31 Burst results for "Kevin Scott"

Interview With Steven Bathiche: Microsoft Technical Fellow

Behind The Tech with Kevin Scott

01:44 min | Last week

Interview With Steven Bathiche: Microsoft Technical Fellow

"Me today is stevie. British stevia technical fellow at microsoft leads applied sciences group which is an interdisciplinary team of scientists and product engineers. His expertise lies in multidisciplinary approaches to inventing technologies and experiences for windows and devices he's been shipping and inventing new devices interfaces and experiences for twenty years from the original surface table to our present line of tablets and laptops welcome. Stevie thanksgiving is so cool. You do this man. I'm excited giddy. Appreciate the time you're going to spend Spend together and this is just so cool for the company. Yeah i i. it's it's It's exciting for me to like. I always Love opportunities to chat with you. so being able to do this on an tape so that everybody can hear it. I think is Is the pressure recording. So i love to start with you as a kid and how you got interested in science technology because you you ever really broad curiosity and set of interest and i'd love to understand how that started is a great question. Yeah i mean as a kid. We saw worn in lebanon around the middle of civil war and that kind of stuff off and moving every few years different countries and so we moved around a lot as a kid. I lived in libya pakistan Stock on five years jeddah. Saudi arabia queens new york and then finally relented and texas where started going into Know junior high school and then we finally moved to virginia where i went to high school and eventually a college.

Stevie Microsoft Lebanon Jeddah Libya Know Junior High School Pakistan Saudi Arabia New York Texas Virginia
"kevin scott" Discussed on Behind The Tech with Kevin Scott

Behind The Tech with Kevin Scott

02:06 min | Last month

"kevin scott" Discussed on Behind The Tech with Kevin Scott

"I guess today is chase. Jarvis chases an award winning artists entrepreneur photographer. His expansive work ranges from shooting advertising campaigns for companies like nike red bull to collaborating with icons like lady gaga. He's the founder and ceo of creative live where more than ten million students learn photography video designed music and business from the world's top creators and entrepreneurs his new book creative calling launched spring debuted an instant national bestseller. Welcome to the show chase. Thank you. I appreciate it so i really really want to get into creative. Live in your book. and Like i i am a customer of creative live actually Love to hear it. So i maybe we can start with Your background like were. You always creative person. Like what was your childhood like well The great place to start off. I i do want to say thank you so much for You know behind the technology you as a technologist for embracing the that creative side you know so many people and this does go back to Relates to your question about my my history you know. So many people understand Creativity as art and while art is a great example of creativity. I always want to talk about creativity with the capital city. And that includes you know. Creativity underpins the solution to every problem. We will ever know. Writing code is incredibly creative. As is this conversation we're having here. We're co creating this conversation right now and either one of us could take this in a in an exciting different direction and to me. That's part of what makes cry creativity so sort of a misunderstood but be vital like great lives great products great experiences. You know. they're not found. I'm a fan. i'm they call founder. I didn't find anything. I built creative. I have you know from the ground up with hundreds of other committed people. So i think i wanna. I established that creativity with a capital. C is what we're all talking about here

christina warren microsoft Kevin scott chase jarvis Chase scott today europe chase chase chase
Interview With Chase Jarvis,  Entrepreneur, Artist and Photographer

Behind The Tech with Kevin Scott

02:07 min | Last month

Interview With Chase Jarvis, Entrepreneur, Artist and Photographer

"I guess today is chase. Jarvis chases an award winning artists entrepreneur photographer. His expansive work ranges from shooting advertising campaigns for companies like nike red bull to collaborating with icons like lady gaga. He's the founder and ceo of creative live where more than ten million students learn photography video designed music and business from the world's top creators and entrepreneurs his new book creative calling launched spring debuted an instant national bestseller. Welcome to the show chase. Thank you. I appreciate it so i really really want to get into creative. Live in your book. and Like i i am a customer of creative live actually Love to hear it. So i maybe we can start with Your background like were. You always creative person. Like what was your childhood like well The great place to start off. I i do want to say thank you so much for You know behind the technology you as a technologist for embracing the that creative side you know so many people and this does go back to Relates to your question about my my history you know. So many people understand Creativity as art and while art is a great example of creativity. I always want to talk about creativity with the capital city. And that includes you know. Creativity underpins the solution to every problem. We will ever know. Writing code is incredibly creative. As is this conversation we're having here. We're co creating this conversation right now and either one of us could take this in a in an exciting different direction and to me. That's part of what makes cry creativity so sort of a misunderstood but be vital like great lives great products great experiences. You know. they're not found. I'm a fan. i'm they call founder. I didn't find anything. I built creative. I have you know from the ground up with hundreds of other committed people. So i think i wanna. I established that creativity with a capital. C is what we're all talking about here

Creative Live Jarvis Lady Gaga Nike
"kevin scott" Discussed on Behind The Tech with Kevin Scott

Behind The Tech with Kevin Scott

02:13 min | 3 months ago

"kevin scott" Discussed on Behind The Tech with Kevin Scott

"Again. Today is kimberly bryant. Kimberly is founder and ceo. Black girls code a nonprofit organization dedicated to introduce girls of color to the field of technology. She's also an electrical engineer. Kimberly has received numerous awards for our work and technology inclusion. She's been business insider's list of the twenty five most influential african americans in technology and she was named one of fast company's most creative people in two thousand thirteen. She was recognized as a white house. Champion of change for tech inclusion and in two thousand fourteen received an american ingenuity award in social progress from the smithsonian institute. Welcome to the show. Kimberly thank you for having me can pay a. I want to apologize ahead of time. I have a new puppy on. Nate mieko seized busy in the morning. So little noise in the background i followed. That is awesome. No problem at all. Is this a covert puppy. It is it is. He's a quarantine puppy that is That is excellent. Well it's like. I think one of the one of the awesome things people are doing to get pandemic so no no worries at all so. I'm just really excited to learn more about your journey. So can can we start with you telling us a little bit about how you got interested in science and technology in the first place. Of course so. I grew up in in memphis tennessee. Back in out. I will raise sixty seventies. Wanna give away my two bunch of my age but in the late sixties and seventies and one of the things that i was lucky. I guess i would classify it as being lucky to be able to experience. Was this accelerated pathway in math and sciences Author middle school into high school so during that period of time when your high school student a year trying to figure out what you wanna do with the rest of your life one of those conversations with my guidance counselors resulted in her really kind of encouraging me to explore in the generic pathway.

Kevin scott microsoft today lactose co
Interview With Kimberly Bryant, CEO of Black Girls Code

Behind The Tech with Kevin Scott

02:13 min | 3 months ago

Interview With Kimberly Bryant, CEO of Black Girls Code

"Again. Today is kimberly bryant. Kimberly is founder and ceo. Black girls code a nonprofit organization dedicated to introduce girls of color to the field of technology. She's also an electrical engineer. Kimberly has received numerous awards for our work and technology inclusion. She's been business insider's list of the twenty five most influential african americans in technology and she was named one of fast company's most creative people in two thousand thirteen. She was recognized as a white house. Champion of change for tech inclusion and in two thousand fourteen received an american ingenuity award in social progress from the smithsonian institute. Welcome to the show. Kimberly thank you for having me can pay a. I want to apologize ahead of time. I have a new puppy on. Nate mieko seized busy in the morning. So little noise in the background i followed. That is awesome. No problem at all. Is this a covert puppy. It is it is. He's a quarantine puppy that is That is excellent. Well it's like. I think one of the one of the awesome things people are doing to get pandemic so no no worries at all so. I'm just really excited to learn more about your journey. So can can we start with you telling us a little bit about how you got interested in science and technology in the first place. Of course so. I grew up in in memphis tennessee. Back in out. I will raise sixty seventies. Wanna give away my two bunch of my age but in the late sixties and seventies and one of the things that i was lucky. I guess i would classify it as being lucky to be able to experience. Was this accelerated pathway in math and sciences Author middle school into high school so during that period of time when your high school student a year trying to figure out what you wanna do with the rest of your life one of those conversations with my guidance counselors resulted in her really kind of encouraging me to explore in the generic pathway.

Kimberly Kimberly Bryant Smithsonian Institute Nate Mieko White House Memphis Tennessee
"kevin scott" Discussed on Behind The Tech with Kevin Scott

Behind The Tech with Kevin Scott

04:14 min | 3 months ago

"kevin scott" Discussed on Behind The Tech with Kevin Scott

"Think we need more organizational support. Not just have lactose co but any organization. That dilling work as a nonprofit. We can't do it along still for me. it's always about. How can we have this magnified effort. Different organizations that are all working collectively to elevate girls to the stem bills and particularly in computer science. Everyone welcome to behind the tack. I'm your host. Kevin scott chief technology officer for microsoft in this podcast. We're going to get behind the tech. We'll talk with some of the people who made our modern tech possible and understand what motivated them to create what they did. So join me to maybe learn a little bit about the issue computing and get a few behind the scenes insights into. What's happening today. stick around. Hello.

Kevin scott microsoft today lactose co
"kevin scott" Discussed on Behind The Tech with Kevin Scott

Behind The Tech with Kevin Scott

02:28 min | 6 months ago

"kevin scott" Discussed on Behind The Tech with Kevin Scott

"This is the first time that we have had a real life astronaut On this show which. I am guessing Given the great breadth of your interests might not be the way that you want to be identified. Even though like it might be the thing that you're most famous for. But i i am a space nerd. straight up. So i'm a little bit in awe of being able to have a have a conversation with you. The thing that i would really love to start with is how did you get interested as a child in science and technology or or or were you like was that interest spark later in your life. So i think than i just like all children you came out to shoot. I've loved science. And i think there's a difference because we get tied up with what the word science means like his science. The scientific method in process. I think of it more about understanding the world around you. So every child wants to experiment they want to explore. They want to figure out. What's going the issue i think is usually how we maintain that interest in how we don't beat it out of them when you go to school right are how the parents are people's fear of what quote unquote science is right. Doesn't mean that we all have to wanna do it as a profession. But i think kids are excited about it. They doing the hands on stuff. So i always say that i was lucky at a chose. My parents well they facilitated this interest. I had in you know. Sometimes people think of the interest means that you had to go out and get a telescope for the child. Bray at five. But that's not what it was. I play with mud pies. I think pies. Were some hype. Best science experiments. Because if you think about it you're sitting there you we'll kill okay. How much dirt do i put in here. What's the drying time can. Will this little stick that. I put in here growth I mean they're all these things and we sort of pull that out of kids right. But i was lucky enough to have school teachers. Who encouraged me some some dead but what. I mean that they liked my my interest. I was a third of three kids. Sit my brother and sister had science project so i got to hang around with their science projects all the time. It's those things and i went to chicago public.

microsoft Kevin scott One hundred year one hundred years
Dr. Mae Jemison: All Children Are Born Scientists

Behind The Tech with Kevin Scott

02:28 min | 6 months ago

Dr. Mae Jemison: All Children Are Born Scientists

"This is the first time that we have had a real life astronaut On this show which. I am guessing Given the great breadth of your interests might not be the way that you want to be identified. Even though like it might be the thing that you're most famous for. But i i am a space nerd. straight up. So i'm a little bit in awe of being able to have a have a conversation with you. The thing that i would really love to start with is how did you get interested as a child in science and technology or or or were you like was that interest spark later in your life. So i think than i just like all children you came out to shoot. I've loved science. And i think there's a difference because we get tied up with what the word science means like his science. The scientific method in process. I think of it more about understanding the world around you. So every child wants to experiment they want to explore. They want to figure out. What's going the issue i think is usually how we maintain that interest in how we don't beat it out of them when you go to school right are how the parents are people's fear of what quote unquote science is right. Doesn't mean that we all have to wanna do it as a profession. But i think kids are excited about it. They doing the hands on stuff. So i always say that i was lucky at a chose. My parents well they facilitated this interest. I had in you know. Sometimes people think of the interest means that you had to go out and get a telescope for the child. Bray at five. But that's not what it was. I play with mud pies. I think pies. Were some hype. Best science experiments. Because if you think about it you're sitting there you we'll kill okay. How much dirt do i put in here. What's the drying time can. Will this little stick that. I put in here growth I mean they're all these things and we sort of pull that out of kids right. But i was lucky enough to have school teachers. Who encouraged me some some dead but what. I mean that they liked my my interest. I was a third of three kids. Sit my brother and sister had science project so i got to hang around with their science projects all the time. It's those things and i went to chicago public.

Chicago
"kevin scott" Discussed on Behind The Tech with Kevin Scott

Behind The Tech with Kevin Scott

05:38 min | 10 months ago

"kevin scott" Discussed on Behind The Tech with Kevin Scott

"Too distant future absolute at the Ellen Institute we've recently. . Written. . A paper that's going to appear in communications of the ACM on something we call green ai and the idea of it is both a to think about the the carbon footprint try to the can we build these more efficient systems but there's another threat here that I want to highlight, , which is <hes> making sure that the research that we're doing is sufficiently inclusive. . So so back in the day used to be that you or I or a talented undergraduate. . In India or some other country with a laptop, , could do something really cool and write a paper about it and get noticed if we reach the point where you have to have so much infrastructure and so much compute to do an experiment that leads the published paper. . That's a real problem. . For the field, , right we don't get to harness all the brilliant ideas creativity of of a broader population, , and so we suggested some some pragmatic ideas of how to fix that not by. . Forbidding or cutting off. . This very exciting high end research but by saying okay, , let's also look at efficiency at <hes> results of okay. . How can weeks run these types of models on a much more limited device but I I'm I'm so glad to hear that you all have written that paper pushing on that because I do think it's one of the. . Fundamental issues that we've got at this particular moment in time with Ai, , research <hes> these models <hes> are. . There not only extremely expensive to train <hes> they are extremely expensive to serve. . You got this cost thing that makes it difficult to make them widely available I mean like we could. . I'll give you an example. I . won't talk about GP three but I'll talk about this model that we build culturing and LG, , which is a seventeen billion parameter transformer model and like the team only seventy seventy. . Like it was extremely I mean we train this on a very large very sophisticated cluster. . GP. . Use It consumed a lot of resources and I like we wrote a bunch of very specialized software to manage the distributed training task <hes> and the model is very, , very powerful. . and. . So one of the things that we're struggling with right now is I would love to get that model into the hands of as many people as humanly possible and. . Like one impediment to get into the hands of as many people as possible is cost <hes> and like I think to your point, , we can bring the cost down. . By making a whole bunch of these investments like the infrastructure could be better you can distill the model. . There's all sorts of like really interesting things you can do to. . Preserve the models power and make it much cheaper to serve. . But the other interesting thing with these models is it's general language model. . It will enable people to put it in use cases that we would find objectionable and like by we I. . Don't mean Microsoft. . I mean we society and so you know it's it's. . And I don't know how you train the model to allow it to do all of the powerful things that it can do, , <hes>, , and exclude the you know the objectionable things that we're not going to want it to do and so that that is another thing that makes access a little bit tricky. . So like do you get that into the hands of responsible people so that they can discover all of the good uses that the tech. . Companies that have the resources to build these models will never be able to imagine on their own <hes> without you know an opening Pandora's box and creating more misery in the world very important questions of the good news. . I do think they were making progress there. . So some of it is you know the old adage, , a garbage in garbage out. . So you have to be careful what you feed this model is kind of like an innocent child. . Rule read anything. . So you have to be careful what you what you feed it <hes> that's typically not not enough because these things consume right you know billions and billions of sentences and documents. . I'm a great believer in <hes> auditing techniques. . So we also. . Need to make moss like this <hes> externally auditable. So . others <hes> bodies can help discover if there's problems in their if it can be tunes <hes> in negative direction. So . I do think that you and Microsoft are very smart to carefully about these issues, , but I do think that. . Help is on the way. . Well and and That I, , think one of the foundational things <hes> I would like to be able to figure out sooner rather than later is just the way to allow the help to happen in an efficient and transparent and open man are <hes> because at least that much <hes> these to be happening it would be very ironic to have a situation where the very, , very necessary. . Public Open work that needs to happen responsibility and safety and ethics, , and all of these other things can't happen because the people who are doing that work outside

chief technology officer Kevin Scott Microsoft
Oren Etzioni, PhD: CEO of Allen Institute for AI

Behind The Tech with Kevin Scott

05:38 min | 10 months ago

Oren Etzioni, PhD: CEO of Allen Institute for AI

"Too distant future absolute at the Ellen Institute we've recently. Written. A paper that's going to appear in communications of the ACM on something we call green ai and the idea of it is both a to think about the the carbon footprint try to the can we build these more efficient systems but there's another threat here that I want to highlight, which is making sure that the research that we're doing is sufficiently inclusive. So so back in the day used to be that you or I or a talented undergraduate. In India or some other country with a laptop, could do something really cool and write a paper about it and get noticed if we reach the point where you have to have so much infrastructure and so much compute to do an experiment that leads the published paper. That's a real problem. For the field, right we don't get to harness all the brilliant ideas creativity of of a broader population, and so we suggested some some pragmatic ideas of how to fix that not by. Forbidding or cutting off. This very exciting high end research but by saying okay, let's also look at efficiency at results of okay. How can weeks run these types of models on a much more limited device but I I'm I'm so glad to hear that you all have written that paper pushing on that because I do think it's one of the. Fundamental issues that we've got at this particular moment in time with Ai, research these models are. There not only extremely expensive to train they are extremely expensive to serve. You got this cost thing that makes it difficult to make them widely available I mean like we could. I'll give you an example. I won't talk about GP three but I'll talk about this model that we build culturing and LG, which is a seventeen billion parameter transformer model and like the team only seventy seventy. Like it was extremely I mean we train this on a very large very sophisticated cluster. GP. Use It consumed a lot of resources and I like we wrote a bunch of very specialized software to manage the distributed training task and the model is very, very powerful. and. So one of the things that we're struggling with right now is I would love to get that model into the hands of as many people as humanly possible and. Like one impediment to get into the hands of as many people as possible is cost and like I think to your point, we can bring the cost down. By making a whole bunch of these investments like the infrastructure could be better you can distill the model. There's all sorts of like really interesting things you can do to. Preserve the models power and make it much cheaper to serve. But the other interesting thing with these models is it's general language model. It will enable people to put it in use cases that we would find objectionable and like by we I. Don't mean Microsoft. I mean we society and so you know it's it's. And I don't know how you train the model to allow it to do all of the powerful things that it can do, and exclude the you know the objectionable things that we're not going to want it to do and so that that is another thing that makes access a little bit tricky. So like do you get that into the hands of responsible people so that they can discover all of the good uses that the tech. Companies that have the resources to build these models will never be able to imagine on their own without you know an opening Pandora's box and creating more misery in the world very important questions of the good news. I do think they were making progress there. So some of it is you know the old adage, a garbage in garbage out. So you have to be careful what you feed this model is kind of like an innocent child. Rule read anything. So you have to be careful what you what you feed it that's typically not not enough because these things consume right you know billions and billions of sentences and documents. I'm a great believer in auditing techniques. So we also. Need to make moss like this externally auditable. So others bodies can help discover if there's problems in their if it can be tunes in negative direction. So I do think that you and Microsoft are very smart to carefully about these issues, but I do think that. Help is on the way. Well and and That I, think one of the foundational things I would like to be able to figure out sooner rather than later is just the way to allow the help to happen in an efficient and transparent and open man are because at least that much these to be happening it would be very ironic to have a situation where the very, very necessary. Public Open work that needs to happen responsibility and safety and ethics, and all of these other things can't happen because the people who are doing that work outside

AI Microsoft ACM Ellen Institute India LG
"kevin scott" Discussed on Behind The Tech with Kevin Scott

Behind The Tech with Kevin Scott

04:30 min | 1 year ago

"kevin scott" Discussed on Behind The Tech with Kevin Scott

"Tell me a little bit about what you're doing at NC tra-. . So the premise for what we're doing. . Really. . Emerges from what I said a moment ago, , which is this last decade has been transformative in parallel onto feels very rarely talk to each other. . We've already talked about the advancement on the machine learning side than the ability to build incredibly high accuracy predictive models. . In, , a slew of different problem domains <hes>. . If you have enough quality data on the other side, , the biologists and engineers have developed a set of tools over the last decade or so that each of which have been transformative in their own rights. . But together they create I think a perfect storm of large data creation enabling large data creation on the biology side, , which when you feed it into the machine learning piece, , can all of a sudden give rise to a unique insights and so some of those tools are actually pretty special and incredible. . Honestly. . So one of those. . Is What we call in DC pluripotency cells, , which is we being the community not we didn't see Tro, , which is the ability to take skin cells or blood cells from any one of us, , and then by some almost magic revert them to <hes> the state that they're in when you're an embryo in which they can turn into any lineage of your body. . So you can take a skin cell from US reverted to stem cell status, , and then make a Daphne Neuron and that's amazing because that definitely Neuron Carey's might genetics and if there are diseases that manifest in neuronal. . In rural tissue, , you will be able to potentially examine those cells and say, , Oh, , wait this is what makes a healthy neuron different from one that carries a larger genetic burden of disease, , and so that's one tool that has arisen a different one that is also remarkable is the whole <hes> crisper revolution in the ability to modify the genetics of those cells that you could actually create fake disease not disease because it's real. . Disease but introduce it into a cell to see what a really high penetrate mutation looks like in a cell and then commensurate with that there's been the to measure cells in many many many different ways where you can collect hundreds of thousands of measurements from each of those cells. . C can really get a broad perspective on what those cells look like rather than coming in with I know I need to measure this one thing. . And you can do this all at an incredible scale. . So on the one side, , you have all the capability for data production and on the other side, , you have all this capability for data interpretation. . And I think those two. . Threads are converging into a field that I'm calling digital biology <hes> where we suddenly have. . The ability to measure biology quantitatively at an unprecedented scale, , interpret what we see, , and then take that back and right biology whether it's using crisper some other intervention to make the biological system do something other than what it would normally have done so that to me is a field that's emerging and will have repercussions that span from. . Environmental, , science biofuel bacteria or algae. . The do all sorts of funky things like carbon dioxide out of the environment. . Better crops. . But also importantly for what we do better human health and so I think were part of this wave, , the starting to emerge and what we do is take this. . Convergence and pointed in the direction of making better drugs that can potentially actually be disease modifying rather than. . As many other many existing drugs just often just make people feel better but don't really change the course of their disease

Daphne Kohler Kevin Scott Chief Microsoft Kevin Scott Christina Warren officer CEO founder
Daphne Koller, PhD: CEO and founder of insitro

Behind The Tech with Kevin Scott

04:30 min | 1 year ago

Daphne Koller, PhD: CEO and founder of insitro

"Tell me a little bit about what you're doing at NC tra-. So the premise for what we're doing. Really. Emerges from what I said a moment ago, which is this last decade has been transformative in parallel onto feels very rarely talk to each other. We've already talked about the advancement on the machine learning side than the ability to build incredibly high accuracy predictive models. In, a slew of different problem domains If you have enough quality data on the other side, the biologists and engineers have developed a set of tools over the last decade or so that each of which have been transformative in their own rights. But together they create I think a perfect storm of large data creation enabling large data creation on the biology side, which when you feed it into the machine learning piece, can all of a sudden give rise to a unique insights and so some of those tools are actually pretty special and incredible. Honestly. So one of those. Is What we call in DC pluripotency cells, which is we being the community not we didn't see Tro, which is the ability to take skin cells or blood cells from any one of us, and then by some almost magic revert them to the state that they're in when you're an embryo in which they can turn into any lineage of your body. So you can take a skin cell from US reverted to stem cell status, and then make a Daphne Neuron and that's amazing because that definitely Neuron Carey's might genetics and if there are diseases that manifest in neuronal. In rural tissue, you will be able to potentially examine those cells and say, Oh, wait this is what makes a healthy neuron different from one that carries a larger genetic burden of disease, and so that's one tool that has arisen a different one that is also remarkable is the whole crisper revolution in the ability to modify the genetics of those cells that you could actually create fake disease not disease because it's real. Disease but introduce it into a cell to see what a really high penetrate mutation looks like in a cell and then commensurate with that there's been the to measure cells in many many many different ways where you can collect hundreds of thousands of measurements from each of those cells. C can really get a broad perspective on what those cells look like rather than coming in with I know I need to measure this one thing. And you can do this all at an incredible scale. So on the one side, you have all the capability for data production and on the other side, you have all this capability for data interpretation. And I think those two. Threads are converging into a field that I'm calling digital biology where we suddenly have. The ability to measure biology quantitatively at an unprecedented scale, interpret what we see, and then take that back and right biology whether it's using crisper some other intervention to make the biological system do something other than what it would normally have done so that to me is a field that's emerging and will have repercussions that span from. Environmental, science biofuel bacteria or algae. The do all sorts of funky things like carbon dioxide out of the environment. Better crops. But also importantly for what we do better human health and so I think were part of this wave, the starting to emerge and what we do is take this. Convergence and pointed in the direction of making better drugs that can potentially actually be disease modifying rather than. As many other many existing drugs just often just make people feel better but don't really change the course of their disease

Disease United States Neuron Carey NC
"kevin scott" Discussed on Behind The Tech with Kevin Scott

Behind The Tech with Kevin Scott

04:30 min | 1 year ago

"kevin scott" Discussed on Behind The Tech with Kevin Scott

"Because sometimes that can be a hard thing like we have. In Society sometimes in especially I, think in some of our institutions like we want to push people into like very specific directions. was there anything that helps you with this wonderful dilemma that you had a broad curiosity? Yeah, to assert have two responses. One is what helped me, but I think the world has. Since I was in an undergraduate. As an undergraduate I was I, remember distinctly taking an engineering class, and there was a professor, also sitting in on the class is very rare. At the time and he opted to sit next to me. And he was a biologist wanting to learn more engineering. And we got to talking in. Just found that fascinating that you could mixie's to. There was no such thing as a bioengineering department did not exist back in the time of no. But. His name was Orrin. Porter and he melded physics and biology in a very interesting mixture of heat, transfer and animals in different climates and I just found that fascinating. After a while, he said Hey, do you WanNa? Join my lab and be a Grad student and I didn't actually know what graduate school was. I said sure and. So that that got me going in this interface, a I think today we are really doing more and more to break those barriers, so there are bio engineering departments. And candidly the word bio comes in front of lots of worse bioengineering. biomethane matic's biophysics biochemistry so tell us a little bit about your research that you did as a graduate student. Yeah, I! Get two different things. I started a masters degree in Wisconsin and I got my PhD Duke at Wisconsin because I was really interested in fluid mechanics. That faculty member said you know, fish swim really fast. <hes>, why is that and <hes> there were? There was this theory of building in the literature that there's something novel about the Polymer Coating Fish. Mucus. And nobody had really looked at it in any. Detailed Way and so. He got me into his lab. We started doing fluid dynamics experiments on what was called. Polymer drag reduction. And I ended up publishing as second year graduate student, a paper on polymer drag reduction of the novel. Chemistry physics of the slimy covering of fish. That's right began. And so like. Whenever I hear fluid dynamics like agan sort of visualize the Naria stokes, equations and <hes>, and my my exposures to fluid dynamics has always been less about the analytical modeling more about computer simulation of these systems of where you doing computer simulations stuff in your graduate work. Not. Then <hes> so Kevin After. Remind you of era. This is the nineteen seventies. And yes I did computer simulations of flow in my undergraduate classes? It was Fortran and we had to write our own numerical solutions. To very very simple things okay? The project I worked on in my master's was much more <hes> of mixture of experimental fluid mechanics. An imaging flows okay interesting then. Ah Duke I moved on to looking at a couple of different flow problems in biology. We got very interested in the fluid mechanics of insect feeding like mosquitoes, blood, feeding, and things like that. What what is going on that allows the mosquito to feed on blood vs related to disease transfer like malaria. What are the relationships there and also locomotion influence movement influence so? So it was a variety of things like that, and again a mix of computational work, and then <hes> experimental

Chief Technology Officer Kevin Scott Hal Microsoft
Tom Daniel: Neuroscientist and bioengineer

Behind The Tech with Kevin Scott

04:30 min | 1 year ago

Tom Daniel: Neuroscientist and bioengineer

"Because sometimes that can be a hard thing like we have. In Society sometimes in especially I, think in some of our institutions like we want to push people into like very specific directions. was there anything that helps you with this wonderful dilemma that you had a broad curiosity? Yeah, to assert have two responses. One is what helped me, but I think the world has. Since I was in an undergraduate. As an undergraduate I was I, remember distinctly taking an engineering class, and there was a professor, also sitting in on the class is very rare. At the time and he opted to sit next to me. And he was a biologist wanting to learn more engineering. And we got to talking in. Just found that fascinating that you could mixie's to. There was no such thing as a bioengineering department did not exist back in the time of no. But. His name was Orrin. Porter and he melded physics and biology in a very interesting mixture of heat, transfer and animals in different climates and I just found that fascinating. After a while, he said Hey, do you WanNa? Join my lab and be a Grad student and I didn't actually know what graduate school was. I said sure and. So that that got me going in this interface, a I think today we are really doing more and more to break those barriers, so there are bio engineering departments. And candidly the word bio comes in front of lots of worse bioengineering. biomethane matic's biophysics biochemistry so tell us a little bit about your research that you did as a graduate student. Yeah, I! Get two different things. I started a masters degree in Wisconsin and I got my PhD Duke at Wisconsin because I was really interested in fluid mechanics. That faculty member said you know, fish swim really fast. why is that and there were? There was this theory of building in the literature that there's something novel about the Polymer Coating Fish. Mucus. And nobody had really looked at it in any. Detailed Way and so. He got me into his lab. We started doing fluid dynamics experiments on what was called. Polymer drag reduction. And I ended up publishing as second year graduate student, a paper on polymer drag reduction of the novel. Chemistry physics of the slimy covering of fish. That's right began. And so like. Whenever I hear fluid dynamics like agan sort of visualize the Naria stokes, equations and and my my exposures to fluid dynamics has always been less about the analytical modeling more about computer simulation of these systems of where you doing computer simulations stuff in your graduate work. Not. Then so Kevin After. Remind you of era. This is the nineteen seventies. And yes I did computer simulations of flow in my undergraduate classes? It was Fortran and we had to write our own numerical solutions. To very very simple things okay? The project I worked on in my master's was much more of mixture of experimental fluid mechanics. An imaging flows okay interesting then. Ah Duke I moved on to looking at a couple of different flow problems in biology. We got very interested in the fluid mechanics of insect feeding like mosquitoes, blood, feeding, and things like that. What what is going on that allows the mosquito to feed on blood vs related to disease transfer like malaria. What are the relationships there and also locomotion influence movement influence so? So it was a variety of things like that, and again a mix of computational work, and then experimental

Graduate Student Porter Wisconsin Orrin Naria Stokes Kevin After Mixie Professor Faculty Member
"kevin scott" Discussed on Behind The Tech with Kevin Scott

Behind The Tech with Kevin Scott

07:26 min | 1 year ago

"kevin scott" Discussed on Behind The Tech with Kevin Scott

"So let let's Since I WANNA make sure we get to some of the like really interesting stuff that we've been doing We've been doing recently. Let's fast forward all the way to some of the work that you've been doing over the past a handful of years which I think is of like again really foundational importance like maybe even more important than this Shift that you all agitated for an and sort of realize when you were Grad students and that is Sort of thinking about a in the human context so as these technologies have become unbelievably more powerful like especially over the past Like ten or fifteen years And their applicability to problem solving in the real world has never been higher we are now being faced with a whole bunch of questions about what's the ethics of applying this particular technique in this scenario. Like how do we make sure that These systems are doing things in unbiased ways like what is fairness in these systems. Like what are the things that we shouldn't use AI for Like where are the places where a I like should always have decision making systems? Where like there should always be a human in the loop and so you've done. I think some of the really most important work in the field et Microsoft and in these organizations that you have helped to start and are like sort of involved in leadership of the Partnership Fray. I was thinking about what the the ethical responsibility frameworks are for doing a a modern moral Like how did you decide? That was something that was going to be such an important focus for you. to really considered deeply what we might do as of growing field including technical issues social issues Looking at the human dimension. You know if people are using these systems had he designed them in a way not just to where they might explain their their reasoning. If People WanNa know what's going on but how do you understand how to apply the technology in a way that will complement expertise? That's already available for human beings. How do you think through longer-term futures where the technology begins to shape The nature of work in the nature of the tasks people do in particularly named jobs. Like I am a doctor. I am a lawyer. I repair automobiles to understand what it all would mean so that we would know

Chief Technology Officer Kevin Scott Microsoft
Dr. Eric Horvitz: Chief Scientific Officer, Microsoft

Behind The Tech with Kevin Scott

07:26 min | 1 year ago

Dr. Eric Horvitz: Chief Scientific Officer, Microsoft

"So let let's Since I WANNA make sure we get to some of the like really interesting stuff that we've been doing We've been doing recently. Let's fast forward all the way to some of the work that you've been doing over the past a handful of years which I think is of like again really foundational importance like maybe even more important than this Shift that you all agitated for an and sort of realize when you were Grad students and that is Sort of thinking about a in the human context so as these technologies have become unbelievably more powerful like especially over the past Like ten or fifteen years And their applicability to problem solving in the real world has never been higher we are now being faced with a whole bunch of questions about what's the ethics of applying this particular technique in this scenario. Like how do we make sure that These systems are doing things in unbiased ways like what is fairness in these systems. Like what are the things that we shouldn't use AI for Like where are the places where a I like should always have decision making systems? Where like there should always be a human in the loop and so you've done. I think some of the really most important work in the field et Microsoft and in these organizations that you have helped to start and are like sort of involved in leadership of the Partnership Fray. I was thinking about what the the ethical responsibility frameworks are for doing a a modern moral Like how did you decide? That was something that was going to be such an important focus for you. to really considered deeply what we might do as of growing field including technical issues social issues Looking at the human dimension. You know if people are using these systems had he designed them in a way not just to where they might explain their their reasoning. If People WanNa know what's going on but how do you understand how to apply the technology in a way that will complement expertise? That's already available for human beings. How do you think through longer-term futures where the technology begins to shape The nature of work in the nature of the tasks people do in particularly named jobs. Like I am a doctor. I am a lawyer. I repair automobiles to understand what it all would mean so that we would know

Microsoft
"kevin scott" Discussed on Behind The Tech with Kevin Scott

Behind The Tech with Kevin Scott

12:39 min | 1 year ago

"kevin scott" Discussed on Behind The Tech with Kevin Scott

"Like learn how to use machine learning tools and like become developers or teachers or be prepared for the careers that don't even exist right now That are going to emerge over the next couple of decades and in order for them to do that. We have to inspire them like they have to see people around them that they admire or people who are online or wherever like they just have to have role models that where they can say. Okay like I am like this person. They are telling me that like I could do this thing and like in there showing me why. It's interesting and I think we have to have that as well as the education in order to get kids to want to choose these careers. Well you speak with quite a bit of knowledge of this. I was very pleased to meet your wife. Shannon during the process of working with you on this book you and Shannon have a foundation that focuses on education. Do you want to say a little bit about that? Yeah I mean the the foundation very broadly look said how it is that we can knock down systemic obstacles to children reaching their full potential and like a lot of that's about education and educational equity like some of it is about again. You know if you do full system thinking about these things it can even be about access to food nutricia like a lot of the early childhood developmental things that That we see is like if you have a kid who comes to school hungry. They can manifest a bunch of behaviors that look like attention deficit. Hyperactivity disorder get have behavioral issues that distract them from being able to learn what they need to learn in their classrooms. And so we just sort of have to think about the full end end set of problems that we need to solve to let every kid unlock their potential. Like one of the things that we you know the local organizations we work with that are trying to get kids. Educated is the even here in Silicon Valley. It's not just about the skills it's about creating the support networks for people where they can get encouragement and positive reinforcement like it is so hard and like the Mo my wife and I saw this because we were the first Like air parents. They'd go to college And so we were trying to figure out like all of this stuff early in their lives about how it is that we were. GonNa go get a college degree where we didn't have is much support as we could have had just because their parents were trying their hardest but like they didn't know they didn't know how to guide. Us necessarily and so we we see you. This is a great organization here in Silicon Valley. That's actually a franchise of Dacian Wide Organization Paul Breakthrough Silicon Valley works with kids to make sure that they get into college and the graduate from college and they start working with them when they enter middle school and they just look at the full problem of like how do you. What are the role models for these kids? Like what are the patterns of success like? Can you show the like a bunch of people who walked similar pass that they did and like they graduated and her having great careers? Like how do you get the people who are graduating and have great careers to get back to their community like? It's a really fantastic organization that really fantastic way of looking at these problems that I think you know again when we go back to Roy Communities in Middle America where we want our kids just to acquire these digital skills but we wanted to choose digital careers and like we want them to be able to stay in their communities to practice these digital skills so that you're building a foundation infrastructure these communities where the community can fully participate in the economic engine. That's GonNa drive a whole bunch of Whole Bunch of like how the future goals for all of us. Can you had a number of people read the book? Give you comments people you know from lawmakers to people who live in rural communities to the tech giradi of Silicon Valley in Seattle. And other places. What are people taking away from the book? And what do you hope they take away from the book? I think almost everyone so far. Who has given me feedback about the book? Like this bias. The bias set of folks in that. I haven't had anyone come to me yet saying. Oh the Sahara or book but You know the thing that people seem to see to me. Taking away from the book is like Oh. This stuff isn't really as complicated as I thought it was. And Wow actually do now Have hope that there's a path forward for developing and employing very advanced technologies for like a very sort of set of equitable benefits. And like the most important thing that I warn people to take away from is like we're not on some sort of inexorable path where we're building these technologies things are going to unfold in this very particular way that's not inclusive like we get to choose our future and I think if we make careful choices that that future could be like theri very inclusive. I WanNa ask you during the course of researching and writing this book. I wonder if there's a particular moment either when you were traveling with the rise of the rest fund or going to I o or or you know in any of the moments along the way that Particularly struck you either concerned you or Or gave you hope for the future? I think there's a really fantastic set a people and a of these communities who are pushing very hard on a similar set of things so like the just an increasing amount of capital that is starting to flow into these technology companies. That are in places that are outside of the coastal a urban innovation centers That we all are familiar with and talk about all the time which is really incredible because what we got to see as we were visiting. These places is that they're brilliant people everywhere just genius industrious Sort of incredibly inspiring people doing really good work all over the country and US collectively choosing to invest in. What they're doing is really really important. And I've seen a bunch of these folks using technology in very interesting ways so like I know all of the capability. Is there the employees the most advanced tools that we have possible in a bunch of places? The you know they're already on this path. The being able to leverage technology to build better businesses to create more opportunities in their communities of the Saul set of problems that they are uniquely situated in a position to solve but like there at the very beginning. And that's the thing that gives me so much hope. Yeah I'll go back to mine. You know most oft quoted example which is my friend Hueys company that he works at the does precision plastics machining. Like they built a really good business in this small town in Campbell County. Virginia where they're using the Internet to market to and communicate with their customers are using really advanced software to be able to Pergram automated machining equipment to make these very high precision parts that they're then able to deliver to customers all across the country and because they're able to leverage really advanced technology. They're competitive and so their problem. Is You know they love to be able hire more people to work there and like they just started need the people with the skills and all of the tools that they're using this almost moore's law for machines where the amount of dollars that you're spending on the machine is getting less and less over time you know as a ratio of the value of the things that the machines can produce it so like in other words the same way that. Moore's law said you got more compute per dollar like you're you're able to do more valuable set of things with these automated machines per dollar that you spend on them and that's a really exciting thing and like when I didn't expect to see that when we went to Virginia but as soon as I saw it like I saw antidotes everywhere like all of these companies that were following the same pattern where they were businesses that were starting to serve some Berry. Port need in the marketplace where their ability to be competitive and to like boob jobs back into their communities. That have been outsourced to you. Know some sort of larger concern or like had been moved overseas like the reason they got to repatriate. Those jobs into their communities was because they were using technology. And like. It's it's a really inspiring thing to see like I if we had never actually publish this book. I would have been happy to have undertaken the project just to see all of that happening And to like just be inspired and fired up by. Yeah well that seems like a good place to end but I want to ask you to read another passage. That's along these lines in which you write very movingly about your community and about the communities in this book I wonder. Would you read one last passage for US sure? So there's this this interested even disdainful attitude that people can sometimes have about those who choose to live in different places who choose to pursue different paths in life. It's very easy to surround yourself with the same news. Sources the same political views the same entertainment the same activities in the same culture as everyone else around you with modern technology with more of our time spent online owner devices with more and more of our connections with one another mediated by social networks. It's hard to avoid becoming trapped in self reinforcing filter bubbles and then not to have those bubbles exert their influence on other parts of our lives many of my friends and colleagues see those living in rural communities people who live outside of urban innovation centers where the economic engines thrum right now in a very different light than I do. That's not just unfortunate. It's an impediment to making the American Dream. Real for everyone. The folks I know in rural America some of the hardest working most entrepreneurial cleverest folks around they can do anything they set their minds to and had the same hopes for their futures and the futures of their families and communities as those of us who live in Silicon Valley and other urban innovation centres. All do they want their careers and their families to flourish. Just like everyone else where we choose to live should become a dividing line and impediment to a good job at a promising future. That's the American dream and it's on all of us to make sure that it works because in a certain very real sense if it doesn't work for all of us it won't work for US Kevin. That's great thank you very much. And we'll wrap it there. It's been a fun conversation. Yeah thanks Greg Shits Victory. Tabio the show that lasts..

Silicon Valley US Dacian Wide Organization Paul Shannon Roy Communities Hyperactivity Virginia moore Seattle Saul Middle America Hueys Greg Campbell County Berry
"kevin scott" Discussed on Behind The Tech with Kevin Scott

Behind The Tech with Kevin Scott

15:08 min | 1 year ago

"kevin scott" Discussed on Behind The Tech with Kevin Scott

"Do you want to maybe geek out for a minute on why those things are important in thinking about? Ai Yet so I think it is very useful for folks to have at least some high level concepts in their head about how AI works. You know. And I'M GONNA go super fast and and this is one of the challenges with writing the book Like that chapter might have been the most difficult thing to write because I was trying to make it accessible for folks like your dad and my mom and still you closely off to like the deep technical complexity and nuance of what actually is going on. On the frontlines of the field is these technologies are being developed but so like roughly speaking you sort of think about the first epoch of a as one where we thought we were going to be able to encode human intelligence is a set of like logical rules and sorta describing knowledge in these very structured ways? That like we were going to be able to sort of build up intelligence by like this berry sort of rational logical so to call them. Systems of reasoning in the book and progress was interesting but relatively slow like we were not moving as fast as some people would have liked in the field and like we had these periods of very high excitement about a is that led to these booms of activity that were followed by bus. Where you know the sort of exceeded what was realizable by the technology and like there's even a term for this called they. I winter men like I've actually seen one. Ai Winter at my lifetime and there was one that occurred before I even became a computer scientists. And so the thing that's happened over the past. Let's say fifteen twenty years is we have gone from these systems of reasoning to systems of learning so things where instead of us trying to discover the logical rules of intelligence and the structure weighed a map the knowledge of the world. What happens in systems of learning with machine learning? You are able to train? Assist them to recognize patterns in data. So if you have a large amount of data and like a enough compered you can run a learning out for them across all of this data to get to build a model and this model built from this data is able to do a set of things. Called inference it let you make judgments in predictions and classifications about Things in the real world and like it's a really powerful pattern. It's like the thing that we use to do a bunch of perceptual things that have seen extraordinary over the past handful a year. So just said twenty twelve like we have really made superfast progress using a set of techniques called supervised learning to be able to accurately transcribe spoken words speech to tax so this is speech recognition. We have made huge. Progress is in computer vision like where computers can identify objects in still images and like even in video streams with accuracy. Similar to a human being like. We're able to do machine translation where you can sort of take a snippet of texts in one language and translated to another and said like they're just all of these extraordinary things that we've been able to accomplish with this set of techniques called supervised learning and the reason that we call these techniques supervise. Learning is that you have to have human beings labeling. The data select you want to build a computer vision system that's able to discern the difference between buckets and kittens. You would have to go. Assemble out like a huge collection of images of buckets kittens. And you'd have to have these images label so somebody would have to sit down and say. Hey this picture has kit netted. This picture has a bucket in it and you would have to have kittens of all shapes. Sizes breeds colors per a texture in different positions Imposes under different lighting conditions at the same thing for buckets and so you would beat all of this You know so labeled data into your learning system many would produce a model that can accurately identify buckets and kids. And so it's fairly expensive in terms of the effort required to do all of this labeling and then you end up with maybe a picture of a bucket with a kitten in it and really confused yes you can really confused system but what are the interesting thing. That's that's really happened over the past couple of years And that's going to be like one of the driving forces for the next few years is we have really figured out in a bunch of areas had to do this thing. Called unsupervised learning. Wear you bypass most or all of this labeling step and you can just sorta point the learning system at a whole bunch of data and you can have it sort of figure out a bunch of very complicated structure about the data that you're then able to use the bill very very powerful systems without having to bear the expense of this supervise labeling process. And that's the you know the set of things that have been really driving progress in natural language processing over the past couple of years where we've got some really sort of extraordinary results with question answering with systems that can generate fairy plausible links of texts that sound like they've been Brit by a human being. It's like you know we're we're making really really fast progress in the interesting thing about it. Is You know when you're able to do on. Supervise learned egg. The only thing that is bounded your progress at least right now and like we may run into boundaries sometime over the next handful of years is the amount of compute that you can throw at the problem the amount of data that you have to train but you know the interesting thing is like. We've got more compute now than we ever have and you have the whole. Internet full of data the train on Yeah well let's switch from the tech to society you know you. Dedicate the book to your father in the book. You write a letter to your grandfather. Shorty explaining to him he. He was a obviously a craftsman and someone who would've been fascinated by. I mentioned this because the book is titled Reprogramming The American Dream. And you had your family and other families in mind puts involved in reprogramming the American dream. What do you mean by the American dream? So I think that we have an opportunity with better investment in advanced technology and like making those investments in a way where they're accessible to as many people as humanly possible to have people in rural the Middle America have the opportunity to create really very interesting new businesses that create jobs and Economic Opportunity. That help them realize their creative vision and that serves as a platform in the same way that industrial technologies served as a platform for these communities to build their economies in the in the early mid twentieth century that AI can have a similar sort of effect in these communities. Today you offer a number of different suggestions related education skilling and that sort of thing. I'm curious what would you say? Is your advice to young people who might be growing up in rural central Virginia or Oklahoma. Where I'm from you know. Should they prepare for jobs of the future? Yeah I've chatted with a bunch of people about this over the past few weeks and when I get this question about what we need to to make a accessible to those kids in rural America is some of the things that we need to do. Just very prosaic I think so the tools themselves that have never been more powerful like the really interesting thing to me. Is that bursts machine. Learning Project that I did sixteen years ago now require me to sit down with couple at graduate level cynical machine learning text books and a whole stack full of fairly complicated research papers and then. I spent six months writing a bunch of code from scratch to use machine. Learning to solve a particular problem was trying to solve the time if I look at the state of open source software cloud platforms at just the online training materials that are available for free to everyone a motivated. High School student could do that. Same Project that I did sixteen years ago probably in a weekend using modern tools. And so you know. I think the thing that we really need to be doing is figuring out how to take these tools that are now very accessible in like we should. We should feel intimidated by them in any shape or fashion and figure out how to get those into high school curricula so that we are teaching kids and our project oriented wedding like how to use these tools to solve real world problems getting kids. Those skills similar important Like the other thing that we need to think about is just how connecting people to the digital infrastructure that is going to increasingly be running our future and so there are things like the availability of broadband. That are a huge huge deal. You know I think we write about in the book. My visit to our data center in boy tuned Which is in Mecklenburg County about hour and a half two hours away from where I grew up and this is one of the most sophisticated technology installations anywhere in the world like. There's an enormous amount of network bandwidth coming into this facility. Like the amount of compute power that is in this sort of acres of data center infrastructure that we have there is just staggering and we have a bunch of high-skill technology workers who are building and operating the infrastructure on behalf of all of Microsoft's cloud customers and some of those people who were living in that community struggle to get access from their mobile telecommunications providers to the high speed broadband that they expect their information workers like they expect in their homes to like have good broadband connectivity for students. Like it's even more critical like if you don't have a good broadband connection that's available to you somewhere student like you're never going to be able to go find these open source tools to use these free or cheap cloud platforms to like go. Learn all of this like Barry accessible knowledge. That is on Youtube and so sometimes I think it's the the prosaic things that like. We're making more complicated than the complicated things. Yeah well it was interesting. You mentioned boy ten. You know some of the places where Microsoft has data centers. We had a chance to visit in in those communities. We encountered this. Ah in Iowa as well when we were reporting there you know a lot of these. High schools have been preparing students for kind of legacy jobs in Wyoming. A lot of kids who can go get jobs and oil and gas in Virginia. You used to be as you write about tobacco and furniture and textile in textiles. You know what we discovered in a love to hear your thoughts on this Ito. The high schools needed to begin to introduce some digital skills and then the community colleges were many of those students would end up going for post secondary also needed to create a a sort of ladder toward the skills needed in those data centers. It so like. It's absolutely true and I think you know the thing that both of us saw And like this was sort of a really really striking thing to me and I don't know why I was so surprised by it. Because in retrospect it's really obvious like I think one of the things that you really really have to have in these communities if you want kids to choose to study these concepts to acquire these skills to graduate from high school and to sort of pursue further training either on their own or community colleges are going to a four year school to get a technical degree is like they have to have role models. I think this is one of the very lucky as quirky breaks that I had is my great grandfather my grandfather and my dad all in construction and the very easiest thing for me to do and like I gotta say even though I was in love with computers like there was still a part of me that was tempted like I asked myself why would I go into the family. Business like in that would have been okay like I don't WanNa make it sound as if going into construction is problematic in any shape form or fashion like there is an enormous dignity and satisfaction. Doing jobs where you're working with your hands and the world needs those things but like in these communities like I think you need a balance like you. You want some people that years ago. Do those things that you want some kids to choose to go pursue careers in it or security your.

AI Virginia Microsoft High School Youtube Middle America America Barry Economic Opportunity Wyoming Iowa Oklahoma Mecklenburg County
"kevin scott" Discussed on Behind The Tech with Kevin Scott

Behind The Tech with Kevin Scott

14:03 min | 1 year ago

"kevin scott" Discussed on Behind The Tech with Kevin Scott

"Some sort of inexorable path where we're building these technologies like things are going to fold this very particular way. That's not inclusive. Like we get to choose their future and I think if we make careful choices that that future could be like very very inclusive. Welcome to behind attack. I'm your host Kevin Scott Chief Technology Officer for Microsoft in this podcast. We're going to get behind the tax. We'll talk with some of the people who've made our modern tech world possible and understand what motivated them to create what they did. So join me. Maybe learn a little bit about the history of computing and get a few behind the scenes insights into what's happening today. Stick around to the show. I'm Kevin Scott and today we're going to turn the tables a bit. Some of you may know. I've just written a book called reprogramming. The American dream sorry guests on the show. Today is my co author. Greg Shaw Greg was journalistic home state of Oklahoma including editor of the Cherokee Tribal newspaper. He went to work with Bill Gates both at Microsoft and the Bill Melinda Gates Foundation. He is co author of the. Nfl IS HIP refresh. And a fellow native. Greg. I'm really glad that you joined us today to talk about the book and I'm grateful that you agreed to lend your word master expertise to the creation of it. Thanks Kevin. It's it's great to be here with you and it's really been terrific. Being along for the journey I got to go back to Gladys Virginia. I met your mother and brother so before we jump into the book. I must ask how they're doing. Were talking in the midst of the Cova nineteen crisis and so. I'm curious how your family and Northern Virginia and your family in rural central Virginia are doing so good at that just as with all of the communities in in the country and throughout the world. The virus is coming so just because there aren't a lot of cases at the particular point in time when we're recording. This podcast doesn't mean that there won't be so they're taking all the precautions that they should be an interesting lead the hardest person to get to abide by the sheltered places my grandmother who has a very active social calendar with all of her church ladies and so. I think two weeks ago. We got her convinced that she needed to curtail her activities and keep herself at home so so far so good. Everybody's doing okay. Oh that's great. Well let's let's jump into the book as you said in your introduction. The title is reprogramming. The American dream the subtitle of the book is from rural America to Silicon Valley. Making a I serve us all and the book is published by Harper Business. It's available now for purchase wherever you buy books one of the first things that we talked about. Really in one of our first discussions was that You know storytelling as you say is a southern thing. Tell me the story of the origin of this book in the story that you wanted to write about. Well I've been part of the development of technology for a really long time and technology itself was the way that I was able to build a life for myself like I think in a whole bunch of ways like it really saved me as a as a kid. It was the thing that I latched onto that help. Give me something productive to do with all of the energy that I had like. I just got really lucky. That personal computing was emerging. Right at the time. That you know is Preteen I was just trying to figure out what to do with myself and I got hooked in it has served as a platform for me for building a career and for doing a whole bunch of things that I think have been helpful to other people in at least some small way is and when I look at the state of technology right now like we have never had a more powerful platform in terms of Technology. So whether it's You know like the set of things that we're using right now to record this podcast. Because we can't be physically proximate with one another. Yeah the amazing networking technology that we have right now. Like computers that let us stay in touch with one another and interact and collaborate. You do really interesting interesting. Things would otherwise be possible but like I have particularly been involved with the development of for the past fifteen years or so so one of the first big projects that I worked on when I left academia to go work in industry was the machine learning thing and I've just sort of watch this technology progress in both power and accessibility and like what I mean in particular by that is power is like what you're able to accomplish with the tools machine learning and accessibility is like who is able to use these tools to create the. It's just been on this incredible curve on both dimensions and I sat down to with you. What is it now? Two and a half years ago when we started this whole process Seems like only yesterday? Yeah it does but you know the thing that I wanted to make sure was that people understood stories of how they could choose to use this technology to help build a better world for themselves and for their communities in this very inclusive way and like I wanted to make sure that there are things about the development of machine learning and its uses that we need to be cautious about but like I want people also feel sort of hopeful about what it is that they can do with these tools. Yeah well the PODCAST is behind the tech and one of the things that I really enjoyed is learning your story. You know from Gladys Virginia to places like Illinois in Europe and in Silicon Valley. So it's a really terrific Story I want to jump into the introduction here and topic on a I in the introduction. You address the question that is on. Everyone's mind which is wind will general artificial general intelligence or Agi. When will it be available win? Will computers the smart is as humans. So I'd like to ask you to read a from the introduction which you address that question okay. Yeah it'd be happy to so even though I have neither the expertise nor the crystal ball to predict exactly when Agi might arrive. I've been involved with modern technology long enough and read enough history to know that we've often underestimated the speed with which futuristic technology suddenly arise. Avon has historically been limited in what it has been able to accomplish by the amount of compute power. We can throw a day our problems and how much time it takes for humans to encode logic and knowledge into Ai Algorithms. We now have enormous amounts of compute power in the cloud and we have enormous databases of digitized human knowledge like Youtube and the kindle bookstore that can be used to train. Ai Systems as their modern. Ai Algorithms absorbed that human intelligence to accomplish your task we imagine for ai powered systems we may achieve what Thomas Kuhn defined as a paradigm shift one which humans will either be in the loop or out which one of these options we reached depends on our actions. Today the story re craft and the principles we assert about what kind of world we want children to live tomorrow. I feel this profound sense of cognitive dissonance. The same thing that can advance humanity can also cause people distress and even harm. This book arises out of a powerful urge outfield to reconcile the two. It is an engineer's tale. Not The musings of philosopher economist or screenwriter as Microsoft chief technology. Do I skin in the game. Of course I do. But also the product of rural America one of the places most vulnerable to the dystopia in story of AI. My values and many of my earliest experiences as a budding engineer occurred in a part of America Rural America. That is most at risk. I left the rural south over two decades ago I for academia and then for Silicon Valley and the tech industry but it by core I am those people rural people and I care about creating future that values them and their resourcefulness. That's great thank you. Can you know I want to ask you to talk a little bit about a and how you define it? You have a very savvy tech audience for this podcast but you also wrote the book for people in Your Community back in Virginia and others. My father read an early proof of the book. He's an oil and gas guy from Oklahoma and he said he felt like for the first time he had a grasp of AI. And what it might mean. How should we define for ourselves? How should we think of what a is so on? The one hand is incredibly complicated. Assembly of Technologies. It's not just one thing but maybe the simplest way to understand what it does or like how to think about it is that a is a told that we built for automating tasks and doing work that would otherwise require a human being to do and like a lot of the work that does is cognitive Sorts of things so the the people talk about this notion of artificial general intelligence and like this was the holy grail for a are back in the mid nineteen fifties when a group of mathematicians and computer scientists coined the term artificial intelligence for the first time they wanted to build a set of software at digital systems. That were functionally equivalent to human intelligence in the most general terms So you could you build a thing. That was sort of a discernible from human intelligence and what we found over the years is doing that is incredibly hard. One of the things that I write about in the book is that human intelligence itself is sort of ill understood and so you know the in the early days of ai the things that the founders of the field thought. We're going to be the problems that once solved would be. Okay now. We're over the Hump like we're you know we've got this whole thing nails. Were things that we believe are high cognitive watermarks for human intelligence like being able to master chess so it turns out that a systems are pretty good at doing things like game playing and so we built a systems. It could beat the best human chess players years ago and like even of the past couple years. Either some of the most remarkable studs that we've done with a I like with the most modern. Ai Tools are like conquering set of games. Where you know like we had set them up one after one is like. Oh like once we get here we will really have cracked the nut so to speak the flip side of that is that still isn't able to solve very basic problems like things that you know. Human toddler can do are at the moment outside of the grasp of a systems. And so at one of the things that I would love to encourage people to think about is like it's sort of very difficult to draw parallels between artificial intelligence and human intelligence Because just because something is hard and challenging for human being doesn't mean that it's going to be hard Ed challenging for machine and vice versa. Just because something is easy for a human being doesn't mean that it's going to be easy for a machine so in my opinion the best way for us to think about a I is imagine it as a tool. It is a tool that can help us to automate tasks into assist human beings in doing the work that they think is important. But you look at it through that Lens like it becomes an incredibly powerful problem solving toll and again the one that I think is increasingly accessible to everyone for you. Go into tackling some really really important issues that we as human beings need to tackle and where most of the benefit is going to be creating this abundance that doesn't exist before because we simply don't have enough human horse power to solve problems in a way that creates benefits for everyone if that makes us great one of the things. We really wrestled with in in writing the book. You know the first several chapters. The book tells some great stories and kind of developed the narrative the latter part of the book present some promising stories and case studies. But what are we really wrestled? Is You know in the middle of the book you wrote. A chapter called how models learn. This is chapter seven of of the book and you talk about things like supervised learning deep neural networks..

Microsoft Silicon Valley Kevin Scott Ai Algorithms Virginia Oklahoma Greg Shaw Greg America Chief Technology Officer chess engineer Bill Gates Ai Systems Gladys Virginia Northern Virginia Cova Bill Melinda Gates Foundation
Kevin Scott and Reprogramming the American Dream

Behind The Tech with Kevin Scott

06:15 min | 1 year ago

Kevin Scott and Reprogramming the American Dream

"Let's let's jump into the book as you said in your introduction. The title is reprogramming. The American dream the subtitle of the book is from rural America to Silicon Valley. Making a I serve us all and the book is published by Harper Business. It's available now for purchase wherever you buy books one of the first things that we talked about. Really in one of our first discussions was that You know storytelling as you say is a southern thing. Tell me the story of the origin of this book in the story that you wanted to write about. Well I've been part of the development of technology for a really long time and technology itself was the way that I was able to build a life for myself like I think in a whole bunch of ways like it really saved me as a as a kid. It was the thing that I latched onto that help. Give me something productive to do with all of the energy that I had like. I just got really lucky. That personal computing was emerging. Right at the time. That you know is Preteen I was just trying to figure out what to do with myself and I got hooked in it has served as a platform for me for building a career and for doing a whole bunch of things that I think have been helpful to other people in at least some small way is and when I look at the state of technology right now like we have never had a more powerful platform in terms of Technology. So whether it's You know like the set of things that we're using right now to record this podcast. Because we can't be physically proximate with one another. Yeah the amazing networking technology that we have right now. Like computers that let us stay in touch with one another and interact and collaborate. You do really interesting interesting. Things would otherwise be possible but like I have particularly been involved with the development of for the past fifteen years or so so one of the first big projects that I worked on when I left academia to go work in industry was the machine learning thing and I've just sort of watch this technology progress in both power and accessibility and like what I mean in particular by that is power is like what you're able to accomplish with the tools machine learning and accessibility is like who is able to use these tools to create the. It's just been on this incredible curve on both dimensions and I sat down to with you. What is it now? Two and a half years ago when we started this whole process Seems like only yesterday? Yeah it does but you know the thing that I wanted to make sure was that people understood stories of how they could choose to use this technology to help build a better world for themselves and for their communities in this very inclusive way and like I wanted to make sure that there are things about the development of machine learning and its uses that we need to be cautious about but like I want people also feel sort of hopeful about what it is that they can do with these tools. Yeah well the PODCAST is behind the tech and one of the things that I really enjoyed is learning your story. You know from Gladys Virginia to places like Illinois in Europe and in Silicon Valley. So it's a really terrific Story I want to jump into the introduction here and topic on a I in the introduction. You address the question that is on. Everyone's mind which is wind will general artificial general intelligence or Agi. When will it be available win? Will computers the smart is as humans. So I'd like to ask you to read a from the introduction which you address that question okay. Yeah it'd be happy to so even though I have neither the expertise nor the crystal ball to predict exactly when Agi might arrive. I've been involved with modern technology long enough and read enough history to know that we've often underestimated the speed with which futuristic technology suddenly arise. Avon has historically been limited in what it has been able to accomplish by the amount of compute power. We can throw a day our problems and how much time it takes for humans to encode logic and knowledge into Ai Algorithms. We now have enormous amounts of compute power in the cloud and we have enormous databases of digitized human knowledge like Youtube and the kindle bookstore that can be used to train. Ai Systems as their modern. Ai Algorithms absorbed that human intelligence to accomplish your task we imagine for ai powered systems we may achieve what Thomas Kuhn defined as a paradigm shift one which humans will either be in the loop or out which one of these options we reached depends on our actions. Today the story re craft and the principles we assert about what kind of world we want children to live tomorrow. I feel this profound sense of cognitive dissonance. The same thing that can advance humanity can also cause people distress and even harm. This book arises out of a powerful urge outfield to reconcile the two. It is an engineer's tale. Not The musings of philosopher economist or screenwriter as Microsoft chief technology. Do I skin in the game. Of course I do. But also the product of rural America one of the places most vulnerable to the dystopia in story of AI. My values and many of my earliest experiences as a budding engineer occurred in a part of America Rural America. That is most at risk. I left the rural south over two decades ago I for academia and then for Silicon Valley and the tech industry but it by core I am those people rural people and I care about creating future that values them and their resourcefulness. That's great thank you.

Silicon Valley Ai Algorithms America Engineer Ai Systems Harper Business AGI Youtube Gladys Virginia Thomas Kuhn Kindle Bookstore Illinois Microsoft Avon Europe
Percy Liang: Stanford University Professor, Technologist, and Researcher in AI

Behind The Tech with Kevin Scott

09:12 min | 1 year ago

Percy Liang: Stanford University Professor, Technologist, and Researcher in AI

"I guess today's Percy Lag. Percy's an associate professor of computer science at Stanford University also one of the top technologists that semantic machines. His research goals are to make machine learning more robust fair and equitable and to make it easier to communicate with computers through natural language. He's a graduate of MIT and received his PhD from UC Berkeley. Hey Percy welcome. Show things have happened so we always start. These shows with me asking How you first got interested in technology. Were you a little kid when you realize that you're interested in this stuff? Yeah I think it was a round maybe and of elementary school or Middle School My Dad always had a computer so it was around but he didn't let me play with it. And what you do. He was a mechanical engineer. Gotcha and I remember maybe my first memories are In after school In middle school there was a computer lab and there was There is a hypercard which is multimedia program for the Macintosh back then and it got really fascinated and building these Militantly simple applications. But they had a scripting language so you could start to code a little bit and there's animation and all that so it was kind of fun to get into that I remember hypercard as well I I believe one of when the first programs I wrote I maybe a little bit older than you are But I do remember at one point writing a hypercard program that was Like a multimedia thing that animated a laser disc like you remember laserdisc gigantic precursors to DVD's Yeah this is really such a great tool. Yeah at that time. I also tried to learn see but that was kind of a disaster. What are pointers and all this stuff? This is sort of a formidable Formidable first language to attempt to learn I mean like one of the things like given that you are Your Computer Science Educator You know I. I'd be curious to hear how you think about that. Evolution of entry into computer science on some levels now. It seems like it's a lot easier to get started than when we were kids. Maybe but in other ways it's actually more challenging because so much of the computing environment like the low level. Details are just abstracted away and like the layering is very high. It's a lot to get through Yeah so somehow. Computer Science Thrives on abstraction right from the low level machine code to to see and we have python programming languages and At some level you just have graphical interfaces so picking the right entry point into that for someone as I think. There are multiple ways you can go probably wouldn't start with see if I were teaching intro programming class but more at kind of a conceptual level of here are the kind of computations that you want to perform And then separately. I think it's different class with talked to you about how this is actually realized because I think there is some value For A computer scientists to understand how goes all the way down to to to machine code but not all at once yet? It's I am still convinced that one of the one of the most useful things I had to learn as Like a programmer. Who LEARNED TO PROGRAM? The eighties was fairly quickly. I had to learn assembly language. Like you had to know what the low level details where the machine now granted the machines were more or less complicated back than they are now but like just sort of at that atomic level knowing how the actual machine works Just made everything else that came after it. Less intimidating yeah. It's Kinda satisfying. It's kind of rounded playing with blocks. So you you started with hypercard And like where did things go from there? Yeah so for a while. I was I I think I also learned basic. I'm just kind of tinkering around There was and Like today as many resources as you can imagine for just. No kids interested in Programming so a of it was kind of on on my own I think maybe a turning point happened at the beginning of highschool where I started participating this Usa Computing Olympiad. Which is a programming contest? You can think about is the programming contest. But I really think about as kind of algorithm problem solving contest so the the problems that they give you are It's kind of like a puzzle and you have to write a program to solve it But much of the the work is actually kind of coming up with insight of how to what algorithm to do kind of efficiently so an example might be How many ways are there to make change for Two dollars museums certain set of coins and it would be kind of Rica moment when you found. That's how you can do it. And then you have to code it up so I think that competition really got me to And a value this type of Kind of rigor and attention to detail but also a kind of creative aspect of computing. Because you have to come up with on news types of solutions that's awesome and so what was What was the most interesting problem you had to solve? In one of these competitions oh That's a really good question I think it's been a while so I don't remember all the problems but one. I think One memorable maybe class of problems is Around the idea of dynamic program and so this idea that you can write a program and if you do it smartly you can make something that would otherwise run in years millennia in a matter of seconds and I remember having to it was always these problems and you have to really figure out. What was the recurrence relation to make it all all work and a lot of problems. Were centered around. Yeah was it one of the amazing things about the dynamic programming technique is it really does teach you and it might be one of those foundational things when you're getting your head wrapped around how to think. Algorithm Mickley about problem decomposition. Yeah because like I. It's one of those magical things. Where if you break the problem down in just the right way. All of a sudden A solution to the problem becomes Possible when it was intractable before. Yeah Yeah I think I liked it because it was an that you had to memorize a bunch of things or you learn if you learn these ten algorithms and ub set but it was kind of a much more open ended way to think about Problems yeah that's awesome and so You go to. Mit As a undergraduate student. How soon did you know exactly the thing inside a computer science that you wanted to do that? I think took a little bit of evolution so coming out of high school. I was much more interested in his algorithm IQ questions and got interested in computer science theory because that was kind of a natural segue So it was and I started doing research in this area and it wasn't until towards the end of my undergrad where I Sir. Transitioning INTO MACHINE. Learning or AI. When was this what year this was around? Two Thousand Four. Okay Yeah says still like machine? Learning was people didn't use the word back. Yeah Yeah Yeah I mean I remember like right around that time was when I joined Google and I've been a compiler guy when I was in academic insult like I'd never done I never done at all and like I didn't know what machine learning was when I started and yet you know three months after I joined Google I was tasked with doing a machine learning thing. You know reading this giant stack of papers and formidable textbooks Trying to trying to get myself grounded but it means a very interesting time like two thousand four and like you know you sort of picked a great time to learn annoy idea that it would be the feel that it is today and why. Why was that interesting so I can sort of get? Why the theory was interesting. Love these problems and the challenge of what was interesting about machine learning. I mean I think there's definitely this Background would be kind of mystical aspect of intelligence that I think I'm not unique and can be drawn to so When there was an opportunity to connect the things that I was actually doing with a theory with some element that I took opportunity to kind of get into that and they say that Mit for my masters which was on Machine learning natural language processing So then that kind of Roy cemented kind of direction that I really started

MIT Associate Professor Of Compute Percy Percy Lag Google School In Middle School Stanford University Berkeley Middle School Usa Computing Olympiad Programmer Rica AI ROY
"kevin scott" Discussed on Behind The Tech with Kevin Scott

Behind The Tech with Kevin Scott

14:29 min | 1 year ago

"kevin scott" Discussed on Behind The Tech with Kevin Scott

"People talk about Silicon Valley Engineers risk-takers I think it's it's actually the opposite. It's the realization realization that if you go and try one of these things and you're actually good at what you do if it fails it fails you have a job the next day at somewhere else. And you'll have this wealth of experience that people value. Hi everyone everyone. Welcome to behind the tech. I'm your host Kevin Scott Chief Technology Officer for Microsoft in this podcast. We're going to get behind the tack. We'll talk with some of the people who made our modern tech world possible possible and understand what motivated them to create what they did so join me to maybe learn a little bit about the history of computing and get a few behind the scenes insights into what's happening happening today. Stick around hello and welcome to our first episode of behind. Find The tech in twenty twenty. I'm Christina Warren. Senior cloud advocate at Microsoft. And I'm Kevin Scott all right so Kevin. It is twenty twenty which Shh is both the new year and I guess a new decade although people will get weird technicalities and it's always a great Chance to kind of look back at what's happened over the last ten years and reflect on new opportunities. Yeah I mean I it. Is I think in their industry and for human beings in general really easy to get completely used to new innovations that in our lives. But like when you think back ten years ago the world looked like a very different place than it looks right now so smartphones were just catching on. They were nowhere near as ubiquitous as they are all right now and the things that you could do on them were far far more constrained than they are right. Now I mean for. For God's sake people were renting movies from blockbuster In two thousand ten right very blockbuster was actually still a thing and instagram hadn't even been invented yet. Coley different world you know I do now that we've hit twenty twenty. Do you have any forecasts about what the next year intact might bring her even the next decade. Well well I think one of the themes that we spent a bunch of time chatting about last year on the podcast was artificial intelligence machine learning and I think we are are certainly going to see the trends that that had started in the prior year's continue to accelerate as one of the reason why I'm really interested in chatting with our guest today So autonomous vehicles. For instance. I believe are going to make AK- ton of progress over the next couple of years in particular and I'm really looking forward to seeing some of that stuff. Play out yes I couldn't agree more. It's funny I don't have a driver's license But I've actually been on a few self driving car panels over the years and I I think the technology she behind it is so fascinating. Which is why? I'm really really excited about your conversation with today's guest. Chris Armstrong and Chris is an engineer. Who's known for his work in pioneering self driving car technology? Yeah and you know one of the reasons that I'm especially interested in self driving cars and I'm looking forward to this conversation that we're about to have Chris is that There's so many ways that the world is going to change for the good once we we are able to put this technology into the hands of lots of different companies so One of the things that will hear about Aurora's. They are a company building the self off driving car technology as a platform for other companies to use to build autonomous applications. And so you know one of the things that I'm sorta hopeful for that will come into the world in the not-too-distant future is some technologies. That may help my grandmother. So I'm I'm lucky enough to have a grandma that's still still alive. She's eighty nine years old and lives in a very rural place in Virginia And she can still drive which is awesome but the day is coming where she's not going to be able to To drive her car car in the same way that she is right now and Like then it begs the question of how she has access to all of the things that she needs in order to help her live and independent life. So how does she get her prescription medicines. Like how does she get her groceries and You know just just sort of the staple things that she needs to exist. And one of the things that I think could be really incredibly beneficial with these self driving thing. Technologies is Like the possibility that you'll be able to have autonomous deliveries for people like my grandmother. I think you're absolutely right. I think the potential for the stuff is really fantastic. So let's hear more about some of the potential for this technology from Chris Aronson Guest today is Chris. Samson Christie's the CO founder and CEO Vera accompanied the bill self driving vehicle technology before founding Aurora he was CTO. Google self driving car program prior to that. Chris was a faculty member of the Robotics Institute at Carnegie Mellon University where he was the technical director of the Darpa urban and grand challenge teams. I'm really excited to hear what he's up to these days. Hey Chris the the show. Thanks for having me so I love to start by learning how you got interested in technology in the first place as a kid. Were you taking engineering classes or programming classes when you were in high school. So are you discover that in college back. When I was in high school there wasn't really computer science at high school And so I Bought Oughta some kind of Tandy x eighty six clone or whatever Back when I was in probably ninth or tenth grade from money for my paper route A- and you know tried to learn to program at first where you go you know you don't if you recall this but you go to the bookstore and you'd buy You know this paperback for Back Book. That was program whatever it was and it was just the source code listing and this before C. D. Roms even pete which people probably don't even remember that that's right we Before that actually bought a commodore sixty four and of course that was exciting. Because it didn't have tape drive right right or it didn't have a floppy drive floppy yeah and five and a quarter inch. Discs that's what had YEP YEP so anyway so we was doing that and then this language C. Plus plus which seemed to be the hot new thing And so started. Actually the first programs I really learned with C. Plus plus. Wow that's rough. Yeah yeah it was a little crazy. A I mean I guess on some some level like CPS was challenging lodging first language. But the good thing is after you've mastered as downhill it's all downhill And so did. Did you know from all of this experience in high school that you wanted to get a computer science and engineering. Gary you know up in Canada so apply to you you know variety of schools got into into a couple of them And then in my senior here I met a girl Turns out now. She's my wife. And decided I wanted to stay at the University of Manitoba which is right in central Canada and Manitoba and got into the computer engineering? School computer. Seem like you know they had a future. Yep and how and so you got your undergraduate degree and you went straight to Grad school right. That's right And you went to Grad school at Carnegie Mellon. Yep How did you. How did you know you want to go to CMU One day I was in the engineering building just outside the library in this poster next to the elevator that showed this robot crawling out of a volcano and I saw that I thought that's really cool. I liked robots. I like space. The seems exciting. Yep and my my girlfriend girlfriend said you know you should really apply if you think that's cool and I figured Carnegie Mellon it's like there's no way How Might Young Universe Mantova how my possibly going to get in in there and you know they made a mistake but now I think he did not make a mistake but But yeah no it was really. I've been fortunate throughout my career to kind of look at. Hey this seems interesting. Cool and fun And Ghana tried it and it's it's mostly seem to work out so far. Yeah and so what was the what was the experience like at Carnegie Mellon because I remember it still is this day like just one of the most extraordinary places in the world especially to do computer science and robotics and like the robotics institute is fantastic. So what what was that. Like as a Grad student for me personally it was. I opening right that You would have come in lecture. who had ridden the textbooks and used in undergraduate and then you know so meeting? These people meeting meeting people who worked at NASA meeting people worked at Darpa meeting people from Microsoft or Intel the time And just it opened up this whole other world of possibility and then the Then the the faculty were great right. There there wasn't really as a graduate student. You didn't see politics. You saw people working together We got to work on. Cool things You know the one of the things I love about Carnegie Mellon is that it's very Very much systems school They've got incredibly deep strong fundamental theoretical underpinnings. But it's about make it work and see it out in the real world and learn learn about that part of You know the development engineering process and actually touching real things and so it was. It was fantastic and you know I got to up to the Arctic Circle and we had a robot up. They're driving around. I got down to go down to the Comma desert with a robot And explore that it was just. Here's an incredible experience. What was the first useful robot that you worked on useful? I don't know that I've worked on truly useful robot yet we're getting closer Now we So the the robots we we built for going to the Arctic this was called high period and and we were exploring. How can you make a robot? Think about How do you make it so robot could operate perpetually so one of the challenges you send a robot to to Mars And you put solar panels on it Well it can only operate when there's enough sunlight and can only operate when and there's a communication window back to Earth so we were looking at both. How do you plan so that if you say launch it to the poll of planet That you have constant power by rotating taking and driving such that the solar panels always pointed at the Sun. And then how do we make Science Discovery Automated so instead of asking. Thank you know. Should I look at this rock. Should I look at this rock. Should I look at this rock. Have the look a bunch of rocks and then try and figure out. Hey this one was unique and interesting in some way and send that back so that you could maximize the the use of the you know. The narrow combine with that was available. So that was. That was cool. Didn't go anywhere other within a research experiment but some of the technology ended up and that would have been two thousand and one. I think we're so that was before the the big deep narrow network computer vision Revolution Yeah Oh very much so this was the you know you spend five five years working on your PhD twenty percent better by coming up with a new set of feature vectors you know you're on your PhD and so you're PhD. was were were you. I'm I'm guessing when you're working on robots they're such broad system so like there's there's there's the software and the software is very complicated all the way from control loops to perception to planning and it's just a ton of complexity there then there's also also like all of this complexity on the electromechanical side of things. You make it light enough. How do you like give it the strength and durability to do? Do the things that you wanted to do. How do you power at? How do you like make it resistant to the environment? So did you have one thing or the other that you specialize in or that you gravitated towards so I was definitely more on the software side and kind of the sauce software and systems side of. How do you how do you think about the whole thing working together You know I'm definitely not a mechanical engineer. I now now. I kind of know enough to be dangerous and really frustrating. I'm sure for the Mechanical Engineering Hiring folks that I work with But on the software side I kind of worked at this intersection of motion planning and perception And so so say a little a little bit more. What what is Motion Planning. Yeah so motion. Planning is figuring out. How do you how do you make the vehicle move through the world and There's a bunch of different offered techniques you can use for it and you know there's variations where you're thinking about just kit a medically what the limits are Then you think about Kennedy Amick Motion Planning where you're actually counting for the fact that there are dynamics the motion and nurses And so that the earliest robots like the this wrote we took up to the Arctic moved at fifteen centimeters meters a second and so you know put that in context..

Chris Carnegie Mellon high school Kevin Scott Microsoft Robotics Institute Aurora Arctic Grad school Silicon Valley Engineers Christina Warren Chief Technology Officer twenty twenty instagram Canada Virginia Kennedy Amick Motion Planning Google
Chris Urmson: Aurora CEO - Autonomous Driving

Behind The Tech with Kevin Scott

07:17 min | 1 year ago

Chris Urmson: Aurora CEO - Autonomous Driving

"Hello and welcome to our first episode of behind. Find The tech in twenty twenty. I'm Christina Warren. Senior cloud advocate at Microsoft. And I'm Kevin Scott all right so Kevin. It is twenty twenty which Shh is both the new year and I guess a new decade although people will get weird technicalities and it's always a great Chance to kind of look back at what's happened over the last ten years and reflect on new opportunities. Yeah I mean I it. Is I think in their industry and for human beings in general really easy to get completely used to new innovations that in our lives. But like when you think back ten years ago the world looked like a very different place than it looks right now so smartphones were just catching on. They were nowhere near as ubiquitous as they are all right now and the things that you could do on them were far far more constrained than they are right. Now I mean for. For God's sake people were renting movies from blockbuster In two thousand ten right very blockbuster was actually still a thing and instagram hadn't even been invented yet. Coley different world you know I do now that we've hit twenty twenty. Do you have any forecasts about what the next year intact might bring her even the next decade. Well well I think one of the themes that we spent a bunch of time chatting about last year on the podcast was artificial intelligence machine learning and I think we are are certainly going to see the trends that that had started in the prior year's continue to accelerate as one of the reason why I'm really interested in chatting with our guest today So autonomous vehicles. For instance. I believe are going to make AK- ton of progress over the next couple of years in particular and I'm really looking forward to seeing some of that stuff. Play out yes I couldn't agree more. It's funny I don't have a driver's license But I've actually been on a few self driving car panels over the years and I I think the technology she behind it is so fascinating. Which is why? I'm really really excited about your conversation with today's guest. Chris Armstrong and Chris is an engineer. Who's known for his work in pioneering self driving car technology? Yeah and you know one of the reasons that I'm especially interested in self driving cars and I'm looking forward to this conversation that we're about to have Chris is that There's so many ways that the world is going to change for the good once we we are able to put this technology into the hands of lots of different companies so One of the things that will hear about Aurora's. They are a company building the self off driving car technology as a platform for other companies to use to build autonomous applications. And so you know one of the things that I'm sorta hopeful for that will come into the world in the not-too-distant future is some technologies. That may help my grandmother. So I'm I'm lucky enough to have a grandma that's still still alive. She's eighty nine years old and lives in a very rural place in Virginia And she can still drive which is awesome but the day is coming where she's not going to be able to To drive her car car in the same way that she is right now and Like then it begs the question of how she has access to all of the things that she needs in order to help her live and independent life. So how does she get her prescription medicines. Like how does she get her groceries and You know just just sort of the staple things that she needs to exist. And one of the things that I think could be really incredibly beneficial with these self driving thing. Technologies is Like the possibility that you'll be able to have autonomous deliveries for people like my grandmother. I think you're absolutely right. I think the potential for the stuff is really fantastic. So let's hear more about some of the potential for this technology from Chris Aronson Guest today is Chris. Samson Christie's the CO founder and CEO Vera accompanied the bill self driving vehicle technology before founding Aurora he was CTO. Google self driving car program prior to that. Chris was a faculty member of the Robotics Institute at Carnegie Mellon University where he was the technical director of the Darpa urban and grand challenge teams. I'm really excited to hear what he's up to these days. Hey Chris the the show. Thanks for having me so I love to start by learning how you got interested in technology in the first place as a kid. Were you taking engineering classes or programming classes when you were in high school. So are you discover that in college back. When I was in high school there wasn't really computer science at high school And so I Bought Oughta some kind of Tandy x eighty six clone or whatever Back when I was in probably ninth or tenth grade from money for my paper route A- and you know tried to learn to program at first where you go you know you don't if you recall this but you go to the bookstore and you'd buy You know this paperback for Back Book. That was program whatever it was and it was just the source code listing and this before C. D. Roms even pete which people probably don't even remember that that's right we Before that actually bought a commodore sixty four and of course that was exciting. Because it didn't have tape drive right right or it didn't have a floppy drive floppy yeah and five and a quarter inch. Discs that's what had YEP YEP so anyway so we was doing that and then this language C. Plus plus which seemed to be the hot new thing And so started. Actually the first programs I really learned with C. Plus plus. Wow that's rough. Yeah yeah it was a little crazy. A I mean I guess on some some level like CPS was challenging lodging first language. But the good thing is after you've mastered as downhill it's all downhill And so did. Did you know from all of this experience in high school that you wanted to get a computer science and engineering. Gary you know up in Canada so apply to you you know variety of schools got into into a couple of them And then in my senior here I met a girl Turns out now. She's my wife. And decided I wanted to stay at the University of Manitoba which is right in central Canada and Manitoba and got into the computer engineering? School computer. Seem like you know they had a future.

Chris High School Aurora Twenty Twenty Kevin Scott Microsoft Christina Warren Chris Armstrong Instagram Chris Aronson Canada University Of Manitoba Virginia Google Gary C. Plus Samson Christie Manitoba
"kevin scott" Discussed on Behind The Tech with Kevin Scott

Behind The Tech with Kevin Scott

03:01 min | 1 year ago

"kevin scott" Discussed on Behind The Tech with Kevin Scott

"All of US everyday should be asking like. How is it that the thing that I'm doing right now is going to positively accrued food the hall social good like if you can't answer that question in an affirmative way? Then maybe you're doing the wrong damn thing uh pie everyone. Welcome to behind the tech. I'm your host. Does Kevin Scott Chief Technology officer for Microsoft in this podcast. We're going to get behind the attack. We'll talk with some of the people who made our modern world possible and understand what motivated them to create what they did so join me to maybe learn a little bit about the history of computing and get a few behind the scenes insights into. What's happening today? Stick around hello.

Chief Technology officer Kevin Scott US Microsoft
danah boyd:  Researcher, activist, tech scholar

Behind The Tech with Kevin Scott

09:01 min | 1 year ago

danah boyd: Researcher, activist, tech scholar

"To the show Dana thanks so I wouldn't of you have such an interesting job and you've had such an interesting career I really would love to understand what about how you got started like were were you were you a techie kid well so it's sort of funny path on how I came into it which is I was a Geeky kid by which that meant I did a lot of mass and I didn't really fit in because I was Kiki up in Pennsylvania outside of major cities and I single mom you know working multiple jobs is trying to make ends meet and my brother who's born very early had a visual issues and so one of the doctors at one point said need work on eye hand coordination there's these things video games as so you she bought him a video game player and I I know that Gordon Intendo is I don't know if that was the first one as we would you know play all of these games and was fine and my brother really got into it and wanted to know how it worked and so he became obsessed with in a reverse engineering all of these different systems he ended up building his own computer and I pretty much ignored him as a big sister does and then he started using the phone line which was just an unforgivable sin and it was making bb sounds and I didn't understand the BBC sounds and one day I marched in to what he was doing it was like what is this and he's like I'm talking to people like what that is crazy and so he showed me using it and it's always the rest is history so I spent my high school years on various fora on us yet building my first website as a homage to Annita Franko on all of her lyrics he's definitely the days of lyrics sites and I went to college I I went to this amazing program called Pennsylvania Governor School mom which took smart kids around Pennsylvania and sent them to Carnegie Mellon the summer and I was way over my head because I did not have the education that most of those folks had and I felt very unqualified to be there but I learned a lot and it was also where I was exposed to what elite universities could look like and would made you what made you persist there because I think it's not actually an uncommon thing for folks to have their first exposure to like very highly level computer science or mathematics or science education seem like really intimidating and overwhelming and like your first assumption is like oh I am the unusual Wohl thing in this situation and like some people give up because his heart and intimidating and some people say nope I'm going to get on top of the us like what made you so for better or worse I always responded to being told I couldn't do something by determination that was gonNA prove wrong this got me kicked out of elementary school in the fourth grade where I staged a protest against my teachers inability to teach and made everybody signs to have them walk in circles that did not go over well and so even when I went to governor's school in the only reason I applaud Reid was that this boy in my class told me that it was a program for men it was not for girls and I was like I'm going to go it's very simple and in that kept happening where when people told me I didn't belong I just became determined to stay and that fire in that fight has done well but it's also it's also costly and I think that tension to me is where things get difficult I mean my freshman year of college I went to college where'd you go Brown University which I knew nothing about except that they didn't have grades mom kind of startling to think about at this point in my life and I was assigned on the first day a supervisor Ah you know somebody to mentor me and I got this piece of paper and it said Andy Van dam gave his office as like all right I don't know who you are had no idea who he was and so I- marched into his office I it was the door was open so I just walked in and he looked up from his Eskimos who the hell are you yeah I'm like it says I'm your student and I need advice and he's like why are you in my office I was like hello and from that and I mean Andy me under the wing and Andy was such a key mentor and in that way where you know obviously it was a different era there was my my way of speaking was very much street language very much working class street language and so it was a period of time he decided he was going to teach me to speak like an adult and you would just hit me upside the head every something wholly inappropriate again looks a little different you know saying it now but it was such a lovely such care and my freshman year in college a group of people I assumed to be group accessed the computer and that computer was a UNIX machine and came which is basically the period get peace which would tell you which user was world writable and so somebody sat and turned it into you know the admin position and then went into my account and hacked all of my emails all my correspondences which included a ton of conversations about out grappling with sexual abuse grappling with You know a mess that I was in with my family all this stuff and they posted it to an anonymous server gene Lord this is nineteen ninety seven and like why other than they were asshole stat year there was a whole group of us who were women and we were regularly told didn't belong and it was oh was it hard and I was I was act and you know Andy had Jack and Andy like prosecutors figure out who is investigating prosecute and what I learned was that it was again laws were different time for every may email stolen was a coup into a male stolen was thirty years and I was like no matter how horrible this is that's not the punitive result that I want from this and so I spend a lot of time trying to figure out how I would position myself with in computer science to be like I'm staying I'm not going going away and it was hard slog and I mean Kevin the number of stories I can tell you of people trying to get me out right like I remember applying for a job at silicon graphics SGI and I remember this interview with Sky who was like oh I thought they managed to get you out by now and I was like what this was alumni of brown and I remember you know applying for a job at Disney when I was at siggraph and walking up to this recruiter and saying what I wanted internship and he's like well we don't have internships artists I'm like Mama computer scientists and like mature girl right and it was like constant story and I was just Doug my feet in and I became determined so much so to be honest that I stopped realizing what I liked about computer science and what I didn't and I was just so determined to do computer science because people told me I couldn't that I wasn't willing to look at the broader You know field if you will I mean I graduated Brown with a few classes that weren't computer science or math because you can't at Brown and it took me many more years to be like actually what I love about computing is not just doing software development I like thinking about how these systems are built gently how they fit into broader social issues what took me a long time and it was really about Andy that made me go back I dropped out of my PhD program so I went back and Andy introduced me to basically work with anthropologist and it was like I knew nothing about it was like what how does this relate at all and it was just this moment of like Oh studying peoples and cultures and practices could give me a different way into it all

Dana Thirty Years One Day
"kevin scott" Discussed on Behind The Tech with Kevin Scott

Behind The Tech with Kevin Scott

02:42 min | 1 year ago

"kevin scott" Discussed on Behind The Tech with Kevin Scott

"So why do you wanna talk and sources this observation we made is this trend that technology companies these are gonna essentially be defined in software not just us more software literally all the actions and decisions in a company happened through software it's going to be a truth hi everyone everyone welcome to behind the tech i'm your host kevin scott chief technology officer for microsoft in this podcast we're going to get behind the tack we'll talk with some of the people who made our modern tech world possible possible and understand what motivated them to create what they did so join me to maybe learn a little bit about the history of computing and get a few behind the scenes insights into what's happening rounding today stick around hello and welcome to behind the tech i'm christina warren senior cloud advocate at microsoft and i'm got today our guests nihad mercader co founder and CTO of one of the initial authors of apache kafka and a former colleague of mine and you know nato is on forbes list of the top eighty self made women in america and this is actually kind of an amazing list includes women in sports and TV music beyond stays on this list serena williams and oprah and on this list but it also has a lot of women intact in business like sheryl sandberg who's the COO hello at facebook and suffer cats of oracle numerous and meyer and a number of other women in in tech and business and i think it's so cool that women in tech are counted among some of the most successful entrepreneurs in the country and really curious to hear about niha and how she got to where yeah she has today yeah i mean it's no surprise to me at all that knee highs on this sort of list item may actually be the closest i'm ever going to get beyond says my association with but you know i i got the privilege at linked in of watching her develop as an engineer engineer and as an engineering leader and she's absolutely spectacular i'm just really excited to chat with her today and to have her share with everyone everyone else like this really amazing in some ways like an archetypical silicon valley tech industries story with everyone and she's awesome all right let's hear today will chat with narcan.

chief technology officer christina warren microsoft co founder serena williams oprah sheryl sandberg facebook engineer kevin scott CTO nato america COO meyer
Sam Altman: Entrepreneurial Prodigy, Y Combinator President and OpenAI CEO

Behind The Tech with Kevin Scott

13:47 min | 2 years ago

Sam Altman: Entrepreneurial Prodigy, Y Combinator President and OpenAI CEO

"Hello and welcome to behind the tech. I'm christina warren senior club advocate at microsoft and i'm kevin scott today. Our guest is sam altman. Sam is a entrepreneur and investor. Sam was <hes> for while the president of y combinator. Which is the most successful startup incubator i think without argument in the entire world and recently same became the chief executive officer of organization called open a is that is seeking to build general artificial intelligence inside of a nonprofit structure sure so that the value that creates a cruise to the public good yeah that's right and this is one of the rare times where we have a guest on that. I actually know that i actually we have have known before. He was sam altman. You're not so fast. Tell us a little bit about that. I didn't know that so when when sam was doing loops his first start up. I was as a reporter at nashville and i used to cover startups. All the time and loops was actually one of my favorites not so much because i thought that what they were doing was the most revolutionary solution everything in the world but because sam was so incredibly smart he was always three or four steps ahead of the whole industry was doing and although that ended up not necessarily working on loops favor i actually remember. I sent him an email. When when loops made its exit that said you know you. You might not love what's happening now but i have no doubt that whatever you go onto the future. You're going to be amazing and that's going to be honest. That's probably the only time i've ever send email like that. <hes> and it's is really true. Sam as sam is a super super impressive guy like not not just in the sense that he's like really bright but that he's very determined to like make big things happened. <hes> and how much weight loop was an interesting the company in in that it was like sort of ahead of its time it was it was doing the location based thing before the four squares and the goal is is and facebook were thing a lot of the stuff that he was imagining like now become just sort of a standard feature set that any modern mobile application is is more or less built on top of so he predicted like this whole big thing that was happening. Timing was <hes> like less than great without us. The whole thing you know every time i would. I would get on the phone with him or meet. In person i would talk. I would just walk away and think this is the most impressive founder i've ever met and so although hello he's been successful beyond what i ever could have expected i also have the same not at the slightest surprise yeah no some of the stuff that he has been doing with entrepreneurship and trying to help <hes> like really smart motivated entrepreneurs like find on their way to having impacts like has been amazing and the stuff that he's doing right now with <hes> with open again like getting a bunch of like very very bright individuals visuals sort of rallied around this very interesting 'cause like also super impressive well. I can't wait to hear what he's up to and hear your conversation nations. I'm excited to chat with sam so let's do <music> next up with sam. Altman Altman sam is an entrepreneurial prodigy. I believe he started his first company when he was nineteen years old and that was where <hes> where you and i first met since then you have gone on to become an enormously successful investor president of y combinator through one of its most interesting runs in its history and most recently <hes> you become c._e._o. Of open i which you know obviously we just did a partnership with <hes> you all <hes> but like that partnership notwithstanding like open is <hes> unquestionably doing some of the most interesting things and contemporary very artificial intelligence so welcome show. Thanks very much so i think we we met the first time when you were when you were at luke. <hes> like i was actually doing <hes> like i was adventure nearing at <hes> at another mobile startup at the same time <hes> and <hes> and that was sort of an interesting like crazy. I'm <music>. I'm like one of those things where you sort of. I guess both of us and like in our own way were <hes> like experiencing the explosion asian of a brand new platform ecosystem <hes> and so you did that for eight years and then you took this year all and then and i took over i see yeah <hes> so you you went to stanford yeah and what did you choose to major in their a computer science. I actually took mostly non computer science classes which at the time sorta felt indulgent and looking backwards that was all the super valuable stuff <hes> <hes> so the time that i spent like taking writing classes or studying history or particular study in science like hard science <hes> <hes> have a big impact for the next ten years <hes> but after that <hes> those are all the most aiba classes. I was going to learn to program no matter what i was going to be good at no matter what and you were. How good a programmer were you by the time you got to stanford like with the programming assignments were easy horrid. They were the first freshman year was easy and then it heart okay. You know i think as you're thinking about how we educate our kids like that's a great luxury to like. Have by the time you get to college. You've already got a reasonably good skill. Oh and then you can sort of do this exploration. That's a that's an incredibly beneficial thing yeah like i. I'm sure you do too like i think the education system in general there's just not nearly ambitious enough but <hes> i think like i was incredibly lucky to go to an amazing high school and i learned a lot of the sort of basic skills knowledge. Certainly i had learned how to learn and so by the time i got to college i could just pursue stuff. I didn't have to. I think really hard about just making everything done for my major. Yep done a lot of that yep. So how did you get started in tech. There was this period of time that i was born. Smack in the middle of of like kids who hit the computer revolution exactly right yeah <hes> <hes> where like the computers started easy enough to work with where we could figure it out on our own and then they like kinda got the right time for us. Yep i was born very lucky time from that yeah <hes> in a lot of a lot of people who have gone on to sort of start reporting companies would be technology. Investors were born in relatively short window. It seems like i i say this a lot like i feel the same thing so i. I got lucky to be an eleven year old like right win. The personal computing boom was say yeah like like right when the personal computers started showing up hooked up to a little thirteen inch t._v.'s in department stores like that was that was when i was developing as a human being a very interesting question is what are these sort of seven to twelve year olds now like what is that technological revolution going to be that they're going to grow up with an it's super like i've got a <hes> like a nine year old an eleven year old right now and so do you have a guest guest then what it'll be. I don't know it's really hard hard to say and i don't know whether i don't know whether i would have had guests <hes> back then. When i was right in the middle of it i certainly would not have. I think it's sorta hard to tell <hes>. I know that their expectations are fundamentally different. <hes> the mind were so like they just they expect a world where you can talk to computers and where you touch them and they don't understand people programming content for you that you <hes> that you sort of have to consume based on their abstract understanding of your preferences like they they you just sort of watch what they want and read what they want whenever they want i mean it's very very different than we were when we were little kids but like i don't know what the technology thing is. Is that <hes>. This is going to captivate their interest. One of the things that was magic but computers is you could go very far in terms of what you can do with them but you could start start easily as a kid like maybe synthetic bio is going to be the thing but like we're not gonna have like seven year olds playing in the lab making new orleans. I don't think maybe we will and like just easy to start with which is synthetic bio like you would hope that that would be a thing because like the benefit to humanity entity if you could have a whole generation who were as enthused by that is we were with computers. It's like i think that would be beneficial. <hes> <hes> you know maybe maybe if you can get a bunch of that stuff in a simulation environment where the cost of doing an experiment wasn't so high but like something like. I think it has to be something i mean like your point about. It's it's always something always starts looking kind of toy and it just keeps going yeah so i don't know what it is right now. Which is i think a curious <hes> a curious thing. I never said we didn't know what it was when it was computers first place yeah well what what i'm what i'm yeah i certainly didn't. I'm and i'm confident what is going to happen is that they're going to be the ones who figure it out <hes> for sure yeah <hes> <hes> so and so you took all of this <hes> like amazing. It's almost like a liberal education and in a <hes> in a way i think the two strategies to succeed in life. Are you either go super deep in one field of knowledge or you go extremely broad and i've always been go extremely brought and find the connections and sort of be good at the intersection. So what was the what was the most interesting non computer science thing you took when you were at stanford <hes> uh the most intellectually satisfying thing ever physics <hes> the thing this surprisingly most relevant one was creative writing yep and so there's nothing that's more fun than a great business class right like just the most intellectually stimulating by what was your favorite physics class. Ooh <hes> well. I'll answer my favorite physics book <hes> but it's related to my class. <hes> quantum electrodynamics. I think is the best science book ever written <hes> answering murray gilman's by richard feynman okay and it's like a series of four or lectures but everyone always like wants to focus on the parts of physics we don't perfectly understand and then there's a few areas where they're incredibly beautiful and and we clearly like we don't understand what's happening like in an easily model level but the math we understand perfectly <hes> and that was this example and there was a class i took that was basically teaching this of like wow like there's this big piece of reality that we actually just perfectly understand. Are we understand well enough to work within model and you know it's amazing so quantum electrodynamics just for the <hes> for the audience <hes> who is <hes> also pretty broad <hes> so this is the this is the study of the leave very very small scale interactions everything but gravity yeah but all of the other forces between particles yeah. It is fascinating stuff. I highly i recommend the book. It's a short read. There's no math in it. <hes> it's really fun so why not become a physicist well physics has been a bad field to go into as a career for a long time now and i remember there. Was this thing where all of the kids that were studying. Physics at stanford ended up going to like work in finance <hes> at which i almost briefly got tempted to <hes> actually accepted an offer to be an intern and then i realized i really didn't want to do that but there was clearly something wrong with physics as a career path the time i i was there. Maybe it's better now just just in the sense that it was going to be hard to get a job. All the really smart physics kids weren't going to physics after they graduated gotcha and that that was like computer science kids were going to do some sort of programming and so it was like i think maybe physics just got too hard or the problems got too trivial or something but it's like. It was very hard to see what i was gonna do. I still studied out of interest but it was like i could sort of sense at the time it was not the right career trajectory and so let's talk about this creative writing thing like in what ways is that useful to you now. <hes> actually agree with your assertion that fabulously ability useful why was it why see certainly the highest leverage on time thing i could ever do was right startup advice yep like the not secret secret too. I see is that <hes> we started because p._g. Is incredible at writing assez and was able to sort of create a friend and a community in a nexus just from his essays <hes> no one else will be as good at writing as p._g. But i was over the bar i was able to continue that like i was well. Well aware it was worse but it was good enough to keep the funnel going. <hes> and you know like you can write something in a couple of hours and get hundred thousands of people to read it and many of them complied why <hes> or later do or come. We're gonna waste company and so that was like <hes> like one of the important important jobs. I think of the person writing why cease to be able to write reasonably well about startups and was was it important as c._e._o. Of looped <hes> no no not at all yeah so again. There were all these like things that i studied college

Sam Altman Stanford President Trump Altman Altman Microsoft Chief Executive Officer Christina Warren Nashville Kevin Scott Facebook Reporter Founder Luke. Programmer Physicist
"kevin scott" Discussed on Behind The Tech with Kevin Scott

Behind The Tech with Kevin Scott

04:49 min | 2 years ago

"kevin scott" Discussed on Behind The Tech with Kevin Scott

"Thanks for joining us for behind the tech. You just heard Microsoft CTO? Kevin Scott, speaking with Jaren linear. So what really struck me about that conversation was how far ahead some of the visions for virtual reality were, you know, decades ago, and how similar those visions are to what we're actually seeing in the market now with both VR and with augmented reality. Yes is really fascinating thing with true visionaries like Jaren he saw this thing like way way way way before anyone else did. And it's not just the the vision of sort of seeing this thing that one day might be. But just the. His consistency and Tonette city over time to sort of stick with the vision. It's not like he's wavered like he's been doing this for almost four decades now and like he's had this vision. And he's kept pushing, you know, episodically for like this very very long period of time. And like, I find that almost is amazing is the vision itself just the willingness to believe in something for that long into just push against it as hard as you can so interesting to mean when she was talking about how he's getting pitches for certain uses of VR, and he's like, oh, yeah, I had a paper kind of predicting nad thirty years ago, and and he was right in as you said he continued to push and be committed to that. Which is just kind of incredible. You know, and sometimes the frustrating thing with technology is timing matters way, more than you would like to think like unfortunate. We like vision and persistence aren't enough like sometimes like the technology that you need and like the Sediq conditions in ecosystem, you need to exist. In order for something to become broadly adopted by by whole bunch of people is just just in there. And it's it's really interesting like it's sort of you can almost see it right now that like, you know, mixed reality augmented reality, you know, like the whole grand, you know, the whole Graham virtual reality vision like might actually be within reach now. But it's like taking all of that time. I it's so true. I mean, as you said, you know, Microsoft just showed off the new version of the hollow lens, and and we it feels so much closer. And yet it's still somewhat. You know, you can eat even has see what Jared vision has been on this time, and we seem to just be within grasp. It's really exciting. The other thing that sort of. Fascinating about his his vision for VR is on the one hand. I think it is a very deeply technical thing. But I think, you know, as you heard in the conversation, the thing, perhaps even more than technology that motivated, it is like this, very, you know, humane. Desire that he had like to connect with other people. And that's something that you don't always get from folks who are trying to do something with like, deeply, deeply deeply technical technology. No, you're you're exactly right. It kinda reminds me a little bit of temperatures in the worldwide bub, which has a similar thing. And that's you know, celebrating an anniversary right now too. And it's like, you're right. A lot of times. It's rare to see these intersections between these highly technical things, and these also highly social and personal and deeply connective for sometimes like, those are the things that like have the biggest impact on the world is like you've got this desire to you know, sort of facilitate more of our own humanity to like empower and a noble like individuals and groups and like those technologies can be really really profoundly transformative. I mean, I would actually argue I think that. What you just described is kind of the basis for the most transformative technologies we're talking about radio or television or transistors or anything else. Is is finding a way to facilitate humanity for sure. All right. So I think we're out of time for this episode. But we're going to meet another icon on our next show. That's right. I'll sit down with Reid Hoffman investor author and entrepreneur someone I consider a true friend. Join us next time won't behind the tack hem. Please help spread the word tell your friends your colleagues and all of the and non geeks. You know, see you next time.

Jared vision Jaren Kevin Scott Microsoft CTO Tonette Reid Hoffman Graham four decades thirty years one hand one day
Danielle Feinberg: Pixars Academy Award-winning computer scientist

Behind The Tech with Kevin Scott

04:57 min | 2 years ago

Danielle Feinberg: Pixars Academy Award-winning computer scientist

"Oh my God. What an amazing computer scientists. And what are truly interesting career? She's had. Yeah. I really loved her advice to the next generation of telling girls or wizar- anybody else out there that they don't have to choose between arts and computer science that the answer can just be. Yes, you can do both. But to send that you said earlier is that everything that we do is going to be shaped by technology, and it will be yet. Another really interesting tool and everyone's arsenal and great that we have folks like Daniel helping to inspire that next generation cannot stress enough the importance of role models in helping kids be able to just imagine themselves. Whether they actually are going to choose particular career path not but just giving them the material where they can sort of magin the possibility of them doing something is so value. Lable especially for younger kids, you were talking about how you're kind of initial interest in computers came from gaming, and you thought that you were going to be studying graphics. You said you weren't creative enough to wanna do that. But you're still artistic you still do photography and things like that. Have you found that what you do as an engineer shapes the art that you in vice versa? I think not accidentally lots of computer programmers tend to get involved in photography and on the one hand, very titan. Whole thing you have to sort of understand how you camera works and apertures exposure times and ice owes and all of this stuff, but it's also a fairly artistic thing. And you have to be thinking about what it is that you're trying to convey to someone who's going to see if Ota graph that you take, and I just sort of love things that blend those two sides of your brain, the creative human side and the technical nerdy side. Not that nerds aren't humans? Because there is kinda this notion that a lot of people have where you don't need the right rain. You don't need creativity. When it comes to code. I personally completely disagree, but your perspective, and where you feel like creativity programming engineering intersect. I think there's a huge amount of overlap. The good thing about programming is I think it offers a safe haven for lots of different types of folks to be able to make really great contributions. I've always thought of code as craft borderline art. They're certainly deeply technical parts about coding, and in many cases in coding solving. A problem is more clear cut than putting out a piece of art it either gets the bits to the user in less than a second or not it either solve a particular. Algorithm. Problem inside of the constraints of a problem or does. But in writing the code itself, there's a lot that can be fairly artistic so for folks who never looked at co before it can be almost literary the difference between elegantly written code and sort of poorly. Written code is almost the difference between Finnegans wake and the scribblings of a five year old trying to learn language for the first time at all is just an incredible difference in like how programmers choose to express the solution to a particular problem. That's a great thing that can be in some cases, the interesting part of the job is the care to craft and detail that you take with the thing that you're doing for me tribute a lot of that not that I will claim to ride the world's most elegant code, but my grandfather and my father were both in construction. And my grandfather was a great craftsman. He cared about every little detail of the. Things that he was building. And even though on the surface coating is very different from building a house. Actually when you look at it. Many many many more similarities than there are differences. Definitely because things need to be done a certain way to work together. But you can also have a lot of freedom to build that house. However, you want and you're talking about some of the constraints that are in code before that something's going to work or it's not I think that kind of opens up artistic possibilities too. When you're forced into sometimes even certain constraints that can force people to be come more creative and more to stick. What would they decide to build? And also, sometimes when you're coding, you're building a system, you can put little flourishes in there that are incredibly satisfying. And you may be the only person who knows that they're they're, you know, the same way that a stone Smith might carve neck stra little thing into something. And she may be the only person in the world who knows that that thing. Is there but incredibly satisfying? I love it. So once again, it's been great chatting

Finnegans Wake Engineer Daniel Smith Five Year One Hand
"kevin scott" Discussed on Behind The Tech with Kevin Scott

Behind The Tech with Kevin Scott

03:44 min | 3 years ago

"kevin scott" Discussed on Behind The Tech with Kevin Scott

"Hi everyone welcome to behind the tack i'm your host kevin scott chief technology officer for microsoft in this podcast we're going to get behind the tack we'll talk with some of the people who made our modern tech world possible and understand what motivated them to create what they did so join me to maybe learn a little bit about the history of computing and get a few behind the scenes insights into what's happening today stick around in this episode of behind the tech will meet anders heilsberg anders has always been one of my coding heroes he built turbo pascal borland which is the tool that i use to become a real software engineer at borland he had a long career where he was chief architect of delphine addition to the turbo pascal tools and eventually moved over to microsoft where he helped create c sharp is the lee language designer and today spends his time as the court of l peron type script anders has had a thirty five year career building development tools that software developers love and we're going to learn how he's done that today behind the tack so welcome in my first guest on this debut pie kasriel thanks for being willing to experiment you were calculated first choice because i think i've told you this before but i learned pergram when i was twelve years old my entry was you know basic and sixty five o to assembly language z eighty assembly language i real programming i ever did was on pascal i went to a science and technology high school and took intro to cs class and turbo pascal five five was the tool i don't think i would have chosen a career in computer science if it hadn't been for that sort of confluence thing in a way you're responsible for my career that's awesome the main reason i wanted to have you on the show is this must be the case for a huge number of folks and we'll get into your journey as an engineer but like what made you decide that you wanted to build programming in development tools because that's sort of been you're in tire career has been doing it for more than thirty five years now yeah kinda scared think back and it's such a long time ago now right i mean a world and industry there wasn't really an industry even you know he was so different i mean indian distri got started probably into early eighties but i got started coding in high school back in the late seventies probably was trying to think back seventy eight or seventy yes eight and we're you the type of tanker where you were building little programming languages no no so i was born grew up in denmark and i went to high school outside of copenhagen and it was one of the first high schools to offer students access to a computer yep what was the computer that was an old hp twenty one hundred it was called it had thirty two k affair core memory you could literally open it and see the fair cores it was amazing paper tape reader and then after a while they got a fourteen inch one megabyte hard drive wow was absolutely state of the art it has huge it was enormous at the read write head on that thing is gigantic magnet everything was so primitive you could program it and we put that poor computer through so much torture you know trying to make music by moving the read write head on the hard drive vibrate the whole table you know it was yeah yeah so that was a very hands on introduction to computing.

chief technology officer kevin scott microsoft thirty five years thirty five year fourteen inch one megabyte thirty two k twelve years
"kevin scott" Discussed on Behind The Tech with Kevin Scott

Behind The Tech with Kevin Scott

02:34 min | 3 years ago

"kevin scott" Discussed on Behind The Tech with Kevin Scott

"Going to. In these podcasts episodes, we're going to get behind the Tak. We're going to talk with some of the people that have made our modern technological world possible and understand what motivated them to do, what they did. They had a great idea. They have passion about particular thing. They did it and it benefited all of us and this really awesome way. Shouldn't we care about that. I think history is valuable in a ton of different ways like helping you not get too damned excited over the thing that you've just invented that you really didn't invent because it's been invented ten times already. And if you knew that maybe you could have saved yourself just a little bit of work. I love for developers of all ages to listen. So people who are early in their career, learn a little bit about the history of the industry and maybe get some insight and perspective on what it means to be a really great engineer, and wow, it's great that I can see this person who, and a whole bunch of ways sort of like me maybe that inspires me to go off and do something. Awesome. I think they're also bunch of folks like me where it's going to be all kinds of the stall, Jack. Yeah, just God. Remember that. The walk down memory lane. What I want people to get out of the show is inspiration. I want them to be a little more informed about the history of computing and what's happening now behind the scenes. They might not otherwise the and I think all of that's important because technologies such a huge part of all of their daily lives. That even those of us who aren't engineers should understand a little bit more about what's going on behind the tax. That is a few using our lives. I'm Kevin Scott chief technology officer at Microsoft. In my new podcast, I'll be talking with really cool people who have done and are still building really amazing technology. So sign up in tune in so we can eek out this summer. He sure to rate review grad to the show on apple podcasts. Google play or wherever you get your podcast.

chief technology officer Google apple engineer Kevin Scott Jack Microsoft