18 Burst results for "Kevin Dishes"

"kevin dishes" Discussed on The Cycling Podcast

The Cycling Podcast

03:56 min | 4 months ago

"kevin dishes" Discussed on The Cycling Podcast

"Kevin dish didn't want to stop but there was a distinct shortage of tigers. If ailing worth couldn't revive the glory years could anyone a move back to kernan quickstep where he spent three of his peak years looked a long shot if only because it was the sentimental auction. Patrick lefevere it doesn't do sentimental when asked he said my heart says yes my head says no and then in early december rich crackle with a new show because several of these things. We're gonna talk about in this episode. First of all mark calendar. She was turning to coney quickstep he wrote for them from two thousand thirteen to two thousand fifteen when they were amiga pharma quickstep and then ethics.

Kevin dish Patrick lefevere kernan
"kevin dishes" Discussed on THEMOVE

THEMOVE

04:51 min | 4 months ago

"kevin dishes" Discussed on THEMOVE

"Eating went up on salaam in ripon. They're getting went through many theflag. I totally get that low income who shuki carrying st importantly import put on narine. Intra your high about whether the menaka done. You'll get those. But i i land film into coronary got if it is a bookie takata dome which education on mccoy on danya egan's the z. Adkison sony got really michael matters. Do you make to get some opponents. Cerqueira san cecilio cement emulator. Not alexa gallon pruitt journal electoral but conrad c. n. Nomad euskera under i swim in. Ict boom to kevin dish gone to our print. Evalu- punters inquiry. Could really get to your gender gendai says the blue moon. Shanna cook cannot have another letter. The latest data matter whereas he has lost interest cup up with see them when the up at all. No they are still not learning the dos. Monsanto down to use google really seven. Guess to win. The gun is toys. Are you hooking dobley anoint. The data and i liked that. Bob can cannot fatty acid better. We don't meet our those said if in your movin- e or really me may may miss open your in protest for their seat out. A a goal duke. I'll maximo beto not getting governors Sokoto in compostela sales elitist nothing will give sprint dot of discipline. they really sarah up on financial. Continue the meena. Say will not will tell them on. But i'll go. Roddick is on. Angels joke started komo. Coriolis from kisii Cooperation komo in which is big data. I would ask. Your lawyer says basically some simple puzzle. Dineh group On winter economic case boyega pork montana's to scuppered interest. Bring my lap yosano but see below. Premadasa manas to mastercard eighty. They will not pursue Apparel look you could okay with them. Not important mission. He turned up. Oh gotcha to okello. H porter bundler pool by nine rallies. Allow the the market attention and institute of lancia. See your call. Borelli are are. They must have get us. Oil stunt nassir presser restore democracy. Chorus e. Musleh lemba avocado gap year. Nasty nic ordinarily as impress. You're not gonna eat. The estate got worse star Your schubert. Mosca saran suet. Mosca saran wrap edo him mono people getting. I meant the same foci. Esto in are not up graham welter ekori impera theralac ira dude i. E circa dollars splinter center square with up us out a canoe Masek speaker won't bring news really trying a unanimous it. Daniel put him blush. Scu in william courtney gazsa. Now with up and romania in phoenix has come in early in nam. Bus carrera's boom. Does there mccurry your community leon. Okita ceo internet data convenience of friends. What am i giving on the left. Who get up and get them. You're know that those lower the super complete look.

shuki narine danya egan Cerqueira san cecilio alexa gallon pruitt conrad c kevin dish Shanna cook maximo beto Sokoto ripon salaam kisii Dineh group Mosca saran mccoy Premadasa manas okello Monsanto compostela
"kevin dishes" Discussed on The Cycling Podcast

The Cycling Podcast

05:28 min | 5 months ago

"kevin dishes" Discussed on The Cycling Podcast

"Good car in julian. so obviously fostered was Was a good good sir. That such a break goal. But i mean the odds of kevin dish. Winning a sprint here would probably be higher than julian. Allah philippe even winning from smallish group on these roads so I mean what were you thinking. Back in. the bunch was ever a moment where thought maybe will work. No not at all. I mean we have the world. Champion team wasn't a breakway. He suddenly very great chance to win. Such state On the same time We also just have aid riotous and We can't afford to to spend a lot of energy everyday so We have to pick fights and Today was a day where It was good for us to rest a bit and let. Let's see what you create off or out of a breakaway. And lastly we're thinking about the record. The mark cavendish doesn't like to talk about but We think it might be on the savage challenge tomorrow may be a sprint finishing carcassonne. Yeah think some miracle chance for sprint. That's for sure I think also stationed nineteen and twenty. One it's an option so I think we have some good Possibilities left in this race. Was he climbing yesterday on one to he com pretty well. I mean compared to a lot of other guys I was quite impressed about how he's he's been climbing climbing in this tour He's doing really well and I'm not concerned for him. Interesting from merck. They're talking about the quickstep not wanting to do the chasing on their own. Obviously if they go onto the front they would have been setting themselves up for the whole stage. My point to more of america was julian felipe fleet from that group of thirteen as brilliant as he as as clauses years on a basically a sprint. Finish would he win against those riders. Would he be able to get into the small enough split. I wasn't sure as it turned out. He he didn't he'd been off the road most of the day you know. He's done a lot of work in this race helping combination leading our closing things down as well so i wanted you know. Perhaps mark coming himself didn't fancy it today. One to a slightly easier day. I mean i am sped the team all that work but then again flipside of is. If you don't want to do any chasing today of these two days would have been the one to do it. Because it's only one hundred and fifty nine kilometers tomorrow. He's over two hundred kilometers. As you say francois a sprint carcassone is not given very rarely engine a sprint. Breakaway is the favourite tomorrow. They're not likely to want to close down everything on a two hundred kilometers stage. So it's an interesting. He just doesn't want the record. Come on too much. Respect for the guy would come name but yeah i think. Another factor an unimportant one. And it's interesting because we kept saying saying everybody keeps saying that team new emory's okay a little bit better than last year. The not controlling the dipoto tone and the did actually control the chase today and my impression and if you look at louis chasing leading the chase of the portal all day it was you a emirates so obviously try said look. We have thirteen guys in from almost every team is there you know okay. You're going to have a stage win. Whatever you know. let's put. We had to climbs onto yesterday. I kind of cracks. We will never know how much did but and my impression is that is asserted himself as a boss. A little bit and said look. Let's take it easy. It's windy we will be named quickly the think of your hotel in the nice shower and massage and let these guys go for it and leave me alone. That's my impression. So the track charted. They all try to shed today. Yeah and i guess they with exceptional asleep. They did. Maybe have a slightly easier day. Other the writers hate that when you say that. Because i'm sure it was so quite hard but yeah i mean this frenetic. Everyone panicking about now. He's too because it meant through the process of the break forming the way it did it meant a big engines in their powerful writers. And they weren't they weren't just breakaway hopefuls. They were strong writers and so that also makes it harder to bring back but one two five six minutes. Seven minutes sent a conscious decision. Not to chase that and say we're not we're giving up a state when mark cavendish giving sprinting legs must have been confident of pulling pulling in a victory. I mean you know. He's still sprinting. Very well as far as we know yesterday will have been tough but as we heard from mccoo. He thinks she's climbing pretty well. So really difficult one to kind of understand. Why why they didn't go for it. I guess because it's a hundred and twenty kilometers to go when the decision has to be made. I either had to react then because once. He went to eleven minutes. Francois we said well that's even. If they go on the front now they might bring it down get it within three or four and then it would have been a real taxing chase so better to let it go. Maybe we're on the road and a check. The best place writer in the in g c and there was surgery now and it was fifteen minutes down. So obviously he was in everybody's interest before you remember..

sprint kevin dish julian julian felipe mark cavendish philippe merck francois america mark louis mccoo Francois
But Why Live: Poetry

But Why: A Podcast for Curious Kids

06:34 min | 1 year ago

But Why Live: Poetry

"Oscar is ten and lives in Bethlehem Pennsylvania and he told us he wrote this poem for Mother's Day bike rides with Mama another scrape. My knees keep donating bloody skin to the sidewalk. Here comes Mama keeping a straight face even though I know she must be laughing inside because it's not the first time I ride my bike into a fire hydrant since we took off the training wheels. I've been living on the edge the edge of sidewalk the edge of Aggressee Hill. The Japan nerves no longer our arms on my shoulder while I ride but she is always there. I remember clapping when I wrote up to the mailbox. You're doing it. She cheered. That was three years ago now. Whenever WE GONE by Christ's we travel miles. It's our thing on narrow streets. She leads the way otherwise. We're side by side even uphill in those. She's not holding my shoulders like she did when I was seven. I know I will always have balanced because of her. That's what a mother does to ride my bike with Mama to tell her without words that I love her Oscar. I love that poem. I Bet your mother was so so happy to get it. Here's a poem from Cassia. Who's seven and lives in Chatham on Tour Ontario? Her poem is called name is waterfall. I walk slowly down the rocks. My eyes are big whitish blue. I carry a bubble of water by breath salty. My touches software misty. I moved fast and sneaky voices. Smooth soft common scratchy. Right name is my name is waterfall casio. That is so beautiful all right. Let's get into more poems. We have more of you who are calling in to read some poems on air and some of you may have questions about poems and poetry that you'd like to share with us as well and I want to bring in our guide for the our Ted. Shy Ted is known as the poetry guy around here in Vermont and beyond. He's been teaching poetry. Two Kids for more than twenty years and some of you listening might have been about to have a school event with Ted shy before your classes got canceled so lucky us. He's with us today. Ted I Jane. I'm so excited to talk poetry with you. Even more thrilled than you. This is such a cool honor to be on your awesome show. Oh thank you thank you but I'm going to start with a really tough question for you. Although I think it's one you've probably answered many many times. So Ted when we think about poems some poems rhyme some poems. Don't some have a few words and then skip to the next line. Some have lines that run together. Some poems are designed to be read on the page others are designed to be spoken and heard a loud some poems follow rules about form and structure. Once you know the rules. Some poems still break them. Some poems are very very short but some like the epic poetry of homer are as long as a chapter book and have characters and plot like a novel would so ted. What is poetry? That's a hard question and you listed so many different ways because that's what homes are. There are lots of different things to me. A poem is a small mostly small. It's focused it's laser focused on one important thing in your life. Something you feel really strongly about and it's sort of like if if kids live in the northeast and especially in Vermont. They know that Maple Syrup for example is something we do here. We make here. And when you make Maple Syrup you take lots and lots of Sap from the maple tree and you have to boil it down and it takes forty drops of maple sap to make one delicious drop of Maple Syrup that dances on your tongue. And it's kind of a process that everybody has to take this long mostly long process of sort of distilling boiling down your thoughts until it becomes a really important night and idea and it doesn't have to take any particular shape. That's the cool thing about poems. A rules are super flexible. So but so if a poem can be anything if you're writing one. Oh that's a good question. Well it's sort of an open thing you. There's so many different shapes and sizes of poems but it is something that you know in your heart. You've written something. Like Oscar was writing about such detail and living I love the way he described living on the edge and Cossio filled with details about her voice and their breath is and it's looking at things really really carefully and so did I answer your question. Not really because there isn't there isn't really an answer. Poems take so many different forms but they're not stories there even though Oscar kind of told story. It's it's really just a focus little expression of something super important so those epic poems and epic poets like homer and you know the the Odyssey and the Iliad are those really kind of different than what we consider modern poems. I think so. I have a hard time There aren't too many poets that long stuff these days and back when they wrote those they didn't even write them down. Had people who memorize like and they would share it for many many days. Twenty four seven without stopping so that was kind of an unusual story type of poem and epic Narrative Poem. And fortunately there aren't. Most people writes shorter stuff and I certainly do myself. I'm kids. Maybe that's a good assignment for you. See if you can just recite a poem. Twenty four seven. See what you think about that. Maybe maybe you can tell them that. Ted Shy told you you should do it. Let's get to some poems. That kids are sending us and we have lots of kids calling in Ted who WanNa read their poems allowed and this is so exciting because I love it when are able to read their own poems but we got a found poem that was sent to us by the common dish town elementary sixth grade class they actually wrote this palm on zoom. They're having video conference meetings and they focused on things to do outside so each student put a line in the chat box in their video conference and hit send at the very same time and this is the poem that resulted watching the birds. That land on my feet feeder going hiking riding my bike bright orange caterpillar under the leaves. I breathe in air running down the sidewalk as fast as I can smelling the bright tulips growing. Love it outside. That's pretty good for palm that everybody hit send on at the same time. Don't you all say the ending? The last line is the perfect line for that yeah. Nothing's no kidding. Thank you for that. Kevin dish sixth-graders.

TED Ted Shy Mama Oscar Vermont Ted I Jane Aggressee Hill Japan Bethlehem Pennsylvania Kevin Dish Cassia Chatham Ontario Cossio
"kevin dishes" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:47 min | 2 years ago

"kevin dishes" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The plant breeding route and James stales response to that there's some exceptionally good breeding programs going on in the world. But you don't end up with Kevin Nash. You end up with something different to Kevin dish. And so if we want to replace Kennedy's with something probably very, very different will probably get that, from the conventional braiding preference. So if you wanna have the Kevin dish in the future, if you wanna have Kevin dish in twenty years time that probably going to be genetically modified that probably gonna be Jane edited that makes it sound as if the Kevin dish as we know it may well be headed for extinction, depending on the banana, companies decisions and the public's response to genetic modification so four the billions of people who eat trillions of bananas, a great many of them, Kevin dish. How panic should they be? We the industry would say this Penick the will run. But what about the cabinet banana? Okay. What I think we're going to have to probably confront is actually having more varieties of been available in the future, as we protect the farming of bananas. We're going to have to get used to how we can actually grow and commercialize and the new the districts for different bananas. The prospect of exporting several different kinds of bananas, would be an adjustment for the industry. Of course, for consumers less standardization might mean higher prices. But the prospect of finding several varieties of banana in a grocery store would hardly be unsettling considering how many varieties of apples and grapes,.

Kevin dish Kevin Nash James stales Kennedy Jane twenty years
"kevin dishes" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:06 min | 2 years ago

"kevin dishes" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Whether genetically modified, Kevin dish bananas could survive Panama disease. Remember once Panama disease struck the soil remains contaminated with the fungus. So we put this. This chain into the single cells and grew bananas back in two thousand twelve they began field trials that would last a few years, planting, both genetically modified and non GM bananas in the Humpty doo soil, would they find? So what we found is a number of things may found that the non GM bananas with between one hundred percent of the dating fictive after three years, so that does as was having pretty big impact. Okay. That's important to know that Panama disease was still in the soil. Which men if a genetically modified plant survived. It was surviving Panama disease. So how did the genetically modified plants do Dale and his team planted, six, different lines of GM Cavendish plants? One of those lines raise the Jamie, putting John. So Taylor line three appeared to be completing me under the threes. None of the plants infected a toll, so sensually. But we've done is we've taken a Jane from wild banana, that he's resistant to trouble the rightful. We've taken that one banana Jane, and we've gone to put it into cavity. And by doing that we've, we've generated resistance to the disease. This was amazing. Banana news RJ to line three was a clear winner. Some the other genetic modifications did well to three of the other lines had relatively high levels resistance way. There was twenty percent lace plants either infected Dade, which was to us, critical outcome rarely get that sort of percentage, the so two things they tell me a pretty excited about that. And there was something else to be excited about the other really important thing we found was that the Jane will be put in this GT Jane not only occasion, these vol bananas. But it also Kazin, Kevin, it just doesn't Blick very well. And Senate textually really, really important. Because there's a new technology known as gene, editing. It's different. Jane modifications, gene, editing. These we can go into the DNA and just tweet chains that are already there, such very, very close to some natural processes, that's why now starting to, to figure out how we can tweak the Jane in Kevin Daesh to make them resistant, but actually adding any new James toll this type of gene, editing is made possible by something known as crisper which as I'm sure you know stands for clustered regularly space short Powell drunk repeats. We spoke with one of Christopher's inventors, the biochemist..

Jane Panama GM Kevin dish GM Cavendish John Humpty doo Kevin Daesh Senate Dade Taylor Christopher Jamie Kazin Dale Kevin Powell James one hundred percent
"kevin dishes" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:03 min | 2 years ago

"kevin dishes" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The world's largest banana companies his title at Chiquita was CEO of bananas, pineapples seriously. That's the title as for the bananas in the world. It's the fourth most important crop of two rice, wheat and corn. The economic value generated by the banana some fifty two billion. There are some four hundred million people that rely on bananas for a staple food staple source of income, there are many countries, they did not have bananas. They would go showed a food the Kevin dish banana accounts for just under fifty percent of global banana production but again, almost one hundred percent of exported bananas and Ecuador alone accounts for more than a quarter of all, Kevin dish exports. If you produce something, and very, very large numbers than you bring down the per unit or average cost for the early American banana companies the transition from luxury fruit to mass import was a strategic move. I think the key to the strategy our understanding the strategy was to realize that they made more money from having a smaller margin on a much larger volume than they would have had continuing to treat bananas, a luxury item and how did they accomplish this? Consider the history of Chiquita. Data started way back in the eighteen hundreds and was a company that I went public believe it or not in nineteen ninety three back, then it was known as the United fruit company and United free happen to have the largest fleet of ships in the western hemisphere only the US navy had a larger fleet of ships. In fact, the navy would requisition some United ships during World War Two, but in peacetime. Well, they use those fleets to move bananas to the United States, very, very efficiently. And as always the case, practically always the case, the major beneficiaries of this officiency were in fact, consumers prices were slashed and within a few years bananas, were no longer a luxury item. They were instead of fruit of, of poor people, the first food that a lot of poor babies aid after weaning where mashed bananas today's. Before canned baby food, it would be hard to overstate here the role of the United fruit company. What we have here is a company that she created of an auto industry. It was called the octopus because it had a near monopoly on production. United fruit definitely had its tentacles wrapped around this industry. Most of United's bananas were grown in the Spanish speaking, countries to our south Costa Rica, Honduras, and other Central American nations happen to be an ideal setting for raising bananas for the US market ideal because of the climate. Yes, but also because land and labour were both very, very cheap. So American consumers were winning United fruit was really winning. And what about those Central American countries keep in mind, they were largely undeveloped at the time. Foreign companies led by United fruit were willing to make the investment. Clear, put an infrastructure and so forth to start producing bananas on a massive scale for the US market. But only if they were awarded vast tracts of land and largely exempted from taxation so that gave them the dominant position. That's what led to banana republics. Yes before it was a clothing store, banana Republic meant something, very different. Essentially a fragile country, whose economy and often political leadership were propped up by an export crop. And when a banana Republic acted against the interests of their banana, overlords, things could get ugly. Consider the case of Guatemala in the early nineteen fifties president Cobo Arbams, former army Colonel was pursuing a land reform program that would have reclaimed property from the banana companies and this anger. United fruit United fruit, definitely wanted to see our Vince go United fruit lobbied. The US congress to act against Guatemala, and Arbenz was ultimately ousted in a coup, led by the CIA drying, simple line of causation. United fruit US government, overthrow of Guatemala doesn't capture all of what was going on? The US government had other reasons why it was alarmed at some of what our Vince was doing apart from the land reform. Specifically the American government was worried that Guatemala was sliding toward communism and Allianz with the Soviet Union. This was a common theme of the Cold War era. We're not talking only Guatemala here in any case..

United States United fruit company banana Republic Guatemala Chiquita CEO United American government Kevin dish Ecuador Vince Costa Rica Allianz Soviet Union Honduras Cobo Arbams CIA
"kevin dishes" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:30 min | 2 years ago

"kevin dishes" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Doing that we, we've. Generated resistance to the disease. This was amazing. Banana news RJ to line three was a clear winner. Some the other genetic modifications did well to three of the other lines had relatively high levels resistance way. There was twenty percent less plants author infected Dade which was to us critical outcome. Rarely do you get that sort of percentage success in the Celtic things? They tell me a pretty excited about that. And there was something else to be excited about the other really important thing we found was that the Jane be put in this is Jane. None unle occasion, these vol bananas. But it also Kazin. Kevin, which it just doesn't Blick very well. Unsanitary actually really, really important because there's a new technology known as gene, editing. It's different attain modifications, gene, editing. Its way we can go into the DNA and just tweet Jane already. They're such very, very close to some natural prices way. Now starting to, to figure out how we can tweak the Jane in Kevin dish. To make them resistant. But that actually adding any new James toll this type of gene, editing is made possible by something known as crisper, which is I'm sure, you know stands for clustered regularly space short pound dramatic repeats. We spoke with one of Christopher's inventors, the biochemist. Jennifer Dowden back in two thousand seventeen for an episode called evolution accelerated at its core. The crisper gene, editing technology is, is now giving human beings, the opportunity to change the course of evolution and human beings have been affecting evolution for a long time. Right. But now there's a technology that allows very specific changes to be made to DNA that gives us a new level of control. Crisper is terrific. And so, yes, we are using crisper at the moment. So this would seem to be super amazing. Banana news. There are. Potentially two ways to save the Kevin dish from Panama disease by using crisper to tweak its genetic code or by. Introducing new resistant genes from other bananas. Either way, the banana industry must be thrilled by the solutions that James Dale is proposing right? We asked Andrew byles, former CEO of bananas and pineapples at Chiquita dream stale. He is working on laurel GM approach. That, of course, is not so acceptable societally, son. Some people will say, yes, I don't mind you think about, if occasion, others will say they do indeed, a sizable fraction of consumers in the US, and especially in Europe, considered genetically modified, crops to be risky despite assurances to the contrary from scientists, like James stale. And I think that's way we filed we really haven't got the message across this one of the most incredibly highly regulated technologies in the world. So the sorts of things have we got through to demonstrate safeties amazing. The objection to GMO crops is also curious in light of the fact that traditional plant breeding without which many, many fewer of us would be alive is itself. A form of genetic modification, Jennifer Dowden. Again, I think it's important for, for people to appreciate that for. First of all, that humans have been modifying plants for a long time, you know, genetically, and for literally thousands of years. Exactly. Thank goodness. And you realize, well, I'm glad there's plant breeding, but, you know, the way that that's been done. Traditionally is to use chemicals or even radiation to introduce genetic changes into seeds, and then plant breeders will select for, for plants that have traits that they want the opportunity here with gene, editing. In plants is to be able to make changes precisely not to drag along traits that you don't want, really the difference between what we're doing and conventional breeding. He should I move fastened..

Jane Kevin dish James Dale Jennifer Dowden Kazin Andrew byles US Christopher Europe Panama CEO GM twenty percent
"kevin dishes" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:03 min | 2 years ago

"kevin dishes" Discussed on KQED Radio

"But there's an even more powerful explanation for why bananas are so cheap standardization. So the advantage of having the confidence is that it is really monoculture that you can actually grow it consistently. Indra byles, again, formerly of Chiquita. You know, it's going to take to nine months to come to fruition and you know, how that banana is going to function when it's transported. Refrigerated cargo, you know how it's going to be form in the rifling rooms in the country destination. And you know how it's going to be form and hold up on the retail shelf, and it's not just that nearly every banana grown for export is Kevin dish. It's every Kevin dish banana, is genetically the same as the next cabin dish. From a business perspective. That's ideal the ultimate in quality control from an agricultural perspective. However, there's no diversity. So this. Each plant is the same age has the same resistance to disease spreads, as you'll recall, the grow Michelle banana was wiped out years ago by Panama disease or technically FU cerium wilt, it's caused by a fungus that infects the plants roots, and eventually kills the whole plant and leaves the soil, unfit for future banana growth, the stream of Panama disease that killed off the grow. Michelle was known as TR one or tropical race one. Now, there's a strain called TR four. That's tacking the Kevin dish. So in the fallen victim to almost the same disease as the grow, Michelle. So what we see is false. Start apparently in Indonesia Philippines. It's devastated crops, there pharma's moved the become bell to all two in the banana.

Michelle banana Kevin dish Indra byles Indonesia Philippines Panama nine months
"kevin dishes" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:06 min | 2 years ago

"kevin dishes" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Fact that they're all imported, you might expect a banana to be much more expensive than those very American apples. And yet, they're not an answer. Typically lesson half the price of apples. In fact, there among the cheapest fruits around how can this be how did an imported luxury item become cheap American staple? Well, let's start here this impart a story of economies of scale, that's the economist Douglas, Southgate, an emeritus professor at Ohio State University, he started studying bananas because, well, the short answer is that my wife is from Ecuador, which happens to be the leading export bananas and has been for the last sixty five years, even though the country's no larger than the state of Colorado bananas are grown in many warm countries around the world in the eastern and western hemispheres bananas are far and away, the most widely traded fruit of route or vegetable, basically there. One hundred thirty five countries that grow bananas and their one hundred forty five million tons of been on this produced every year. That's eight hundred billion bananas and that's Andrew byles until recently worked at Chiquita, one of the world's largest banana companies his title at Chiquita was CEO of bananas, and pineapples. Seriously? That's the title as for the bananas in the world. It's the fourth most important crop of two rice, wheat and cold. The economic value generated by the banana indices. Some fifty two billion. There is some four hundred million people that rely on bananas, FRA staple food staple source of income, there are many countries that did not have been on this. They would go showed a food the Kevin dish banana accounts for just under fifty percent of global banana production but again, almost one hundred percent of exported bananas and Ecuador alone accounts for more than a quarter of all, Kevin dish exports. If you produce something, and very, very large numbers than you bring down the per unit or average cost for the early American banana companies the transition from luxury fruit to mass import was a strategic move. I think the key to the strategy our understanding the strategy was to realize that they made more money from having a smaller margin on a much larger volume than they would have had continuing to treat bananas, electorate item and how did they accomplish this? Consider the history of Chiquita. Started way back in the eighteen hundreds and was accompanied that I went public believe it or not in nineteen. Oh, three back, then it was known as the United fruit company and United free happen to have the largest fleet of ships in the western hemisphere only the US navy had a larger fleet of ships. In fact, the navy would requisition some United ships during World War Two, but in peacetime. Well, they use those fleets to move bananas to the United States, very, very efficiently. And as always the case, practically always the case, the major beneficiaries of this officiency were in fact, consumers prices were slashed and within a few years bananas, were no longer a luxury item. They were instead of fruit of poor people, the first food that a lot of poor babies aid after weaning where mashed bananas today's. Before canned baby food, it would be hard to overstate here the role of the United fruit company. What we have here is a company, the created of an auto industry. It was called the octopus because it had a near monopoly on production. United fruit. Definitely had its tentacles wrapped around this industry. Most of United's bananas were grown in the Spanish speaking, countries to our south Costa Rica, Honduras, and other Central American nations happen to be an ideal setting for raising bananas for the US market ideal because of the climate. Yes, but also because land and labour were both very, very cheap. So American consumers were winning United fruit was really winning. And what about those Central American countries keep in mind, they were largely undeveloped at the time. Foreign companies led by United fruit were willing to make the investment to. Clear land, put an infrastructure and so forth to start producing bananas on a massive scale for the US market. But only if they were awarded vast tracts of land and largely exempted from taxation so that gave them the dominant position. That's what led to banana republics. Yes before it was a clothing store, banana Republic meant something, very different. Essentially a fragile country, whose economy and often political.

United fruit company United States Chiquita banana Republic Ecuador Costa Rica Kevin dish Southgate Ohio State University United Colorado Andrew byles CEO Douglas Honduras professor one hundred forty five million one hundred percent
"kevin dishes" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:22 min | 2 years ago

"kevin dishes" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Was amazing. Banana news RJ to line three with a clear winner. Some the other genetic modifications did well to three of the other lines had relatively high levels resistance way. There was twenty percent less plants author infected Dade which was to us Nic critical outcome. Rarely he get that sort of percentage succession, the so two things they tell me a pretty excited about that. And there was something else to be excited about the other really important thing we found was that the Jane will be put in this G I, Jane none unle occasion, these wall bananas. But it does how Kazin Kevin dish. It just doesn't work very well. Unsanitary actually really, really important because there's a new technology known as gene, editing. It's different attained modifications, gene, editing is we can go into the DNA and just tweet genes that are already there, such very, very close to some natural processes. And so that's why we now starting to, to figure out how we can tweak the Jane in Kevin dish. To make them resistant. But that actually adding any new James toll this type of gene, editing is made possible by something known as crisper, which is I'm sure, you know, stands for clustered regularly spaced short Powell dramatic repeats. We spoke with one of Christopher's inventors, the biochemist. Jennifer Dowden back in two thousand seventeen for an episode called evolution accelerated at its core. The crisper gene, editing technology is, is now giving human beings, the opportunity to change the course of evolution and human beings have been affecting evolution for a long time. Right. But now there's a technology that allows very specific changes to be made to DNA that gives us a new level of control. Crisper is terrific. And so, yes, we are using crisper the moment. So this would seem to be super amazing. Banana news. There are. Potentially two ways to save the cabin dish from Panama disease by using crisper to tweak its genetic code or by. Introducing new resistant genes from other bananas. Either way, the banana industry must be thrilled by the solutions that James Dale is proposing. Right. We asked Andrew byles, former CEO of bananas and pineapples at Chiquita dreams Dale, he is working on moral GM approach of that, of course, is not so acceptable societally. So some people will say, I don't mind genetic modification of those will say they do indeed, a sizable fraction of consumers in the US, and especially in Europe, considered genetically modified crops to be risky despite assurances to the contrary from scientists, like James style. And I think that's way we filed we really haven't got the message across. This is one of the most incredibly highly regulated technologies in the world. So the sorts of things have we got through to demonstrate safeties amazing. The objection to GMO crops is also curious in light of the fact that traditional plant breeding without which many, many fewer of us would be alive is itself a form of genetic modification, Jennifer Dowden. Again, I think it's important for, for people to appreciate that, first of all, humans have been modifying plants for on time, genetically, and for this literally thousands of years. Exactly. Thank goodness. And you realize, well, I'm glad there's plant breeding, but, you know, the way that that's been done. Traditionally is to use chemicals or even radiation to introduce genetic changes into seeds, and then plant breeders will select for, for plants that have traits that they want the opportunity here with gene, editing in plants is to be able to make changes. Precisely not to drag along traits that you don't want, really the difference between what we're doing an end conventional breeding he should I move fastened.

James Dale Jennifer Dowden Kevin dish Jane Panama US Christopher Europe Powell Andrew byles CEO GM twenty percent
"kevin dishes" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:36 min | 2 years ago

"kevin dishes" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Was a disease co punchy, top had a long history and has tried to bungee top was caused by a virus. Scientists couldn't find a way to control. And so when the concept of genetic modification kind along, and that was sort of the late eighties. We said, well, this is going to be absolutely perfect for, but Ona's and the reason for that is that the bananas that we ate primarily sterile wild banana seeds are very hard. And so the cabin dish like other banana varieties that people eat has essentially been bred into a seedless sterile condition show, crops, it done have any sage extremely difficult to breed conventionally. So the idea of being able to genetically modify them, and that is to add additional James to two candidates, for instance, which way are interested, same really, really attractive attractive, and for the global banana trade important because the cabin dish like the. Michel before it has rare attributes they robots that travel long distances on there really isn't anything else on the horizon that could now go and replace Kevin dish. There's nothing that you could pull out and say this is going to do what Kevin did after the last outbreak. The new strain of Panama disease emerged in the nineteen ninety s and around about two thousand we decided that this disease, tropical rice, four was kind to be a, a huge problem. And so we set out to look for Jane provide resistance to the disease as part of this research, Dale had a former PHD student out collecting, wild bananas, and the scientist was in Malaysia and happened to see this patch of bananas, which way of growing with everything else had died from tropical vice full, so she and her colleagues collected seeds all those bananas. And I sent them back to straighten James Dale and his team began studying these bananas. And so he said, let's go, and look in the deny of is resistant ones in safely can find the Jane that would provide resistance, and we came up with a number of candidates, James that seem to be working in the resistant sailings, but not in the susceptible savings of one of those look really promising to us. So we took that Jane, and by a process known as Agrobacterium mediated transformation. We put it into another technology, Embry genyk, settles remember, Denic sales suspensions. Some these are we might they sales from Kevin dish. They have the ability to regenerate an entire plant from a single cell and this leads us back to Humpty doo Australia, which had been a fertile site for banana production, but because of the tropic of ice full, it's. Lockdown which made Humpty doo the perfect place to hold the world's first experiment. To see whether genetically modified, Kevin dish bananas could survive Panama disease remember once Panama disease. The struck the soil remains contaminated with the fungus, so we put this chain into these single cells and grew bananas back in two thousand twelve they began field trials that would last a few years, planting, both genetically modified and non GM bananas in the Humpty doo soil, would they find? So what we found is a number of things we found that the non GM bananas with between one hundred percent and edge of why the data infected after three years. So that is as was having pretty big impact. Okay. That's important to know that Panama disease was still in the soil. Which men if a genetically modified plant survived. It was survivor. Panama disease. So how did the genetically modified plants do Dale and his team planted, six, different lines of GM Cavendish plants? One of those lawns raised Jamie putting his G too. So a GI Taylor line three appeared to be completely at the end of three years. None of the plants infected a tool, so sensually. But we've done is we've taken a gene from the wall banana, that he's resistant to Trump. The rights full, we've taken that one banana Jane, and we've gone to put it into cavities and by doing that. We, we've generated resistance to the disease..

Kevin dish James Dale Panama Jane scientist Humpty doo Australia Humpty doo GM Ona Embry genyk GM Cavendish Michel Trump Agrobacterium Malaysia Jamie three years one hundred percent
"kevin dishes" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:06 min | 2 years ago

"kevin dishes" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Fact that they're all imported, you might expect a banana to be much more expensive than those very American apples. And yet, they're not bananas are typically less than half the price of apples. In fact, there among the cheapest fruits around how can this be how did an imported luxury item become cheap American staple? Well, let's start here is in part, a story of economies of scale. That's the economist Douglas Southgate an emeritus professor at Ohio State University, he started studying bananas because, well, the short answer is that my wife is from Ecuador, which happens to be the leading exporter bananas and has been for the last sixty five years, even though the country has no larger than the state of Colorado bananas are grown in many warm countries around the world in the eastern and western hemispheres bananas are far and away, the most widely traded fruit of route or vegetable, basically there. One hundred and thirty five countries, the grove, anonymous one hundred forty five million tons of been on this produced every year. That's eight hundred billion bananas, and that's Andrew byles who until recently worked at Chiquita, one of the world's largest banana companies his title at Chiquita was CEO of bananas, and pineapples seriously. That's the title as for the bananas in the world. It's the fourth most important crop of two rice, wheat and corn. The economic value generated by the banana industry. Some fifty two billion. There is some four hundred million people that rely on bananas, FRA staple food, or staple source of income, there are many countries, they did not have bananas. They would go showed a food the Kevin dish banana accounts for just under fifty percent of global banana production but again, almost one hundred percent of exported bananas and Ecuador alone accounts for more than a quarter of all Cavendish exports, if you produce something, and very, very large numbers than you bring down the per unit or average cost for the early American banana companies the transition from luxury fruit to mass import was a strategic move. I think the key to the strategy or understanding the strategy was to realize that they made more money from having a smaller margin on a much larger volume than they would have had continuing to treat bananas, electorate item and how did they accomplish this? Consider the history of Chiquita. Started way back in the eighteen hundreds and was accompanied that I went public believe it or not in nineteen. Oh, three back, then it was known as the United fruit company and United free happen to have the largest fleet of ships in the western hemisphere only the US navy had a larger fleet of ships. In fact, the navy would requisition some United ships during World War Two, but in peacetime. Well, they use those fleets to move bananas to the United States, very, very efficiently. And as is always the case or practically always the case, the major beneficiaries of this officiency were in fact, consumers prices were slashed and within a few years bananas, were no longer a luxury item. They were instead of fruit of, of poor people, the first food that a lot of poor babies eight after weaning where mashed bananas in the days. Before canned baby food, it would be hard to overstate here the role of the United fruit company. What we have here is a company that she created of an auto industry. It was called the octopus because it had a near monopoly on production. United fruit definitely had its tentacles wrapped around this industry. Most of United's bananas were grown in the Spanish speaking, countries to our south Costa Rica, Honduras, and other Central American nations happened to be an ideal setting for raising bananas for the US market ideal, because of the climate yes, but also because land and labour were both very, very cheap. So American consumers were winning United fruit was really winning. And what about those Central American countries keep in mind, they were largely undeveloped at the time. Foreign companies led by United fruit were willing to make the investment to. Clear land put in infrastructure and so forth to start producing bananas on a massive scale for the US market. But only if they were awarded vast tracts of land and largely exempted from taxation so that gave them the dominant position. That's what led to banana republics. Yes before it was a clothing store, banana Republic meant something, very different. Essentially a fragile country, whose economy and often political.

United States United fruit company Chiquita banana Republic Ecuador Douglas Southgate Costa Rica Ohio State University United Colorado Andrew byles CEO Honduras professor one hundred forty five million one hundred percent sixty five years fifty percent
"kevin dishes" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:59 min | 2 years ago

"kevin dishes" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The fruit from over ripening, but then came steamships and railroads. They just put huge pieces of ice at each end of freight car to try to keep the bananas, cool, and by the nineteen twenties trains, started getting mechanical refrigeration in the nineteen thirties came refrigerated trucks, this new technology at huge impact on food distribution generally made possible the modern meat industry. For instance, it also allowed for the bulk importation of bananas to the United States, the variety that Americans came to know and love was the grow Michel, also known as big Mike. And it was a large banana and it had thick skin. So it didn't bruise easily. There are more than a thousand banana varieties in the world. But Jenkins says a lot of other banana varieties. Don't travel. Well, either they're small or they have been skins, or for one reason, or another didn't grow well in one thousand nine hundred Americans were eating fifteen million bunches of bananas, a year, just a decade later forty million. So it was very bad news. When a fungus emerged devastating the plantations in Latin America, this fungus came to be called Panama disease. It was I noticed in the eighteen hundreds by the nineteen fifties. It was wiping out the grow Michel. And so what the fruit companies did was they move onto another country by a lot more land and groping in until the disease caught up with them and they had to move on. But the disease couldn't be outrun. The grow Michelle was doomed. So they changed to provide a call the cabinet banana, the Kevin dish was not susceptible to the disease. Wiped out the grow, Michelle. So the Kevin dish is the banana most of us eat today. It accounts for ninety nine percent of the banana export market, the last grow Michelle's in the US were sold in nineteen sixty five. So our banana is not the same banana, our elders. Eight, I've never had a grow, Michelle not old enough. So I'm not really sure how much difference there was some people who did eat the grow, Michelle say it was more, delicious than the cabin dish. But the Kevin dish has done very well. Thank you. It is the most popular fruit in both the US and Europe, even though the vast majority of them must be imported, the EU imports around six million tons of Cavendish bananas each year or one hundred ten bananas per person, the US about one hundred thirty bananas per person Candida pizzas, both with a hundred fifty bananas. So you can imagine there would be a lot of unhappy people. If. The banana we all were once again under existential threat. Well, the doomsday scenario is that it wipes.

Michelle Kevin dish Michel United States Jenkins Mike Latin America EU Candida Europe ninety nine percent six million tons
"kevin dishes" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

04:01 min | 2 years ago

"kevin dishes" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Give got to believe me. Mr. b I did nothing about it. If there's anything I can do would committing Harry carry on yourself be asking too much. Gosh, isn't that a little drastic? What do you expect me to congratulate? You not only did Mona stole him into my office and break a golf club over my head my best, but she's also suing a hut bomb. Wired herald glam apply from the coastal area. She's marrying him instead of a banker like that pride already taken out of marriage license miserable. Two dollars wasted. That would be what's Jordan? You'll just wait till I get hold of that blunt saboteur maisy. No. I don't understand why you did Atlantic. Can you tell me again, slowly? But don't understand Eddie. I didn't know that your boss that he will that she that you well the pin. Will you can't blame me for that? Kanye carolina. What Eddie lazy means that when she opened it and put it on that it wasn't attended from him to her step from you to her. Exactly. Thank you Martin you have to clear way of explaining it. It's okay. Thanks. That's why you really can't hold it against ready. I could've I knew what to hold against her maisy. How can you do so many dumb things in one day? But it's easy. When you use your head Eddie going to return, this Mr. Espy, then I'm going to tell you still love me. Don't you Eddie? Yeah. That's why I'm going to psychiatrist. Well, at least that he doesn't understand any still nuts about you. Yeah. He's nuts. All right. I don't deserve it. Let there Mr. Gillespie. Sure must be a louse firing Eddie for such a such a natural steak. Yeah. I just gotta get less. Be Mona back together if any two people deserved each other. They do we have. How you gonna do it? Maybe Mona's marrying that fella Haralambos tonight. But if I went that wedding sort of disillusion Mona about him Glaspie might get a chance to straighten things out whether and give any back job with a raise. Maybe then you Eddie could get married and live happily ever. Yeah. I'm gonna have kids at home a car. So you can see what we gotta do it for Gillespie sake. Yeah. For his sake. Exactly. Now, I've never seen eddy's boss. I mean ex-boss need. But but if Mon is what he wants Mona's what he's going to get now. I'll just get into by stage makeup. I got just the right outfit to wear. So's Mona won't suspect. It's me then at the wedding tonight. We are gathered here tonight to witness marriage of and Kevin dish. Thank you. Yeah. Just can never understand Mon handwriting. These marriage certificates. The marriage Ramona Kevin dish too. Cheviot Gillespie the Donna God. And you remember. I realized what a truly unusual, but when you off a believing my story about that diamond deciding instead of that booth that Lambert man Sam I just knew the own man in the world when you gave me that beautiful ten thousand dollar pin. Did you know it was ten dollars? I headed to crazy. Continue with the ceremony. Before I pronounce your nine and Golda. Why is about.

Mona Eddie Cheviot Gillespie Harry Kanye carolina Ramona Kevin Kevin dish Mr. b Golda Jordan Mr. Espy Martin Sam I Haralambos Mon eddy Glaspie ten thousand dollar Two dollars ten dollars
"kevin dishes" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

04:27 min | 3 years ago

"kevin dishes" Discussed on Here & Now

"And providing intake services, and medical appraisals, and what shape or the. When they come to you, whether they're very tired. They're feeling a little bit downtrodden. They're scared everyone who comes to us is still very frightened. They're concerned that we are another government entity that they're just being moved into another detention center. And fortunately, very quickly we're able to turn it around. So that they understand that they're safe, and we're really here to help them at no cost to themselves. So let's be clear about how this process works. The federal government has vetted these migrants after they've crossed and they're processing the asylum claims. So ice knows exactly who's there with you. In fact, it sounds like you're also saying they sent them to you. I says drop them off to us with the full expectation in fifteen days from the point of their release. These individuals are going to report to an pre assigned immigration hearing somewhere within the forty eight states, which is near the homes of their. Sponsors or their families who have already agreed to accept them. And then what happens because we're hearing that the courts are so backlogged that in many cases, these people are waiting a long time before their asylum cases, ever finished. So they're really only with us for a day or two possibly a little bit longer while their families are putting together what they need to purchase a bus tickets or the plane tickets, but their families have agreed to take care of them for the period of time that they're in the United States going through their full immigration process. So that can take at least a couple of years. But the folks that come through our centers are shelters, they have full intentions of going through the legal immigration process, a legal asylum process. That's why they're here. They don't intend to disappear they intend to fulfill every aspect of that process that many people are concerned that during that process they will disappear into the country once they're returned. And that's why the Trump administration. I just changed the rules and some people are already forced to now. Wait in Mexico. Whether case plays out. How's that going over who have anyone there said anything to you about how that could affect them? Well, you know, the folks who who come to us right now aren't aware that the that kind of a policy change is being considered from our perspective. We realized that people being forced to remain on the Mexico side of the border. That's a very dangerous place for them to be. So we're very concerned about what could happen to people. If they are stalled on that side of the border for an extended period of time bid conversation of the countries having especially policymakers in Washington DC about whether or not there's a national emergency at the border. You have seen people who are hurting the just crossed the border. You could argue that that is in fact humanitarian crisis. What do you think? You know, we hear the term humanitarian crisis and having them come to our country for the type of safety and assistance. They're looking for. That's not a crisis. Their lives are in crisis. They've come to a place in their lives for only the United States can offer them any hope. It's Theresa Kevin dish Tucson's Benedictine monastery just opened its doors to house migrants seeking asylum in the United States in the demand is high. Thanks very much. You're welcome. Thank you. No one knows the border better than the people who live there too contrasting views right there. Quick note while parts of the US just went through a deep freeze. Australia is having a brutal summer more than a thousand people have had to leave their homes in the Queensland city of Townsville after seven days of heavy rain, crocodiles, roaming around more rain is forecast as high winds and flash flooding, and then there is the heat. The southern city of Adelaide posted its hottest day on record on January twenty fourth a hundred and sixteen degrees. In fact, across the country. Australia saw its hottest month in history in January. December was the hottest December on record. There have been mass deaths of fish fire alerts and birds reportedly falling from trees killed by heat. We will keep an eye on the heat in Australia. But right now, here's a question..

United States Australia Mexico federal government Adelaide Washington Theresa Kevin Tucson Benedictine monastery Queensland Townsville sixteen degrees fifteen days seven days
"kevin dishes" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:38 min | 3 years ago

"kevin dishes" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Sirius XM one sixty nine and from PRI public radio international. My name is Tom power. There is a lot of writers and performers and artists at there who will probably tell you you never really know when inspirations gonna head. It's the kind of thing you can't force either. I know song writers who locked themselves in a cabin for three or four days at a time just making cups of tea watching television. And hoping that a song comes to them anti-bush. And Mark little are two guys not song writers comedians, but who have learned about this inspiration thing over the past few years back in two thousand twelve their comedy show picnic face had just been cancelled. They were right trying to write a new TV show. It wasn't just clicking. So they took a break. Andy went to Kevin ish Prince Edward Island, a place he had visited many times before but this time this trip was different when he got back. He gushed to Mark all about all the little things. You saw the tour stops the little museums that filled the place. Really strange theme park. Mark saw animated. Andy was getting about all this. And he thought well, why don't we just wrote about Kevin dish? Instead six years later Cavendish the show is about to premiere on CBC Mark little and Andy anti-bush star in the series as two brothers who returned to their hometown. After years away. They're going to tell you more about the whole story in just a minute. I'll say this is that I scour like now magazine in Toronto to find out when Mark little or anti-bush doing shows in Toronto. And I'll just go to it. No matter what it is. They're two of the funniest people in Canada, and they've made a pretty amazing show. So you're going to hear me kind of really a lot in this interview. But I had to ask them about the other interview the sorry the other idea the one they didn't do the one that came before Kevin dish that one that just didn't click. What are we doing? At the time. We were working on a different show. We work on a different terrible show. We just didn't have any business right now. We're trying to write a show about night custodians. Yeah. Night custodian. Very familiar with. Yeah. Just yeah. Night. Custodians, essentially, just what happens after the office closes down. Apparently nothing. Learned that nothing. We every episode we just clean up and then credits roll. That's it. Do their job. And if they have kids back home, there's a it's tinged with melancholy. So we're trying to write this and struggling than Andy went on a trip to Kevin dish Pia came back told me about it describe this very strange town. And I got really excited about that. And we both agreed that should somehow night. Custodians nut go anywhere. We pivot still got in for the night. Estonians at that point. You were you were really excited about the one kernel of an episode idea. It was a good one. Yeah. Why were you in cabinet issues is your family at their? Well, I grew up that's where we took our vacations, and this was just another one of those vacations, and it was like this. I honestly there'd been a certain amount of time between when I was a child to to this certain vacation and. Hey, aged many years, and I went back and went, oh, this is much weirder than I remember there's a lot of because it was the birthplace of Lucy. Montgomery and green Gables. Are there? A lot of like mom and pop kind of places like open up like all these attractions rainbow valley. So I wanna I wanna play a clip. This is from the first episode. This is you guys. This is the first thing you see when you watch the show. This is you guys driving into town back to cabinet for the first time in a long time. Hey, how sick..

Mark little Andy Kevin dish Sirius Tom power Toronto Mark Kevin ish CBC rainbow valley Canada Cavendish Prince Edward Island Montgomery green Gables four days six years
"kevin dishes" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

Rock N Roll Archaeology

04:02 min | 3 years ago

"kevin dishes" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

"United Kingdom would you know, through that something in the United Kingdom across Hugh fossil ten years, and you've got Joan Bonham smashing a hotel suite without daily basis. Yeah. I throwing ponts refrigerator out of the off the balcony the edge tell into the into the drink below zone. But he was interested ground said I'd just never seen anything like it. You know, if the door up you taking the door off its hinges in photography invade CIN that that stuff was happening. I think if he learned to deal with gene Vincent and Barry, Barry, hit handle anybody. It handle anybody. And that was the idea you that you always. To get your artist to stage, a always had to do the show, and you always had to get the money. And he would always get into the stage. Always get the money. No matter what it agai cry. Right. So I have to ask about the oldest gangster esque legend about grant. I think this first shows up in hammer the gods, which you know, is a book that should be taken with a grain of salt. I I know that but this hanging Robert Stig would out of the sixth floor window four. Don arden. It was really true. Don't think that stories in the hammer to go today. I don't think seven it doesn't matter. But right. Yeah. They see the story, and you know, steak was arrivals of impresario. Yeah. You wanted to wanted to poach ground spans faces with grounds. Don's bans this will face his and Don goes there with some heavies. They gonna scare him somehow ends up getting dangled over that volt flow balcony Kevin dish square, which will pass only the other day. Kaffa disc wearing London looked up. Of course, he hadn't been on Christ. I mean, Kevin dish. I'm gonna look at Elkin wearing happened grams one of the gods and said he had hold of his ankles. He had these Chelsea boots. So Jen, the worry was that he faked slip out them said I had to hang on ready tied. The question is d- happen. Will we know that stigmatise dangling over balcony? That is true. But whether grow was that we don't know he always told people he was and so I like to. Leave. He was it makes sense. You know, he he was wanted Don hardens heavies, and you know, in we know that Don was certainly capable of suggesting that that might motivate a person to do what he wanted. So. It makes sense definitely makes sense. So so that that gets us to grant managing the yard birds. How did that occur will happen because he's Mickey moist will working together making south of production company and record label and make producing the outputs who at the time was more of a pump group. I guess a rogue group Eric Clapton had left by this time. Go on Jeff Beck was in there. And then Jeff Becker Jimmy patriot together manager some and night. Bali went on to great success later on eight sick of them. He's fed up with interviewed som- about this. He said look couldn't deal with them. So I said, I don't wanna manageable and paid to grow. So the put his hand up and said, I'll take them, and I think it was simply about he wanted to manage someone. The company south would pay to hand with making much data management wing. And they weren't really managing. Anyone managing anybody successful. We thought I'll tighten the out buzz. And he was the best decision ever might because it goes Jimmy Page's guitar the Alba at the end and that that's the beginning of Led Zeppelin. Yeah. Yeah. Happy accident, you know as rod time. Yeah. Now, of course, I have to ask about Beck's bolero session because I think that's really where the name of the most famous group of the nineteen seventies comes from right? That's right..

Don arden Jeff Beck United Kingdom Elkin gene Vincent Kevin dish Jimmy Page Don Joan Bonham Barry Robert Stig London Eric Clapton Jen Mickey moist Jeff Becker som ten years