did Nathan take on after the umbrella protests ended Nathan Oh became a founding member of a political party and was elected to Hong Kong's legislature but he did not get to serve very long because of controversy surrounding the oath he took when he was swearing in it wasn't just him the democracy lawmakers who will ended up being disqualified in his case before he was sworn in he gave a speech essentially attacking the government in quitting Mahatma Gandhi you can't Tang me your kind poultry me. You're kind even they tried this body. But you will never. On my mind as a result of this, he was along with these other lawmakers disqualified from parliament and his seat was taken from him. Nathan becoming elected to the legislature and being forced out was a big moment. Any cemented you as a political figure in Hong Kong an awesome it. There was a huge amount of attention focused on you out. Did your family feel about my family's has not been politically active? They have been tangled with daily works that garnered him Brian Butter. So at first, they worry about men opposed me from participating in politics even though they are not like pro-beijing people, they just want stability. And that's what to be honest. Light does something I. I can. I have never. been able to offer them since I was involved in ten to fourteen. And I completely understand it they they flat also from mainland. China, it was way comically was extremely unstable during the childhood growing up. And understand that kind of shoot a Wedneday successfully moved to Hong Kong and tried to stabilize their life. So yeah. The effort beginning they. They were doubtful in trying to persuade me not to get in full deeper and deeper. But Yeah. At the end of the day, they didn't stand out. They're not going to change me. And they're not going to change the frustration of a lot of the I think. Not long after that along with your friends and fellow protesters Joshua Wong and onyx child he was sentenced to prison for your involvement in the umbrella movement. What was that like? Well I that was I felt really bad during that period of time. In. July twenty seventeen. A day after my twenty, four, th birthday I was Unseated the court ruling. And in amongst time in August. I was sentenced to months of imprisonment. One month before my time, I was visiting the prison as a legislator. Talking to older superior officers in the person but on the next day. I've to be there. So it was quite a. Turbulent journey for me. So it was tough but I think for me I I I was quite relieved after I really make. A my mind strict. That will person time full inactivates in Hong Kong is inevitable. the government manipulated the legal system. And the colts is getting more and more aggressive towards protesters and prosecute anyone that they like on the. Delta. Critic leadership a managed to go sweat a relief peaceful the an calmly. He said team of eight month sentence. What kept you going through that time? The love from people and. From them. Actually my. Key Driving Force for me to move forward. And, along the. Journey that you walk through in your political life, you've seen so many people suffering from a also injustice from the government's also applicable prosecution. And when you feel them. It translates into your Muslim bulletin detail. To move. One Mile Mole for them. You have to show a lot of responsibility. Does that ever feel overwhelming? Yes full for an activist. A So it's difficult to balance everything. For example I mentioned about the expectation of my family's. And it's devastating. For me to always disappoint them. When they felt like. You're not really having stabilized then. Putting them in. A in a what were position on the com- basis. And as You have a lot of things. that. Personally cannot achieve or tame your relationship go your your life go other than politics. It all screw up by by political participation, and also like people pay speculation to you and. You will demand yourself on hot in harder. N. sometimes it it it it. It will burn you out. Is Not an easy task for me to admit that it's okay for me to fill a bit tired and. To try to have arrest..

Hong Kong Nathan Oh Mahatma Gandhi Sina Brian Butter China Joshua Wong Delta founding member Key Driving Force colts Row
"key driving force" Discussed on News Beat

News Beat

06:24 min | 9 months ago

"key driving force" Discussed on News Beat

"And music, welcome to another special episode, documenting the devastating fallout from the insidious novel Corona Virus, as it continues to decimate nations' claim lives and Pummel economies across the globe, and what's been emerging since last episode is a bit of a clearer picture of the faces of folks represented in those some numbers surprise, surprise, their predominantly black and brown. Brown, the corona virus has been disproportionately affecting African Americans and SPANDEX with preliminary figures, revealing the death rate among minority groups to be double that of their white counterparts and testing to overwhelmingly be administered to Whiter and wealthier folks than those of color well, anyone who's been awakened to the sheer brutal structural inequities. This country has been designed with since its founding. There's really no mystery at all. In fact, civil rights and civil liberties, advocates predicted exactly this way before the body count started piling up. The answer is racist. The threads of which have. Have Been Sown into the very fabric of this nation, and these brutal truths are merely being laid bare yet again in these sinister figures as you'll hear from our amazing guests, the government's quoque guidelines to stop the spread merely perpetuate these inequities also hear about weathering a term coined by one of our esteemed guests, whereby the constant unrelenting omnipresent stress, always crushing these communities has worn down their immune system and other vital physiological processes to the point where they're much more susceptible to viruses, vicious as covert nineteen, which demands every ounce of health and energy. Energy to fight and top medical assistance breaking all this down for you is Dr Blackstock aboard Certified Emergency Medicine physician and founder and CEO at advancing health. Equity Dr Cheryl Barber, a social epidemiologist and assistant research professor at Drexel University Dorn. Safe School of Public Health and Arlene Jeronimus a professor in the Department of Health Behavior and health education and associate. Director and research professor and the Population Studies Center at the Institute for Social Research at the University of Michigan so without further ado. This episode explores how Racism Fuels Higher Corona virus death rates. I just WanNa make a brief comment to get back to the discussion about the health disparities in the African American community, because it really is very important and the reason I want to bring it up because I couldn't help sitting there. Reflecting about sometimes you're in the middle of a crisis like we are now with the coronavirus, it really does have ultimately shine a very bright light on some of the real weaknesses and foibles and our society. Health disparities. Have always existed for the African American community. But here again with the crisis how it's shining bright light on how it's unacceptable that is. Many of us in the health equity space, we were aware of these racial health disparities that existed prior to that Kobe, nineteen pandemic, and despite significant advances in healthcare, innovation and technology, these realized health disparities have persisted so the communities that we're now seeing most heavily impacted by covid nineteen. Mostly black communities carry the highest chronic disease burden, diabetes, high blood, pressure obesity as We know that the result of structural racism which is a key driving force of the social determinants of health now did that growing and disturbing trend, the disproportionate impact covid nineteen is having on communities of Color New York Detroit to nearby Baltimore where I drove this week to see for Myself Baltimore is a majority black city. It seemed more than seven hundred fifty infections and twenty two deaths so far, and it's about to get worse labeled as an emerging hotspot for this deadly virus. So, we know that these communities have limited access to safe housing to access to healthy food. Access to quality education access to secure job employment, and so all of those factors have really made communities incredibly vulnerable so that when a pandemic like this happens, we essentially have a crisis on a crisis. and that's because across every major cause of death in the United. States black folks have a higher mortality rate, and that's across the board. It's not these aero explanations, or sometimes you know we get into some of the genetic explanations. It really is structural racism, systemic racism that has existed since slavery, and that manifest in so many of our institutions and really give way to these higher rates of morbidity and mortality in African. African American communities. My background is in a racial residential segregation and I think as we're thinking about that legacy. The legacy that dates back to the nineteen thirties of redlining of racial islands of structural violence and disinvestment or decades, really gets a place where the residential environments that black folks and other marginalized racial groups occupy a really separate and unequal and not just separate in terms of the people, but resources investments etc.. One of the ways I. Think, that's playing out right now. With the coronavirus is one is access to healthcare. WHO HAS ACCESS TO QUALITY AFFORDABLE HEALTHCARE? In this moment, we know that communities of color typically don't have as good of access healthcare. Dr Anthony Vouching head of the national. Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases at the National Institutes of Health told a congressional committee yesterday that the testing system in the US is quote. Failing. The system does not. Is Not really geared to what we need right now what you are asking for that is a failing and failing. It is a failing. Let's admit the fact is the way the system was set up. Is that the public health component that DR A. Dr Redfield was talking about was a system where you put it out there in the public and a physician asks for it, and you get the idea of anybody getting it easily the way people in other country doing it. We're not set up for that. Do I think we should be? Yes, but.

African American community Safe School of Public Health Baltimore professor Department of Health Behavior DR A. Dr Redfield Dr Cheryl Barber Dr Blackstock Brown National Institutes of Health Dr Anthony Vouching Drexel University Dorn assistant research professor Kobe Arlene Jeronimus
"key driving force" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:54 min | 1 year ago

"key driving force" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The reminder of where we are we are halfway through the opening round of this intelligence squared US debate I'm John donvan we have four debaters arguing it out over this resolution parenting is over rated you heard from the first two opening statements and now on to the third to debate for the resolution here is professor of psychology and director of the twin study center at California State University Fullerton Nancy sickle please confirm an anti single so when I told a colleague that I was participating in this debate he said to me you can't win because parents believe that what they do makes an incredible difference in the lives of their children but as my colleague Dr plumbing pointed out DNA is the key driving force behind how children turn out to be as individuals children are not blank slates they come into the world with genetic predispositions that parents respond to and do not create parental influences do not work in the way that most people think they do there are a number of misconceptions for example if I read to my child I'll make him smarter or if I take my child to museum I'll turn her into it an art lover there are correlations between parent characteristics and child characteristics but what to rise that correlation that's the point to consider and jeans and environments cannot be disentangled if you use intact biological families because parents pass on both genes and environment to the children what we call passive gene environment correlations right parents tend to have bright children but they also tend to read to their children I children also illicit opportunities for reading from their parents the incident fireman's can only be disentangled if used twins and adoptees and my colleagues and I have produced a number of compelling findings showing that virtually all behavioral traits have some degree of genetic influence the logic of the twin method is very simple and very elegant you simply compare the similarities of identical twins to the similarities fraternal twins and if the identical twins are more likely to they invariably are this is consistent with genetic influence on that particular behavior and you know twins are wonderful because they tell us so much about human behavior just by acting naturally now one of the most provocative findings to emerge in the last thirty years is it twins raised apart are as the lake as twins raised together it's the sheer genes that contribute to similarity and family members living together but she is only explain fifty percent of the variation the other half is explained by the random a non shared effects the people experience on their own if the shared environment that makes such a small difference think about religiosity and sports participation very interesting behaviors if you study young children living at home you will not see a genetic effect identical twins are about as similar as fraternal twins because they're under the guidance of their parents but once they begin to hit adolescence and adulthood they acquire greater control over their environment and you genetic effects kick in now in contrast with twin studies we have adopted siblings and this is siblings to grow up together sure no jeans and commented to share their families and their communities scores of studies have shown little resemblance between them in most behaviors you know I think the parents of one child as environmentalists and parents of two children a geneticist and I say that because parents of two children quickly realize what works for one child may not work for another thank you Nancy Segal and.

"key driving force" Discussed on No Limits with Rebecca Jarvis

No Limits with Rebecca Jarvis

03:49 min | 1 year ago

"key driving force" Discussed on No Limits with Rebecca Jarvis

"Answers or you. Just wanna hear a good story. You're in the right place. Ace on today's episode how kate bosworth has navigated her career as an actress transcending genres and constantly challenging yourself to achieve new heights from i roll at just fourteen years old to finding her voice as a producer. Kate is someone who has shown that the combination of determination talent and authenticity hissy can be the key driving force to finding not just success but success on her terms. Here's kate bosworth kate bosworth. Welcome up to no limit. Thank you so much and so happy to be here with you. I'm so excited to be here with you. We were just having this conversation off the mahat podcast about determination termination and you were born determined from day. What yes i entered the world literally with sort of my fist in front of me they might my parents decided to not know the sex of the child and so when i was coming into the world the doctor said oh it's a boy because it was like so aggressive in a way like it was like i'm i'm here and i am. I love them excited to be here and my and and they said oh it's a boy and then i came out and they wait no. It's a girl and that's literally why my parents parents named me catherine because it means strong willed determined and they thought this person is meant to be in the world and she's going to be quite fiercely determined to be here so that is so well well. I definitely definitely want to talk about the the new film your purdue you've co produced with your husband known <hes> <hes> but i want to go back a little bit to your childhood because you got into acting so young fourteen years old but it was sort of by accident yes it was so you know and it's funny because in hindsight i was such a like like an artistic kid who loved to entertain like i i remember having these weird puppets and i would like demand to put on these bizarre of it. Show i was a strange child. L. d-actually like were they regular. Puppet shows for regular puppet shows i would so i'm an only child and my cousin who <hes> who is a boy he is is also an only child and we're like a year apart and so we were kind of like brother and sister and he's a year younger than me and i was really torture him because i'd be like you're doing the show with me and i was like they've kind of cruel older sister from anyways and he's like i don't want to do what you're doing. You're going to be the weird cat and i see like some other like strange and i'm like the horse of probably and <hes> an and in hindsight insight on my dad's a very sort of and i was like right my plays and i would like act it out with the the puppets and <hes> and i would make my mom i and my dad and their friends watch the like the show <hes> and i and hindsight so so cut to get into middle school i was horseback back riding a lot became obsessed with horses and i was showing i was jumping and there was a movie being cast out of new york city. I lived in connecticut at the time and that was called the horse whisperer and based on the novel and robert redford directed and they were looking for authentic horseback riders <hes> that had a real affinity with horses. I <hes> robert redford was very adamant that <hes> that that'd be the case that he didn't want like like sort of these young like cookie cutter. Actor kids sort of didn't have that connection. I think he has actually quite a lot of courses or he did so i think he really felt connected to that <hes> and <hes> and so when when a movie is being cast rather horseback riding or surfing or <hes> ballet or something like people who specialize in those things will sort what of trickle and they'll hear the trickle of of that particular film being cast in the skill needed and so he went around the barn that i was at that there's a movie being cast in new york work i love the word went around. The dead like everyone went and audition like it was like oh..

kate bosworth robert redford purdue new york city new york producer connecticut fourteen years
"key driving force" Discussed on This Week in Tech

This Week in Tech

03:46 min | 1 year ago

"key driving force" Discussed on This Week in Tech

"And sometimes it doesn't apple for a folding phone. You have to think they've got one in the lab somewhere that they're gone. Pulling on that one the difference that you know, they patent tons of stuff that never comes out. You know, they they patients stuff the fact that there's an entire blog dedicated only to like posting apple pays they post the stuff. Just in case somebody else develops it. They don't wanna lose the royalties. But but they with the galaxy note really could exemple Dylan because I think that was something that really did take off in in in the Asian market. You know, that was a big deal people really like those huge devices, but over here in the US and in Europe, like dude, why would you wanna phone that's twice the size of other phones? And we took a little while to catch up. And also, the hardware better to the big screen phones got slimmer the vessels got slimmer. So they became more hold -able, and usable so everything kind of can congealed I guess until one spot but Nate you're onto something there like with apple their designs. Always very top down. Right. You're gonna like this. You're gonna like MAC pro with no usable ports. You're gonna. Like, a keyboard with no travel deal with it. And I I don't think quality control has been better for them. Honestly, I think they've been faltering to look at those macbook keyboards, but it's a very different philosophy. But like Samsung or Google or something? There's a I I kinda ties into something. I read this week. It was actually a blog post refuse ago, a speech by Claude Shannon that was never published Claude, Shannon, of course, one of the great theorists and computer sciences, if you don't know his name read their Wikipedia article, but he gave the speech in nineteen fifty two at bell labs was not widely published about creative thinking, and he said a small percentage of the population produces the greatest proportion of the important ideas. And he talks a lot about this funny. It's just coincidental. But a lot about this idea of innovation and one of the reasons he says it happens, particularly in the tech sector is because people are dissatisfied. Things could be done better. I think there's a neater way to do things. I think it could be improved a little. There's this continual irritation when things don't look quite right. And I think that the satisfaction. He wrote his present in present days as a key driving force in good. Now, he called scientists. But of course, it was quickly technologists. But I also think that there is a intense pressure from the stock market and investors and the market in general to come up with the next new thing, and and even just pride. What's the next new thing? And unfortunately, we're the Guinea pigs for that. Jeff Bezos has a phrase that he used which really irritates me. But I think gets to the same point that Claude Shannon made which is best talks about divine discontent, and how the customer is never satisfied for very long with anything that that you provide them. So so for Beddoes he interprets that is in need for the company, you know, for any tech company really to continually innovate on continually moving forward. Because last year's totally amazing thing is something that you know, everybody has now. And you're like could be better we wondered with the exploding note was at the note, seven the note eight with the exploding note, if that would be a permanent, you know, Mark on Samsung, and they seem to completely dodged that bullet will the failing folding phone. Be good. The the next black Mark on Samsung will have a lasting impact he polluting credibly forgiving of tech companies. I mean, look at what happened with Facebook..

Claude Shannon Samsung apple US Jeff Bezos Facebook Europe Dylan Nate bell labs Beddoes Google
"key driving force" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:51 min | 2 years ago

"key driving force" Discussed on KQED Radio

"To Isaac the life coach to share the news. Two groups though right now everybody, right? Delivers. You're going to. Really? But the good news has come almost too fast. The union bootcamp we'll start before the graduation from the pre apprenticeship program next week. Their families won't see them graduate Christian Garcia, the one. Who said he liked being on a college campus is torn nothing in my life wanna graduate. It's a rare rainy day in Los Angeles. And the group is standing under one of those big white tents on central campus, the kind you'd rent for a wedding or something there's fake grass underneath. So they can work out is the rain pelts. The tent Isaac makes a call to the union rep Delfino Delacruz to thank him female, you made it rain. All these guys are super excited, man. I go down to the union hall to meet Delacruz. He's wearing a suit, and we sit in a big boardroom Delfino knows the chance he's giving the pre apprentices because he knows the world. They're coming from. You know, a lot of people tend to feel different towards somebody has been incarcerated as made mistakes in their life. I said we've all made mistakes and our live on myself. You know, I was incarcerated to Delacruz says becoming a construction worker in nineteen Ninety-four helped him see that there was more to life than the streets. And he feels good to be able to give this chance to others. Apprentices started eighteen ten an hour in two years. He says they'll be making thirty three dollars an hour. And that economic stability changes everything for them. Now want to buy a house get married, I'm gonna raise a family, and I just have a family raise a family. That's a big difference. Because in the past you would think we want to have kids and the mentality was so when I die I'll have something we by the reason, they anti recidivism coalition pre apprentices can jump the line is because they're in demand. Delacruz explains contractors need disadvantage workers to fulfil the hiring goals in their contracts. Anybody has had a challenge in life. I mean, they don't have a high school diploma single-parent, either, male or female, this matter, I incarcerated or even disadvantages has not been able to find work. So that's been a key driving force for for what we have right now, the diversity in in our unions right now, the anti recidivism coalition has placed more than one hundred people in union apprenticeship so far and it's gearing up to expand. But next says it costs eight thousand dollars to put someone through air sees twelve week pre apprenticeship program. The funding comes from the county the community college system and philanthropic support eight thousand dollars is about a tenth of what it costs to lock someone up in California for a year, the people I met were the fourth group to go through and they've done pretty well Garamaba hawk has the guy who is so eager to get into the program when he got out of prison as a laborer building the new ram stadium. Victor Blas the former lifer got an apprenticeship with the electricity and. Nyan Christian Garcia, the twenty one year old who'd never graduated from anything in his life. Got a certificate from L A trade tech and hopes to join the painters union with jobs like these they're far less likely to wind up in prison again. But but Nick says that's setting the bar too low. I said the bar at are they in a union job and making beyond a livable wage. Are they able to get out of poverty and buy or rent a nice place for their family? Are they able to graduate college or university to me those are the outcomes we should be looking for not just do they not go back to prison?.

Delfino Delacruz Nyan Christian Garcia Isaac Los Angeles ram stadium Victor Blas Nick California Garamaba hawk eight thousand dollars thirty three dollars twenty one year twelve week two years
"key driving force" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:29 min | 2 years ago

"key driving force" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Programs can be what happens if participants don't make it into apprenticeship Bob Lerman, the economists from the urban institute has that concern sometimes people can set up a pre apprenticeship program, they can rent some space, hire some teachers recruit some students, but the hard part is getting employers to offer apprenticeships slots, and if there are a lot of slots that are going begging, then that's great. Opportunity for pre apprenticeship program, but very often we have waiting lists to get into apprenticeships. And so lengthening the waiting list may not be all that productive use of funds. The laborers union in L A, for example, has a waiting list of two thousand people even so opportunity can sneak through on the day. Visit the pre apprentices had just gotten some surprising. Good news. The laborers union was inviting ten air sees pre apprentices to join labor is boot camp the following week. Usually the is take two or maybe five people, but ten is unheard of the group. Russia's up to Isaac a life coach to share the news one day groups though right now, everybody, right? Then he delivers. You're going to. Really? But the good news has come almost too fast. The union bootcamp we'll start before the graduation from the pre apprenticeship program next week. Their families won't see them graduate Christian Garcia, the one. Who said he liked being on a college campus is torn in my life. I wanna graduate. It's a rare rainy day in Los Angeles. And the group is standing under one of those big white tents on central campus, the kind you'd rent for a wedding or something there's fake grass underneath. So they can work out as the rain pelts. The tent Isaac makes a call to the union rep Delfino Delacruz to thank him pheno. You made it rain. All these guys are super excited, man. I go down to the union hall to meet Delacruz. He's wearing a suit. And we sit in a big boardroom Delfino knows chance. He's giving the pre apprentices because he knows the world. They're coming from, you know, a lot of people tend to feel different towards somebody that's been incarcerated as made mistakes in their life. I said we've all made mistakes in our live on myself. You know, I was incarcerated to Delacruz says becoming a construction worker in nineteen Ninety-four helped him see that there was more to life than the streets. And he feels good to be able to give this chance to others apprentices start at eighteen ten an hour in two years. He says they'll be making thirty three dollars an hour. And that economic stability changes everything for them. Now want to buy a house get married, I'm gonna raise a family. I just have a family raise a family. That's a big difference. Because in the past you would think we want to have kids and the mentality was so when I have something really by the reason, they anti. Recidivism coalition pre apprentices can jump the line is because therein demand Delacruz explains contractors need disadvantage workers to fulfil the hiring goals and their contracts. Anybody that's had each allergy life. I mean, they don't have a high school diploma single-parent, either male female, this matter, I incarcerated or even disadvantages as not being able to find work. So that's been a key driving force for for what we have right now, the diversity in in our unions right now, the anti recidivism coalition has placed more than one hundred people in union apprenticeship so far and it's gearing up to expand. But next says it costs eight thousand dollars to put someone through air sees twelve week pre apprenticeship program. The funding comes from the county the community college system and philanthropic support eight thousand dollars is about a tenth of what it costs to lock someone up in California for a year, the people I met were the fourth group to go through 'em. They've done pretty well gear mobile hawk has the guy who is so eager to get into the program when he got out of prison as a laborer building the new ram stadium. Victor blast. The former lifer. Got an apprenticeship with the electricity. Christian Garcia, the twenty one year old who'd never graduated from anything in his life. Got a certificate from LA trade tech and hopes to join the patriots union with jobs like these are far less likely to wind up in prison again. But Nick says that setting the bar too low. I said the bar at are they in a union job and making beyond a livable wage. Are they able to get out of poverty and buy or rent a nice place for their family? Are they able to graduate college or university to me those are the outcomes we should be looking for not just did they not go back to prison. Construction is booming right now. But Scott Budnick worries there could be a downturn. That's why he's trying to create pre apprenticeship and other areas. Like, firefighting and healthcare Lynn Shah, the founder of the winter program says every time there's a construction boom. She hopes blue-collar women will finally make the gains professional women have made in fields like law and medicine. She points out construction jobs are good paying jobs that can't.

Delfino Delacruz Christian Garcia Isaac Lynn Shah Delacruz Bob Lerman urban institute Scott Budnick Los Angeles ram stadium Nick Russia California Victor blast founder patriots eight thousand dollars thirty three dollars
"key driving force" Discussed on No Limits with Rebecca Jarvis

No Limits with Rebecca Jarvis

03:46 min | 2 years ago

"key driving force" Discussed on No Limits with Rebecca Jarvis

"Hainault limits listeners it's Rebecca and quick note about our scheduling before this week's show for the next two weeks. We're going to be posting new episodes on Wednesdays so Wednesday, December twenty sixth and Wednesday January second after that we're backed Tuesday's, but we figured we'll give you the holidays off. All right. Here's this week show. K entered the world literally with sort of my fist in front of me. He's it's a boy. And then I came out and they said, wait. No, it's a girl. And that's literally why my parents named me Catherine because it means strong willed and determined and they thought this person is meant to be in the world, and she's going to be quite fiercely determined to be here. So. From ABC. It's no limits. I'm Rebecca Jarvis. In each week. We're talking to the most bold and influential women laying at the top of their game trying to demystify success, and what it really takes to get there in all the trade offs. Whether you're looking for answers, or you just want to hear a good story, you're in the right place. On today's episode how Kate Bosworth has navigated her career as an actress transcending John RAs and constantly challenging yourself to achieve new heights from her first role at just fourteen years old to finding her voice as a producer keta someone who has shown that the combination of determination talent and authentic can be the key driving force to finding not just success, but success on her terms. Here's Kate Bosworth, Kate Bosworth. Welcome to no limit. Thank you so much, and so happy to be here with you. I'm so excited to be here with you. We were just having this conversation. Off the Mahat podcast about determination. And you were born determined from day. What yes I entered the world literally with sort of my fist in front of me. They my parents decided to not know the sex of the child, and so when I was coming into the world the doctor said, oh, it's a boy because it was like so aggressive in a way like it was like I'm here. And I'm I love that. I'm excited to be here, and my and and they said, oh, it's a boy. And then I came out, and they said, wait, no, it's girl. And that's literally why my parents named me Catherine because it means strong willed and determined and they thought this person is meant to be in the world, and she's going to be quite fiercely determined to be here. So that is so well, well, I definitely want to talk about the the new film your Purdue you've co produced with your husband known. No. But I wanna go back a little bit to your childhood because you got into acting so young fourteen years old, but it was sort of by accident. Yes. It was. So, you know, and It's it's. funny. Because in hindsight, I was such a like an artistic kid who loved entertain like, I I remember having these weird puppets. And I would like demand to put on these bizarre of it show. I was a strange child actually like were they regular public shows for regular it shows. I would so I'm an only child and my cousin who who is a boy he is also an only child and we're like a year apart. And so we were kind of like brother and sister, and he's a year younger than me. And I was really torture him because I'd be like you're doing the puppet show with me. And I was like kind of cruel older sister in many ways, and he's like, I don't wanna do it. I'm like, you're doing you're going to be the weird cat, and I'd be like some other like strange, and I'm like, the horse of probably and an and and hindsight on Mike, that's very sort of. And I was like, right. My plays. And I would like acted out with the with the puppets. And and I would make my mom and my dad and their friends watch the like the show, and I and hindsight so. So cut to you know, get into middle school..

Kate Bosworth Catherine Rebecca Jarvis Purdue ABC Mike John RAs producer fourteen years two weeks
"key driving force" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

WHAS 840 AM

18:59 min | 2 years ago

"key driving force" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

"Good evening, everyone, Jim straight or here in the studio and delighted to be with you tonight because last night. I had a night down memory road this year cata weird. But I'm gonna tell you why I'm saying that. And while I'm humbled by and actually some of my parts, here's what I mean by this. There's a lot of people that have their hands and their brains. That's a important part their brains. Around my career why I'm here. Why sit in the studio and. As you look back on your life are yes. And I've been in radio for thirty plus years you start to go down the road. If you will of who got you there. Why are you there people that had an impact on you? And it's it's an amazing thing to me. To look back on that. And. For that reason, I'm gonna pay homage to. And thank you to people that had an impact upon me. And when I say they had an impact on the here's what I'm talking about. If I'm anything, I'm a student watch people. Listen to people I pay attention to how they comport themselves. In other words, how they? Deal with themselves professionally. And this is why I think that I've enjoyed the decades that have been on radio, and it's not something that I take lightly. It's not something that I. Would refuse to pay homage to. If that's the right way to say that and and it's a great thing. I mean, this is a beautiful thing. And. I will say that Julie and Mike Jenkins who host along with my wife, Donna. We host a party every year in and we do this to honor the type of people were talking about and sitting with those folks last night and listening to them is what brought this to my mind to the forefront of my mind. I guess. And it's a it's a thing you have to turn your mind upon if you have any humility about you at all. And I hope and pray the Lord that I have that. I will start with someone who's near and dear to my heart is anybody because he's the man he's the standard. He's the dude. That that got me into radio propelled me into radio and brought folks attention to. Whatever you folks want to say about my radio career, and that is van V. Now, you talked about a guy you talking about a legend you talking about a person that had integrity. Van the on radio for me K would leverage right there with him. I've done shows with K would both when he was here and whether is up in Lexington. These guys were consummate radio people. Some folks calm personalities to me they were radio people. And what I mean by that they loved radio they studied radio they they brought. A degree of professionalism. To radio craft, and it is a craft. It's a you have to work to do radio. You know television. You can do fifteen seconds and do a blurb radio and their type of radio. And my type of radio I'm here for you. I'm here for you to criticize me, I'm here for you to agree with what I say, I'm here for you to disagree with what I say. And that's different thing than television. There's no feedback. And that's what I love about radio as most of you know, I've done print. I was with Currier journal, which that time was the statewide daily for seventeen years. Did television. I was syndicated in four different states with the early stages of outdoor TV. But the thing I'm most proud of the thing that I hate my head on is radio. And the reason I do that is because MAC connection with you folks are every week when out in the smartphone. We don't screen you you're on here. Bing, bang bang one two three four my producer over there. Or no Santa grasp Billy Rutledge who is dental has done a great job for me. He'll be quick to tell you. We take them as they come. We don't screen you because you disagree with us. As a matter of fact, if you disagree you're actually someone that I want to talk to. Because I've got in my head. But I want to know what's in your head. I'm not here to pontificate or or be a bully pulpit start what Jim straighter doors is about we connect with the folks in their doors. Now, I want a terribly something. That's interesting. It's very interesting to me. Last time this party you had van Vance. Tony cruz. My man, Tony baby. Tony at our blood brothers. Where your way way back in time. He is transition through radio in ways that are unbelievable. And and he's a good, dude. He's a radio guy. He understands exactly what I'm talking about. K Thomas K is a person that's been in radio and television forever. She's a sweetheart and someone that I have a lot of respect for Dan Robinson, Dan. Has been in radio forever. Rubbing shoulders with these people. It's it's worth more than you can say. Jerry Solomon who was in sales here at W H ASEAN across the boards. Jerry's guy. He's a radio guy radios different. It's just. I don't know how to say this. But it's a heartfelt thing. With me. Tom Omer Moondog is that knowing Tom is building radio on both sides of the street. It is a gaffe is a hunter fisherman compadres if you will someone who hours pay attention to what he thinks and what he hears these are folks that you identify with because they bring something to the street. It's a. Gosh, it's a different thing. I. And then you go through your career with folks that are near and dear to your heart and helped you, and these are names, you folks know, Joe Elliott. I mean, if you've ever heard Joe Elliott, you know, what a professional. He is. I mean, he he's a guy. That's just top the rock for me. Bob, Valvano Valvano. Bob is a former producer mash show. I mean, this is this icon with sports. I mean, what else can you say, he's an icon. Mark Travis Mark was my producer. Mark Travis was a radio guy with W H A S radio the moved to fish and wildlife later who's a guy. That's a consummate professional. He made me better. I'm indebted to him forever. Bob Shearer who's the station manager here. He recognized. I will say recognize me, but he recognized surveying Vance and some other folks that I mention what hunting and fishing means to Kentucky. This was a guy that said straighter, you need to have a show in a reasoning warned me have a show wasn't me. It was the fact that was a lifelong. Advocate for and believer in the sportsman sportswoman of the state, and he said, you know, what you've got a voice we wanted here. What better complement can you have the net, and I have held that to my heart ever since I came on the show here. Cox courage Jerrell sports editor Earl was the guy that put me on the newspaper. When you talk about someone you hold and reverence I've got to talk about or Cox 'cause Earl was MAC Hannah guy is what it is. And what you want it to be in eight winner by else says it is it is what it is. Jim's trader you can speak to that. I want you to work for me for the sportsman for the sports men and women of the state not for me to promote my agenda. That is not what I've been about that. It's not what I'm about. Now is for me to go out talk to sports from talk to sportsmen around the state it all the districts about their thoughts, and their desires, and what is important to them. That's why I sit here today. I mean, it's a real honorarium. Skip essex. Skip was the program director here who helped me move forward. And here's what I mean. By that. You'll get a chuckle out of this. I wanted to be in on during the week. Just I guess like every other radio Nassar does except GM. You're you're missing the boat here. I said what are you being? He said, you gotta be on on the weekends and needs to be at night when they're coming home and driving in their cars, and they're reflecting back on the week. What did I do? I listen to skip skip still radio. I think I'm not sure where he is now. But I tell you one thing I'll never forget him. I'll never forget what he told me. And the reason that I enjoy whatever measure of success. I have today is because of skip Essex. How many he was a radio? Jim host. You folks know who he is Jim host was host communications UK basketball football cetera. Jim was a guy I was on the air with his folks in Jim host was a genius. I mean, he was the reason I was on there with cable lead for for example. Just a super guy will you make king. These are currently I studied under William H king, and he had the sport boat. Mckay, she show here Louisville. And he was the reason I got into the gym straighter and fishing expo why? 'cause I learn from the best. Matt television show. It came about really in large part because we makes king. But you know, it was one of the key driving forces behind that. The golden boy. Y'all know who I'm talking about here. The golden boy the guy Paul Harney. Paul Harding was the producer executive producer my radio show. You wanna know why who'd been on the air more in all mediums the ball Horning in our with their with my hat in my hand with Bobby stolen, my buddy, Bob Stalin's. Unfortunately, this past who is my hunting and fishing, buddy. More more fishing hunting. He and Paul and I sat down and literally developed not television show how to do it. What to say how to do it? I mean, folks, this is stuff you if you can't pay Amish to it. Then you're just not paying attention. Let me talk a little bit about fish and wildlife. There's folks there that have been lifelong friends of mine and who stood for everything good about the department. Dr Salako that the name the Salako sitter after there is no finer person anywhere anytime that I've ever met, Don McCormick. Who's the Commissioner of fish wildlife? Who was the visionary who put people out there like John Phillips? John was the deer coordinator. Don, McCormick gave him the resources internally loose with the time and money it takes to stop dear all throughout Kentucky. And we ought to. George right. The Turkey man, George, right? If you don't know or understand who George righty is. Let me tell you who he is. He's the guy. That created our Turkey flocking Kentucky. He went up candy back caddy stock the birds met with people I went with him. A lot of these trips who were patient enough to protect those turkeys to make sure they would propagate. I mean, these are folks that you never never forget Charlie Bowers director of fisheries he was the guy he was a visionary with fish wildlife stock stripers understood what habits would be walleye. This is the guy. In course, Pete Pfeiffer lifelong friend of mine who unfortunately is no longer with us. Pete was the guy the took those programs that Charlie developed and thrust forward into the modern age. I mean, these are the people you think about that you revere. Here. And that you understand or the reason you're on the air today. Herald night, David Hale herald, when he was a barber he cut hair but herald new to hunt turkeys, and I heard about him through the grapevine before he even developed Turkey calls. David Hale was a farmer from Christian county who herald night cut his hair, and they developed juice call. I mean, these are things that. Wouldn't you turn on this microphone? They're always in the back of your mind. That's the best way. I can describe it. The region you're here. They're the people that you need in your memory. There are people you pay Amish you, quite frankly. Go on and on. I'll tell you folks that I wasn't radio with they got into radio later in life. But they were folks that taught me so much about people relationships humility. Chrome Jobe hall. These are two class act gas. I mean, they been to the height of whatever you wanna call it. But if you ever were fortunate enough as I have been to been around him to hunt and fish with them, you learn from them if you had a sense about you because they were about that every day. And gal they love their fans. They love the kids they coached, and they were very very special to be around. So that's a trip down memory lane. But it's one well worth mentioning because you know, what I'm a lucky man to be sitting here. And I appreciate you, folks. I connect with you every week week by week and revere, you I appreciate you. And these are the folks that I learned under connected with my career and a very very grateful. We'll be back after this break is presented by someone that after a lot of good, man. He's Paul Thomas. Mossy oak properties heart realty..

Jim host van Vance producer David Hale Kentucky Don McCormick essex Joe Elliott George righty Tony cruz Bob Shearer Jerry Solomon Currier journal Bob John Phillips Jobe hall Charlie Bowers Tony baby Pete Pfeiffer
"key driving force" Discussed on The Voicebot Podcast

The Voicebot Podcast

04:34 min | 2 years ago

"key driving force" Discussed on The Voicebot Podcast

"So you basically had two things happening in the second connected. Amy with connected to everything through mobile. We will connected to everybody through social and early. Social wasn't mobile early. Social was degrade extent very much desk based stop based outside of Twitter, but overtime a social mobile with the two driving forces ad that has those to really change things dramatic. In the fact that the first internet age I connect today. Ge- didn't really impact traditional businesses that much in the way, they went to market it. Basically, they added some logistics things. They added that they had people using inflammation, etc. But it didn't revolutionize stuff like the second. Connect today JR. Now, it's very interesting in the second. Connect today JR. Where you still have such Celebi Cobb has they haven't gone away. But now you've got mobile social, but the key driving forces all of those things are now available with you everywhere on this device, which is a phone and the thing with the phone was lost. You know, the thing you don't do on a phone as you actually talk on it almost nothing. Right. You you do all the other things is really very interesting mobile computing thing with photography intuited in a bunch of other stuff that over the last ten years has given books to amazing companies that could not exist today if it wasn't for that mobile social revolution. And at. That's everything from the Airbnb is to the Bluebells. But in many ways, even things like the dollar Dollar Shave Club which had positive word of mouth unsocial used things like YouTube ad faithful to promote themselves with Stella vision. And I think the struggle, and the reason we got into marketing and business transformation is standing as later. We have these companies that grew up native mobile, and social, and those companies have midge, amok it gap, even besides technology platforms. Why legacy company is now struggling so I had this thing about new scale in old scale, which is all scale was is based allot of things like spending our distribution our in resources as gala manufacturing still important, but new scale is based on data networks influence in ideas. At a lot of the modern companies have come built for that. So we are now probably the end of the second. Connect today. Jr. I can talk to you about the third. Connect today JR. But remember the connected ages build on each other. So it's not like such ecommerce onto route. But now, he's got such e commerce mobile social. Yeah. Fair enough. In the way, you describe it. I think of porter Michael Porter's five forces in the doesn't fully account for that. And I think it's interesting that that that I that you talk about in many ways was a revolution in distribution, I in digital content distribution in the foul up in terms of how we actually distribute connect our deliver in the physical world based on the digital physical interactions. And we, you know, looking back on it easy to understand. We are just learning. Right. Because it was a complete break with the the atomic pass that we'd we'd grown up with moving into the digital. And it will we've really seen over the last decade or so is this revolution connectivity. And then change people's expectations as you say about the expectations in power structures in those types of things. So that's that's really that's really fascinating. We come to this point. Talking about this idea that they build on each other. You don't just start a new era in in the past as your relevant the pass very relevant night. I'm thinking back to this quote. And I just looked it up that you gave being interviewed at the conference in New York where we had a chance to meet very briefly in sort of spawned the idea for this interview, you said people now spend eleven hours a day looking at a screen there were few other things there are a few other things to do like shower in sleep keeps us away from screens. We've reached saturation of the is now advertising is looking at colonization of the ears. I think that's an interesting setup to talk about this idea of where we've come from a now where we are in. Why voice one of the reasons why voices kind of this new wedge into the marketing world. Yes. So it would not doubt that that's the key thing that we had now grappling with which is the amount of time..

porter Michael Porter Dollar Shave Club Twitter Celebi Cobb Amy Airbnb New York Ge YouTube Stella eleven hours ten years
"key driving force" Discussed on English News - NHK WORLD RADIO JAPAN

English News - NHK WORLD RADIO JAPAN

03:27 min | 2 years ago

"key driving force" Discussed on English News - NHK WORLD RADIO JAPAN

"You're listening to radio Japan of an inch, Kate world, Japan at work. Japan's Prime Minister and a veteran Luma ker campaign in kilter on Saturday, a head of an election to choose the deer. The main governing party Shinzo Ave said he'll promote tourism to jumpstart, regional economies while Shing area. Sheva is calling for moving some central government offices, outset Tokyo to route the juvenile the countryside. I'll bet you seeking third straight, Tom as the president of the liberal benthic Prodi. He said, usual victory dishing revitalization must be promoted as many people of Japan say they've yet to enjoy the benefits of economic recovery, noting that tourism will serve as a key driving force obey reiterated. His goal of -tracting forty million foreign tourists annually by on twenty. He Sheba a former air AP secretary general said major corporations are owning huge profits as the Konami grows, but the fix of not trickled down to the regions or smarter arms. He added that the government must extend maximum support to these regions. He, she said that for the sake of regional revitalization and government offices must be spread out across Japan except for departments in charge of crisis management international affairs. And those that need to respond to questions in the diet. The DP presidential election will effectively decide who these the country about which will become -ted and the winner will be announced next Thursday. Japanese pump star nummy modal has performed live for the last time before drawing the curtain on a twenty five years singing career. I'm not part in a music event in Geena. One in her home prefecture of Okinawa on Saturday. On the eve of her retirement event drew a large crowd, including many people without tickets gathered outside the venue. After the concert they began calling out. Her name on windows hits include new celebrate, and hero shows became an icon for young women who copied her fashion and makeup almost popular spread beyond Japan, but last September when she turned forty, the singer, suddenly now she would retire in twenty eighteen twenty five years after making her debut. Harada has won the gold medal and the man's murdering event at the I f as c. cramming world championships, the final Rondo the competition was held in Innsbruck Austria on Saturday. This was the first time how to have taken part in the world championships sportclimbing will be added to the Olympic program for the two thousand twenty Tokyo games. And that was a news from radio Japan of the NHK world. Japan a network. I'm hero Kazu Secca Machi Keiko Kitagawa. Thank you for tuning in.

Japan Machi Keiko Kitagawa Prime Minister AP Sheva Kate Konami Tokyo Kazu Secca gold medal Tom NHK Okinawa president Harada Innsbruck Austria twenty eighteen twenty five ye
"key driving force" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

02:12 min | 2 years ago

"key driving force" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

"No one has been asking they were all in there and we are constantly overwriting over explaining and overshooting and then dialing back and the audience wants the information until they get it. And in the scenes where they've gotta get it, there's information is the death of emotion. It just you start to get bored. And the reason Pennington arches works is because it's all conflict, conflict conflict. And you sense when a guy starts explaining, this is not conflict anymore, and just we just took everything out that was it's interesting because you have seen of exposition pretty much your longest of explaining how to dismantle the bomb. And it's interesting because it becomes this key driving. Force in the end of the movie, talk about putting those elements together of you need to cut the wires of the two bombs at the same time, but only after the trigger has been taken out of the detonator because isn't that simple? Yes, yes, but, but how long did it take you to arrive at that? And then as you're doing the end sequence, I want to own a talk about it now because it's it's complicated and it's beautiful, but it could have gone wrong in so many different ways. And I just wanna get into it for some. It all came down to what's a scenario that gives everybody stuff to do at the end of the movie. Swansong will writing. Essentially nobody is sitting there waiting. They all have their own character goals and action, right? They all have their jobs and the tent collapses. If everybody's not functioning, if Rebecca hadn't come, if Julia hadn't come right, Julia, grabs a gun in mission impossible three. You have her using her skills as literally a surgeon, yes, to help dismantle a bomb, which I thought was really well. And that was the thing is I wanted her to be active, but I didn't want her to be. When did she learn to be a spot, right? But she is a surgeon. She's been a surgeon. We this, this what's so fascinating about that though is that there is no indication in this movie that the character of John lark aka Walker Cavill knows why cruises chasing him. Other than to think he's just like a vengeful guy, the filled with spite because to do the math that he's trying to crash his own helicopter into larks helicopter..

Julia Walker Cavill Pennington arches John lark Swansong Rebecca
"key driving force" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

02:22 min | 2 years ago

"key driving force" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"Fifty three twenty four straight payroll pressure for peace of mind call now eight Eight seven seven, six, four, nine fifty three twenty four that's eight seven seven six four nine fifty three twenty four Eight hundred. Three one three one four nine five you were watching TV Point hawk see the medieval church where, private steel was snagged on the steeple call my friends at conservative tours eight eight seven three three ninety four ninety four that's eight eight eight seven. Three three ninety four ninety four or go. To conservative tours dot com all, your sight seeing in Paris as well, I'll see. You on Omaha beach The boys Five Glad to have you with us eight eight, eight, three four zero, three, three, seven, three, AAA, three zero, three, three, seven. Three that's my phone number for you to join the conversation and curious as to what you've been hearing us discuss tonight in any thoughts you have on. It I wanna say also a big, thank you to Mike Lindell of my pillow you know for the last I wanna say four years now he has the my pillow folks have been the cornerstone sponsor of. Radio Night Live with Kevin McCullough in really every broadcast that I do. All the stuff that we do, online all the archives that you see every show that I'm a part of Mike Lindell has been the key driving force behind that in my pillow has really changed people's lives people are. Getting better sleep than they've ever gotten before in right now he, is, brought, back his his his best offer his. Most. Favorite by far the most popular offer that he's ever had and that, is by a, premium, mypillow, and he'll, send you a, second, one, at. Absolutely no cost one hundred percent free when you call eight hundred five zero six two six four one and use my promo code now he's also got The lowest price on his bed, topper, that, he's ever offered when you use my. Promo..

Mike Lindell Paris Kevin McCullough one hundred percent four years
"key driving force" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:13 min | 3 years ago

"key driving force" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Biggest move that we've seen since december so last relief for many of those long this particular market after about a fool month bear market and i think that's a few reasons that are driving this we've been talking about for the last few days and weeks how perhaps the fact that we're coming to the end of the tax here in the us is going to be april the seventeenth that could be driving a lot of selling pressure at the moment because perhaps the pay your tax after the sudden surges we saw in two thousand seventeen actually having to liquidate some be bitcoin and ether so that's coming to an end that's one particular reason that perhaps with starting to see some appetite for bitcoin once again we've also heard santander is rolling out a blockchain based money transfer this is actually backed by ripple that showing the institutions that getting on blockchain technology that's a benefit for the industry is the whole and look shorts are getting squeezed out if you've been putting on some bets against bitcoin and some you see these big moves at one point we saw bitcoin moved by thousand dollars in thirty minutes you suddenly get squeezed out of the system you have to take off those short bet so that could be another key driving force all of these have been being what's been voiced by thomas lee he's fun strapped he's a wellknown ball when it comes to bitcoin but the mood music is there we've been talking about soros getting in his fund getting into the trading of cryptocurrencies i'm tara and other hedge fund details coming out saying look six thousand five hundred dollars lots in the past we could see twenty thousand by again for bitcoin so beyond bitcoin other things are moving you know what else did you see happening in the crypto markets today yeah you name it and they rose we got bitcoin cash which foot from bitcoin that was on the up how many we saw light coined ohio e for go higher you seen ripple on the on the ripple coin being exile piece so overall this was an old boats rise kind of story and talk about what barclays is saying because you know they're saying that bitcoin has this really caught my eye why because they are using a way of strategizing bitcoin by using cancer as a way of.

us santander soros barclays cancer thomas lee ohio six thousand five hundred doll thousand dollars thirty minutes
"key driving force" Discussed on All Business with Jeffrey Hayzlett

All Business with Jeffrey Hayzlett

01:47 min | 3 years ago

"key driving force" Discussed on All Business with Jeffrey Hayzlett

"Bear and they plug lay of businesses two day saddle up it's time for all business whipped cheer free hazlitt basil first question i gotta ask you while i guess i should say before question i you know i was talking about your before we got on but i absolutely love the product love what you guys are doing what made you decide to come to new york city to begin this say ruling to be quite honest we we looked at how donna and we saw that widow loaded neocons on our website is opening up gone at watering and so it was really the dotted atlantis there but it also i'm against the hopes of isis blends it for a fashion brandon if he may in yuxi make your anywhere so i guess they were the key driving forces behind it and what made you get into this business yourself longest lot michael ogun small i had just finished jeannie and then entered the workforce and was on a set of minus entrylevel salary but you're expected to have would right to expect in every few suits aqui shirts to very expensive crisis and then as you go out to the search and shirts you end up compromising on storrow price yesterday a yet suits will share its oh to realize that hold crises broken and foolish iin points points and risk unknown at the same time had friends that have been going to hong kong thailand and then having to police title might suits shirts made over there so really came to the reagan let's go to a website that can link consumers any around the world too high kuwait titles aisha and then from there started rolling at charms and you we all today so james win you did mention summit those interesting and i want to get into the intricacies of running style fashion business online at measurements now you get around that because is not a natural kinda thing i mean if it does make it difficulty have some difficulties.

new york city donna brandon jeannie reagan michael ogun storrow hong kong kuwait two day
"key driving force" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

02:28 min | 3 years ago

"key driving force" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"Their overall investing strategy i wanna bring michael on just right now to ask him why he feels this is important especially right now michael what are your thoughts so i'll be you know when you you look at the market today there's a couple of key driving forces of wide people should start looking at their sfr strategy um first you look at demographics we still um we have basically the highest concentration of millennials which are about twenty nine years old right now uh the highest concentration of them are aging i would and are actually aging out of their parents homes into potential uh rentals they have far more of the propensity to rent sitting by uh read verse old um and we've got kind of opportunity out there you're starting to see um what could be a large landslide in the market additionally as i mentioned before you started looking at some of the tax reform that's in the market right now with south homeowners being able to uh raid off lots of their mortgage interest every year again this to rides more of that rental rate uh rental opportunity especially in market um life you work um and california uh the next key driver that people should also look guys is um a mobile lower spectrum lower economic spectrum there are many markets as well where you're ending up with uh environments where uh number ones that are may not be any homeless shelters available so subsidized book comes very important um places like new york we're seeing a lot of that coming on it also is out in uh in california as well as that have been mentioned both of those but you also have the instances in some markets like in kansas for example where you have hold me veteran desirable areas where uh parents might be a single parent with two children and they're looking for a good education for their children and yet they're fico score is still too low in order to get a mortgage and they can afford jobs uh to pay the rent every month and that'd be strong tenets so when you start looking at fault demographics economic graphics and then some tax implications you start seeing the importance of building that sfr model and the last piece i would say to which is you know you look at some.

michael new york california kansas twenty nine years
"key driving force" Discussed on Historical Figures

Historical Figures

01:30 min | 3 years ago

"key driving force" Discussed on Historical Figures

"Young scholar extremely good at every subject and already declaring his intention to go to yale but then the unexpected happened he was playing ice hockey with some friends when he was struck deliberately in the face with a hockey stick he lost most of his upper front teeth he was fitted with false teeth but that was only a cosmetic fix the excruciating pain in his jaw and face could only be cured by time the boy who did it was younger than wilbur but much larger and was known as the school bully his name was oliver half a boy who infamously grew up to become a serial killer with over a dozen murders to his name including members of his own family for wilbur the attack and the pain at caused led to a great deal of anxiety a lingering digestive issue in the end of any talk of going to yale he fell into a long and dark depression where he once talked only of himself and his plans for further education he now turned his attention to it ailing mother who by then was entering the final stages of tuberculosis when he wasn't at his mother's side though he continued to teach himself by eating up every book in his father's wellstocked library he became a reclusive young man whose powers of focus would grow formidable with time that focus combined with his insatiable curiosity in the willing company of his younger brother oroville was the key driving force of all of the rights future endeavours.

wilbur depression hockey oliver