35 Burst results for "Kettering"

Sloan-Kettering Spin-Out Harnesses AI to Diagnose Cancer

The Bio Report

05:09 min | 7 months ago

Sloan-Kettering Spin-Out Harnesses AI to Diagnose Cancer

"Leo thanks for joining us. Thank you so much for having me. We're gonna talk about page. It's ai base diagnostics. And how digital pathology has the potential to change out cancer. Patients are diagnosed. Perhaps we can start with the need. What problem is pains trying to address their few different problems. We're building a portfolio of products. And those problems. Really fall into three different buckets. One is to provide more information to pathologists during their their clinical workflow. That will help them ultimately have real time. Quality assurance provide the more information during their diagnostic process as well as ultimately help them with efficiency in throughput. The second need that we're helping address is with our our viewer in our digital pathology platform which is allowing them to access historical images to share uh slides easily to get consultations as well as to be able to reference other digital images and slides during the course of their work and then the last set of needs is really around trying to look for new biomarkers that can help doctors on college costs ensure that the patients get the right treatment every time. And how are these tests generally perform today. How does pages technology change that. So in a clinical pathology setting What happens today is a pathologist or piece of tissue is taken out of a patient from a biopsy or surgery that tissue gets cut stained mounted on a glass slide. And then the pathologist is handed a set of slides to look at that patient at thaad will look at that slide and they may see something that they're not sure what it is. It may be a little unusual. They may ask a colleague. They may send it out for consultation. They may do an additional stain or send it off for some molecular testing ultimately. They're going to get all of that information back and they're going to have to make a call for that patient. What the right. Diagnosis is in a page world. That slide is not looked at under a microscope. Scanned and the pathologist is looking at a computer monitor and pages gone through those slides and matched each slide. The tissue content in that slide those patterns with a database of known tissue and diagnostics. And that information is made available to the pathologist during the course of their their clinical treatment so that they have this additional information available to them automatically forever case having to go through and take those other steps of consultation and sending cases out in additional testing in staining. They'll have that information at their fingertips so that they can get to that right. Decision faster and more standardized more confidently are slice prepared for a page test as they would be for a traditional test today yes exactly the same way in fact there's no additional Staining no additional preparation that's needed. The only piece of additional equipment is the side scattered south and is the digital. Ai system visually reading an image and is doing so in a way that's unique to the machinery somehow mimicking. What a pathologist is looking for. I think the best way to think about how. Ai works is. It's looking for patterns in data in this case patterns and tissue and so that machine is identifying these patterns matching those against database of of known patterns That have been either diagnosed by other sts or that have been results of additional testing like molecular tests or something like that to really match those patterns and then highlight that information to the pathologist during the course of their their diagnostic process as we think about going forward in that biomarker direction that i mentioned and that case These are patterns at just may not know about may not be aware about may not really be visible to the naked eye and yet the computer is able to sift through thousands ten two thousand hundred thousand millions of images and identify patterns that are signatures for treatment responses or other

LEO Cancer
Who Was Dr. Fata

Dr. Death

05:10 min | 10 months ago

Who Was Dr. Fata

"Patty hester is a petite woman with straight blond hair and blue eyes. She's lived in clarkston michigan a suburb of detroit. Nearly her entire life and she's a fitness junkie. My father was a jackie. I'm very healthy and live to be eighty four so i i'd always been into fitness and health. We ran racism. Road bikes like mile. Trips and i played softball. I played hockey in two thousand nine. Patty was working as an emergency room technician. She monitored patient's vitals the thing she saw the er were enough to keep her motivated to take care of ourselves but then something happened to her. That inspired her to become a fitness instructor. Her mom was in a car accident and because she had a congestive heart failure. My mom was in a coma for from january. Fifth until june ninth. Patty and her family were very close almost daily. She stayed at her mother's bedside praying. She would recover. I looked at my mom and him. I was so tired of sickness that it was like and wanted something. That was life giving a new then beyond anything that i had to pursue That is where my drive really kicked to become a trainer. Because i just could not bear the thought of someone being long-term l. i. us sick and i don't want that for myself either. So at age fifty five. Patty began studying to become a fitness instructor a few months into her studies. Patty got pneumonia. Her doctor did some blood work. And a few of the tests were concerning she suggested that patty see hematologist a physician who specializes in blood conditions. The haematologist petty really wanted to see out of the country so she did some research and found one who looked pretty promising. My internal medicine doctors that you know. Hey i set my mom to him. He's world renowned dot. They're freed fighter. Sloan kettering graduate your choice patty but i would go to him if her thirty years. Working in healthcare had taught her anything. It was to be extra sure that this doctor farid fata was legit. She read all the reviews. She could find. She asked around about him at the hospital she worked at. She called it bernice. Who's an internal medicine doctor in saint louis who said she'd heard good things. There is nothing nothing to ever question that this person was anything. But like oh wow. You're lucky to get into see this person. So in late february two thousand ten. Patty went to see dr fata at his practice. Michigan hematology oncology. She arrived late in the afternoon and almost every seat in the waiting room was full. She took a seat and began filling out her paperwork. A big screen. Tv in the waiting area played an ad for dr fatah's charity swan for life. This video about the story of this patience has an making this wooden swan in holding up and telling the story how you know his patient who who had passed away. Her husband carved this for him. It the whole thing wrapped around donating money but it played over and over again when you're waiting for an appointment. How long can you watch this. After half an hour patty got up and approached the woman at the front desk. I said. can you please change. A channel in the employees all spoke in a whisper. I really didn't understand that one either. Because i worked in the medical field and you whisper of confidential. But she said no. I can't i can't change the channel confused. Patty turned to go back to her seat after a forty five minute wait. Chief finally got into an exam room. an in his room. There's the Top tack framed pictures of him. Now top dak sway talked. It was another half hour. Wait before. Dr fata appeared. He entered the room in a white lab coat over a shirt and tie he was short. Have very round face. He introduced himself. He was very very soft. Spoken almost to the fat that it was a whisper. He was reaching out. His hand turned to be very personable and would lean in. And hey you know while patricia. You're in the right place. Patty wasn't sure what to expect but she didn't wanna miss anything in case he did have surprising news for her. She came prepared really prepared. In fact i had a little Recording device in my pocket. And i told him i said i'm recording our conversation in case i don't catch it all. So could you speak up. And he said oh. You don't need that you know i'll give you all your lab results and you'll get all this stuff and i just liked to do that. He

Patty Patty Hester Sloan Kettering Clarkston Farid Fata Dr Fata Michigan Hematology Congestive Heart Failure Softball Dr Fatah Coma Detroit Hockey Michigan Pneumonia Bernice Saint Louis
Ruth Bader Ginsburg hospitalized for minimally invasive procedure

Ron St. Pierre

00:31 sec | 1 year ago

Ruth Bader Ginsburg hospitalized for minimally invasive procedure

"Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg was hospitalized yesterday to undergo a non surgical procedure to correct a bile stent. According to a court spokesperson. The routine Which is minimally invasive. It's a procedure took place at New York's Sloan Kettering Cancer Center. It revised the vile Ducks tent that she had inserted last August. Spokesperson noted such provisions are common occurrences, and it was done to minimize the risk of future infection. She's expected to be released from the hospital by the end of the

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg Sloan Kettering Cancer Center Supreme Court Ducks New York
Ruth Bader Ginsburg undergoes medical procedure at hospital

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | 1 year ago

Ruth Bader Ginsburg undergoes medical procedure at hospital

"Supreme Court justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg is undergoing a procedure in a New York City cancer center the Supreme Court says the eighty seven year old justice underwent a minimally invasive procedure to revise a bile duct stent it was performed at memorial Sloan Kettering cancer center and her doctors say stent revisions are common this is performed by endoscopy with imaging guidance this dented been place last August when Ginsburg was treated for a cancerous tumor on her pancreas the procedure was also done earlier this month to clean the stent Ginsburg announced this month she is receiving chemotherapy for cancerous lesions on her liver Jackie Quinn Washington

Ruth Bader Ginsburg Supreme Court Sloan Kettering Cancer Center Jackie Quinn Washington New York City
Interview With Padma Lakshmi

Asian Enough

05:52 min | 1 year ago

Interview With Padma Lakshmi

"Bodmer. Thank you so much for joining us. Thank you, I think it's really cool. What you're doing because I would have loved something like this when I was in Asian American teenager. So I'm pleased that you know this generation of young Asian Americans will have that. Maybe they can grow up without some of the baggage that we have. Baggage and should but yes. I wanted to talk a little bit about you. Know your upbringing in your memoir, which is called love loss and what we ate. You talked about growing up in new. York and L. A. and I had no idea you. You grew up in in Los Angeles. Where did you grow up in L. A.? And what were your experiences like? I grew up in La. Puente which is in the San Gabriel, Valley Yeah. Winter Workman, highschool my mother got transferred from Sloan Kettering Hospital in New, York, to city of Hope Hospital in Duarte or are Katie I. Guess, and so that's why we moved and I went to High School in San Gabriel Valley, so yeah. I mean I consider myself such a New Yorker, because of the New York's along. It was my first point of entry into the United States when I immigrated here when I was four in. So you know that's what winds up getting a lot of play in my personal history, but I have very slowly formed deep memories. Of My years in La Pointe. Day, and you know my mother still lives in the house. I grew up in so whenever I come to La I always wind up going there, of course. Did you like growing up in L. A.? Did you like growing up La Puente? Was it a cool place to grow up, I, did not. Bad at my mother for moving to Los Angeles for years I, really? How's it against her? My poor mom, she's a single mom, and she's from south India and so she couldn't take the cold. And you know expensive to live in Manhattan, and so I understand as an adult, and as a parent all the reasons that she, of course you know moved us across the country as a child, it just seemed hugely inconvenient and down because in new. York I was much more independent because everybody walks, and you're in a very densely populated metropolitan area in Los Angeles says you buy as no like there's no center. There's no downtown in especially in La Pointe Day I was in a suburb and you need a car to get. In so, I felt like my independence was with stifled drastically, just moving cities, and then I was also I was in La Pointe Day I wasn't in like Sherman oaks or something. So you know in the eighties. When I was in high school, there were a lot of gangs in la, Puente and other than South Central. La It was a very seriously dangerous place we had. Had, Mexican. Gangs. We had a lot of Tolo and SCHOLLA's. And some of them are friends, but some of them also bullied me, and so I had my little conclave of friends who were mostly Filipino because our school did have a lot of Mexicans a lot of Filipinos lot of African Americans probably the most Mexican, and also Caucasian, but from my freshman year my senior. Senior year, you could really see the population of the schools you much more ethnic, in Brown and so I found it hard. You know because I'm Indian, and my skin is Brown on face value you could think I was Mexican may be, but then once I opened. My Mount was obvious and I don't think they were enough Indians at my school for anybody to form any. Any kind of opinion about me except other you know actually I'm curious. You mentioned that you were not super happy about the move to La for a while, not happy that your mom made that move and of course. That's a huge move from New York. New York is a huge move from India. Where much of your family is? When did you and how did you? come to understand your mom's journey and your mom's reasons for moving both of you so far well I understand that those moves were born of necessity. I understood why she didn't feel totally comfortable in New York, but I'm different than my mother, you know my my mother is is not as curious about being in the world, and just traveling and bumping up against other people, whereas that's all I wanNA do. You, know so I knew very very early on even when I was four that the reason we were leaving India is because it was very taboo for my mom to be a divorce. A divorce just didn't happen in Indian culture in growing up and going back to India I still don't know I know one person in India. WHO's divorced? You know, and so I knew that we were leaving to have a better life, you know. My mother left when I was two and I lived with my grandparents, and I didn't see my dad so I had no recollection of my real father I didn't even know what his face looks like. Because they had ripped up all the pictures so from two to four. I didn't see either of my parents so I literally was so excited to come to America, because America to me, meant being reunited with my mom.

La Pointe Bodmer L. A. Winter Workman Sloan Kettering Hospital New, York Katie I. LA Los Angeles Hope Hospital San Gabriel Valley San Gabriel Duarte La Puente New York York New Yorker South India Sherman Oaks High School
Padma Lakshmi on Being 'Other'

Asian Enough

04:01 min | 1 year ago

Padma Lakshmi on Being 'Other'

"Bodmer. Thank you so much for joining us. Thank you, I think it's really cool. What you're doing because I would have loved something like this when I was in Asian American teenager. So I'm pleased that you know this generation of young Asian Americans will have that. Maybe they can grow up without some of the baggage that we have. Baggage and should but yes. I wanted to talk a little bit about you. Know your upbringing in your memoir, which is called love loss and what we ate. You talked about growing up in new. York and L. A. and I had no idea you. You grew up in in Los Angeles. Where did you grow up in L. A.? And what were your experiences like? I grew up in La. Puente which is in the San Gabriel, Valley Yeah. Winter Workman, highschool my mother got transferred from Sloan Kettering Hospital in New, York, to city of Hope Hospital in Duarte or are Katie I. Guess, and so that's why we moved and I went to High School in San Gabriel Valley, so yeah. I mean I consider myself such a New Yorker, because of the New York's along. It was my first point of entry into the United States when I immigrated here when I was four in. So you know that's what winds up getting a lot of play in my personal history, but I have very slowly formed deep memories. Of My years in La Pointe. Day, and you know my mother still lives in the house. I grew up in so whenever I come to La I always wind up going there, of course. Did you like growing up in L. A.? Did you like growing up La Puente? Was it a cool place to grow up, I, did not. Bad at my mother for moving to Los Angeles for years I, really? How's it against her? My poor mom, she's a single mom, and she's from south India and so she couldn't take the cold. And you know expensive to live in Manhattan, and so I understand as an adult, and as a parent all the reasons that she, of course you know moved us across the country as a child, it just seemed hugely inconvenient and down because in new. York I was much more independent because everybody walks, and you're in a very densely populated metropolitan area in Los Angeles says you buy as no like there's no center. There's no downtown in especially in La Pointe Day I was in a suburb and you need a car to get. In so, I felt like my independence was with stifled drastically, just moving cities, and then I was also I was in La Pointe Day I wasn't in like Sherman oaks or something. So you know in the eighties. When I was in high school, there were a lot of gangs in la, Puente and other than South Central. La It was a very seriously dangerous place we had. Had, Mexican. Gangs. We had a lot of Tolo and SCHOLLA's. And some of them are friends, but some of them also bullied me, and so I had my little conclave of friends who were mostly Filipino because our school did have a lot of Mexicans a lot of Filipinos lot of African Americans probably the most Mexican, and also Caucasian, but from my freshman year my senior. Senior year, you could really see the population of the schools you much more ethnic, in Brown and so I found it hard. You know because I'm Indian, and my skin is Brown on face value you could think I was Mexican may be, but then once I opened. My Mount was obvious and I don't think they were enough Indians at my school for anybody to form any. Any kind of opinion about me except other you know

Los Angeles La Puente York La Pointe La I High School New York San Gabriel Brown Scholla San Gabriel Valley Sloan Kettering Hospital United States Hope Hospital Winter Workman India Sherman Oaks
Supergoop!: Holly Thaggard

How I Built This

08:34 min | 1 year ago

Supergoop!: Holly Thaggard

"Week, but then I also immediately thought about my seventeen kids that I taught that year in the classroom. And never once did I see a tube of sunscreen on the school campus. Despite the fact that the children were on the playground in the middle of the day, and often even staying an in sports in the afternoon, no one was wearing sunscreen. And and to be clear with the vast majority of us are not wearing sunscreen all the time, right? This is just not part of our. It's not. It's like brushing your teeth. Most people don't just don't do this. This is two thousand five and you start to think. What like hey, maybe maybe I can figure out a way to get people to wear sunscreen all the time, not just at the beach. was that what you were thinking like? Immediately asked so I found the study by Memorial Sloan Kettering that was talking

Memorial Sloan Kettering
Sunny Summer Citrus

Essential Oil Solutions with doTERRA

05:59 min | 1 year ago

Sunny Summer Citrus

"Samantha. Thank you so much for joining us today. I'm so excited to talk with you about these citrus oils. Now I'm excited to talk with you too. There are some amazing oil that we have so. I know a lot of people think of Setris when they think of summer. It's fun and it's bright and of course the taste and the smells remind us of summer but what are some things to be aware of when using citrus oils topically especially during the summertime? Like you said oils are great. They you know we have that bright fresh smell also great topically for certain uses however it's important to be careful where you apply them most such as well as have compounds that can cause UV sensitivity basically means skin is more sensitive to the sun and UV. Rays for myself. In the summer I personally don't use many citrus loyals topically unless it's at night or if I absolutely have to and then I make sure underclothing things like that right absolutely so we do have to be a little bit. More careful about where we're applying citrus oils but what makes them a great companion during the summertime. They are fantastic. I love combining said shows or something to ground them it really just brightens refreshes the atmosphere. That you're in one of my favorite diffuser blends to us is wild orange green monitoring grapefruit. Hawaiian Angela just a few drops of each of those. It's so refreshing uplifting whether that's during the summer or as things get kinda cooler in the fall that sounds like it would smell amazing. That's definitely won. The I want to try now I recommend so does. Tara has quite a few sicher soil. Some people may be really familiar with some. They might not have tried. Before and so they're kind of a few different categories maybe that we could put these citrus into the first one would be the sweeter citrus says things like wild orange. Or Tangerine what are some of your favorite uses I the sweeter citrus oils. While warrenton kettering arm I go to as an addition to my water bottle to drinking water. I love the sweet taste like you mentioned. They really are in that sweet category and it helps me drink more water throughout the day. Be More mindful about the water that I'm drinking. Plus there. Those emotional benefits that we love from citress loyals absolutely and the internal cleansing as well that can come with citrus oils. That's amazing and I think you're absolutely right. Sometimes it's hard to get in all the water that we need to especially when it's hot and we need a little bit of extra water that taste of that sweet citrus can be such a good companion. Yeah it's a great motivated drink. More for sure. So the next category would be kind of the tangy citrus oils. Things like lemon lime burgum. Oh Green Mandarin and grapefruit. What are some of your favorite ways to use these oils internally? Some lemon lime are my favorite goto oils cooking. Especially in the summer. I use these in Salsas guacamole along with a little bit of Cilantro oil for both the tastes and the internal benefits like you mentioned about the internal cleansing and internal emotional benefits. We can get from those oils. Ooh those in a guacamole would be so fresh and then you don't have to worry about having the fresh ingredients around the house exactly it's divine. So what are some other ways that I could incorporate these funds citrus oils around the house? So we all know. soils are ideal oils for cleaning. But if for me if I ever need to use a harsher cleaner to remove stubborn stain Soaps gone. I really like to add a few drops of grapefruit and lemon in the bottle cleaner. It adds a bright fresh aroma. Kinda cuts that harsh cleaner. If I really have to use some things a little heavier but also helps soclean stubborn surface ads and it boosts cleaning benefits. Also lemon mix with some retain makes for great would cleaner. That's awesome for you. Know would tables but as always test the oils? You're using a small inconspicuous area before just to make sure you're not going to damage your surface. Because some of the finishes can be a little touchy to to these citrus oils. Those are great ideas in such a good alternative to some of the harsh chemicals that we would bring into our house otherwise for that cleaning and different things. Yeah Yeah. It's definitely your alternatives. So the last category that I think we could lump these citrus oils into is kind of the bright citrus oils and these two are the citrus lens that we have the citrus bliss and doe Tara Cheer as part of our product marketing team. You know you have some experience with the creation of these oils. The thought behind creating these two essential oil blends as bliss is simply inspired by an orange cream sickle. When you smell that you really get that vanilla ice cream in that sweet. Tang you orange. We wanted to create a fresh summary. Blend that still reminded us that you know simpler days in the San Juan joying sweet classic ice cream treat diffuse it smells just like an orange cream cycle and then as part of the emotional therapy program cheer actually. Combined Citizen Spices which is on that emotional therapy wheel. And they've been shown to inspire optimism while uplifting attitude and so you mentioned fusing and you mentioned the emotional benefits with the cheer. How can you utilize the citrus blends every day in your life? I feel like suggest. Bliss is amazing diffused from spring all through summer. I also like to put a few drops on a paper towel. Then put that the bottom of my garbage bin. I found it helps of any unpleasant smells can kinda kick so smells and then cheer is one of my favorites from the emotional therapy line. Actually it's the one that I I- diffuse whenever I need a different type of such a splint. The spices actually perfectly complemented suggest profile. So I generally use it late summer to fall to warm up the house. A bit with those spices while still keeping it fresh energize having citrus aroma. That you love in the summer

Citress Loyals Setris Samantha. Tara San Juan
R/x for Healthcare: Better UX Through Measurement and Deeper Engagement with Jay Erickson, Chief Innovation Officer at Modus

Outcomes Rocket

06:44 min | 1 year ago

R/x for Healthcare: Better UX Through Measurement and Deeper Engagement with Jay Erickson, Chief Innovation Officer at Modus

"Just got back from Argentina year over there Yeah that's right. We have an office down there and I was doing some work down there and Yet we just moved back last week. Interesting time to move back of course to be traveling around but love Argentina. Wow well welcome back to the States. And you are also very focused on the digital aspects within healthcare so tell us what inspires your work in the healthcare vertical In the core of my inspiration is a very personal so seven years ago. I was diagnosed with advanced metastatic to sicker cancer. I spent about a year and treatment at Sloan. Kettering forty five days in patient. Three months of Chemo for big surgery. So I was sort of a professional patient for a year and I learned law things. I'm six years. No evidence of disease now so I feel very much. Thank you thank you and as you can imagine I learned a lot of things and a lot of different levels but one thing I I learned in observed in that role was just in my opinion. How poorly a digital was being deployed in space for patients and for clinicians and this is not a knock on Sloan. They're amazing they saved my life. But it's something that's across the industry. As as soon as I came back and so before that I was the chief operating officer is really just focusing on running the business and when I came back I said this is something I really want to dive back into. Working more directly with clients focusing on as a problem to be solved doing what I can to put my shoulder to the wheel of making better more effective experiences for patients and for clinician. So that's my My touchstone of the passion that I bring to it. Well I think it's A powerful story Jay and I appreciate sharing that and congratulate you for for beating cancer and so great that you have taken this upon yourself. Having been there done that as a patient better and more efficient are two things that we could definitely get from from digital technologies. Tell us a little bit more about how you guys are. Adding value to the ecosystem through digital so our focus is really on creating experiences that are engaging in effective and this mostly for patients but also for clinicians and sometimes caregivers and bringing best practices to the industry that hasn't really been woven into the to the way that the digital products have been built outside. The industry and healthcare has has been data centric and rightfully so right. The legislation was passed. You know twenty plus years ago saying you need to get everything into the data and and that's been journey and now that we have all the data in we're starting to figure out ways to unlock the data and share the data and do more with the data. We need to stop being so data centric and start being more human centric and understanding that people are complex and their situations are often very unique and we need to build experiences that meet them where they are and make things easy for them and drives towards the outcomes that we want for them. So that's a long answer and I can be unpacked. Non Thought of different ways but how we sort of more tactically are coming into his kind of doing really running more design thinking processes That haven't been lacking so picking up on sort of clinical insight or a market research research site in farm industry for instance and building on that doing ethnographic research actually talking to patients in really understanding their sort of holistic view. Their Longitudinal journey that might touch a bunch of different things. A bunch of different providers a bunch of different mediums a bunch of different co morbidity or products understanding those longitudinal journeys doing rapid prototyping and. Co Design and collaboration ways. And then putting those back for early prototype validation before anything gets actually develop so that process of design thinking is something that has been lacking in the industry and has led to a lot of digital experiences that are either painful or hard to navigate or create unnecessary cognitive. Load especially in the case of clinicians. It's interesting you know. And I'm glad you mentioned clinicians as well because bad experience exists on on the patient side and on the clinician side. As well and to your point there's a lot that's going on that's great but there's an opportunity to do so much better and saw I'd love to hear from. Uja On on what your team has done. That's made either outcomes better or business models better within healthcare. Yeah so I think it's. It's applying that process that I described by lake. You know it's all in. The end is about outcomes right so you really are trying to make better Clinton experiences. They can spend more time to medicine less time on data entry or so. They're less burnt out. Say let's make less mistakes and in the patient case you're trying to keep them engaged. You're trying to get data to flow and to have the outcome of their experience in their disease journey or or or health journey. Have a better outcome. So it's not just about great experiences to create great experiences. I WanNa make that clear to but specifically applying those cases. I mean. We've done everything from working with. Pharmaceutical companies to develop a digital prototypes around using stress managed using behavioral change techniques around social support for stress management or behavioral scientists at pharmaceutical companies or working with healthcare providers to provide better pathways for patients to navigate their journeys. So it's a lot of simple stuff and it can be starting with schedule. An appointment and navigating to the in helping with with with transport access to the site of care. Just that doesn't require blockchain or a I or anything fancy but doing that in a way that is easy in as easy as Uber or another experience that we're used to in our normal life bringing that level of ease and utility to those experience that's table stakes right and then it's going from. They're moving more into actual medicine side of things and we do a lot of stuff around adherence and getting people know we know that that forty percent of outcomes is driven by behavior. And there's really nothing better at a scalable in evaluating level to help with behavior change them and digital devices mean there's a there's a shadow side to that too also right. Mike. We're all addicted to these things. But that same power can be used to drive behavior change whether it's adherence to medication or physical therapy or just a care plan so creating experiences for patients that help them with that. So that's we start to get into the closer to the medical side of things so that's some of the ways that we are bringing our skills that we've owned also in other industries like you've working in hospitality and retail and e commerce and all these other industries that have more are more mature digitally especially from human centric perspective bringing all those practices and tools to the space

Sloan Argentina Chemo Chief Operating Officer Kettering JAY Co Design Mike Clinton
US job losses mount as economic pain deepens worldwide

AP News Radio

00:32 sec | 1 year ago

US job losses mount as economic pain deepens worldwide

"Some students in Kettering Ohio start their home school day with the pledge of allegiance it was an idea from one mom trying to make her family's new normal feel a little bit like the old one and she included neighbors I and now Jennifer stampers nine year old son Zach has had a change of heart about school I always wish the school was in the thing right tell Julie Ryan is a second grade teacher who lives on the block I think it brings the neighborhood together when we're supposed to be a part actually after

Kettering Ohio Jennifer Stampers Zach Julie Ryan
How does the immune system combat coronavirus

Morning Edition

03:31 min | 1 year ago

How does the immune system combat coronavirus

"Some people who get covert nineteen will experience something that's really frightening they fight through the first week of the disease and maybe even start to feel a little bit better but then suddenly they crash they end up in intensive care and sometimes they even end up dead NPR's Geoff Brumfiel explains what's going on here right now the best weapon you have to fight against covert nineteen is your own immune system the majority of people who get the disease just need to rest while their municipal seek and destroy the virus but that army of cells can do collateral damage when they deal with infection they make a lot of toxic molecules and so those toxic molecules can cause a lot of tissue damage Jessica hammerman is an immunologist at the Benaroya research institute in Seattle she says the fevers aches and pains you feel when you're sick that's often a side effect of the immune systems work and sometimes when the fight is particularly tough the side effects can get really out of hand what happens is this community cells have a way of calling in reinforcements using molecules called cytokines and sometimes sells just keep producing more and more cytokines hammerman imagines it this way the virus is like a fire breaking out in a large building the cytokines are like the alarm like the smoke alarm never turns off and you keep having firefighters are coming coming coming spring water on the walls chopping through doors doing all kinds of damage to the building even if the fire is out the name for this is a cytokine storm and it can be deadly in fact it's believed that side kind storms killed a lot of young and healthy people during the flu pandemic in nineteen eighteen now hammerman and other scientists and doctors say they're seeing signs storms are killing people infected with corona virus tests are showing elevated levels of cytokine molecules in the blood of some of the sickest patients often in the second week when the immune system is ramped up to fight some doctors are trying to treat the storms one is Daniel Griffin the chief of infectious disease for pro health care associates a group of physicians and serves the New York City area when I spoke to him last week he had just started using steroids and powerful anti inflammatory drugs on a handful of patients the goal was to try and turn down the music stems alarm and he said you're seeing results everyone did really well it was actually I have to admit yesterday was a good day some patients recovered in a matter of hours the impact was dramatic since then he's treated dozens of covert patients not all have responded well but he says overall he thinks it's definitely helping however to buy this whole of memorial Sloan Kettering in New York City warns that these therapies carry risks one risk is that the infection could get worse remember the music system is the best weapon people have to fight covert nineteen turning off even part of its communications network just finance in the fight of its life against corona virus could cause the virus to surge back horses the treatment could also lead to secondary infections that could be worse than covert nineteen itself you know I don't want to be a Debbie Downer but I think we have to be humble and just not assume that things are gonna work given the dangers hall says rigorous studies need to be conducted to see who will benefit from the drugs to block cytokine storms those studies are already underway Geoff Brumfiel NPR

"kettering" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

02:16 min | 1 year ago

"kettering" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"Daylight savings time whatever they call it it's six oh eight that's what I call it and do it we're a little bit late for this but it's never too late for deck good morning good morning how are you I'm doing well thank you for a okay yeah you usually don't last this long do I know yeah sometimes changes changes all right Greg will limit had to say you understand all yeah and she's got a lovely voice yeah yes I I can't imagine her with the Kettering banjo society that would be a treat he sounded good to have Dick from Dayton Lynette and the Kettering banjo society maybe you can do one of those in living room concerts like I heart radio is going to do tomorrow I was thinking about that yeah that's going to be huge yeah so what's going on at Lowe's deck pretty busy lately have you yep yep yep but it just seems like that area of lumber his I think people are doing early spring projects we have nothing else to do a lot of them yeah I might as well might as well did you did for your tool right I liked your your guest about but let's talk about the rolling stones the other night what's that guy's name John Marshall mighty John Marshall for money music dot com yeah yeah he's great good yeah hi I just want to say about they had a concert disposal of post to be at upper city G. feel with the Indians play yeah they were going to be there sometime in June I I I don't think it's gonna happen now engines are gonna reschedule concerts yeah they're gonna think about the age of the the aggregate age of the rolling stones they're all high risk yeah for go by what he did anything they did you know Jerry Jeff I loved anything they they had what's your favorite rolling stones song to get off my cloud.

Greg Kettering banjo society Dick Lowe John Marshall Dayton Jerry Jeff
"kettering" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

01:39 min | 1 year ago

"kettering" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"The whole food chain two minutes decently PS when will the prime minister good to stop this deliberate policy it inflicting impoverishment and destitution on open wounds I'm not registered social landlords in the northeast to study the particular cases he he raises but I use universal credit is available from day one is this the best he is it is this is a wages are not rising with the rising as well Mr speaker Los good night prime minister made a secret visit to Kettering General Hospital overall this is not a whole as soon as he listens to a patient's on this one I'm actually you're listening visit you.

prime minister Kettering General Hospital
Cafeteria at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in NYC shut down due to listeria

Bernie and Sid in the Morning

00:14 sec | 1 year ago

Cafeteria at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in NYC shut down due to listeria

"A cafeteria and one of the top rated cancer hospitals in the city has been shut down after testing positive for Listeria A. B. C. seven says memorial Sloan Kettering cancer center on York Avenue confirm that a close the cafeteria that feeds patients

Sloan Kettering Cancer Center
Ohio Supreme Court will not hear appeal from abortion clinic

Woody and Company

00:40 sec | 2 years ago

Ohio Supreme Court will not hear appeal from abortion clinic

"An abortion clinic in Ohio is fighting to stay open after an appeal with the Supreme Court of Ohio refused to take up its case an abortion clinic in Kettering Ohio the Dayton area is only clinic he's seeking intervention by a federal court after the Ohio Supreme Court refused again to hear the clinics appeal after the state health department revoke his license for violating a state law that mandates the clinic have backup doctors and written patient transfer agreements from local hospitals supporters of the clinic of argue the transfer rules were medically unnecessary and unconstitutional the Ohio department of health not commenting on the

Ohio Supreme Court Kettering Ohio Ohio Supreme Court Dayton Ohio Department Of Health
Ruth Bader Ginsberg Being Treated for Pancreatic Cancer

KSFO Morning Show with Brian Sussman with Katie Green

00:50 sec | 2 years ago

Ruth Bader Ginsberg Being Treated for Pancreatic Cancer

"Sherry in a one story we can talk about this morning that broke on Friday at some kind of big but it's a repair Ginsburg Supreme Court justice yeah they announced that she had undergone three weeks of radiation therapy at Sloan Kettering in New York after doctors found a crate a cancerous tumor on her pancreas now this is the second time she's had the pancreatic cancer this could be a continuation of the last time there they really didn't give a lot of information but let me tell you this woman he's he's like the energizer bunny she could teach some of these NFL guys a couple lessons right now you see broke three ribs so what was it about a year ago she had lung cancer removed he's had pancreatic cancer I mean it's just incredible what she's done and she's still taking eighty six years

Sherry Sloan Kettering New York Ginsburg Supreme Court NFL Eighty Six Years
Ruth Bader Ginsburg treated for pancreatic tumor

Nightside with Dan Rea

00:41 sec | 2 years ago

Ruth Bader Ginsburg treated for pancreatic tumor

"Supreme Court justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg completes radiation therapy for pancreatic cancer here's ABC's Terry Moran justice Ruth trader Ginsberg diagnosed late last month with a cancerous tumor on her pancreas and undergoing three weeks of outpatient radiation treatment at memorial Sloan Kettering hospital in New York City in a statement the Supreme Court press office described the tumor as localized and added it was treated definitively and there was no evidence of disease elsewhere in the body this is justice Ginsburg's fourth row with cancer last December she underwent surgery for lung cancer in two thousand nine she had surgery for pancreatic cancer and in nineteen ninety nine she was treated for colon

Ruth Bader Ginsburg ABC Ruth Trader Ginsberg Sloan Kettering Hospital New York City Supreme Court Terry Moran Three Weeks
"kettering" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

News Radio 690 KTSM

01:57 min | 2 years ago

"kettering" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

"In Cali twenty four of Kettering now stands accused by a federal criminal complaint of unlawfully possessing a firearm while being a user of controlled substances he was Attorney bank Glassman says collie is also charged with lying on federal firearms forms gunman Connor bets was killed by police after killing nine and injuring more than two dozen others outside a bar in Dayton that's sister Megan was also killed in the mass shooting the F. B. I.'s scouring the island home of Jeffrey upstream federal agents were seen swarming little Saint James in the U. S. Virgin Islands just days after the billionaire and convicted sex offender killed himself in a New York jail cell prosecutors are continuing their investigation into the sex trafficking ring that F. Steen was accused of running major league baseball's twenty twenty schedule shows this season will officially open on March the twenty sixth Tom Roberts has details the full schedule was released on Monday it features an April series between the New York Mets in Miami Marlins importer Rico a June series between the Chicago Cubs in the Saint Louis cardinals in London and a game between the Chicago White Sox the New York Yankees at the field of dreams side in Dyersville Iowa the last game of the regular season is set to be played on September twenty seventh putting the World Series on track to take place from October twentieth through the twenty eight Tom Roberts NBC news radio in a fortnight champion got quite the scare will he was streaming recently tile gear store for a sixteen year old who won the three million dollar grand prize in the fortnight World Cup last month was swatted while streaming on twitch over the weekend it's wanting is a criminal harassment tactic in which someone reports of false emergency to get authorities particularly a swat team to descend on an unsuspecting target according to the upper Potts Grove township Pennsylvania police department the department received a call from somebody acting as gears door saying that he had killed his father and tied up his mother in the garage when police arrived per protocol they called into the house and your store smaller answered and went outside work may feel NBC news radio when.

NBC Potts Grove township Pennsylva harassment Dyersville Iowa Saint Louis Miami Marlins New York Jeffrey Connor Cali New York Yankees Chicago White Sox London Chicago Cubs Rico
Shopping for iPhone 6 replacement

Talking Tech

04:38 min | 2 years ago

Shopping for iPhone 6 replacement

"Talking Tech is brought to you by WICKS DOT COM creatine published a stunning website all from one powerful platform go to wicks dot com to create your very own professional website. Today that's W.. I. X DOT COM in stay tuned after the show to hear you can take advantage of Wick special offer for talking tech listeners as we discussed earlier this week apple will stop offering new software updates for the iphone six in September and that's going to cause many longtime fans to begin a search if they have already for new model so here's your weekend talking tech projects start thinking about a replacement. Maybe you want the latest and greatest. Perhaps you'd rather save money with an older less powerful iphone surprise we just went over the specs between the iphone ten are which which is the most current entry level model and the two preceding devices the iphone eight and seven and the differences are slight in every category but photography okay. The iphone ten is seven hundred fifty dollars. You get a six point one. An inch screen twelve megapixel camera eight twelve processor chip sixty four gigabytes of storage in the best resolution at the three models by far seventeen ninety two by eight twenty eight the iphone eight has a smaller four point seven screen green the same twelve megapixel camera and a eleven processing chip sixty four gigabytes storage and resolution of thirteen thirty four by seven fifty. It'll cost you six hundred dollars to buy it iphone. SEDDON originally released in two thousand fifteen is four hundred fifty bucks you get the same four point seven inch screen of the iphone eight the same twelve megapixel camera a slightly less powerful attend chip thirty two gigabytes of storage. That's a big difference and the same thirteen thirty four by seven fifty resolution ocean now so far you can see the ten are is bigger has better resolution in a slightly more powerful processing chip. How does that affect you if you're into games if you're into augmented reality if you're into high end photography like kettering capturing? Capturing images in slow motion and processing them right away. You will miss the extra power for the person who just uses the phone to go on facebook's and text messages read email. What's Netflix listen to spotify and YouTube clips flips? You see a difference now photography of course you do see a big difference if you're happy snapping quick cell fees and group shots capturing your food is it's being delivered your table along with quick video clips. You'll have no issues with the iphone seven Avenue camera however you get a perk with ten are and the plus versions of the iphone seven eight and ten versions that bringing extra features in the portrait mode setting this is where you can blur the background in the style of a professional level D._S._L. C._S._l._R.. Camera now ten are eight and seven all have one camera Lens The plus versions of the eight and seven have to cameras a wide angle and medium Portland's so if you really into photography like me. These models make more sense because they're more. More versatile I personally would live without the two cameras but that's really your call. The new models of IPHONES are expected to be released in September and we expect to see three new models with a top of the line model in line three cameras lenses. I can't wait you have questions about shopping fry phones. We're here to help. Look for me on twitter where I'm at Jefferson Graham. You've been listening to talking tech. Please subscribe to the show wherever you listen online audio whether that be apple podcast spotify stitcher or wherever ever and don't forget that I'll be back tomorrow with another quick it from the world attack these days businesses of all sizes need an online presence whether you're an established name a brand new startup or something in between you WanNa make sure the people know where to find you at wicks dot com. You'll find all the tools you need to create a stunning professional website. You'll get access to hundreds of design elements and features that can help you grow your brand online email marketing tools and accustomed domain to name a few Wicks is creation without limits choose from one of their five hundred templates or start from scratch. You have the freedom to build your site anyway. You want plus. Everything is optimized for any device so you'll look great on desktops and mobile's alike.

Wicks Dot Com Wicks Apple Spotify Facebook Seddon Jefferson Graham Netflix Kettering Portland Youtube Sixty Four Gigabytes Seven Hundred Fifty Dollars Thirty Two Gigabytes Six Hundred Dollars Seven Inch
Israel Folau Debate: Freedom of Speech or Homophobia?

Between The Lines

09:51 min | 2 years ago

Israel Folau Debate: Freedom of Speech or Homophobia?

"Well, you don't have to be a rugby fan to know that Wallaby sti- Israel allow has been a big news story over the past few months, when I pretend he posted these woods on his personal social media accounts, quite warning drunks homosexuals adulterers, lies fornicated his thieves eighth assed, odometers hill. White, you repent. The fallout was a means rugby Australia won't allow that he had breached these plaid code of conduct by posting homophones combs on social media after examination of the event this happened. Well, he's roughly is football career to be TATA's right now, rugby Estrella saying is going to rip up his contract and no long matted that allow was one of the most talented players in the game. Hanes four million dollar contract will no longer together. Now, this story has ignited a discussion across the nation. That is polarized opinion really before. Why love invited to experts to navigate what all this means? Joining me in Sydney is paid a cookie. He's an eye junked associate professor of law at Notre dumb. He's also a senior research fellow at the center for independence studies as off started on this program before CIs. That's the thing tank. I hate it. Well, the guest is professor, Catherine Gilda, Catherine research, is freedom of speech, human rights in public discourse at the university of Queensland school of political science and international studies, and she's in Brisbane studio cath paid, welcome to the program. Thanks to be here. Now, let's stop hearing both of your opinions about what the exact issues are that we need to address a cookie. What's the hot of what's dividing public opinion? Well, I think Israel has done two things that run counter to the culture. The first thing is that he's stalked, very, clearly and openly about his religious beliefs, something that we're not really accustomed to doing in Australia. We just don't tend to. About God publicly, but the other thing that he's done is whereas straightens, generally very accepting of LGBT. I people there is a small, but very powerful group that wants to move the community beyond acceptance to endorsement, where dissent is not tolerated, and Israel allow refuses to go along with that. But it seems to be a difference between how people define freedom of speech religious freedom discrimination cath. What's the release you? He really show in my opinion, is that all human rights are not absolute and all human rights, stop at the point at which your exercise of your own right impairs, somebody else's exercise of their human rights. So what we have here is a difference of opinion of what the implications are for these Ralph last said, so in my view Israel now has engaged in discrimination occurs is not about religious freedom. It's about discrimination, pater, freedom, offense, discrimination, Joel on well agree with Catherine's assessment of human rights, and I think they are not absolute. I think that's very important. I don't think this is an issue really over religious freedom. I think it's gonna be on that. Now, I don't think that Israel has discriminated against in any more of a sense that he's just made a decision to he's chosen one group over another, he and he's not vilified not incited violence against this particular Cody should there, be limits to what freedom of speech allows people decide. Well, I think we have very careful about where we want to draw those limits. What what's wrong with him expressing an opinion? And remember that this opinion is, it's a conditional warning, as it were he saying, essentially, I love these sinners including homosexuals, and I want you to repent because in my religious belief you go to hell. If you don't so he's issued a warning out of love and Israel flowers, post vilifies more than one element of society. Cath gilda. What is it about homosexuality? That is really triggered the greatest response. Well, the answer to this question response directly, what pay to just sit? Absolutely. What is? Flouts said, Philipon homosexuals. And the reason that the issue with sexual was more important than liars or adulterers, or drunks is that there is no entrenched systemic discrimination, or bias in society against lies or against adulterers. There is entrenched systemic discrimination against time a sexual and by saying what he said, what is flour saying was that guy. People have no place on this earth. They must repent I ate Thiam must become not guy in order to be acceptable now. That's what crosses the line that is what is. But what is wrong with expressing that opinion? Again, I think Catherine's analysis is right ex-. I don't think is what have occasion. But if that's what you believe what's wrong with expressing it. Which is why I'm concerned that we've reached the point now in society where we simply cannot descend from certain positions that are laid down calculator. It is not just an expression of opinion to think that is to say that when. In your talking. All you're doing is expressing your thoughts, but we have decades of scholarship that tell us that words can do things worked can do good things and words can do bad things, and there is wise expressing yourself that constitute a form of discrimination, and that is why we recognize that law as height speech or vilification, or the Katherine disagree about whether or not to these this amounts vilification, because it seems to me that in Australia, at the moment that being gay is no bar to holding the highest office, highest officers in the land to holding commanding positions in business and in, in the academic world. So I wonder to what extent this discrimination, which certainly was very real. And I think very toxic early generation is is as prevalent today. Cather some commentators, they say that we're already over instructed by the nanny state governments, institutions. Are we headed towards becoming the nanny state? Many libertarians think we already are. Absolutely not. What we have in this country are very narrowly drone very carefully constructed laws that don't side that you can't talk about particular topic. So Israel Lau would have been free to say as he is in has infect said, don't support same sex relationships and audience put same sex marriage. And if that's all he'd said, we wouldn't be having this discussion go. Fund me has finally closed down. Fillets requests for money to becky's legal challenge, cath, is that fair? Yes. Guy fan me has a policy that is in sync with a and law in sync with international human rights law, and in sync with public opinion in strategy that we should to combat discrimination repeater fails, a millionaire. At least how is it moral to us, the public for money? He's using go fund me to correct what he perceives to be an injustice, and go on me is clearly, a barometer of public opinion because he's got tractor nearly two two million dollars of support even though the has taken over the funding. So whether or not he can afford it. I think is beside the point on Thomas. What's important is that he's attracting a great deal of public support through donations to the site, which suggests that there are many, many people who agree that not necessarily agree with flowers views about the destination of sinners, but they, they believe committed to his the freedom that he should have to express those views cath is Australia angry about censorship. I think there are lots of reasons why people are giving to fund. One of them is, of course, that he's a staff footballer. And so he has a lot of fans. Another one is that he has a particular religious community supporting him. So it's not possible to say that people are against since ship just because they giving him money. This issue has become much bigger than an issue of his religious freedom. And so people are giving money for all kinds of reasons, Catherine you've said that fillet himself is a victim. He why flower caught up in something that's much larger than himself. This is an orchestrated an organized campaign by conservatives who are evidently frustrated at the decades of progress that have been made. Human rights and anti-discrimination, particularly in law. But also in hearts and minds in terms of public opinion. And this movement is now somewhat clearly using the language of human rights at self to try and Hanis public support for Wanding back thighs protections. I don't think this is a push back in a sense. I think it's a reaction to the tyranny of tolerance that Torrence's demanded any dissent from what needs to be tolerated. What is required to be tolerated will not be tolerated. And I think that is what people are reacting to. They would say we've reached a tipping point where now you simply cannot express a dissenting point of view that departs from that, that's a certified by design guy says it were and Kath, how do you see this ending? I'm very, very concerned that paper light paid deny that discrimination still exists simply because there are one or two people in positions of power who may be, for example guy, and that therefore discrimination doesn't exist. Look at the research about what happened during the same sex marriage. So if I look at the research on what happens to young. Gay and lesbian people when role models like fil might comments like this incidence of suicide and self harm increase. It is absolutely the case, both in my research, and in lots of social science research. Discrimination is well, and truly alive and well, and we must not get to the point where we say, oh, discrimination is Ivan. Now. We can stop this fight. I hope that people Tyke from this, the message that we can need to maintain at posture. We need to maintain stance against discrimination, and bigotry, a lovely debate, Catherine Gilda, pita, Cody, thanks so much for being on our end today. Thanks to thanks. Tom Kettering, Gilda is a researcher of freedom of speech, human rights in public discourse at the university of Queensland's school of political science international studies and pay the cookie is a senior research, fellow at the center for independence. Studies also -ffiliated with Notre Dom, and he specializes in religious freedom. And if

Catherine Gilda Israel Australia Catherine Rugby Senior Research Fellow Sydney Cody Associate Professor Odometers Hill White Tata Thiam Israel Lau Football Estrella Brisbane
"kettering" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:59 min | 2 years ago

"kettering" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Theater and the county area San Jose island in the Perlas group was selected as the test ground since the climate and flora are similar to that which has been found in the southwest Pacific. And it uses those two stage feel tests large groups of men are asked to sort of stage mock battles and while they're doing this planes fly over and gas them from the air. And then the question is how welded the men hold up. These soldiers come from who are they to government is unwilling to send continental troops to be used as test subjects in San Jose island in this way. So Puerto Rican troops on many of them, don't speak, good English. They don't really understand. What's happening? The men who are guests sixty thousand men who were gassed they experience standing effects, many of them emphysema scarring lung damage. These men were also supposed to be doing this secretly. And it only really came out in the nineties just how many of its own people, and you know, good number of them Puerto Ricans the United States tested chemical weapons on. So Cornelius Rhoads becomes the head of the Sloan Kettering institute and one of the forefathers of chemotherapy, this is a super premium. Surreal twist some of that mustard agents that work as poison gases also work selectively in fighting certain kinds of cancers. A number of doctors figure that out during the war. They put a pin in and they say after the war. Let's check this out. And so the government makes available its stock of surplus chemical weapons Cornelius roses in charge of deciding which hospitals get it because it's a three hospitals and good bunch of it goes to his own hospital. And then he has a Sloan Kettering institute of which he's the head, and then he has for the rest of his career this incredible chance a hospital that it's full of dying cancer patients who will submit to experimental treatments, and he just goes for it and just test chemical after chemical after chemical and in doing so becomes one of the forefathers of chemotherapy. Dr p roads other Moyle hospital in New York. He's on the cover of time magazine able to, cultivate, this image of himself as a cancer fighter. Without anyone really acknowledging that he's had this back history in Puerto Rico. Most people didn't know the informational. Segregation is so complete yet. After roads dies there's a award. That's given out by the American Association of cancer research in his honor for promising young cancer. Researchers and this word is given for over twenty years before anyone who's involved who's in the medical community, and has a voice in that way can say you might wanna rethink the name of this award because powerful people in the United States, not just politicians doctors to have basically been able to think of their country as a continuous blob and haven't really had to grapple with the parts of US history that have.

Cornelius Rhoads San Jose island Sloan Kettering institute United States Puerto Ricans American Association of cancer Moyle hospital Puerto Rico cancer Perlas emphysema time magazine lung damage New York twenty years
How Sanders plans to cut prescription drug prices in half

KDWN Programming

07:47 min | 2 years ago

How Sanders plans to cut prescription drug prices in half

"Because there was about a one and a half percent reduction in ACA enrollments. And the reason was simple people know, there's no more penalty sort of like why why are we paying for crap insurance? So part of this story regarding the case for Medicare for all the underinsured America is because people can't afford out of pocket so high. That's a true that that part is right? Administratively the insurance companies are very efficient where the government's inefficient. But he says we could do all these things we can make the major second major savings. Our study, we're come from government. Go sheeting prescription drug prices. Which would eliminate about six percent of the total systems cost per prescription drug prices in the United States are about twice as high as advanced economies. Well, you know, there's a lot of truth to that. I'll give them that one. But the question is how come we haven't done anything in the last five to seven years and prescription prices have risen dramatically. How is it in the United States? You manufacture drugs in United States cost us on average double or more than it would in Canada, etc. That is socialism where they control the cost. But here's where he loses. He loses. Everything he tells you how to government we could cut all these expenses by doing this that the other thing he says larger firms that haven't provided coverage for every worker would pay five hundred dollars for each uninsured worker while small businesses would be exempt from this. But these premiums this measure would raise six hundred billion dollars. So the big companies once again would have to pay little companies will be off. This somebody's got to pay. It's the little companies right after that after two or three years. The system would be would make a transition to a one point seventy tax on groceries seats or eight point two percent payroll tax, either which generally would generate the six hundred billion. So really thorough efficiency, isn't there? And they're not cutting our cost they're raising our taxes significantly the remaining four hundred billion necessary would comfort to measure. Here's a national sales tax a three point seven five percent. I nine necessities, which we generate about two hundred billion and a wealth tax point thirty eight thirty basis points after exempting the first one million for families what a net worth of which we generate another two hundred billion dollars. So essentially this Medicare for all system is a tax. A greater tax. But it's, but we're going to go home with more money, we won't have to pay copays. This is true don't deductibles, but you're going to pay taxes? So essentially what he's saying if you make one hundred thousand dollars a year a half family makes two hundred thousand a year, they're going to pay seventeen thousand dollars for health insurance. That's what I pay. Now. Just show me where I'm getting save y'all. Out of pocket. And how do you control the out of pocket cost? You're going to tell these physicians and big pharma. You gotta take less money. Which is what I said earlier in the conversation. United States is a for profit industry. And I'm sick and tired of hearing how the United States is health care system sucks compared around the world. That's why all the billionaires around the world come to the United States for healthcare. And you go to UCLA they go to Sloan Kettering, they go to Stanford. Here's here's a here's one for you. My wife's in hospital, and I'm talking to my friend, who's a doctor, and we're talking about the various hospitals in Clark county. Don't go to Summerlin hospital. He says you'll die my wife. He goes he says to me my sister died, and when he goes the worst hospital might be desert springs. You know, what's interesting. If you go on and you Google search, these hospitals, you get ratings you start to wonder where the facts are. Maybe there's some truth to somebody's statements. My father was killed in my opinion, centennial hills. I thought the physician's care was horrible. The same physician. I talk to for ten years suffered a medical malady until he went to Stanford and within twenty minutes at Stanford. You gotta solution that was medical problem. And he's fine now, but medically you take medicine. Yes. But for ten years here in Vata, he couldn't get handled. Healthcare and United States vary state to state a certain facilities in California. It's exceptional is certain facilities around the country. It sucks. Each facility has its own shining. Knight of shining armor. You MC opinions a fabulous facility. It's a trauma center. I went there. It's been great. I wanted my wife to go there, and it didn't work out. But the bottom line is when you look at our healthcare system as a whole today. These are the problems that we have in America. We expecting United States to medical system. They'd be perfect exceptional. You should go there with cancer and walkout a new person. Healthy one hundred percent, and maybe a couple of hundred dollars in your pocket. That's not realistic. But I will tell you this prior to the Affordable Care Act the healthcare system may have been broken. But it wasn't broken to the point where you couldn't acquire health insurance. See this crap about pre existing conditions is cracked if you went to work. At a company that offered benefits. There was no pre existing freight Shimo. If a company offered an HMO our point of service plan, you didn't have pre existing case in point the chamber of commerce metro chamber at the time was the Las Vegas chamber had a health plan being offered to small businesses. The MAC they had write ups. Yes. But there was no pre existing on their point of service HMO through health plan in Nevada. How many people know that? And it might thirty years is providing Asian insurance. I've never had a client cancelled by an insurance company. Once they got sick. Quite to the contrary. I've made it rain now if you bought a PPO plan for your business. They have a one year look back where they can give you a one year pre existing non an individual plants whole different platform. But do you remember when Obama ran on the platform of you can have you no longer have to rely on your group policy can go become self employed. So what you do is you go on the Affordable Care Act. Get your own health plan, and you can go become an entrepreneur how to premium is looking at and the platform private platform. If you make one hundred thousand laser pre what's the average premium for somebody fifty five six hundred dollars a month. That's cheap, right. Seventy two hundred dollars. Oh, let's go. Let's say you're one hundred thousand dollars that's seven point two percent of your income that falls right into the wheelhouse of what this not this. Not this not. This guy's telling you about eight point two percent payroll tax, right? Oh, and they got out of pocket maximum of seventy nine hundred fifteen one fifty one of one hundred fifteen point one percent. That's what that that's why people don't go become self-employed. They can't afford that fifty percent. But let's say you get a job working for somebody. And because you don't want any risk. You're going to get eighty thousand and they pay one hundred percent of your health insurance and your exposure seventy nine hundred which is almost ten percent of your gross income again is that affordable. The answer is no pre Obama Care. The average plant is sold as a broker. The average family out of pocket was seven thousand individuals thirty five hundred that was an HSA. Thinking about what I'm saying seven thousand family out of pocket thirty five hundred for an individual and today, it's four is fourteen thousand Indiana and the premiums are exorbitant the premium furniture say today, make the HSA of

United States Stanford Medicare Barack Obama America Summerlin Hospital ACA HMO Google Clark County Indiana Canada Ucla California
"kettering" Discussed on Ellen on the Go

Ellen on the Go

03:07 min | 3 years ago

"kettering" Discussed on Ellen on the Go

"This is very inspiring. You get on top. Chef I they came to you and one. Did you to be on the show? And you said, no, I'm not ready. Come back later. Amazing. Yeah. So how many years later did they come back to you too? Okay. Two years later, then you're on top chef and you do pretty well. Yeah. I do pretty well. And thanks to the fence. I actually I one fan favorite. Yes. Lech which some people say is better than winning the whole thing. So so I have that under my best top Jeffers. Absolutely incredible. I made wonderful friends they've been so supportive through its entire journey. Yes. So okay. So you're on top chef then you're off top chef, and it's like a a year or so after year off the show, right? No. It was a few months. Yes. Okay. And what did you feel that you start you needed to see a doctor? So after maybe two months after filming I had this ache in my left shoulder, which I ignored for a couple more months. I got an MRI and within four hours. He calls me on my cell phone. And he's like, look I hate to do this on the phone, but I don't want to waste any time. He's like this could be something very serious. I feel like you should call some family to help you through because I'm going to refer you to an ecologist. So after we went to Memorial Sloan Kettering in New York, and I got my biopsy, and it came back that it was Ewing sarcoma, which is usually a pediatric, right? So this is so rare. So it's not just pediatric. It's it's pediatric and male white, man. White male. Yeah. Okay. Little white boy cancer, right? You're. You're a little white boy in your soul. Okay. So you go through chemo, you go through everything you think it's all clear, they think it's all clear, and then all of a sudden how did this come up that they say you have a year left? So in July had clear scans. I was technically cancer free. And I had this weird ache in my left hip after we moved to Los Angeles. And I had this nagging feeling that something wasn't right? So we went back to New York got another pet scan and my doctor satis down. And they were they the is back. It's metastasized the chemo has not worked. And I looked at my doctor, and I was telling me straight. I call on happen. He say a year. It's a lot. It's. Yeah. That's a lot to here. Yeah. It's crazy. Yeah. But life is crazy. Yeah. It is. And. Then you're so special here. So such a special little white boy. Thank you. This is really hard. I it's it's never fair. Anyone who is dealing with anything. You just think this isn't fair. But you know, you get to live the way we're all supposed to live. And who knows what tomorrow brings you just happen to have this diagnosis, but we all should be living like that. Because we none of us know what tomorrow is so one is your what is your bucket list? What are you doing? What's what's now was I get to cross this off my bucket list? This is huge..

New York Memorial Sloan Kettering Jeffers Lech Ewing sarcoma Los Angeles four hours two months Two years
"kettering" Discussed on Le Show

Le Show

02:22 min | 3 years ago

"kettering" Discussed on Le Show

"In consulting fees and ownership. Interests in healthcare companies. Memorial Sloan Kettering officials declined to comment on the matter findings in his papers aren't being challenged. It appears that while disclosures weren't made in journals, cancer center officials were in fact informed about his competing interests. They land Milwaukee, former Wisconsin, governor Tommy Thompson is apologizing. He was the governor from nineteen eighty seven to two thousand one. He says, he regrets his role in building prisons while in office, he didn't have long enough to think about it is solution turned some prisons. Vocational schools to train inmates for jobs, and an early release from incarceration Thompson is promoting a new memoir well is reason enough to buy his book. We lock up too many people for too long, and it's about time. We change the dynamics and I apologize for that. He said it was so passionate about the issue. He would give up his business career if he could make policy changes. Sounds like he sure he can't. Pittsburgh Steelers wide receiver. Tonio Brown has taken issue with members of the media in recent weeks on Friday, threatened the undefeated Jesse Washington over recent story, Brown threatened to physically harm Washington in a now deleted tweet, wait till I see you, bro. We don't see what your JAL like. Then following Wednesday, Brown issued an apology. I made a mistake in judgment with tweet last weekend. I Bala jobs for that. It is not okay to threaten anyone and I need to be better spiritually. And professionally though I do not agree with the negative parts of the story, but my personal life, I need to have better control over my accent. See you social media as a way to engage with my fans rather than use it improperly. Do you think the same person wrote the tweet and the apology just asking they line San Mateo, build a bear CEO Sharon price, John apologized for sales promotion. That overwhelmed several bay area malls earlier this summer. They still have malls interesting. Belieber workshops created a frenzy into of headed a special, pay your age of ent- more. People flocked to the stores for the one time stunt than expected creating massively long lines and I'm media frenzy. Customizable stuffed animals. Usually retail for twenty five dollars or more during the promotion..

Tommy Thompson Tonio Brown Memorial Sloan Kettering Pittsburgh Steelers Milwaukee Jesse Washington Wisconsin San Mateo Washington CEO Sharon price John twenty five dollars
"kettering" Discussed on The Rusty Humphries Rebellion

The Rusty Humphries Rebellion

04:26 min | 3 years ago

"kettering" Discussed on The Rusty Humphries Rebellion

"The loss of a child is even more painful than loss of apparent she was she was very strong about all this my grandmother spent every day at her daughter's side through the treatment she never broke down in front of robin or my grandfather at one point three year old robin seemed to rally enough to make visit home to midland but in spite of all their efforts robin died at sloan kettering and october of nineteen fiftythree my grandmother was inconsolable she took refuge from her sadness by showering love and attention on her son george she said she had to remind herself not to keep smothering me with love she had to free me from her compulsion to want to hang onto the to the one of the remaining two children then my grandmother realized that young george was giving up his own playtime to comfort her i heard a boy out the window say one day we'll come on out and play georgia and he said well i can't i've got to play with my mother so that's when i let loose of them my grandfather became my grandmother's rock he encouraged her to charity work it would get her back into the world death of a child really can wreck family but it certainly didn't in our case made mother and dad stronger is a couple and i think one of the reasons their relationship is so good and so powerful and so beautiful in many ways is because of being able to rise to the occasion during incredibly difficult period for them my grandfather had buried much of his grief and his work and his his company grew so did the bush family there were two more boys my uncle's neal born in nineteen fifty five and marvin and nineteen fifty six but my grandparents still hoped to have another girl and nineteen fiftynine my grandmother was pregnant again and that august she gave birth to a second daughter doro named after my grandfather's mother dorothy the family moved to houston or my grandmother continued her charity work and the life of a hinge on mom carpooling and going to all the little league games their home became a clubhouse for the children and their friends theory in life was look we've got a great place love to have all your friends come over and so there was a kind of a controlled chaos at our house at all times grandparents were deeply religious and turkish attendance was mandatory the children were also expected to be well behaved in public my grandfather was often traveling and working long hours so my grandmother became the family disciplinarian it's something that we referred to it as the claw she had an amazing ability she had a rubber arm nobody knew this but she could reach back in the back seat the matter if you're in the you know to to rose back she had the ability to grab with those red you know those red fingernails of hers and the aggression into your arm and she got your tension as the children got older they had to observe curfews if they went out at night and if the rules were broken they had my grandmother to answer to i've been reprimanded by barbara bush is at child and i've been reprimanded as an adult and both occasions book but in both circumstances is not very much fun but my grandmother's days is a stay at home mom were numbered and nineteen sixty two my grandfather george bush was elected chairman of the republican party in harris county texas and only two years later he ran for the us senate a republican in a heavily democratic state he was seen by some as a carpetbagger people painted the bushes as wealthy out of touch aristocrats from from yankee land from the northeast to really had no knowledge in familiarity with real heartland issues in texas my grandmother made every effort to project down home image voters could identify with she spoken shook hands with hundreds of people across the state and even made needlepoint bags to support the campaign my grandfather lost his bid for senate in nineteen sixty four by nineteen sixty six he decided to try for a seat in congress and won it in nineteen sixty seven the family moved to washington where my grandfather took his seat in the house and from then on grandmother's life would never be the same.

three year two years one day
"kettering" Discussed on Naked Astronomy, from the Naked Scientists

Naked Astronomy, from the Naked Scientists

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"kettering" Discussed on Naked Astronomy, from the Naked Scientists

"Action is stronger how did you discover that there was so many connections between the beatles and space was it something that you just sorta gradually piece together i was starting signed communication and i grew up with a father with really totally in love and water with be does so just a teacher asked me as more to imagine it book of science and they made the connection is start to try rich reserves and i found a lot of materia believe it's all about love when you are in love with someone you want to speak about it so it quite natural that are a lot of science scientists who love the beatles will try to link them their work to be too so a notice on your poster the was a lovely photo of some astronauts recreating the famous walking across the pedestrian crossing which is only abbey road l fe and to be honest it passed me by this was a mission from two thousand ten the here has the expedition twenty six because even as the anime ges worth more than one thousand four so nasa sometimes make some poster featuring the truth this petition and for this expedition select the beatles theme and kettering column on the astronauts even post barefoot for the poster so they absolutely totally recreated it and i was surprised to hear that a beatles song didn't quite make it onto the voyage this or yes the record company of the beatles didn't own the right for the song but they were decimated does work to become the bustle of the pop music in space because naza beamed across the universe into the deep space to celebrate this diversity and the neighbor.

beatles nasa naza kettering column
"kettering" Discussed on The Projection Booth Podcast

The Projection Booth Podcast

02:09 min | 3 years ago

"kettering" Discussed on The Projection Booth Podcast

"Right so and what's interesting about it is it was based on a true story right so you've read the book so but you know one of the things that will clark pride himself find was changing the names in the story right in with interesting about about that though is in fact is the the girl who was murdered was actually named barbara butler and she was murdered exactly the time he writes about in the book in the same location and in fact over the years it's come to fruition that who the real people were in the story in that you know the obviously william clark's the main character in the book and some ways and of course he is relegated to sort of bit part in the book and the film with lane smith playing his sort of role without naming him directly but the cliff robertson character was actually gentleman named keith thompson who was he was a kettering police department detective and in the killer or the guy who allegedly is the killer in the film keating is skied him jimmy wayne howard who was in fact as portrayed in the film you know those the twelve year old girl who was murdered five months after the butler murder and they they arrested him because there was a witness and even though they never could pin him to the butler murder day it was the belief that he was the guy that probably did it in so even though he was never convicted or tried for the murder he did go to prison like the books that he went to mental institution for fears nineteen seventy two he was moved over to incarceration cleared sane and it's interesting is he still in jail today still alive and the listeners are brave enough they can go to the ohio correctional website and look up jimmy wayne howard and there's a fixture of the real man still alive eight years old still in prison life in prison i think it's a great film i think again i think it's in a way is a little bit of his time it has i think one recent reiter who saw the film kind of said it had i don't know if i agree with it but it kinda had a twin peaks vibe at your mystery kinda feel.

barbara butler william clark smith keith thompson keating jimmy wayne howard murder reiter cliff robertson ohio eight years five months twelve year
"kettering" Discussed on Data Skeptic

Data Skeptic

02:19 min | 3 years ago

"kettering" Discussed on Data Skeptic

"So you said there were nine different classes and only three thousand examples this is certainly a challenging problem how do you go about measuring that is a typical accuracy or how do you look at the evaluating what is good so yes and we will you send lag luck loss as the as the metric you're generally like kinda like the glasses were highly unbalanced on not only that had you know like a did his i mean it is well documented in the clinical literature the even if you would like to demean experts claimed to bless you find this same mutation with the same maybe than's decaf a high probability of than not targeting taiwan saying this is likely pathogenic on the other one sandies pathogenic it's actually a bit interesting paper from from needham from the new england journal of medicine leg wanted to two years backward they actually look at the easiest by the asians to classify which were kinda like brick on one mbeka to mutation for breast cancer tablets concert like everybody knows about it that have genetic tests all over the place for people to kinda like identify these mutations de put together a group of like five for people like general like dummy an extra they took i think he's like up five percent on the luke into the atlantic profiles and they were trying to see if they will lykidi on what will be the treatment of recommendations based on the mutation their sowed the couldn't i guess my plenty is like that election many factors that you have to take into account in order to defy whether or not these results good a good enough but i don't see any estimate of begin out the right method eke you'd mentioned one critical step to this whole process of taking maybe some of the insights from the that there were i think you said six kind of unique regional ideas that emerged how do you take those from uh a nice demonstration into helping patients while that's actually what our team that yesterday asia some background i work lubis go like a data products on engineered in we had a group were machinelearning data scientists engineers and even the signs are working together a legitimate goal is to is to be liberal products here's laggy snug yes to do research i promise you learn in is to actually applied these research to solve your problems so far.

"kettering" Discussed on Data Skeptic

Data Skeptic

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"kettering" Discussed on Data Skeptic

"It's like the eight and defy can't needed mutations so we dis the go to day literature on these selling making mongla searches these human being this come on expert would go there would go to path mad at any of these cannell literature searchers our search engines will start making searches hidden defy articles that may contain ab than's regarding these mutation these special would cost to read all these articles and eventually he will determine whether or not that easy enough evidence that associates these particular mutation with dumont good allseam melanoma for instance d'souza beatty labourintensive plus denies like outside completely night require flick a lot of work a lot of people attempts slow get that in the next three years ago we created top position on quality knowledgebased caller uncle kaby twoweek have like a group of fifteen people who are doing these monologue work day yesterday they read that he church here they can teach hun sun an in three years the been able to on a day like around like three thousand defend mutations but you don't like these approach approaches lesson scale gives you think of the number of mutations in the in the human genome icc india or laid off three media new mutations that might be impactful for concert come out empty months on the information that we on a daily today you might get outdated one week from now while months from now on you from now through the complex to kinda like you know when you think about what did the garden city knees it's very difficult to scale so what we decided to do it's one of the reasons why we sms k we we we cuff on active roller we tried to have an active role in the machine learning community we were seeking for help in the machine learning community like basically saying hey could you help us sell being one of the main challenges that we can only faffing cancer research which is like you know like i've kelly glassy flying whether these mutation his driver us who surpassing it worthy modest for these frantic left amman so we decided to take this data.

"kettering" Discussed on Data Skeptic

Data Skeptic

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"kettering" Discussed on Data Skeptic

"It's one of the worst complications up can happen it's basically a block club that got happening the lower means of the body on can be quickly move all the way up to the lungs and can kill you in that might have you hours so the rolling for the institution was like kind of like the hypotheses worth like will there be a way by which you could tell me which patients would be at least of developing dvd like deepvein thrombosis in the next 24 hours in the next forty eight hours to we started working with a couple of doctors want a couple of like those came to us with these hypotheses we usefully alex for on meetings with them to understand what they need these covered the use these type of more the laker operationally we spend like quite a bit of time actually understanding what's in their minds color the scene of that process because they could do it like united you would give them like thousands of charts and they would streets to them they will be able like to do a bitty decent job but saying like which chretien said at the free school districts which once audit and the peronist that they can do that in our leg i you have to keep in mind that these police aren't highly b c two five reforms how would you prefer she on the candidate decayed like you know like their precious time doing these two i think dvds one one good example off one of of these peronist we tackle with him do the unconscious come to you and say here are all your features go know cope with a model or whether the steps to actually implementing the sets us a very interesting question that's three key one of the requirements for this big that we impose indecent galets is that the gun a town with a blank slate and say hey i want you to these that i want you to help me to to these i will usually ask them to come up with the new shell data said that the munnelly label the kathan incentive to do that we at the cutting edge of counter free church suffer some of these colored use those are questions that have been in the in the concert community for a long time the nobody has been able to answer dating send defused like if.

"kettering" Discussed on Data Skeptic

Data Skeptic

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"kettering" Discussed on Data Skeptic

"Let's do this new question before we get into the second half the interview larry you went to data skeptic dot com click to contact us and left agreed question on our listeners mail system this runs inside your browser with nothing to install if you've got a great question please head over the data skeptic dot com and ask astaire successful applications of ai in says mationale in global skied environment of problems like climate change and crop losses remains flint consigned to academic cases while we cannot wait any more we must act now as forever global issue the question is was going to pay for this building databases and machinelearning algorithms the comsaid cost and it's a big cost in this case my question is how can governments ngos universities and software companies work together to build an ai platform for tackling global environmental problems thank you so how can governments ngos does universities and business bilden a i platform for tackling global problems i'm not sure i can solve it in under a minute but here goes when it comes to the types of problem the governments and ngos take on in my observation the challenges data scientists are going to face is the data or the lack thereof sure maybe the fda is working on leveraging computer vision in some novel food inspection task but studying things like homelessness or crop loss these are problems that typically have a lot of dark data if you have the absence of data or low quality data it's a nonstarter for many data science in ai projects now sometimes when one thinks they have no data maybe there's the opportunity to be especially clever crops for example are commonly seen by satellite imagery if you could find out who's taking photos from satellites and get access to that data you might have something useful to work with you know several times a year i see very wellintentioned projects written up about applying data science to some worthwhile humanitarian.

"kettering" Discussed on Data Skeptic

Data Skeptic

01:51 min | 3 years ago

"kettering" Discussed on Data Skeptic

"In a particular set of ways they are similar to one another once you've defined that outcome you have the machine actually learn what are the parts of the ro record that matter we kind of a priori know that things like type of cancer with mutation they have what treatments they might have gotten matter what we also want to learn that specifically for specific trials and we don't want a heart code any of that so bike sort of flipping this problem is by seeing similar dissimilar and setting up the objective to train for that is how you get around a lot of these issues where you have to think very carefully about would features will go into this when it comes to that similarity like you said you have i think a thousand clinical trials going on at some time in some sense that means it's like a competition if i'm running one of those trials i i want patients as do nine hundred ninety nine other people how do you said those needs there's a couple of components there so those competitions there's kind of again policy in sort of physicians knowing which trials are going to be more impactful d and others and again this his supposed to be sort of your first level decision support we're not going to be resolving those political issues around it or even scientific issues measuring around that says so if we just make that process a little bit more smooth that's kind of the attempt at gotcha so you described how this is a an active in running system you guys who leveraging i'd love to hear about kinda the end to end process about how a patient arrives at an if the present himself as a willing to be in clinical trial what's their story and how do they flow through the system yes so typically speaking though the patient is going to come to sloankettering and a lot of the times they're going to come with a fairly complex case that's the reason why they're going to research center in complexity in terms of their diseases rare or has computation could be there the diseases rare or they've had a number of treatments and they.

"kettering" Discussed on Data Skeptic

Data Skeptic

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"kettering" Discussed on Data Skeptic

"Generally because they could mean a difference between getting a a novel treatment or therapy that hasn't really proven to work very well a traditionally so there is a this huge desire of making sure that we can not only advance signs but also give as many patients as possible the opportunity to get treated in a novel way it gives them a better chance of cure and survival but it's also a very complicated problem for example slum catering is a huge research center we have over a thousand clinical trials going on at the same time and in on colleges needs to know about hold of those mom in order to be able to say this is this one is the appropriate for my patient so it's a a huge cognitive overload in your hoping that clinical trials are the top of mind for particular clinician when there are all sorts of other complexities they're going to patient care so what we wanna do is basically make recommendations based on our understanding of the patient history in their medical record in terms of what clinical trials might be appropriate for them so challenging problem from sort of a a classification perspective were from recommend in perspective but it's also challenging in the fact that clinical trials are not really organized very well in terms of what are the criteria that you're looking foreign patients so they are written on paper or a written in pf documents that are not structured so a lot of people tried to do some natural inge processing to derive sorta matching rules to say all right we're looking for patients who are female over eighteen what have you have breast cancer we tried that a few years ago and that actually doesn't scale in doesn't work very well because you national english processing models end up being the bottleneck and also trying to look for specific signals in the medical records also very complicated the way we decided to go to go away from the natural language processing in the rules and to say well within running clinical trials for very long time and we actually have more than forty thousand patients historically proven rolled on them so why don't we try to learn similarities between patients and make recommendations based on the patients who have enrolled in particular clinical trials and see if the patient that you're trying to make a recommendation for which one which ones.

"kettering" Discussed on Data Skeptic

Data Skeptic

01:51 min | 3 years ago

"kettering" Discussed on Data Skeptic

"I for many different resource casquette you study glee is like a small lead every game use on collegue millions of you mateus her billion suspects documents so for me particularly like anelia that embiid interested in sad base yandi networks any sort of like new missile lilies that can be applied into these small data yelm so that we can learn better representation of sorts for the weekend feedback with less data as in the for me personally has been interesting welcome to data skeptic armenia episodes gentle introductions two concepts related to artificial intelligence these short discussions are meant to serve as a primer for the topic learn more by reading your show notes at data skeptic dot com my name is alex kruger ankle i'm the lead data scientist on the data products team at memorial sloankettering cancer center can you tell me a little bit about what that means especially with the word product in there what it means is that we're part of a larger team a team of designers engineers data scientists and machinelearning experts work together on solving specific problems for clinicians and researchers the we we solve those problems is by building products that are driven off of machinelearning algorithms we worked very closely understanding the needs of our and colleges issen researchers translating those into machine learning solutions and then testing them out seeing how that actually fares in the real world one of the things that were very didn't excited about is making sure that we're building ap eyes into into our work um the kind of helps us designer own software but it also allows different products to tap into the intelligence that we're producing once were sort of radion confident that this this type of stuff works it will be really interesting to see well what if we turn it on not just for their physicians that that.

"kettering" Discussed on Everybody's Got Something

Everybody's Got Something

02:03 min | 5 years ago

"kettering" Discussed on Everybody's Got Something

"When you're faced with cancer you feel hopeless helpless loss but every new day is a better day to be cancer because each and every day memorial sloan kettering has better research treatment and care than the day before every day making what was impossible yesterday possible today more science less fear memorial sloan kettering cancer center learn more at em s k c c dot org slash more size so as we were just hearing with my guest delilah caring for kids indeed that's what she would call her greater purpose that's actually the mission of a program she started called point hope their work is international here in the united states in ghana and as she is about to describe at a liberian refugee camp which taught her an important lifeless tell people about it you know i go there in in the refugee camp that i started working in in two thousand and four one out of four children died before the two five just horrific tragedies and yet they're still humor and there is still levity and there is this this undescribable of and that's what we need to get back to is unconditional undescribable overwhelming love not some ethereal the metaphysical although i speak love of the earth's no no your neighbors line if they failed went through chemotherapy and they can't get out of the house and mother down on a don't don't speak metaphysical crap if you are not willing to when you see somebody at the grocery store and elderly woman who's waiting for a taxi say can i give you a ride home can i can i carrier bags of your house for you can i help you when you see a mom struggling with two or three kids and you're getting irritated because they're making noise at the restaurant go sit down next to second which can i color pictures with you it.

cancer united states ghana the house sloan kettering sloan kettering cancer center