18 Burst results for "Kevin Dish"

But Why Live: Poetry

But Why: A Podcast for Curious Kids

06:34 min | 8 months ago

But Why Live: Poetry

"Oscar is ten and lives in Bethlehem Pennsylvania and he told us he wrote this poem for Mother's Day bike rides with Mama another scrape. My knees keep donating bloody skin to the sidewalk. Here comes Mama keeping a straight face even though I know she must be laughing inside because it's not the first time I ride my bike into a fire hydrant since we took off the training wheels. I've been living on the edge the edge of sidewalk the edge of Aggressee Hill. The Japan nerves no longer our arms on my shoulder while I ride but she is always there. I remember clapping when I wrote up to the mailbox. You're doing it. She cheered. That was three years ago now. Whenever WE GONE by Christ's we travel miles. It's our thing on narrow streets. She leads the way otherwise. We're side by side even uphill in those. She's not holding my shoulders like she did when I was seven. I know I will always have balanced because of her. That's what a mother does to ride my bike with Mama to tell her without words that I love her Oscar. I love that poem. I Bet your mother was so so happy to get it. Here's a poem from Cassia. Who's seven and lives in Chatham on Tour Ontario? Her poem is called name is waterfall. I walk slowly down the rocks. My eyes are big whitish blue. I carry a bubble of water by breath salty. My touches software misty. I moved fast and sneaky voices. Smooth soft common scratchy. Right name is my name is waterfall casio. That is so beautiful all right. Let's get into more poems. We have more of you who are calling in to read some poems on air and some of you may have questions about poems and poetry that you'd like to share with us as well and I want to bring in our guide for the our Ted. Shy Ted is known as the poetry guy around here in Vermont and beyond. He's been teaching poetry. Two Kids for more than twenty years and some of you listening might have been about to have a school event with Ted shy before your classes got canceled so lucky us. He's with us today. Ted I Jane. I'm so excited to talk poetry with you. Even more thrilled than you. This is such a cool honor to be on your awesome show. Oh thank you thank you but I'm going to start with a really tough question for you. Although I think it's one you've probably answered many many times. So Ted when we think about poems some poems rhyme some poems. Don't some have a few words and then skip to the next line. Some have lines that run together. Some poems are designed to be read on the page others are designed to be spoken and heard a loud some poems follow rules about form and structure. Once you know the rules. Some poems still break them. Some poems are very very short but some like the epic poetry of homer are as long as a chapter book and have characters and plot like a novel would so ted. What is poetry? That's a hard question and you listed so many different ways because that's what homes are. There are lots of different things to me. A poem is a small mostly small. It's focused it's laser focused on one important thing in your life. Something you feel really strongly about and it's sort of like if if kids live in the northeast and especially in Vermont. They know that Maple Syrup for example is something we do here. We make here. And when you make Maple Syrup you take lots and lots of Sap from the maple tree and you have to boil it down and it takes forty drops of maple sap to make one delicious drop of Maple Syrup that dances on your tongue. And it's kind of a process that everybody has to take this long mostly long process of sort of distilling boiling down your thoughts until it becomes a really important night and idea and it doesn't have to take any particular shape. That's the cool thing about poems. A rules are super flexible. So but so if a poem can be anything if you're writing one. Oh that's a good question. Well it's sort of an open thing you. There's so many different shapes and sizes of poems but it is something that you know in your heart. You've written something. Like Oscar was writing about such detail and living I love the way he described living on the edge and Cossio filled with details about her voice and their breath is and it's looking at things really really carefully and so did I answer your question. Not really because there isn't there isn't really an answer. Poems take so many different forms but they're not stories there even though Oscar kind of told story. It's it's really just a focus little expression of something super important so those epic poems and epic poets like homer and you know the the Odyssey and the Iliad are those really kind of different than what we consider modern poems. I think so. I have a hard time There aren't too many poets that long stuff these days and back when they wrote those they didn't even write them down. Had people who memorize like and they would share it for many many days. Twenty four seven without stopping so that was kind of an unusual story type of poem and epic Narrative Poem. And fortunately there aren't. Most people writes shorter stuff and I certainly do myself. I'm kids. Maybe that's a good assignment for you. See if you can just recite a poem. Twenty four seven. See what you think about that. Maybe maybe you can tell them that. Ted Shy told you you should do it. Let's get to some poems. That kids are sending us and we have lots of kids calling in Ted who WanNa read their poems allowed and this is so exciting because I love it when are able to read their own poems but we got a found poem that was sent to us by the common dish town elementary sixth grade class they actually wrote this palm on zoom. They're having video conference meetings and they focused on things to do outside so each student put a line in the chat box in their video conference and hit send at the very same time and this is the poem that resulted watching the birds. That land on my feet feeder going hiking riding my bike bright orange caterpillar under the leaves. I breathe in air running down the sidewalk as fast as I can smelling the bright tulips growing. Love it outside. That's pretty good for palm that everybody hit send on at the same time. Don't you all say the ending? The last line is the perfect line for that yeah. Nothing's no kidding. Thank you for that. Kevin dish sixth-graders.

TED Ted Shy Mama Oscar Vermont Ted I Jane Aggressee Hill Japan Bethlehem Pennsylvania Kevin Dish Cassia Chatham Ontario Cossio
"kevin dish" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:47 min | 1 year ago

"kevin dish" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The plant breeding route and James stales response to that there's some exceptionally good breeding programs going on in the world. But you don't end up with Kevin Nash. You end up with something different to Kevin dish. And so if we want to replace Kennedy's with something probably very, very different will probably get that, from the conventional braiding preference. So if you wanna have the Kevin dish in the future, if you wanna have Kevin dish in twenty years time that probably going to be genetically modified that probably gonna be Jane edited that makes it sound as if the Kevin dish as we know it may well be headed for extinction, depending on the banana, companies decisions and the public's response to genetic modification so four the billions of people who eat trillions of bananas, a great many of them, Kevin dish. How panic should they be? We the industry would say this Penick the will run. But what about the cabinet banana? Okay. What I think we're going to have to probably confront is actually having more varieties of been available in the future, as we protect the farming of bananas. We're going to have to get used to how we can actually grow and commercialize and the new the districts for different bananas. The prospect of exporting several different kinds of bananas, would be an adjustment for the industry. Of course, for consumers less standardization might mean higher prices. But the prospect of finding several varieties of banana in a grocery store would hardly be unsettling considering how many varieties of apples and grapes,.

Kevin dish Kevin Nash James stales Kennedy Jane twenty years
"kevin dish" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:06 min | 1 year ago

"kevin dish" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Whether genetically modified, Kevin dish bananas could survive Panama disease. Remember once Panama disease struck the soil remains contaminated with the fungus. So we put this. This chain into the single cells and grew bananas back in two thousand twelve they began field trials that would last a few years, planting, both genetically modified and non GM bananas in the Humpty doo soil, would they find? So what we found is a number of things may found that the non GM bananas with between one hundred percent of the dating fictive after three years, so that does as was having pretty big impact. Okay. That's important to know that Panama disease was still in the soil. Which men if a genetically modified plant survived. It was surviving Panama disease. So how did the genetically modified plants do Dale and his team planted, six, different lines of GM Cavendish plants? One of those lines raise the Jamie, putting John. So Taylor line three appeared to be completing me under the threes. None of the plants infected a toll, so sensually. But we've done is we've taken a Jane from wild banana, that he's resistant to trouble the rightful. We've taken that one banana Jane, and we've gone to put it into cavity. And by doing that we've, we've generated resistance to the disease. This was amazing. Banana news RJ to line three was a clear winner. Some the other genetic modifications did well to three of the other lines had relatively high levels resistance way. There was twenty percent lace plants either infected Dade, which was to us, critical outcome rarely get that sort of percentage, the so two things they tell me a pretty excited about that. And there was something else to be excited about the other really important thing we found was that the Jane will be put in this GT Jane not only occasion, these vol bananas. But it also Kazin, Kevin, it just doesn't Blick very well. And Senate textually really, really important. Because there's a new technology known as gene, editing. It's different. Jane modifications, gene, editing. These we can go into the DNA and just tweet chains that are already there, such very, very close to some natural processes, that's why now starting to, to figure out how we can tweak the Jane in Kevin Daesh to make them resistant, but actually adding any new James toll this type of gene, editing is made possible by something known as crisper which as I'm sure you know stands for clustered regularly space short Powell drunk repeats. We spoke with one of Christopher's inventors, the biochemist..

Jane Panama GM Kevin dish GM Cavendish John Humpty doo Kevin Daesh Senate Dade Taylor Christopher Jamie Kazin Dale Kevin Powell James one hundred percent
"kevin dish" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:30 min | 1 year ago

"kevin dish" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Doing that we, we've. Generated resistance to the disease. This was amazing. Banana news RJ to line three was a clear winner. Some the other genetic modifications did well to three of the other lines had relatively high levels resistance way. There was twenty percent less plants author infected Dade which was to us critical outcome. Rarely do you get that sort of percentage success in the Celtic things? They tell me a pretty excited about that. And there was something else to be excited about the other really important thing we found was that the Jane be put in this is Jane. None unle occasion, these vol bananas. But it also Kazin. Kevin, which it just doesn't Blick very well. Unsanitary actually really, really important because there's a new technology known as gene, editing. It's different attain modifications, gene, editing. Its way we can go into the DNA and just tweet Jane already. They're such very, very close to some natural prices way. Now starting to, to figure out how we can tweak the Jane in Kevin dish. To make them resistant. But that actually adding any new James toll this type of gene, editing is made possible by something known as crisper, which is I'm sure, you know stands for clustered regularly space short pound dramatic repeats. We spoke with one of Christopher's inventors, the biochemist. Jennifer Dowden back in two thousand seventeen for an episode called evolution accelerated at its core. The crisper gene, editing technology is, is now giving human beings, the opportunity to change the course of evolution and human beings have been affecting evolution for a long time. Right. But now there's a technology that allows very specific changes to be made to DNA that gives us a new level of control. Crisper is terrific. And so, yes, we are using crisper at the moment. So this would seem to be super amazing. Banana news. There are. Potentially two ways to save the Kevin dish from Panama disease by using crisper to tweak its genetic code or by. Introducing new resistant genes from other bananas. Either way, the banana industry must be thrilled by the solutions that James Dale is proposing right? We asked Andrew byles, former CEO of bananas and pineapples at Chiquita dream stale. He is working on laurel GM approach. That, of course, is not so acceptable societally, son. Some people will say, yes, I don't mind you think about, if occasion, others will say they do indeed, a sizable fraction of consumers in the US, and especially in Europe, considered genetically modified, crops to be risky despite assurances to the contrary from scientists, like James stale. And I think that's way we filed we really haven't got the message across this one of the most incredibly highly regulated technologies in the world. So the sorts of things have we got through to demonstrate safeties amazing. The objection to GMO crops is also curious in light of the fact that traditional plant breeding without which many, many fewer of us would be alive is itself. A form of genetic modification, Jennifer Dowden. Again, I think it's important for, for people to appreciate that for. First of all, that humans have been modifying plants for a long time, you know, genetically, and for literally thousands of years. Exactly. Thank goodness. And you realize, well, I'm glad there's plant breeding, but, you know, the way that that's been done. Traditionally is to use chemicals or even radiation to introduce genetic changes into seeds, and then plant breeders will select for, for plants that have traits that they want the opportunity here with gene, editing. In plants is to be able to make changes precisely not to drag along traits that you don't want, really the difference between what we're doing and conventional breeding. He should I move fastened..

Jane Kevin dish James Dale Jennifer Dowden Kazin Andrew byles US Christopher Europe Panama CEO GM twenty percent
"kevin dish" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:03 min | 1 year ago

"kevin dish" Discussed on KQED Radio

"But there's an even more powerful explanation for why bananas are so cheap standardization. So the advantage of having the confidence is that it is really monoculture that you can actually grow it consistently. Indra byles, again, formerly of Chiquita. You know, it's going to take to nine months to come to fruition and you know, how that banana is going to function when it's transported. Refrigerated cargo, you know how it's going to be form in the rifling rooms in the country destination. And you know how it's going to be form and hold up on the retail shelf, and it's not just that nearly every banana grown for export is Kevin dish. It's every Kevin dish banana, is genetically the same as the next cabin dish. From a business perspective. That's ideal the ultimate in quality control from an agricultural perspective. However, there's no diversity. So this. Each plant is the same age has the same resistance to disease spreads, as you'll recall, the grow Michelle banana was wiped out years ago by Panama disease or technically FU cerium wilt, it's caused by a fungus that infects the plants roots, and eventually kills the whole plant and leaves the soil, unfit for future banana growth, the stream of Panama disease that killed off the grow. Michelle was known as TR one or tropical race one. Now, there's a strain called TR four. That's tacking the Kevin dish. So in the fallen victim to almost the same disease as the grow, Michelle. So what we see is false. Start apparently in Indonesia Philippines. It's devastated crops, there pharma's moved the become bell to all two in the banana.

Michelle banana Kevin dish Indra byles Indonesia Philippines Panama nine months
"kevin dish" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:59 min | 1 year ago

"kevin dish" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The fruit from over ripening, but then came steamships and railroads. They just put huge pieces of ice at each end of freight car to try to keep the bananas, cool, and by the nineteen twenties trains, started getting mechanical refrigeration in the nineteen thirties came refrigerated trucks, this new technology at huge impact on food distribution generally made possible the modern meat industry. For instance, it also allowed for the bulk importation of bananas to the United States, the variety that Americans came to know and love was the grow Michel, also known as big Mike. And it was a large banana and it had thick skin. So it didn't bruise easily. There are more than a thousand banana varieties in the world. But Jenkins says a lot of other banana varieties. Don't travel. Well, either they're small or they have been skins, or for one reason, or another didn't grow well in one thousand nine hundred Americans were eating fifteen million bunches of bananas, a year, just a decade later forty million. So it was very bad news. When a fungus emerged devastating the plantations in Latin America, this fungus came to be called Panama disease. It was I noticed in the eighteen hundreds by the nineteen fifties. It was wiping out the grow Michel. And so what the fruit companies did was they move onto another country by a lot more land and groping in until the disease caught up with them and they had to move on. But the disease couldn't be outrun. The grow Michelle was doomed. So they changed to provide a call the cabinet banana, the Kevin dish was not susceptible to the disease. Wiped out the grow, Michelle. So the Kevin dish is the banana most of us eat today. It accounts for ninety nine percent of the banana export market, the last grow Michelle's in the US were sold in nineteen sixty five. So our banana is not the same banana, our elders. Eight, I've never had a grow, Michelle not old enough. So I'm not really sure how much difference there was some people who did eat the grow, Michelle say it was more, delicious than the cabin dish. But the Kevin dish has done very well. Thank you. It is the most popular fruit in both the US and Europe, even though the vast majority of them must be imported, the EU imports around six million tons of Cavendish bananas each year or one hundred ten bananas per person, the US about one hundred thirty bananas per person Candida pizzas, both with a hundred fifty bananas. So you can imagine there would be a lot of unhappy people. If. The banana we all were once again under existential threat. Well, the doomsday scenario is that it wipes.

Michelle Kevin dish Michel United States Jenkins Mike Latin America EU Candida Europe ninety nine percent six million tons
"kevin dish" Discussed on SciShow Tangents

SciShow Tangents

04:34 min | 1 year ago

"kevin dish" Discussed on SciShow Tangents

"Jensen's Fijian insists which affects the leaves and it like rots them and makes them have holes which ruins the photosynthesis of the plant. So both of these diseases have popped up and caused. I think local devastation within cavernous crops. But like nothing that would make us. That will go completely extinct because we're ready with fungicides. We don't have a great one size fits all solution for this mostly. It's like we are reacting to these problems as they pop up. And I think there are some scientists that are trying to genetically modify bananas to introduce genes that give them resistance that seems like the solution. If we are going to keep having Kevin dish bananas. It will be because of genetic modification one of the things that you end up with is like areas of soil that is infected with one or both of these fungi. And then you can't plant bananas. They're more like you just can't effectively apply fun decide to all of the soil. And then the idea of introducing diversity doesn't work because that's not how bananas work if you cross bred a Cavin dish with another banana crop. It would be completely useless banana bananas are like apples in that. Every like Honey crisp apple you've ever had is a clone of every other hunting crisp apple. But like the vast majority of apple tree. He's come up with crap apples. Okay. So what what how did we let the girl Michel? We're just not where we weren't ready with. Yeah. It happen. Very fast, and it was in the soil. So like, the only reason cabinet can grows because it's resistant to the strain that killed the Grammy show, Dino in that was it was a sixties maybe when we stopped having big Mike's article where they are just like this kind of banana anymore. They do still grow some places. Like if you're in South America like you can find Michelle bananas. They just can't do them out like mass scale is that the issue with the other varieties of banana also is that it's harder to make them. Well, we have designed our entire banana infrastructure around the cabin dish. Like the tree to table chain. Is it is a it is an efficient process to get a banana like it's amazing at no point in the year is my grocery store, not full of bananas. And that is true for everyone in America. Yeah. Like, how is that PA? It's the most popular product at WalMart. They sell more bananas than anything else because you can buy a bunch of time. Okay. Toilet paper. Yeah. How many rolls of toilet paper? Through and around the banana peel sort of doubles as toilet paper. Yeah. Boom. No. If you want to ask the science couch follow us on Twitter at sideshow tangents where we'll tweet out the topics for upcoming episodes every week. All right. So you ever final scores. Now, Seri got one Stephan. You got one. Thanks vavilov. If you like this show, and you want to help us out. It's really easy to do that you can leave us a review on I tunes or wherever you can leave reviews, that's helpful for us to know. What you like about the show? You can also tweet us your favorite from this episode. And finally, if you want to show your love just tell people about us. Thank you for joining us this week. I have been hanged green of in. Stephan Jin, haven't Sam Schultz, say right? I'm mixed it up. Sideshow tangents is co produced by complexly and WNYC studios. It's produced by all of us and Caitlin Hofmeister. Are art is by Hiroko Matsushima, and our sound design is by Joseph tuna, mesh our social media organizer is Victoria journal. And we couldn't make any of this happened without our patrons on Petri on. Thank you. And remember the mind is not a vessel to be filled. A fire be lighted. But one more thing people have been using their own poop to fertilize fields for a long time. But I guess saying that your field is fertilized by human poop is probably not like good marketing. So they the name for human base fertilizer coal quickly kind of night soil, and some people think that that comes from the way that it was collected. We're in the middle of the night. People would go out and find septic like pits of poop and out houses and stuff, and they still the poop out of it for it on a wagon and bring it to the next town and sell the poop fertilizer. Great row.

South America Stephan Jin Kevin dish Jensen Cavin apple Grammy WalMart Twitter Caitlin Hofmeister Michel Hiroko Matsushima Michelle PA Dino Seri complexly Mike Victoria journal Joseph tuna
"kevin dish" Discussed on Freakonomics

Freakonomics

01:33 min | 1 year ago

"kevin dish" Discussed on Freakonomics

"Some the other genetic modifications did well to three of the other lines had really high levels of resistance where there was twenty percent less plants author infected Dade which was to us in critical outcome rarely do you get that sort of percentage success in the sorts of things to tell me a pretty excited about that. And there was something else to be excited about the other really important thing we found was that the gene will be put in this GT. Jane, not only occurs in these wall bananas. But it also causing Kevin dish, it just doesn't work. Very well and senate's actually really really important because there's a new technology known as gene editing. It's different attain modifications, gene editing. These we can go. Into the deny and just tweaked genes that are already there sides, very very close to some natural processes. And that's why we're now starting to to figure out how we can tweak the Jane in Kevin to make them resistant without actually adding any new Jane's toll, this type of gene editing is made possible by something known as crisper, which I'm sure you know, stands for clustered regularly. Inter spaced short pal Andro repeats. We spoke with one of Christopher's inventors the biochemist Jennifer Dowden back in two thousand seventeen for an episode called evolution accelerated its episode number two ninety one.

Jane Kevin dish Jennifer Dowden senate Andro Christopher twenty percent
"kevin dish" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:38 min | 2 years ago

"kevin dish" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Sirius XM one sixty nine and from PRI public radio international. My name is Tom power. There is a lot of writers and performers and artists at there who will probably tell you you never really know when inspirations gonna head. It's the kind of thing you can't force either. I know song writers who locked themselves in a cabin for three or four days at a time just making cups of tea watching television. And hoping that a song comes to them anti-bush. And Mark little are two guys not song writers comedians, but who have learned about this inspiration thing over the past few years back in two thousand twelve their comedy show picnic face had just been cancelled. They were right trying to write a new TV show. It wasn't just clicking. So they took a break. Andy went to Kevin ish Prince Edward Island, a place he had visited many times before but this time this trip was different when he got back. He gushed to Mark all about all the little things. You saw the tour stops the little museums that filled the place. Really strange theme park. Mark saw animated. Andy was getting about all this. And he thought well, why don't we just wrote about Kevin dish? Instead six years later Cavendish the show is about to premiere on CBC Mark little and Andy anti-bush star in the series as two brothers who returned to their hometown. After years away. They're going to tell you more about the whole story in just a minute. I'll say this is that I scour like now magazine in Toronto to find out when Mark little or anti-bush doing shows in Toronto. And I'll just go to it. No matter what it is. They're two of the funniest people in Canada, and they've made a pretty amazing show. So you're going to hear me kind of really a lot in this interview. But I had to ask them about the other interview the sorry the other idea the one they didn't do the one that came before Kevin dish that one that just didn't click. What are we doing? At the time. We were working on a different show. We work on a different terrible show. We just didn't have any business right now. We're trying to write a show about night custodians. Yeah. Night custodian. Very familiar with. Yeah. Just yeah. Night. Custodians, essentially, just what happens after the office closes down. Apparently nothing. Learned that nothing. We every episode we just clean up and then credits roll. That's it. Do their job. And if they have kids back home, there's a it's tinged with melancholy. So we're trying to write this and struggling than Andy went on a trip to Kevin dish Pia came back told me about it describe this very strange town. And I got really excited about that. And we both agreed that should somehow night. Custodians nut go anywhere. We pivot still got in for the night. Estonians at that point. You were you were really excited about the one kernel of an episode idea. It was a good one. Yeah. Why were you in cabinet issues is your family at their? Well, I grew up that's where we took our vacations, and this was just another one of those vacations, and it was like this. I honestly there'd been a certain amount of time between when I was a child to to this certain vacation and. Hey, aged many years, and I went back and went, oh, this is much weirder than I remember there's a lot of because it was the birthplace of Lucy. Montgomery and green Gables. Are there? A lot of like mom and pop kind of places like open up like all these attractions rainbow valley. So I wanna I wanna play a clip. This is from the first episode. This is you guys. This is the first thing you see when you watch the show. This is you guys driving into town back to cabinet for the first time in a long time. Hey, how sick..

Mark little Andy Kevin dish Sirius Tom power Toronto Mark Kevin ish CBC rainbow valley Canada Cavendish Prince Edward Island Montgomery green Gables four days six years
"kevin dish" Discussed on Plantrama

Plantrama

04:23 min | 2 years ago

"kevin dish" Discussed on Plantrama

"Maybe after the first frost when the leaves dieback you can dig that up bring it indoors put the root ball in a plastic bag and just put it like if your garage doesn't get below freezing. Or if you have a cool spot just lie it down on its side. Check it every couple of weeks, you probably won't have to water much. If the rupaul is is wrapped in plastic all of the top growth will turn Brown, and you can either cut it out cut it off or not after its turn Brown, and you can replant that rupaul in the spring, and you will have a real head start on what your banana plant is gonna look like it'll be much bigger. You won't be starting all the way over again. So for those of you who can't over winter it as a house plant for space reasons or light reasons, you can still over winter it, but you have to keep it dormant to do that. I think that's a great idea. Most people don't realize that a banana plant. It's not a tree, right. It's actually considered an herb it is. Now, the definition of a nerve of courses any plant whose leaves seeds or flowers are used for food or medicine, but but this is a plant that's considered a perennial herb in places where it grows out in the landscape, the the fruiting ones die back to the ground. And then the plant puts up new growth from the bays and botanically an actual banana the fruit is considered a berry because the seeds are in the center. Yeah. And in fact, bananas all used to have seeds. They've been bred by people over time. So that the seeds are just, you know, not significant and not viable, but it right? But you know, way back when that's actually one of the things that worries me about bananas because all the unlike you I love to eat banana. Okay. And and all the bananas that we get in the store. Are these sterile hybrids that have been bred for their sweet deliciousness? And if they if if like, a repeat if we have a banana fam- in the way, we had a potato famine they're all going to be wiped out, then we'll have no bananas. Well, that that has always already happened. Once if it because it used to be that the bananas that were all grown for export were variety called gross, Michael I believe all of the bananas were that and a disease came along that attacked them, and it wiped out all of the bananas and sent and that was in the nineteen sixties. Yeah. And then the banana that is now sold which is called Kevin dish. Right. Yes. Yeah. That became the banana of choice to grow and and harvest and export. But there are many people who are very worried about this Kevin dish because if. Insect or disease comes along that attacks that again, it's all going to be wiped out. There are however people in particularly other countries who depend on this for for the food for the population. There are people who are breeding varieties that are different. And so that's the good news is that there are new varieties that are resistant to all the various banana problems that are coming into into being. But that at it has happened once and there's a huge danger. Whenever we limit production of any food source to one thing. Yes, there's a danger that it'll disappear. Yeah. It's just one reason. Why genetic diversity is so important? Yeah. Yeah. It's interesting bananas are interesting because here it is a fruit that has a lot of moisture in it. Right. A banana. Is probably about eighty percent water. But you can't squeeze the juice out of it. No, I've never had banana juice. No never because it just mush is. Right. That there's something about their molecular structure that is not very, you know, juicy. It's not very squeeze -able. You're right. You're right..

Kevin dish Brown Michael eighty percent
"kevin dish" Discussed on The WIRED Podcast

The WIRED Podcast

02:48 min | 2 years ago

"kevin dish" Discussed on The WIRED Podcast

"To make a cabinet resistant to to. Because the thing is it's, like you said, James, the industry is set up this one banana. So we've kind to commit ourselves to the Kevin dish. So rather than saying, can you find a different banana? They're saying, can we Jeanette it the banana to make this banana resistance diseases on its way round and the most exciting and perhaps. Aggressive and sort of. Have gotten the words banana re, but now on our good research is going on in a place called Humpty doo Humpty doo exactly. So Humpty doo is a place just outside of Darwin in northern Australia, and there was a banana plantation there in one thousand nine hundred six. That was set up because it's really good pace. Groping honors and the guy's name. Robert percent. Oh, he set up this banana plantation in one thousand nine hundred six. Great. I'm gonna go bananas in nine hundred ninety seven. Panama came to Australia. She's actually quite sad and basically decimated his plantation. Luckily a few years later, I think in round two thousand and five thousand six. He research could James Dale who'd come up with a way of transplanting gene from the resistant version of banana banana. One of those really seed filled bananas I talked about before and put into Kevin dash. And so now in Humpty doo, they're growing the world's first tier four resistant, but. Whoa, whoa. Whoa, we've your witchcraft. So this is a GMO banana yet. That's the rather big if so there's a problem with this method of taking gene from one species. I'm putting into another species in this case, both been honest, but you could do with with anything. It means they fall under GMO regulations, right? So they're genetically modified organism, which I'm sure as a term that all of her dolphin kind of scary basically means that organism has genetic information from do different species, which is really, really big problem. Because in the EU GMO crops are very, very tightly regulated. They're only sixty four GMO crops that are allowed to be. Allowed to be sold in the u. k. sort in the EU sorry. And almost all of them go to go to animal feed. Right? So they're very Asians on stuff like rapeseed and call and oil and things like that. And they really, you don't find many GMO foods in which isn't the case in the US. There's a lot more GMO in the US and in Australia, it's legal as well, right? Heavily regulated Australia's, heavy, regulated Australia's. We have a weird is also illegal to import bananas into Austria here as well. So they basically got to solve this problem. Exactly. And the thing is because Australia has its own banana industry. It's both doesn't like the kind of biological rest of important, but honors very protectionist of its own trade. So actually we think that probably the Australian bananas are going to be the first year open honors to be to be grown and sold in the same place..

Humpty doo Australia Robert percent James Dale Kevin dish Jeanette EU Kevin dash US Panama Austria
"kevin dish" Discussed on The Science Hour

The Science Hour

03:37 min | 2 years ago

"kevin dish" Discussed on The Science Hour

"Packaged sweet nutritious and yellow. What more could we want? A hundred billion are consumed every year according to figures from the UN's food and Agriculture Organization. Although there are one hundred different varieties, just one accounts for half of all production. The Kevin dish, it is high, yielding it chapels very well as the politics in and it tastes pretty good. It's it's not a bad banana and seedless. Yes. Very, actually eight nor tried to a banana Sade. They are like little pebbles. They very talked for you don't about on one now. Now, seventy years ago. It was another variety that was the top Nana Crofts Michelle or big Mike sweeter still than the cavern dash. And then a fungus Fusarium wilt or Panama disease surged through the plantations killing the plants Cavendish was the substitute, but it too is now threatened by new strain of the fungus called tropical race. Four and the race is on to protect the crop. James, Dale and his colleagues at the Queensland University of technology and ustralia have successfully engineered a resistance gene into the variety, which they say makes it safe from the fungus. He told Roland Pease that the reason Cavendish bananas have been vulnerable is the being seedless means they're all clones. Dating back to the early days of agriculture. Hammond dish is probably around about two thousand years old and has not been improved in time, whereas nearly everything else. Has by next the reason why we got this incredible susceptibility to diseases. I just haven't been improved and before we go on to your work, what is it about this that so deadly to the plants? Well, into syllable and fungus. It lives in the soil and considered by at least fifty years. It's very, very good at infecting. So they infect through the roots of bananas. I get into the vascular tissue that kill that vascular tissue will night fade on that gig tissue. And by doing that, of course, I kill a banana in how swift is it pretty quick lunch. You say the symptoms in the first symptoms and pretty obvious. She usually on four to six weeks before you start say that plant collapse note the traditional way of guessing resistant varieties of species is crossbreeding a, not mainly finding some kind of plump that Scott resistance to the disease, and then he crossbreed NCO crop. You've been soaring to do that. You will search not. So if we trying to find out if there are wild types of. Bananas that are resistant to this tropical race full and there are a number of us. So when you get back into the center of origin of bananas, you find resistance inside, we were able to access a resistant banana, and that's resistant to lots of things. So that vast starting point is that resistance down to a single gene? Yes, it is way pretty set with the genetics of the resistance way. Believe it's a single dominant Jane for your next step then was to copy that gene in through an artificial variant ARGUS a GM, very of the candidates banana definitely took one of the James at that banana, and it's called music cue. Manatt Mela, Kansas. We took fund Jane out of that and we put it into candidates finance by genetic modification and you've tested it. We did. We went up to field in the northern territory where this disease is pressing for more than twenty years, and we work on a plan Tykes in. That's really the last commercial banana plantation. In the northern territorial, please raise aside. Size and we went into field which been previously ground candidates pronounce b-a-e-n decimated with TI for and we planted app Lansing there.

Jane James Kevin dish Nana Crofts Michelle UN Queensland University of techn Agriculture Organization Roland Pease Tykes Panama Lansing Hammond Manatt Mela Cavendish Scott GM Dale Kansas two thousand years
"kevin dish" Discussed on Science in Action

Science in Action

04:16 min | 2 years ago

"kevin dish" Discussed on Science in Action

"Packaged sweet nutritious. A hundred billion consumed every year according to figures from the UN's food and Agriculture Organization. Although there are thousand varieties just one accounts for half of all production. The Cavin dish chapels very well, the thick skin. It is high yielding and it tastes pretty good. It's not a bad banana and seedless. Yes, full. If you've ever actually tried to the banana Sade they're very talk for you. Don't a bottom one seventy years ago. It was another seedless variety. That was the top banana grobian show or big Mike sweetser still than the cavern dash. And then a fungus Fusarium wilt or Panama disease. These surged through the plantations killing the planks, Kevin dish was the substitute. But eight two is now threatened by straight of the fungus called tropical race. Four t are four and the races all now to protect the crop. James Dale and his colleagues in Queensland University of technology in Australia successfully engineered a resistance gene into the variety which they say makes it safe from the fungus. Kevin dish. Bananas have been vulnerable. He told me because being seedless and sterile, they are all clones dating back to the early days of agriculture. Hammond dishes probably around about two thousand years old and has not been improved in that time. Whereas nearly everything else has by next the reason why we publish incredible susceptibility to diseases. I just haven't been improved and before we go onto your work, what is it about this fungus that so deadly to the plants? Well into solvable and fungus. It lives in the soil and consider by at least fifty years. It's very, very good at infecting. So they infect through the roots of bananas. They get into the basketball tissue that kill vascular tissue. And by doing that, of course, I kill the banana. And how swift is it pretty quick months. You see the symptoms which usually on four to six weeks before you start say that Pont collapse the traditional way of guessing resistant varieties of species is crossbreeding. That means you finding some kind of plump that Scott resistance to the disease, and then he crossbreed into your crop. You've been starting to do that. You'll search starts off. We're trying to find out if there are wild types of bananas that are resistant to this tropical race, four and there are a number of others. So when you go back into the center of origin of bananas, you find resistance. And so we were able to access a resistant banana and it's resistant to lots of things so that their starting point is that resistance down to a single gene? Yes, it is pretty sick of the genetic. Of the resistance way, believe it's a single dominant Jane for your next step in was to copy that gene into an artificial variant guess GM very of the candidates banana took one of the gene that banana, and we put it into cabinets pronounce by genetic modification and you've tested it. We did. We went up to field in the northern territory where this diseases being pressing for more than twenty years. We work on a plan Tyson. It's really the last commercial banana plantation in the northern territory, and we went into a field which been previously ground candy spinout. It's been decimated with TI four and we planted appliance in there along with controls course and ran that trial for three years. That survey nerve racking, it got more and more nerve wracking. As we went along. We really didn't know at the beginning, whether we're going to be successful as we went along, we saw four airlines. Lee put in one was exceptionally good. And of course, every time that monthly assessments came in on a really good line has come down. I mean, you really put things to a halt spot. Oh, yeah. And not only did we put it into a hotspot. He actually took banana planting. Material was already infected with the Fundus hand, put one of those bits between each plant and the plants entirely came through mostly came through said one lawn after threes night, plants infected. And with three other lines we had between fifteen twenty percent infection the where as the controls way between two-thirds in one hundred percent effective, a definite improvement..

Kevin dish UN Mike sweetser Pont collapse Lee James Dale basketball Panama Queensland University of techn Agriculture Organization Hammond Scott Australia Material GM Jane fifteen twenty percent one hundred percent two thousand years
"kevin dish" Discussed on BBC Inside Science

BBC Inside Science

04:44 min | 2 years ago

"kevin dish" Discussed on BBC Inside Science

"Controls where between two-thirds in one hundred percent effective and I must admit your after while we're starting to get, you know, the early results were getting terribly. Sauntered about, but then as you go along, you start to really worry in every every every month when the assessment was stunned by thinking all done, tell us one of them's come down. But luckily after three years in one line, none of the plants became defect. Now, Kevin dish also has its own latent resistance gene, so it there's something there, but it switched off. So can you switch it back on? That's what we're trying to do. So the Jane that we transferred from the wild banana banana call, usual q. Menachem allocations. We called j two and we found out GI to in the cavity Jane, I was well. The difference is that it's expressed at a very, very limit. So that's probably what it it's not working. It's not providing any resistance. So at how plan at the moment is to take that tonight'd Jane, if you like in Kevin Nash and switch it back on, doesn't lot of resistance to genetically modified fade, especially in Europe. Is there a danger that you're going to do this work saving the combination and no one's going to want tweet them? Yes, of course. There there there recently that possibility appreciated going back to cabinet in trying to switch the strain on. We're doing a by pressure school gene editing, which is really so Chrysler it indistinguishable from conventional breeding. It's actually down in and just tweaking the Jane. Just like would be tweet in conventional braiding. Sods identical originally identical conventional Brady, but much more precise. So we're attempting to do that lamp can be able to go into the cabinet Jane and tweak this journey. So. So it's, we'd switch it back on and high played signed time switch on chocolate rightful resistance and in some jurisdictions. And let's it lay in places like the US and very, probably in a strategy that went be classified as GM. It will not be regulated. And that does two things. One is texoma Texas, massive, costume post. 'cause deregulation is very, very expensive process. But also it doesn't have that GM tag. And so hopefully that's going to be the way that will go challenge for European Europe. Very recently decided through the European Court of Justice. That genetic was really just another foam of GM side decks paid a bit of a setback for Europe. I'm just wondering about the fungus so it struck cool rice fool at the moment. Presumably the fungus is going to modify itself as well. So is this an ongoing battle each unlikely. That the fungus will talk the rice, four, we'll meet a tight to become something general into things that resist. That's probably unlikely the match be concern is somewhere round. The went in in in the areas by bananas, originated this Rex five, and we don't know about that one yet. So this if it works, this is going to be the big hope for bananas. This is going to save bananas for the push able kitschy. Yes, professor, James, Dale the man who saving the cabin dish banana. Eggs on egg-shaped on. That's not particularly helpful description, but ask anyone to draw one and you'll end up with a picture of a chicken egg probably and yet eggs on uniform in shape. Take the guillemot. For example, this seabird lays something twice the size of a hen's egg, which looks a bit like an obelisk is blue. It's speckled. It's weirdly elongated at one end with almost flat sides. The point of this pointing us has long bothered scientists who've come up with a handful of theories. Professor Tim birkhead egg expert from the university of Sheffield has published his theory this week. And when he came into the studio, complete with a fake guillemot egg, he began by talking me through some of the old ideas. This shape is fascinated people for centuries literally, and there's been a number of ideas, and I idea that came out was that this would allow the to spin like a top when it was knocked or blown by the wind. But that was the role of silly idea because that was simply. Based on empty blown egg had no contents a real egg when it's full of yolk, just won't move like that unless you really try to spin it. The other idea was that the egg would role in an arc if you placed his own smooth, but sloping surface and the the idea was that this would save it for rolling off the edge of the cliff rather than rolling in.

Jane GM Europe Kevin dish Professor Tim birkhead European Court of Justice Kevin Nash Texas European Europe Chrysler US university of Sheffield Brady Rex professor James one hundred percent three years
"kevin dish" Discussed on BBC Inside Science

BBC Inside Science

02:30 min | 2 years ago

"kevin dish" Discussed on BBC Inside Science

"James, Dale from the institute of feature environments at the university of Queensland told me why tropical race four is racing through this particular plant relatives funders have been around for a long time. One of the biggest had disease dimick's in history was actually in south Central America where a different version core brace. One wiped out that then expert banana cross Michelle. And that's why we have Kevin dash cabinet is resistant to rice one, and so it it replaced cross Michelle as the expert banana. However, either the last twenty twenty five years, this new version, the rice force. It's cold has been spreading out probably in donation app through southeast Asia and now into south HR now into Africa. Now, the really important part about that is it tilts cabinets, whereas race fund didn't and how come bananas, a susceptible. They were separately. Honest, quite participant to Trumka rates for as many of the other banana diseases. It's just we've selected at Kevin, Kevin dish now represents more than fifty percent of the Madonna's ground in the world. Kevin Klein said all the cabinet in the wilder extremely yet closely related. And so what if people don't safer to try and stop the spread of this fungus Shanley by security has been one of the major strategies to try to stop it spreading. However, the real thing is we need resistance, and that's where nice to visit Haiti and how can genetics come to the rescue. So what we've done is we've taken a Jane from wall banana, which is completely resistant to Trump the rightful And wait. we'd take an Jane from that banana and put it into Kevin dish. And we've taken that through threes field trials in very heavily infested soil. We up in the northern territory bestride aware. The diseases been prison for near probably at least twenty years, and we went onto a plantation one of the last night to plantations in the northern territory and into a field that a Bank completely decimated by tropical rightful previously. And that's why replanted field trial. So basically if it survived that, then you knew it was resistant. That's right. We ran the Trump for three years which is much longer the nice people do said one lawn after threes overnight plants infected. And with three other lines we had between fifteen and twenty percent infection where as the.

Kevin dish Kevin Klein Michelle Kevin dash Kevin Dale Jane university of Queensland Central America Haiti Shanley Trump Asia James Africa Trumka twenty twenty five years twenty percent fifty percent twenty years
"kevin dish" Discussed on The Cycling Podcast

The Cycling Podcast

02:13 min | 2 years ago

"kevin dish" Discussed on The Cycling Podcast

"Just have to go harder than pedal speed and that really starts to so we must be on about twenty five or twenty six minutes now so you've got to hope enough rided in that group when they will come in inside the limit your that's what we hope for from the and you know i mean raja raja is rich last group with fringes group he has a really good feeling so i think and all these certainly would would push an and and give them a heads up and then no way we do we do our time spits us raleigh so i gave them a click basically when we when we get over the climb on then he starts stop watch and then he knows exactly where they are if it's really really tight you don't wanna be fooled by digital delay of television because he think that just past the line but in reality the pass line forty minutes forty seconds earlier this is you know it's it's doable sometimes if in the car if you rely on streaming then you up to up to three minutes and just don't wanna be fooled by that it's just too important so we tried to get it right and most of the time we do but it's it's it's hard so if you don't make it simple as like not good enough not able to who does the calculation and will the riders now it's thirty four minutes thirty so that coming up to finish straight they see the they'll know whether they're in or out and you know you have your physiotherapist at the finish line and you look at their because it pops up display you always do your own prediction calculation and so you have a pretty good view say what if and when so in the morning already thirty five everett's going to be that thirty four it's going to be that so seven ever going to be that and so you up well here's a couple of reuters three of your riders is that a good sign that's not the g repetto yet prejudice from mode so you know you can track them we can see them where they are and that they were together with julian for more renshaw and kevin dish so we know pretty much weather i'll throw by made it with twenty second span as easy peasy why would they hurry so much should have down of it never in doubt then never in doubt i made it with twenty eight seconds to spare why why be three.

raja raja everett reuters renshaw raleigh julian kevin dish twenty eight seconds thirty four minutes twenty six minutes forty minutes forty seconds three minutes twenty second
"kevin dish" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

02:04 min | 2 years ago

"kevin dish" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"Seventeen ninety three and kevin dish lifts seventeen thirty one through eighteen ten okay so what was the deal what how did they touch on black holes all right so even in their day it was known that stars flared up they subsided and even vantage from the heavens a popular theory of the day was that they had dark spots on them you know much like the spots that could be observed on our own son and this would affect visibility though theories varied on what those dark spots were actually going to be they might be dark valleys or ripples or peaks at a darker core underlying you know outer fluid or gases scum or rock like bodies these there's all star scum yes starts your star scum and then there was this cool idea that that there was also thrown around that you might have flattened stars so these would have been i guess kind of like kind of like lenses rotating disks yeah and so if it depending on what how it was facing you it would affect luminosity so that turned its edge to you would obviously be a lot less illumination so it's not exactly the same principle but i can see that being an interesting inside preceding the the discovery of things like pulsars yeah yeah so they pondered the structure of the cosmos and the nature of stars and eventually hit upon a rather i would say haunting idea and this was in seventeen eighty three what if a star was was massive enough large enough that it attracted back upon itself all the light it admitted in other words so massive that light itself could not achieve escape velocity this was the idea of the dark star whoa now we should give a little more context and explanation to what they're thinking was here but i have to say the name of this paper because it's crazy okay the paper by john michell in presented at the royal society of london in seventeen eighty three and eighty four was quote on the means.

john michell kevin dish royal society of london
"kevin dish" Discussed on Pat Gray Unleashed

Pat Gray Unleashed

01:45 min | 3 years ago

"kevin dish" Discussed on Pat Gray Unleashed

"Right she she wasn't mentally all there apparently they thought so the her dad took her in for a frontal lobotomy which did not go well and then she was institutionalized the rest of her life that happened in nineteen forty forty one in forty four joseph kennedy junior died in world war two when the plane he was piloting went down in the english channel kathleen kennedy kevin dish whose husband died in world war two died in a plane crash in france at the age of twenty eight in nineteen forty eight patrick bovi kennedy second son of president kennedy and his wife jacqueline died on august seventh two days after he was born president kennedy then was assassinated that same year november twenty second in dallas edward kennedy the youngest kennedy child escapes ted kennedy escaped a plane crash that claimed his aide edward moss robert was assassinated in nineteen sixty eight then of course teddy drives off the bridge mary joke kopechne dies edward m kennedy senator son lost his right leg to cancer joseph p the set of robert ethel driver of a car that leaves one passenger permanently paralyzed the list is you get to william kennedy accused of rape he was acquitted of that by the way john f kennedy jr who died in a plane crash on and on and on goes on there.

kevin dish france kennedy jacqueline dallas robert ethel driver rape joseph kennedy kathleen kennedy patrick bovi kennedy president edward kennedy edward moss senator william kennedy twenty second two days