35 Burst results for "Kerns"

"kerns" Discussed on Elliman Daily Podcast

Elliman Daily Podcast

03:46 min | 6 months ago

"kerns" Discussed on Elliman Daily Podcast

"Okay great so. I think let's start off with working together as a as a mom and son team and then we'll go into you know how you guys vote for business in newport beach which was one of the most competitive markets in the world and i know that for a fact. It's who you know what clubs you hang out at the cars you drive. I'll never forget when i met when i was president. A cold banker bought strada properties. I mean excuse me coach newport properties in danny bebe was the owner negoti. No peter he goes. You know we not only drive mercedes here but it has to be a us. It has to be an s. class. The automated was he wanted me to really know the level of newport beach and that is kind of the vibe. Isn't it it is i. Was there at coz nuclear properties. That's where i got my first job. I thought the other thing. That was really fascinating about newport. Beach is like when you think about the center of town. It's really It's a fashion island. Just a huge mall. Everybody that is the center of county. Newport beach show. It's about you know luxury brands and and you know shopping and all that which is really kind of fun so Dynamics is it is so. I remember working for my dad. Oh my god. It was horrible. I felt like i had a big film on my head. I nothing i did was good enough. What's it like working for your mom. Adam rose there you hit it on the man Been fired a thousand times and rehired and do this do that. You're not doing you're right. Oh gosh let me do it. My way no way. It's crazy but it's fun. The engineering swings both ways drastically. What about for you to need. You have the prodigal son here is he just trying to keep them like a puppy on the blanket. Or what's going on for you with adam. Yeah i just feel like he could work a lot harder and be out with people in you know go. I used to send him out golfing because at one point when he was in high school he was a golf caddy at big kenyan. Go go golf and meet people and bring him back while he'd go golf but he would never get anybody's information of that lasted about three weeks. And i said forget it. You're not golfman has. Has adam ever quit before draining on you. He's threatened to case you've never really pulled the trigger. It'd be smart not smart. I'd be lost without him. So how'd you guys divide up the responsibilities of your job. And how do you guys have daily meetings in. how do you work. Give us low rundown. Yeah we tried to catch base in morning and unusually texting him or whatever now he has a new baby to if she's only two months old before it used to be i was waking him up but Now he's up all the time. So i can text menu giant. Is he more motivated now. Dinning yet very much after something. That happens on a child's board nonetheless. The ice shouldn't have had him do this long ago. So adam so what do you think you contribute to the team. What what do you think your strengths are. First comes to mind is technology you know. Urge generation takes a little bit longer to get into it and really figure out the accusing as in i'll help route every now and then especially with printing or something that's last minute. We know a lot of things are last minute here But also paperwork. I'm really good on that end. Tc i can do that and then showings inspections if she has the showing gets all. Be right there in an emergency like. Yeah this you know help you out. I'll do that one. You do the other one in. let's talk it out..

strada properties newport beach danny bebe coz nuclear properties center of county Adam rose golf adam Newport beach newport peter Dinning
"kerns" Discussed on Elliman Daily Podcast

Elliman Daily Podcast

04:29 min | 6 months ago

"kerns" Discussed on Elliman Daily Podcast

"Good morning everybody. This is the friday morning. Drive this peter hernandez this is the call that started them all started the whole podcast series for tell us now. Douglas salomon and Rolled into role plays and everything else which is which is so exciting. So welcome everybody. The friday morning drive and speaking of children and family. Today we're gonna talk about The family real estate in we have deneen kerns and adam kerns here as are as my guests for today. We're gonna talk about their their families Relationship but i don't know if you guys most of you know that i'm a product of family being in the family real estate. I'm a son of a realtor. i'm a brother of a realtor in. That's kind of how i came into the business you know and It was just continuing on with the family business. When i was thinking about this call. I was kinda thinking about the mafia a little bit. I was thinking about the family. I was thinking a little bit about winchester in. You're never out. I was kinda thinking about you. Know maybe coming in kicking and screaming. I don't. I haven't asked adam this yet. I don't know of his goal was to be a realtor in life but here he is his mom as an agent in a realtor. I know my goal would not be a realtor. I mean i- Con- you're not gonna leave it. I did not want to be a realtor. I always like adamant against it. Now look at me like fifty years later of like love with it. So it's it's it's it's it's interesting it's like it's like real estate gets in your blood and it's something that either get as as a family member or just from being in this business of being in the family real estate. That is sort of guessing your blood but we have some really good examples. Doughy dineen in atom we got. He need an atom down in newport beach. We've got a ruth. Leeann down in san diego there among daughter team. We've got about david in on a solomon. You know in our brentwood office. There's another another great family team..

peter hernandez Douglas salomon deneen kerns adam kerns winchester adam Doughy dineen Leeann newport beach san diego david brentwood
"kerns" Discussed on Mornings With Gail - 1310 KFKA

Mornings With Gail - 1310 KFKA

05:10 min | 8 months ago

"kerns" Discussed on Mornings With Gail - 1310 KFKA

"Problem. Because joe biden done. So i have to wonder i mean no disrespect but this cackle and referred to her as the new wicked witch of the west dethroning. Nancy pelosi but this cat limited. Some of her handler say to her. Look we need to make you more appealing onto the voters and we need to soften your prosecutorial image and you just need to laugh but this cackle is so Pudding yeah you know you hit the nail on the head here. There's no doubt in my mind that somebody had her in a focus group and the feedback came back that she was as ice which she is. And i really do think that they said you know you got to lighten up a little. You got to laugh. But it's having the same result as the last hillary clinton instituted when she was running for president which was also fake and forced and really came off as you know else. Sorta creepy had the unintended result of coming in. Look the best thing you can do by candidates for over fifteen years. Be yourself You can't hide who you are She should own her reputation as a tough prosecutor and she should be using that tough mindset on the border crisis. If anything but again. I go back to her seeming seeming. And that's key here in ability to handle and i'm gonna say jennifer i'm gonna call it for what it is the crisis at the southern border. I can't help but think that that's by design. I mean more people coming into this country mean more vote. Votes and continued continued legacy in the democrats. Mind power and control you. There's there's no doubt about it. You know they're looking for a new voting base You know this is why they fight voter. Id so so frequently and look. I think they've wedged commonly into this position where they forced basically to say that sound bite. Don't come don't come. I think i hurts her on the left flank of her party we saw. Afc immediately come out and say gosh. How dare you tell people not to come. asylum law of the us as long as they can get to the border there in Her on the left side of her party and it also is going to hurt her on the right. because she's gonna have this lip service and be on record is telling people not to come. Yes the biden policies people are still gonna come streaming across the border because they want the free goodies and they want The voting rights and they want all of the wonderful things he can get when you live in america. So i think she's in a real wings situation here jennifer. Do you want one of those selfie cookies those faceless assumpico handed out to reporters that was just weird but are and you know it's more part and parcel of the coal a personality that that politics has become that anyone would even think you would want a cookie with someone's face on it. No less a politician space. That would be the last cookie in the world. I would want to bite into jennifer. Kerns hosts of the new nationally syndicated show all american radio with jennifer kerns publisher of all american news dot com. Tell us about your show jennifer well. We're so excited where moving across the country in were actually in colorado is well broadcasting out of denver as well and just having a great time. We share stories of america reopening positive stories pro american story and fighting the evil left every step of the way people can check it out as he said by going to all american news dot com and clicking on episode. Jennifer are all we can hope. is that The great unwashed that we are we as voters are paying attention to everything that is going on these days coming out of that administration as you so aptly noted run by i'd even put bernie sanders into the mix run by I would say. Afc well the shine is off of that particular piece of glass but run by bernie sanders and susan rice. Yeah i would think so. I would think so. I think that's where we're headed as a party. We don't stop them in the twenty twenty two mid turned or in the two thousand twenty four presidential election business. What we're going to be living under for the next twenty five years and that is hera fighing specter jennifer currents thanks again for your time your insights here perspectives cruciate. It thinks summer eight forty nine now. Thirteen ten kfi. What's happening in your own. Backyard listened to know now with tanner's swint a northern colorado's voice thirteen ten kfi k. If you miss any portion of mornings with yale go to thirteen ten. Kfi dot com to download. The podcast today.

america Jennifer today susan rice bernie sanders joe biden Nancy pelosi colorado tanner denver over fifteen years democrats thirteen jennifer jennifer kerns one two Kerns yale northern colorado
"kerns" Discussed on Mornings With Gail - 1310 KFKA

Mornings With Gail - 1310 KFKA

06:58 min | 8 months ago

"kerns" Discussed on Mornings With Gail - 1310 KFKA

"Well there's one thing that we do know for a fact that vice president carmela harris has never been to spain. Eat thirty eight now thirteen ten. Kfi a thirteen ten k. of k. a. dot com northern colorado's voice mornings with gail from the auto collision specialist studios so during a recent trip to guatemala. She had a sit down with nbc's. Lester holt and lester. Well pressed her on the crisis. I'm going to call it for what it is the immigration crisis at the southern border. Let's just say carmela didn't much like that. Just quickly put a button. You have any plans to visit the border at some point. I we are going to the border. We've been to the border. So this whole this whole this whole thing about the border. We've been to the border we've been to the board you haven't been to the border and i haven't been to europe and i don't. I don't understand the point that you're making. I'm not discounting the importance of the border. Funny it sounds that way. And then we got the signature. Kamala harris cackle. And what's up. What that cackle of. It's not funny. Joined this morning So pleased to be joined this morning by jennifer kern. She's of the noon nationally. Syndicated show all american radio with jennifer kerns publisher of all american news dot com by the way she served as a gop strategists spokesperson for the california republican party strategist for the colorado recalls over the second amendment and a writer researcher for the most watch. Us presidential debate of the twenty sixteen election cycle for fox news denver a pleasure. Thanks for having me so Vice president harris taken shots from both sides of the aisle for her rather perplexing performance and inconsistent messaging when it comes to immigration. Yeah you know. It's interesting it the bag as the office if you're a liberal Far-left liberal democratic party and even nbc and msnbc or critiquing. you know. There's something wrong there when that's happening I think something bigger my even. Be going on here though. Dale which is i think. The biden administration has given kamala harris a portfolio. That is broader than her capability. I think they've done that on purpose. You know they put her in charge of some of the foreign affairs and they put her in charge of other things including this massive border crisis. And i think the problem that she is not really equipped to solve not only because she doesn't have experienced previously in solving it. But she she just Is really out of her reading here. And i think the reason. The biden administration Has allowed her to wade into. This is a little bit of political rebounds. Yeah a lot of people. Forget that in twenty fourteen It was none other than comma harris wind. She was california attorney. General who who basically taint basically just completely spitball barack obama's a solution to the border crisis back then very similar in nature to the border crisis. We have now of barack. Obama actually did try to do something he started the two thousand fourteen secure communities act which basically said that. If you know if you are illegal immigrant or you're pulled over on a traffic stop you can actually an should actually be overturned to the federal authorities. I sent and so forth will come with her. Because the attorney general of california state nation also border state said no. We're not gonna do that. So she actually bucked the abidin obama administration plan and i think they have not forgotten that and i think that assigning hurt this massive border crisis which they know she can't solve is political payback for what she did to them seven years ago when i can't help but think jennifer that it's also personal because Just recently recently there were reports. Jill biden saying that harris should go do something unnatural to herself for her debate attack on. Joe will yeah. You're very right. Look at and we. We remember the contentious debate Wouldn't she Caller joe biden on his desire to not have But in to white schools and he actually said he didn't want his kids going to a racial jungle of those were his views on integrated schools. She really blew him up on the stage. And what's interesting here is by. Who was actually pretty smart and this he did the reaganesque thing. You might remember ronald reagan. When he was facing the prospect of having george h w bush be his shadow. You know bracket him everywhere. He went be his worst nightmare for the next four years and potentially run against ten ronald reagan. Hey i'm put george h.w. On the tickets that we can keep an eye on him like keep your enemies close you know. I think that's what they i think. That's what they've done here with comma harris. But i think there's something a play i think they really have given kamla a vast portfolio that they know she can't deliver on. She makes all out on her face and then she can't really run and win in twenty twenty four and other people who are really running the white house right now. Susan rice and friendship. Obama could actually move into that position. And i've long thought that if you fat flash forward to twenty twenty four. That's the intent with all of this as you so eloquently say to give her a portfolio things that she's just not prepared to handle they want to dilute the specter of any political power. That she may have yeah absolutely either. She's not from the obama world She she has a pretty high opinion of herself. I say this is somebody who lived under her reign of both thanks and Well san francisco be an attorney. General california before becoming. Us senator and yes she she. She's marxist to her own drum drummer She does not answer to. This opened the obama world. And that's a big.

Jill biden Susan carmela jennifer kern Obama spain jennifer kerns Joe msnbc Dale obama guatemala europe ronald reagan seven years ago lester Lester holt kamla two thousand fourteen secure c Caller joe biden
Looking Back at Rudi Gernreich with Alexander Joseph

Dressed: The History of Fashion

01:56 min | 9 months ago

Looking Back at Rudi Gernreich with Alexander Joseph

"Alex. Thank you so much for joining us on dressed. thanks for having me those so honored. Yeah of course of course and today. of course we're going to speak about rudy gernrich and before we go any further. I just want to point out that it's really gernrich not kern reich. Yes because apparently. I have been saying this incorrectly for a very long time. Well lou. Thir- makes his point. She interviewed him for her book for the rudy gernrich book. She's mary lou luther as a journalist and she made this point that he corrected her and said it's gern rick and that's what he says on batman with a show. That was prerecorded tapes. And everything in so you know that. That's how he wanted. It said but i would put a little note on this. Which is that in two thousand or somewhere around there harry. Hey his boyfriend who will talk. Probably mentioned in the show was interviewed about him any referred to him as really gern reich. So i don't know what to do with that but just throwing it in there. Maybe he changed it. Maybe he changed it in the fifties. Because that's how he wanted to be known that but i'm making that up. I don't know exactly right but we're going to call him rick for the purpose of our wants to be known as would you tell us a little bit about what were the highlights of rudy's career. What what did he mean to the history of american fashion. Because i think we're going to go through a lot of these points by point as we go on through the episode but he really meant so much to contemporary fashion today. There's three things that i think about with really gernrich to about the career in one about not about the career. I is sort of interesting paradox. to me i love paradoxes. But if you think about most designers most fashion designers their most famous things the most famous things they make are things that you know into the real world and become real objects and influence fashion

Rudy Gernrich Kern Reich Mary Lou Luther Gern Rick Gern Reich Alex LOU Harry Rudy Rick
Should I Come Out As Bi to My Friends?

Friendshipping!

02:33 min | 9 months ago

Should I Come Out As Bi to My Friends?

"Deer gen entrant over the last few years. I've realized that i am a bisexual woman. Hell i added that. I can now see that. I had romantic feelings for a few of my very close female friends in the past. Though currently i view them in a purely platonic light. I have managed to come out to my partner and a few other friends. But i'm torn about whether or not i should do the same with the friends i used to have feelings for. I am intensely afraid that they will suspect that. I used to have crushes on them. Which makes me feel ashamed and uncomfortable. I've been with the same partner. Who is his mail for ten years. So part of me wonders if i even meet to come out while another part wants to cultivate openness and honesty with my close friends by revealing truth. Any advice would be greatly appreciated pronouns. She her first off. It's time to party okay. Year by hell. Yeah hell. Yeah who kern grants congrats. Ray were celebrating. You found out information about yourself. That's awesome and i did hear will impact us. But i'm so glad to hear that you already have people in your life. That are celebrating in supportive of you. Because that's what you deserve. Yeah absolutely and this says it's a journey. You know as you said yourself like. It's been a after the last few years you came to this conclusion and that is true for so many people because we are taught humans in general and i think it may be especially our culture. We are taught that queer nece is a thing that happens to other people. There's the gay friend. There's a side character who's bisexual you know like the doesn't happen to me. I'm normal you know like like that's that's what we're taught and so because of that it can take a really long time to say. Oh wait being gay is a normal perfectly normal thing being bisexual is. I even suspect that many people are most people are bisexual like the. It takes a long time to equate that with quote unquote. Normality like like. It's not something wrong with you. You know it's not like an etiquette quirk or something like that or a character trait that again. A secondary character in the story gets it can tap into the main character. You're the main character and your by and your book rules and i'm going to buy it love it. We cardi now. It's time to get down to business right. I'll kick it off by saying it would be strange to say the least if they in that moment were like. Oh my god did you ever. Do you have a crush on me or did you ever ever crush on me. That would be so inappropriate.

Nece RAY Cardi
Groups sue over California county's plan to drill oil wells

Morning Edition

00:29 sec | 11 months ago

Groups sue over California county's plan to drill oil wells

"In energy News. Environmental and community groups have sued current county after its board of Supervisors approved in ordinance this week that could fast track tens of thousands of new oil and gas wells. Sierra Club and other groups have asked the court to order county leaders to set aside the ordinance, which allows the county to use a blanket environmental impact report when considering permits for new wells and bar Kern County supervisors from approving any new drilling

Sierra Club Kern County
Where Estate Planning and Social Inequality Meet

Pod 4 Good

04:26 min | 11 months ago

Where Estate Planning and Social Inequality Meet

"I'm richie philanthropy. Jesse vice admiral flint pod. Chris miller and today our guests are laurel and riley carbone kern founders of tall grass estate. Planning their goal was to create a different kind of law firm when they're reaches out to people who are routinely overlooked traditional law firms or people who are hesitant to work with traditional law firms we talked to riley in laurel about social justice through estate planning the lord of the rings and why everyone needs estate planning even sar on the deceiver enjoy. We are very excited. Have riley and laurel kaduna kern from tall grass estate. Planning on the podcast today. Hello both of you view. Elo mainly grits. Thank you welcome. Mo- more popular of the two of us. I would say it's all the incheon. Listen we fight over the attention. That's always been our problem. And i relate to. That aren't i don't have to fight for our listeners. They're going to be asking this point why we are having an estate. Planning company on the podcast. So we'll start with the most basic question which is how is estate planning social justice issue. I recognize that estate. Planning sounds like feels like smells like the most untold listed whitebread topic. Anyone has ever thought about. We are as spicy as as yes manny's however we are grateful to be able to do a fair amount of pro bono low bono work and we see in that practice a number of things pop up like over and over and over again people who their grandparents great grandparents own a piece of property and then didn't know about estate planning and so now they're in a situation where like fifteen people own it To be able to like apply for grants for certain things they would need to track all of down or pay for a quiet title action. It should be something that is giving them wealth insecurity but instead it's costing them money to have this asset and if you know what state planning is if you're willing to hear about it and learn about it It can really enhanced generational wealth for for non. Just you know middle class. America or or upper class market but like literally everyone. And that's why it's so important to us to help. People understand estate. Planning is for every single person. The the misconception is that estate planning is about figuring out who gets your stuff when you die and there's a whole lot of people who look at their lives and think i don't have stuff so who cares That's that's a wrong understanding of what it is. It's really just about making sure that the right people are in control at the right times of the right things and what we see your your question about it. Being a social justice issue is that there are massive disparity in who plans for that kind of control and because all of us no matter. What our demographic Racial status religious status nationality cetera. All of us are subject to losing that control because of disability and death because of the disparity in who plans there's also a disparity generational wealth and the influence political influence financial prosperity. That come along with that so over generations you see the disparity linked to you know we think of as as a as a pretty clear as one example reinforcement of systemic racism. Disproportionately people who have large amounts of money are larger. Amounts of money are thinking about doing estate planning right. It has occurred to them. Hey i should probably do a power return. He get a trust in place right but the reason that they're doing that planning the things that they see may be happening down the down the line in their lives and being possible. Those things are possible for every single person regardless of how much you have but if you have a plan in place it's gonna affect your life and your loved ones a lot differently than if you don't have that planning in place

Jesse Vice Admiral Flint Pod Riley Carbone Kern Tall Grass Estate Laurel Kaduna Kern Riley Chris Miller Bono Richie Laurel Manny America
Rudy Gobert's Transformation Started In The D-League

The Lead

05:30 min | 11 months ago

Rudy Gobert's Transformation Started In The D-League

"On sunday rudy. Gobert made his second straight appearance in an nba. All star game. Tom make it a second confederate and for years. Now the big man with the even bigger wingspan. There's been a dominant force within the nba. Tolbert defensive player of the year. There was a time when that was not the case. Time when rudy gobert future was very much in doubt. Today the fx christopher come ronnie takes us back to the time when go gobert was uncertain about where it was headed and explains how he climbed his way to the top. They knew that if he could fill out if he could continue to develop defensively and add various tidbits to his game. Offensively could potentially become a game changer in the league. That's their mind in rudy's mind. He always believed that he would took from wondering athletic. I'm under scotto. It's monday march eighth. And this is the league. It felt like something great emotion and ask past. I s not get this. This is here. you're gonna be the athlete. It stays with you so chris basketball fan today. Think of rudy gobert this absolute force you know a guy who dominates around the rim often makes other teams change their style of play when they face him. But you recently spoke with rudy and wrote about how that has not always been the case so take us back to the days when rudy gobert was not yet rudy. Gobert there. Yes so rudy. Gobert was drafted by the denver nuggets in two thousand thirteen and acquired by the jazz in a draft night. Trade played for show les the french league and his sizeable things into the twenty seventh overall. Pick and he came into the league as a relative unknown. What you'll bring to this team. I mean i i know. You're very long and and a defensive presence. What do you think you can. How can you help this team right away right away. Yeah can we. He had worked his way up the international level coming up in france he had to work himself onto the radar of even french national teams. He wasn't really all that known as a fifteen sixteen year old. How long have you been playing basketball nine years nine. So did you grow up playing soccer before he was on jazz team. That had several high draft picks on it. They had derrick favors. Ns canter to former high draft picks. Big men that played rudy's position. They had a veteran and andreas. Who was a veteran presence on that team as a big man and under that regime rudy kind of found himself as the odd man out but the jess drafted him and took him on as a project and he apparently was not the most stylish guy. What he i community league. yes so obviously. When you're twenty one year old seven foot one kit. That's tall and gangly. It's hard to find clothes that fit you. Great i was going to be on. Is doing right now if you see rudy these various nba awards where he's won the nba defensive player of the year. Two times now. He's showing up and looking very much like a stylistic parisian that he probably always wanted to be back in two thousand thirteen when he was still sort of odd man out on the jazz as you put it. He got sent down to the bakersfield jam of what was then the d. league. i from a life standpoint. What was it. Like for rudy gobert. End up so far off the beaten path and you know in one of the rougher parts of california yes so it's a culture shock for anybody. I think who wants to be a professional basketball player to have to go to a place like bakersfield. California bakersfield has kind of a rough and tumble streak about it. It isn't the most friendliest places. Well tonight we are taking an in depth look into black tar heroin and its presence here in kern county. Rudy's coach will void talked about it would be culture shock for anybody. Let alone a parisian arriving in bakersfield. Which is we're like community area where where are rena and everything was based. That is kind of like mess. Mess capital of the world. So i think he was not going to find a croissant sprint. Snow and anywhere around there. The coaches just told him to stay in his hotel room. And just relax tries to be honest. tells hotel for the most in when he wanted to go work out at the gym. the bakersfield complex. Had you know that all that stuff in their facility but it was very much like. It was almost like a private school in that. He went from work to the hotel room. And that's

Rudy Gobert Rudy Gobert NBA Scotto Chris Basketball Tolbert French League Bakersfield Ronnie Denver Nuggets Christopher TOM RIM Basketball Derrick Andreas Jess
Jamie Kern Lima on How We Can Go From Underestimated To Unstoppable

Dose of Leadership

06:37 min | 1 year ago

Jamie Kern Lima on How We Can Go From Underestimated To Unstoppable

"Jamie kern lima on dose of leadership. This is amazing. Welcome to the show. Richard thank you so much and excited to be here to share this special moment with you your whole community to you. So it's an honor. Thank yo i gotta tell you. This is an amazing piece of work. You should be extremely proud of yourself for this. I don't need to tell you that. But i mean just from a reader. Just read this. And i've read it and i told you in the prerecording i got this. You guys fed ex this to me monday. I think got it. And i got it last night so i read it nine pm here. It is the next day. I finished it at one pm. Amazing book i just i love it. It made look. I'll be honest with you. It made me cry. I've never cried in book. it made me cry. Maybe he never cried. Okay not in a not in a book like this. I mean maybe in a fictional book. Or something yeah. It's an amazing story. Thank you so much. It's and you know it's been a journey. I think everyone of us has has a story. And i think you know just all of us are kind of on this journey. I think of. I mean for me. It's really it's really you know. So many people think oh. Is this a book about how you went from. Denny's waitress to leading a business. A billion dollar businesses like that's part of it but it's really a story of a girl who went from not believing herself to believing ourself and like not trusting myself to list like to learning how to hear my own gut instinct and learning how to trust it And just learning how to break through all that self doubt that. Hold us back so often and why i wrote. It is really like for a lot of years. I would get these. Dm's on instagram. Where people say. Oh i saw your your story Like hat like was it. Like did you just get lucky. Or because all that's out there is kinda like the headlines. And i realized oh if i don't share if i never share the real story behind the story like how it all happened years and years of rejection opposition and all those things than it's like so many other people out there that maybe are trying to launch their own dream or maybe they're trying to be a better leader or whatever it might be are gonna feel alone and their struggles if they're just reading like the highlight reel of people's success is online and so this is the first time ever but i just i took everything and kinda like throughout that filter out the window and just poured everything i had every personal and professional life lesson i've ever learned and my hope is just. It's absurd for anyone else out there who's really on that journey of like breaking through that self-doubt in and an on that journey to becoming the person they're created a bi. No i mean it's it's it's it's a prescription boards a recipe that you've kind of attacked life with anyway. What thing that's really kind of. Come out of this show and all these conversations when people ask me well. What are the biggest lessons that you've learned from talking to all these people and your book hits all of these these points that you know the prescription that is needed so that is in such lacking in everywhere we look. Is this authenticity. This transparency there's vulnerability which lends itself yet to be courageous. If you're gonna do those things because we suck adams human beings you know what we're bombarded with from our limiting beliefs are doubts. The pop culture the the social media now that just even feeds on that. I mean everybody deals with this head trash this limiting beliefs. These self doubt. It's a constant battle. You still battle with the today. I it with everybody that had on. The show has said that. And that's been a big moment for me on this show and a relief a sense of relief and reading. Your book is kind of the same feeling. That god is when you read it and because you're so authentic you're so transparent you're so vulnerable in this book and you have been in your whole. That's why you've been so successful and entrepreneur in in your brandon's accessible because of those things what do you think when you hear me say that that authenticity transparency vulnerably. That's the currency that's needed right. It is and it's scary for so many of us. I think that you know you look at so many of the studies out there that show. How like it's impossible to have a real human connection if you show up as your representative who you think people want you to be in the and the only real way to have a human connection as show like only parts parts the messy parts but a lot of people who know that awesome miss that connection of like our relationship with our customers also needs to be an authentic one our relationship with our teams and our employees also needs to be an authentic one and we ended up putting so much pressure on ourselves right social media your point to that too but we think all i a leader acts this way or we learn these things and we end up showing up is our own representative and then you know what i've learned and i don't wanna like jump too far ahead give anything up because there's so many crazy stories in the spot but wanted the leadership lessons i would say and life lessons frankly that i after which is three years of rejection a crazy story we finally got one shot on qvc. I can talk about only only if you want to but but you know being on. Kabc for united about a thousand shows live myself. And so i've met tens of thousands of entrepreneurs and brand founders and senior executives. That will go on the television for their company. And it's like all the years when i look back at. What is the commonality between the people that made it and those didn't because most people in the space they they get one shot on air and they never come back because they don't have the sales goal or maybe they they come back twice or three and then they're gone so i've seen thousands of people leave and then like what's the commonality between the ones that lasts and literally. It's not who's smarter. It's not who's more qualified or more accomplished. The people that will lasted were the ones that were the same off air in the green room as they were on here for better or worse like some were wild and crazy in quirky in somewhere very conservative and quiet and like but they were the same and it's because that live on air to one hundred million homes you can't fake authenticity and the only way for customers to connect as when you show up as you you fully are in the thing that one of the things i talk about in the book is In believe it is this lesson. I learn which is that like authenticity. Alone doesn't guarantee success in authenticity. Guaranty's failure

Jamie Kern Lima Denny Richard Kabc Adams Brandon QVC Guaranty
"kerns" Discussed on Pantheon

Pantheon

06:28 min | 1 year ago

"kerns" Discussed on Pantheon

"Thrown into the deep end of the pool and being told We're going to write a song today. Like force myself into our a number of occasions where my my friend and i will walk her over. Jio anything to start. We don't have a risk. We don't have a lyric on title. Kinda like we're gonna write a song today. Okay and at the end of the day and wouldn't have existed if you haven't lock yourself in there and made yourself through it so i mean that's important as well as a fan. I'm really excited that because there hasn't been a lot of live shows and in people staying at home know but musician home. I'm excited about all the material. That's gonna be coming out over the next year two years because of you know what buddy musicians do. What do songwriters do they songs. And they've had more time to do it than ever. And i'm excited about all that's going to be coming out. I'm excited about all that new music. Oh yeah it's gonna traffic jam dude Like i'm paying a lot of attention. Who twenty twenty like bon. Jovi put his record called twenty. Twenty corey taylor. But a record Cnn having another record. Yeah yup yup. So i've been watching it because you know in the slash camping even paying a lot of attention and there was sort of like a. We gotta take advantage of downtime and do something for production creating when the same time. It's kind of like you know you're talk people in handle record today. I don't. I don't know what we're supposed to do with it because we can put it out but you can't really in the record. Industry is so different now. Back in the day you caught her record That was actually kinda like more you know with more dictate how things we're going to go was the actual records that you had it in. You could make a living off of record sale now. Records are almost an excuse to go on the road and they were academic their money. That's why they're willing someone's just aerosmith or any of that. They can't jack They make all their money on the road and Sort of bands like us. Or you know munitions like me. It's kinda like well. I can't go anywhere It makes it changes the the motivation but at the same time This isn't gonna last forever. And what a perfect time to create. What appropriate time to make music and write music so that when things are ready we have a whole bunch of stuff to present. And i think that that's that's really where we're at. Is you know. I keep saying my friend. Why go they finally live this thing. It's gonna be whether you're in chicago or detroit five band in town tonight to go see because everybody's going to be back in play And it's gonna be a traffic jam of musicians and bands that you love coming to town than something. Which i think like everybody. We've all taken it for granted that we can school and play music forever and major. We've all taken for granted that we can go and see like eating forever Having people like eddie van halen pass away this year or last year Really made me realize that. Wow i'm never going to iligan or kranz or bowie. People that you know you just kinda realized that none of this lasts forever and some of our heroes. All of our heroes really are getting older and and it's really no excuse to say al gore's the the rolling stone on their you know with time it's all mckearney put out a record that you know like We you i'm looking forward to. I'm very excited as as as hard as it's been i'm really excited to me like you say there's a lot of things that are implanted in a lot of it's going to be a forest of growing around and if can be a renaissance in europe or you know for burning i have i have my thought on not releasing music during a pandemic. I believe especially the way. Rock and roller has positioned itself over the past decade. Or so where. It's been struggling to remain relevant in terms of you know compared to pop music or hip hop and you know you. It's been down in terms of popularity with the youth over over that over past several years. And i think and i've said this before. Rock and roll needs angst in the anger of the youth to jerem back again and i think out of this pandemic if something good out of some comes out of something bad i think it is for rock and roll to take advantage of the way the youth is feeling i know i have a sixteen year old son. He's gonna be sixteen a couple weeks. He loves rock music and he's at it. Sucks doing the same thing every day. And when they're used to listening to the music that they listen to that's kind of been crammed down their throats over the last decade and now they have something new whether it's inspired by the new. Acdc album or whatever it is you know i think is It's going to be a great moment for rock music over the next three to five years. I think so as well. I mean we always laugh about that whole thing because when you live in north america and sort of more like the world in general goodbye whatever is really happening very popular in in the bigger sense of the word and everybody tells us how rock and roll is dead and then you know we get on a bus together on a plane to play in front of you know whether it's australia or south america or asia or europe or you know it's just like everywhere we go there's rock and roll people and their young in the slash camp. You know people assume that you know in some ways you would have more of like a heritage act Audience which of course they do. But you'd be surprised how many young people show up with guns rose shirts or kiss concerts or aerosmith and i think that you have to keep in mind a lot of these kids. They're going gonna put band together and they're gonna make music and they're gonna make something interesting so you know it's like my friends would always you know i have a lot of rock and roll friends. And they'll they'll be complaining about the grammys complaining about this award show or just with that. I do like when i was a kid. I never saw iggy pop on the grammy awards it. It doesn't make any difference to me. And whether twenty twenty or twenty twenty one or or nineteen eighty five. It was kinda like my favorite bands. Might be favorite artists. Were never.

australia europe chicago south america north america asia sixteen eddie van halen Jovi tonight last year today next year this year sixteen year old kranz five years Cnn iggy pop detroit five
"kerns" Discussed on Pantheon

Pantheon

07:55 min | 1 year ago

"kerns" Discussed on Pantheon

"On the radio or or or on the internet or whatever and like wow this is so cool about came together like that you know and it really sort opened my mind so like all these things that we consider like you know like. I don't wanna do that. I don't wanna record separately now. It's sort of like almost anything that's possible. I think that that's a good place. You mentioned you know this was dipping. Your toe and different cool. Was that important for you. During covert and and being under lockdown to kinda do something a little different to change things up for me i. i'm not just during colin. I'm i'm white i'm You know. I started as a bass player when i was a kid. Which is usually just kinda like you know. I can't i can barely play and I had a base So that kinda that meant you're the player and i was playing with guys like you know five to ten years older than me At like fourteen years old fifteen years old and So i started off as a bass player. I would have been perfectly happy. Just been like. I was all i wanted to be in a band. The best thing whole wide world playing in front of people great. That could have been the end of the story but then you know when you start singing and people go okay. Make him this and the next thing you know. You're you're really gonna singer or somehow you. It's a great deal responsibility. And if you're like. Oh wow this happen but And then used the writing songs that kind of stuff so So what i find. Is you know 'cause especially back then. I put a band together with my with my younger brother. In canada went on to be successful and In my absence. While i was playing in the bands my little brother had picked up the bay so when he and i put together i said well okay i'll move out. Front playroom guitar thing You know paul family or something and So that is a big part of it is being a bass player being tara player being a singer. playing some keyboards playing drums. It's almost kind of like When you talk about like giving you're telling another pool it usually means you know. Do you wanna sing on this. Do you want to play based on this. Can you play guitar wrong. So they're always different projects that i do. I'm usually doing something. Markedly different from one to the other in flashes ban on the bass player and i handle all the harmony vocals with mild. Was thing a few solid live But that's a different thing in minefield. I played baseball. I'm elise there from the majority of the record and my to ban on the rhythm guitar player lead singer in the whole failing. So it's like All these things interest ban. Well i'm sort of handling the pole position So all these things really yeah That's why i did my pool. Because i have all these things that i wanna do still to this day i keep saying someday i'm gonna put together a garage band drum and that just happened presented itself yet because i'm not new pert by any stretch your imagination but i love playing music and playing. I think that that would be really cool to be onstage. Seeing this late in my career to be seeing that perspective from their like whole other version of how things could be Community is important. It is important as a as a songwriter singer. As your tar player with bass player is being able to do all those things and unfil- one of those projects become so busy which always happening well flash capital. We do it. were you know. Two years of my life means i'm doing that. You know what. I mean so In the meantime everything else is Scratches a lot about riches. Was it hard for you to be creative while while the pandemic is going on i may have talked to you a lot of different artists who didn't have any issue you know. They can tap into that well of creativity and be fine and there's others that found it difficult because they're doing the same things every day. They're not living the life that they usually do where they find inspiration they they gain inspiration by doing different things and experiencing different things. Was it like for you. when you I'm a big believer in you. Just gotta gotta sit down and do the work you know. I mean like. I remember reading a an interview with stephen king. The writer one time and just was i was really surprised by the fact that he's sort of like had this real sort of blue collar. Hard hat kind of tally about like. Just kinda like wake up in the morning. Make a pot of coffee and i sit down and i write and some days. There's great drop some days. There's nothing some days it's crap some days and you kinda go on. And i just had this sort of like moment of like. I had no idea. That's what i assumed. It was like. He was struck by this idea. I have to sit down and just get this out of my system and you know it was just magic but it never really quite as magical as you think Obviously the magic is is the idea and the sort of like this tiny little spark that you try and build into this gigantic bonfire So for me I think we're constantly challenged by you know creativity. I think that you know i. I've often used the excuse. That like if i'm not writing living your life and still a portion is part of reactive writing because You know you're frustrated or your heart got broken or what all these things. All these life experiences that you're having so that say that goes on for months on that thirty day you sit down and start writing a song. It's probably going to be informed by everything you've lived in the last fourteen days You know whatever those happen to be so So that wasn't. I wouldn't say it was a challenge when when The lockdown happened in a lot of ways. I sort of right war based on project to project. it's sorta like i find it a lot easier to kind of be like i used to be a lot more comedies. Right song them a pile and just kinda like but now. It's more like if there's a project in mind it makes it a lot easier to kind of like go. Okay say it was a hard rock thing and this is a very heavy metal thing and this is a very you kind of know what you're kind of head spaces and you know what the goal minded. So i think i feel very fortunate that with the to project and then with minefield and then eventually slash These things they come up and it makes you kinda get off the couch. I use the excuse to many times. It's like there's always something on tv you know it's like there's we live in a renaissance age of like. Have you watched this theory. Have you watched this like you know next thing you know. You're on the couch for eight hours. Watching some series never really thought about but I find you know. Life is distracting. And you really have to. I really take into account got stephen king. Is you know you really want to achieve something. You kinda gotta get up and they look at your day and decide. Am i going to sit down and be creative today. And and creativity is really something you kind of have to go and sit down and put pen to paper or hand and just sorta kinda make it happen and like you said. It's like yeah. There's some people they might have considered. You know there was just. They couldn't find in racial. But i usually just need that You know it was just. They had days where nothing happened. And that happens all the time. When you're when you're trying to be creative writing songs you sit down and you place and stop and you look around and and sometimes it's not as productive as others.

five thirty day eight hours Two years fourteen years old stephen king ten years today fifteen years old canada baseball paul family one time days last fourteen Scratches
"kerns" Discussed on Pantheon

Pantheon

07:50 min | 1 year ago

"kerns" Discussed on Pantheon

"As a lot of you know expectations and and they are repeat customers so when they come to a show and They all the last leg of the tour. They'd like to see it's gonna juggle. You know a juggle up the celtics in which is what we tried to do. On the flash campus of every night we have a few saws. We can kind of interchange and here and there and often the middle tour or a few weeks and like she add this other song and we all got kind of you know woodshed on that and It just makes them different and shifted the art for the musicians as well because if you have a show that's really sort of routine it can be really. It can really play on you after a while to be like you know like your passion for it. away I was talking to another friend of mine. Doug aldrich Anybody's gonna daisy now. But he played in whitesnake and he said you know he always said that you know i never thought of it quite that way but he loves to have it like where is it becomes to routine you start the kind of like you started thinking about like i gotta make sure. I pick up milk on the drive home tonight. I got a call so and so and you're like banning in front of tens of thousands of people and they want to be in that moment and nothing makes you more in the moment when you realized removed. And if you don't keep your eye on the ball you're gonna fall so I think you're i think i'm with you as far as trying to find a balance between you know playing the song people wanna hear or doing stuff that people want to enjoy from the same time having moments that can kind of feel a little bit more real or in the moment. Yeah moment that will take you. You might be present at the show physically but a mullet that can take you away. You know kinda just you just being awe of what's going on in an unexpected moment can always enhance the performance and enhance the experience. It's just You know. I mean i have a. I'm a big zeppelin bootleg collector. And i think all the stuff that i've listened to over the years with these jams that they would do and it's just like man. I can't believe that they did that. You know an eleven. Oh no no two nights. It'd it would be so. The new project is minefield and then two new songs are our home and alone together. And how did this project come about. Well yummy as brock and matt starbucks planes freely fans so Twenty because you whole weird Music world where you cross paths with people and you really. You know a guy he's great. Oh this guy's fantastic that guy's really talented and We do the kiss crews together almost every year. I often do Sit in with kulich from The non makeup years kissed by singing with him in our in our drummer Brent pits slash band. He plays that are friends. Doctor on concrete taylor's band slipknot And we do like a whole set of non makeup kiss eighty ninety kiss which is black and then so jeremy and matt plane as freely thing which is just over there. You know within this sort of on this kiss family tree so we all love each other and really really friendly and matt. And i've played together in jeremy It's just a guy. I admire and one day jeremy reaches out and not out to that. They were doing this project. with this kid brandon field And we just you know we're looking. I think it was initially after thing on one song out. Course and this was during coded which made it specifically like. I was at the beginning of of the whole lockdown situation. Like anybody was sort of. Like i'm one of those people who's really wired the every single day i wake up and i thought calendar things. I need to do that day. And when that calendar certainly was when suddenly relevant it took me a couple of weeks it kinda really okay so i can just sit here and watch you know. Whatever an episode of of this netflix show turns into the episode during the next episode of embrace bed because A lot of guys like flash while kennedy and all of my friends were sort of you know very goal and career ranted as far as like what you want to try and achieve but So sometimes these forced breaks are important and I tried to take advantage of that. And then also phone ringing and guys like matt journey like we're doing this project and i o okay. Great and i talk to to brandon kit this big. It's our player and he does. He sends a track and then another track an instrumental tracks and just animals. And i just found like you know you know it was just sort of really lit a fire on me because i was not doing anything you know of like very creative and and it's always good and i always recommend this for almost anybody to kind of like whether it's music or whatever is your thing is to just kind of once in a while dip your toe in another pool because it sort of makes you kinda go. Wow i you know a lot. It's a little bit more like unapologetically. Hard rock Then some of the other things that i was doing at the time. 'cause flashing is is a major focus in my life but a lot of the other things that i do. can be My my canadian band to with my friend brand from flashes band and corey from sharon twain. You a whole other thing and it's a lot more sort of slick pop kind of oriented thing and then this thing was a lot more like big bombastic rock kind of fan and i was like well. Great like sorta of like take away the restraints of what you sort of feel sort of you know in a corner of their kind of go on gotta be more like slick or more you know clean on this and then over here and you get to in the minefield cabinet like you know you just take just go for it so it happened pretty quickly in that you know like i was initially after thing song and then i was with another song and i was like well. Who's playing based on this project. And they're like well. We don't know yet and i go all play bass so it and it went from being Just you know sitting on a couple of songs. There still is a a few saws on the record that we have a couple of guys coming on Jeremy actually one of the entertaining us on their brandon's but you know it just really turned into the thing. Where would you suddenly had a on albums worth of material and the most interesting part about it is that none of us were in the same room at the same time which is of course for me. I mean i've done a lot of things where in this day and age where someone can send files over. Can you play on this. Can you single shirt the back. But i never actually did a project that was sort of you know. Like i'm such a stickler like when we talk about all led zeppelin and the beatles and the like that that i love There's supposed to be in a studio together. You're supposed to be looking at each other and his last campaign we do. We're in studio together. We're making eye contact. We're playing together. In some instances stuff's going down live like rhythm tracks going down live. And that's the way i prefer to do it. But it really is sorta taught me that. There's really no rhyme or reason to it you kind of when things are when creativity happens and all that kind of stuff it sorta more about like go for it and this is. We can't even be insane room together. jeremy's a nashville of and kentucky's somewhere know what the hell and math in la..

sharon twain corey two new songs netflix tonight kulich Doug aldrich jeremy whitesnake nashville one song Jeremy led zeppelin tens of thousands of people one kennedy eighty ninety kiss single shirt flashes band two
"kerns" Discussed on Pantheon

Pantheon

07:40 min | 1 year ago

"kerns" Discussed on Pantheon

"'cause i'm still learning you know it's amazing when you think back of that period you had the british invasion with the beatles and the stones and kinks and the animals and all those bands that came over across the pond and it was so influential. I mean it's still influences. People today in terms of the songwriting like you were talking about. You went from that and then you went into led zeppelin and even the who who is originally part of the british invasion started to experience spearmint. More with like you said longer songs a an album. You know with a concept like tommy and quadrophenia and all that stuff and he pink floyd and was it was it based on some of these bands like zeppelin for instance really jammed out. During their live shows. I mean they can do a dazed enjoying us. Version of forty minutes longer whole lot of love thirty minutes long and it almost is like those albums in those bands back then tried to recreate those that that they had live that that sense of chaos at or that beautiful chaos at they had and it went from these two and a half three minute pop songs to these epic journeys of music and lyrics in symbolism in mystery. It was interesting. How in a very short period of time it changed it really rapidly developed. Did it. it's funny. You know it feels like from early beatles either even the beatles themselves starting to really stretch out when you listen to like i want you on avenue road you kinda go. This is pretty out there for these guys. Foreigners like sort of stepping away from you know like a three minute pop song and It's funny because a kid. I was so you know like i went from all that stuff that we're talking about and i went into more of a punk rock thing i also. I can't just glaze over Speaking chicago or more rochman is is cheap trick influence as far as songwriting and nielsen. Just ability to Is an underrated in many in many cases I believe as a songwriter and the player. there's a kind of like guy he really kinda creative that there's been thing that continues to this day on the sort of formula to kind of build so then moved into that world punk rock became sort of the end of sort of pink floyd's and all that kind of stuff and it was weird for me because coming from a small town and i really appreciate where i came from because i never really law. I never really had that thing where you're a punk or you're into metal or you're into you know what i'm saying like new wave or prog rock. It was just sort of music to us because we were wasn't really it was just too small town have a quote unquote seen that. You could be a part of you just like you liked. So one day you'd be listening to the clash and the next thing you listening to playing for it and and and that you know was kind of part of the beauty. I think of being able to kind of walk away and happens vocabulary. That sort of covers a lot of it. You know in the in When you get into things like their own then you're back to three minutes again. You know with really poppy. Sort of melody isn't really popular. Almost you know they. They weren't afraid this would bubblegum this of it and then but at the same time with the advent heavy metal and that kind of stuff. 'cause a lot of the punk rock also was really sort of anti guitar. Solo like it was sort of like it was almost found upon to be super musical. You know nobody really cared. How many notes could play in fact. It was sort of you know. Go do that over there. you know. Here's where we just kinda. It's more about the regression and more about the the song i suppose and of course heavy metal is again the guitar player whether it's like when you think back in the seventies and thinking of aircraft in cranston or any of the guys will really kind of like you know really kind of playing a lot of guitar playing a lot of solo and playing a lot of stuff and like you said nothing was crazier than putting on song remains the same and realizing that they use the whole side one record. I was fascinated by that category. I can't believe there's like one saw the side of his record because they were just they were and go into other things and come back and experiment and i play with slash man and he you go on youtube right now. You can find in paris. France minute version of rocket queen by guns and role that we together. And it's literally when you do the math. It's like it's a minute song when you look at the album which is a pretty long for two possible So what's the six minute song with twenty four minutes of jamming and guitar soul which we love. You know i think that. Well there's a mild davidson to it or something like there's kind of you come to see someone like steve i or my davis or an instrumentalist like that should expect that you're going to see some extended moments you know you're going to see some planning is throwing down So i i liked that kind of thing at the same time as i do have a sort of a foundation of like a punk rock sensibility. That is sort of like you know trimming the fat as it would be for the same time. I think music is is supposed to be kind of whatever it feels like in the moment and in the moment in sort of a point and that's what i don't i'm not a jazz guy at all but i love listening to it. I i think. I love it so much because i don't understand what's happening all the time but i think there's so much like when they record something it's not really based on a lot of what's going down. The old jazz records is kind of what was happening in the moment. And i think we're all kind of spotting for that as well as trying to figure out how to make a song the you know universally interesting or or sing along abol or whatever you wanna call it. Yeah you know. It was almost like the bands came out of that era. Where we're like almost pushing each other. Like oh you're going to do a thirty minute version long. I'm gonna do a thirty five minute version of this song and you know that guitar playing in the experimentation. I mean you know when you think of zeppelin you think of that ban. You think of john paul jones which is really the backbone of the ban. You know i mean a lot of that starter. Stuff doesn't happen without him. Arranging the music and being able to adapt you know because of the weight bonham played with page and all that stuff and and you know planning even said when bottom died that it was almost impossible for them to get a replacement because they knew each other so well and for them to bring in someone new in recapture the essence zeppelin which is the jamming to these. You know these blues baddeley's incite songs. It never would have happened again. It would be impossible and when you when you are in a band and you have that sense of just improvisation and you don't know where it's gonna go. That is special. that's really special absolutely. I think he's interesting because to me when i listened to live albums like Anything and live and lead by the who they were both what i liked about them. The most will they were. You know presenting their material live. But it was never slavish to the original versions. You know what. I mean like there was never this sort of feeling of like we have to have. I mean mostly because when you're dealing with four piece ban which is essentially three piece Three-piece the vocal Trying to reinterpret what you recorded which has so overdubbed guitars army things. He's playing there's sometimes in bogle harmonies that. Are you.

john paul jones steve thirty five minute six minute thirty minute youtube two twenty four minutes forty minutes paris zeppelin davis France Three-piece three minutes both led zeppelin thirty minutes seventies today
"kerns" Discussed on Pantheon

Pantheon

08:12 min | 1 year ago

"kerns" Discussed on Pantheon

"Dream But i was interesting listening to you. Know a guy you know generation or two ahead of me talking about you just want to put a band together. You wanted to put a band together and call it the something you know. You just want it to be four or five guys in this gang teen and I think that very much. You know whether it's john paul george. And ringo or jean-paul. Ason your or keeping guys you know you just have this image of like i need to pick up a tour and i need to find other guys like minded guys and actually that happened very quickly because you find you know especially in that sort of preteen and early teenage you find yourself you know getting obsessed with this and you realize that a lot of your friends feel the same way Not all of them have the motivation. Gonna qatar or pick up a drumstick but you know a lot of your friends. Or even if they've been it doesn't mean that they're talented enough to be able to continue to carry on doing it but I would i would. I would definitely the pete as well. You know. I got land that the pizza hut and say like. I'm gonna do this. And when i think i can do this. There wasn't that. I thought pete was like you know. I look at it and i was arrogant. Why can do that. It was more a case of like i want to do. I want to. I felt inspired to do that. Because you know there's a moment to you know you go from playing music you know you you try to emulate your heroes and you know you start playing songs and beatles songs and kiss songs and then you kind of move into wanting to write your own music. What was that moment like for you. An inspiration a song or a group that you really liked what they wrote and connected with you It's funny because in a lot of ways we started doing our right away. I think it was so hard to play beatles song. There's a lotta cords and beatles song you know what i mean. We realized early on that. This is not like even to this day. You know as grown men when you get together with other guys if you don't if you don't know the songs they're not really jammers. You can jam some songs jam. But a lot of You know beatles songs are so arranged them so cleverly put together that you know if you don't know when to go to that beef section it falls apart and So very early on we were already kind of like. I have an idea. Here's what i don't think it was really so much a case of like thinking that you were lennon mccartney european towns and you just kinda thought like it doesn't sound cool and then you can play with your friend and he'd play along and i pray drums and so it kind of happened pretty early on but i don't think anybody really took. It seriously was just kind of like you know a bunch of guys making a horrible racket in the garage with patient parents But we you know you know it. Sort sorta became more serious time went on. I think again You know we. A lot of us came up playing in cover bands and and learning songs of which teaches you a lot about songwriting. I think i had a conversation the other day about how playing bill or playing whichever you know the top forty hits the day you learn about like the intro into the into the versed pre chorus and of course and all that stuff that goes on to the solo. If was i'd have that and and Again i got two thousand on that as well because he was songwriter. And i think. I was around that time when i became so obsessed with with music the beginning substitute probably the starting become szeswith. The actual active putting a song together. But i probably started to pay more attention to that. You've said something really interesting about how plane other people's songs really teaches you about songwriting. I meant i imagine it's also about the arrangement and the structure You know the hook that we focus on onto as well. You know what i mean. A great song always has a hook and a it stands the test of time when you're evolving as a songwriter. What were some songs that really man so much influenced you you took from the structure of those songs and put it in what you wanted to do. That's a really good question. It's interesting because you know looking back. Now i remember seeing an interview with Won't be town again. And i remember saying to the guys. I was in in in the studio with slash in the guys and i was saying i remember watching this interview with pete townsend talking about when they were there to entertain the idea of writing army and he was kinda like his manager. Who was you know. Adventurous and kit lambert was his name and he was you know. What do you think about like making longer songs are making a longer narrative piece. You know what. I mean like like an opera and pounds and was sort of like pop. Songs are two minutes fifty. He would say i was thinking like two minutes fifty. So i'm sitting there with the guys. And i pull out my phone. I start calling a beatles songs from back in the early sixties even even the fifties if you went on because everybody no. That's no way there's no way those songs without short because when you when you talking about it right now you can talk about like can't buy me love or something like that and we'll be there's so much going on that song don't have to be at least three minutes long but go back. I'm not sure what is. Because i don't have it on me but i was amazed that so many songs were you know under three minutes long. You know these pop songs but then like within a few years you get into the happens you get into a lot of log with the jam sections in the middle and all that kind of stuff and and the song get longer and longer cream deep purple you know and people become you know sort of Rebellious about the the structure of the song. And all that kind of stuff and it becomes more you know i sort sorta weeds in and out of that because sometimes even though that kind of thing is happening there's still people rocking knocking out three minute. Pop song matter what I think that when you talk about what an actual example some songs that made me think like You know actual structure goes i. Would i would think the beatles. The beatles is always a good example when i when i even the day like i feel like i'm constantly learning something else. They'll be in the car driving and some saw beatles song will come on and i'll go. It's interesting that almost like there's quite a few examples of a hard day's night and a few of the songs where there's a bridge or middle eight you call it. That will come up and which is always kind of like that kind of like extra. like seasoning. Went into the song that you didn't expect at the sort of three-quarter mark. They're gonna a section. Then they'll go back to that bridge again and you're like interesting we don't in i've been working in a sort of war An interesting kind of songwriting mode with a lot of people for several years. Now and when you sorta just boil it down to we're gonna write a song and it's going to be intro verse. Chorus chorus rian. Troll bruce pretty chorus chorus some kind of bridge perhaps then maybe a solo section or instrumental breakdown. Then you're just kind of course out sort of so you sort of structures you can. You can get very sort of stuck in your way. No no it wasn't the way thongs over it and you can always get your kicked by going back and listening for the guy who did it and you go wow i. I'm still learning to this day. I think that's the beauty of music is that there's such a wealth of stuff. I really envy young kids. These days to find it rolling stones and the beatles or or whichever band you find and just kinda like 'cause i remember what it was like for me to find the beatles and realize oh there's like there's a whole wealth of music here but it's an adventure to go out every day and every weekend and try and find another beatles record Now you can just go on on your social media on whether it's youtube or or whatever and just listen to everything but that was such a joy for me as finding the who and finding deals and find stones and led zeppelin and all the things like that and just just never end. But just.

pete townsend john paul george jean-paul two five guys four Won't be town two thousand ringo youtube three minute lambert pete qatar forty hits two minutes fifty generation early sixties under three minutes three minutes
"kerns" Discussed on Pantheon

Pantheon

08:24 min | 1 year ago

"kerns" Discussed on Pantheon

"Welcome back to the hook. Everybody it is jase scott your host in the new year two thousand twenty one happy new year if you're still celebrating. I don't know if people are. it's a week long celebration for some. I think people just kind of wanted to get over with this year but nevertheless we continue to be an escape for you talk and music talking great topics talking new bands talking with great artist and we have one for today. We have mr todd dammit. Kerns on the show. Welcome aboard todd. How you doing. I love when you use my full name. How are you. i'm doing well man. How are things going for you. How how's the weather where you're at what's going on. Well i'm in vegas So it's funny. Because i was just talking to people back home. I'm from canada. Originally so and i do miss it on occasion but my wife always reminds me that we don't have to shovel sunshine. That's true for you. It hasn't been too bad of a winter so far. We've gotten some snow. Had some cold weather but nothing like minus thirty that sometimes we get here in chicago. Yeah i know right You know relative when you grew up that stuff You just know. And you're acclimated to it and you know you have your selection of winter clothing and that's just how it goes. I mean i remember it. Well weird here when you suddenly like go from like well basically if the reverse here like where the summer is happening you just don't qualify for three months Because the summers hot versus the winter being cold. So it's just kind of a trade off in the rushing the i remember i had a friend visit from nashville a couple of years ago and she was driving up and she was like. What's people driving seventy miles an hour while there's a blizzard going excessive to drive in that stuff. Yeah i mean you take driver's ed you're driving in it. You're learning in it and it's like no big deal you know absolutely. I know where we grew up driving. And it's been a long time for me to drive in that so 'cause i moved like from schedule. Where i grew up was super. Winter was mega winter. And then i moved West coast to vancouver. Which has that sort of seattle rainy kind of winter So i kind of you know. I'm i'm pretty green when it comes to driving in the snow but i get my legs back someday. Yeah yeah you know. It's it's always the first one to every had that. I experience when the snow i you know falls and you you haven't been driving it in a few months. That's always like the one time you're cautious but like after that for the rest of the winter you know. It's like a race track on the on the highway. Well it's funny. Because i've lived here in vegas for fourteen years and i've seen it snow i think twice and it's funny because when you live places where even vancouver in canada for that matter when when it would snow and you know no one's accustomed to it it was just like chaos like you're we look like the walking dead cars left on hill. They couldn't get off because you're tiny snow tires. It's the whole thing. So you know you gotta be thankful for wherever you are and whatever you're accustomed to i suppose yeah absolutely you know. It's just you adapt you know and and you. Yeah well we always start this. Show the same way with the same question. Every time we have a first time guest and that is the essence of the podcast. Just like every rock song has hook. That sucks you. In every rack van has a moment whether it's a song and album aband- or performance that hook them on rock and roll. What was it for you. The actual song Whatever it was they hooked you whenever it was. Well i gotta be honest. It's it's always been really difficult to pinpoint that because you know talking my older friend. And there's always that. And then the beatles came on and sullivan and the next day. Everybody was in a band. You know what i mean. I'm always like wow. What an amazing moment that would be the have that kind of ground zero to to focus on I remember like people always ask me like what. What's your favorite song. And i always will say Jumping jack flash by the rolling stones. I even have some lyrics tattooed on the somewhere Just because i kind of like the first song. I remember hearing that made me go. Whoa whoa whoa. This i mean. I remember being a little kid and it just had that sort of this sort of like energy to what they're really kinda lit a fire under me So i would probably have to go back to that. I think some degree i would have been. I mean that's all. I'm trying to think what year it came out. It's probably around the same age. I am but Maybe a little older but I know finding my parents beatles records and stuff like that you know 'cause my parents were always into music but they weren't really obsessive like i became about it so they had record like that was johnny cash and like a lot of the outlaw country stuff and my mom just you know your smell or some beatles and sort of the four major food groups of rock and roll. I suppose and. I remember staring at those beatles records and just that sort of your child and it's just a a four headed monster you know what i mean like just looked like they all have the same haircut. I couldn't even tell them apart. You know. I couldn't tell who was thinking what i just. I think that really kind of in a weird way. I suppose without seeing the beatles and sullivan multi many years after that back the beatles. I think it did actually kinda like our fire. Enemy finding bands like kiss later on as a kid We're probably around the same time. I can't remember but i've always said this Finding things like elvis presley or the beatles or kids to me they were inspiring in the way that you love music. But i don't think it was the kind of thing that made me wanna pick up qatar because those those those characters seemed like. I don't know they didn't seem like real big fictional characters. Like kiss literally legitimately comic book fire-breathing superheroes and the beatles just being like they came from valhalla. And elvis just seemed like you know any guard of some sort so why i remember Being a kid. And and being i went to a movie theater by myself and watch the film The kids are alright. It's a film about the who. And i remember walking out of that and feeling like really kinda like i wanna do that. Like i felt like for some reason just watching crashing in watching that sort of energy of those guys that and then led to a lot of punk rock and a lotta stuff that that a lot of us decided like it rocked so much about the technical ability of the news about you know the feeling the emotion and i always knew aggression kinda for whatever reason towns townsend million had an effect on me to go. I think i can do this. You know what i mean. There isn't a progression of the artists. And you mentioned. You know the stones the beatles elvis. You mentioned the who. Who was it that influenced you or motivated you to pick up an instrument. Well i think all of those all of those characters. But i think that for whatever reason towns and was the one that really made me feel like i can. Do i think i again when i when you look at elvis and you're just looking out perfect you know. He is at least in the presentation of him and the beatles just being so perfectly put together and kiss having this whole thing sorta dialed in. When i went to who had just had a little bit more A little bit more of a an edge to it or a little bit more like it wasn't quite so perfectly put together. It looked like real people playing this music. And i think that made me kind of Pick up a guitar. I mean it really made me go. I think i can do this. I would have had the townsend thousand guys like paul manley handed the guys like you know home mccartney and all those guys i think that just the image of of of seeing someone playing guitar whether it was even something like watching something on laurence welk have something like that on or musical show and just seeing. Hee-haw was oddly enough. My dad loved he off so he'd watch clark shred and i just felt like that energy. Just a person's banning there where they just looked like it looked looked right. Anna sorta.

jase scott nashville paul manley chicago canada vancouver fourteen years twice three months first song seventy miles an hour thousand guys today vegas minus thirty elvis presley next day clark shred four major food groups first time
Interview With Steve Ells

How I Built This

03:49 min | 1 year ago

Interview With Steve Ells

"So there's a famous ted talk by a guy named barry schwartz. It's called the paradox of choice and in it very explains that virtually all kern research on human behavior supports this idea that we humans we don't really like to have too many choices. Anything beyond four to six actually makes us anxious and unhappy which could help explain the success of kepala. Because if you've ever been in one you can probably tell me the menu by heart burrito bowl salad tacos four options. That is it. There isn't a whole lot to agonize over. And it's one of the reasons why you put late just exploded in the two thousands on the eve of the millennium the company had just been more than twenty stores and today cipolla has nearly twenty three hundred locations across the us and in four other countries and its value is around fourteen billion dollars now aaa as you will hear was never meant to become what it became. It was supposed to be a one off burrito joint in denver a joint that would generate enough cash to finance a high end restaurant that was developed as plan. He's actually a classically trained chef and he wanted to make michelin starred food. Not foil wrapped burritos into the earliest recollection. I have of in being in the kitchen and cooking was in the third grave and we lived in germany. And i remember cooking scrambled eggs. Had you make them. Did you scramble the digital crack the eggs into the panel scramble him or did you scrambling before no ice. Scrambled them for With a fork in a bowl. Thank and then. My mom had a a very well. Seasoned cast iron skillet. Nice i mean it was very very smooth and almost nonstick and i used to push the kurds into the center in a square shape. A perfect square. Maybe three by three or three and a half by three and a half something like that and then and then when it was just set enough i would flip it over and I mean it was very controlling. My can says a lot about me. Because i'm a i'm a little bit of a control freak and of course i had no idea then but I was just. It's an interesting. It's an interesting memory. Like what point did you start to a. I've read like stories about you in college where you'd dinner parties and and people like. What is this that you butter you. You'd make like duck con feet and stuff like how did you even know about this. How did you get into foods at such a young age in it well. My mom was a very adventurous cook and a really good one And she had a garden. She got all the cooking magazines and had a lot of cookbooks. And i used to. I used to spend time in the kitchen and And follow along. And at some point. I started watching cooking shows a julia child and graham on the galloping. Gourmet and the pbs series. The master chef series. I really love those and and would duplicate the recipes and and liked to cook for my family and then When i was older in high school i started having people over so you go to college in in boulder yes and you study art history and of course it made zero sense to my father. What you do with artistic. He'd be like so. What are you gonna do that. Our history degree. Of course i would say you know. I don't know we'll see. We'll see how this unfolds. And probably i was thinking that i would continuing and go to graduate school but my roommate suggested to me that i go to cooking school. She said this just weeks before

Kepala Cipolla Barry Schwartz Kern TED Denver Germany United States PBS Julia Graham Boulder
Too Much Of A Good Thing: The Cautionary Tale of Biotech Crops

Short Wave

09:03 min | 1 year ago

Too Much Of A Good Thing: The Cautionary Tale of Biotech Crops

"Dan let's start with a little bt crops one. oh one all right. Walk us through how they work. So these genetically modified plants got their superpowers from a bacteria. Let's let julie describe it a little bit for bt in particular They express genes that. Come from a type of bacterium It's really a very common. Bacteria that's found in soils it's called bacillus thuringiensis as the scientific name now. This kind of bacteria is actually poisonous and the larval stage of some major insect pests like corn route worm. Cotton bollworm Which farmers worry about a lot. So what the scientists did was they took some of the genes from bacteria and inserted them into these corn and cotton plants which then made the plants poisonous to the insects just like the bacteria were so now. The plants can actually protect themselves by killing off past that. Try to eat them. Exactly which is a big deal for farmers. Here is david current. He's an entomologist at texas am university. He gives farmers advice on the best way to handle their insect problems. A lot of them are cotton farmers and for them. The effect was dramatic. U we'd have cases before the introduction of bt where You know farmers were having to treat you know it could be ten times. You know for these pests. The ring ten times in a season they could yeah some areas and one bt was introduced. Well our our insecticide sprays just plummeted. And you know in there were guys who wouldn't have to treat it all and that's a big deal for not just the farmers but for the environment right. Dan like those pesticides. Don't just kill the insects year. For right yeah absolutely. Regular insecticides can kill off a whole range of species and mess up the whole ecosystem. Bt crops produced specific proteins that only kill particular insects so those crops are basically harmless to pollinators like bees and beneficial insects. That prey on past help. Keep them under control. It's not toxic to people or birds and for farmers like jonathan evans and north carolina. It meant he didn't have to work so hard is always better for the plant to protect itself. Then i have to go out and try to to spray for the worms. Did it really change farming. Have -solutely i mean you can tend a lot more acres. Were the whole equipment. Got it so jonathan. The farmer loves these crops. Julie who likes insects is happy. When did things start to go sour. Dan well i guess for jonathan it was you know one day in two thousand sixteen when he went out to cotton field and saul some cotton bollworm happily chowing down on his cotton plants and he knew what that meant. Those insects had evolved. He was looking at a new strain of bollworm that the bt protein wouldn't kill and this has been happening more and more often the country right david kerns that insect specialist at texas a and m. says some farmers are pretty disappointed and angry. There's words i can't use but they wanted to know what the heck they're doing paying for a technology and they're still having a spray. Okay dan so let's talk about. Why some of those insects have become resistant to bt crops. Yeah let's get into the science mattie evolution and here we go okay so there's a part of this. It's really simple. You have a gazillion different individual. Let's say cotton bollworm out there. There's genetic variation among them and just by chance. You may very well have a few that have some genetic mutation that makes them a little less vulnerable to the fbi t. Now they're rare normally right no problem share except if you plant these bt crops everywhere you kill off all the other insects and you have. What biologists call selection pressure right those rare individuals. That aren't killed by the gmo will be the only ones that survive and they will find each other and you know what happens next. Mattie they do that birds and the bees and the bugs thing they do they they they mate and offspring and suddenly you have a lot of insects with that. Same genetic trait a new strain of resistant. Insects emerged its evolution. Right in front of your eyes. That is what has happened over and over now. It's complicated because the biotech companies actually deployed a whole series of slightly different bt jeans and we've seen insects evolve resistance. I two one gene and then the next one sometimes it took maybe five years other times. It took a lot longer fifteen even twenty years. And it's patchy in some places the bt crops are still working and other places they aren't okay but the end. This idea of selection pressure has been around for a long time right so clearly. Scientists saw this coming. Oh absolutely did. In fact i was around. I was reporting on this back when there. Were these arguments going on back when the crops were new and university. Scientists were predicting that this would happen. If the genes were overused. They were pushing this idea of refuge to keep it from happening. They said farmers should be required to plant some of their land with non bt crops Just so all those pests. You know those with and without the resistance. Gene could thrive there elway. So in that way the rare insects with genetic resistance to bt wouldn't completely take over because some of those that were sensitive would still be around to be in the gene pool exactly exactly and the companies actually agreed to this in principle but there were these big arguments about how big the refuge had to be. There were some scientists who said at least for some of these bt crops. Farmers should not be allowed to plant those crops on more than half of their land. But the company said that'll never work. Farmers won't go for bt crops at all if there's such strict rules and the companies one and sure enough now there's resistance to bt so scientists like julie are back once again this argument pushing for tighter government rules. We are at an important point where we've seen some examples of what can happen and definitely do need to make some changes. What kind of changes are we talking about here. Dan because it feels pretty late in the game. Right it is. It is but there's one thing that people are focused on there's at least one bt. Gene is still working the bugs of not resistant to it yet so it still is effective against a lot of insects. And it's sort of carrying a lot of the weight right now. It's kind of the last bt. Still standing and scientists are worried. It'll soon break. You know under that weight of overuse especially in the south is used in both corn and cotton to fight off insects so that the environmental protection agency scientific advisers have told the agency it should only allow that gene to be used in one of those crops cotton or corn and it should be caught because controlling the bollworm in cotton is just much much more important economically in corn. It's a minor pest got and cotonou can wipe out your crop. And if you don't let it be used in corn than all those cornfields are that refuge. I see see but the company that owns this gene. Syngenta says no. That's not necessary. And it's not fair and the and the epa is actually backed away from idea. Okay i mean so what happens now dan. Well there are a lot of scientists including julie peterson who say if current farming practices. Don't change. it's possible that all of the bt genes that are currently on the market will stop working reliably within ten years and then farmers will have to find new ways to fight the insects. Maybe they'll be spraying more. Insecticides again or more and this is what julie wants maybe they go back to some more old-fashioned pest control methods you know crop rotations change what crops you plant from year to year. Yeah i mean. Indigenous communities around the world have used that technique for thousands of years some organic farmers due to right the the trick is going to be using those techniques and still producing the kind of big harvest that a lot of farmers and a lot of consumers now depend on. Okay dan charles. Thank you so much for bringing us

BT David Current Jonathan Evans David Kerns DAN Jonathan Julie Texas Saul Mattie North Carolina FBI Elway Gene Julie Peterson
Political Ad Campaign from The Gap Strikes Sour Note with Twitter Users

Business Wars Daily

03:05 min | 1 year ago

Political Ad Campaign from The Gap Strikes Sour Note with Twitter Users

"These days. It's become almost mandatory to declare your company a purpose driven brand but owen said it would be easy. Take the gap for example last wednesday the day after election day. Remember that oh what feels like about a year ago. The gap came forward with a message of unity to this divided. Country on social media posted an image of its classic hoodie. But this one was navy on one side. Red on the other click. The image in zipper brought the two sides together. The accompanying message. The one thing we know is that together. We can move forward sitting berkeley alongside the text. We're two hearts one red one blue this while the united state of anxiety was just beginning to hold its breath waiting for ballot counts in court battles. The gaps message felt so flat that you might say no one voted for it. With the exception of a hapless brand manager who suggested it and the yes people in the boardroom who had thought it was a good idea as add weeks. catherine lunchroom wrote the hoodie. Mashup was greeted with almost exclusive derision. Many on social media criticized the gap for being tone death at such a tense moment. Lindstrom noted the common sentiment across to the new york times. The gap utterly failed to read the room within an hour. The gap deleted. It's post a brand representative assured the new york times that the sweatshirt existed as an image only they had no intention of selling it in a statement sent to several publications. The gap said their intention was to show the power of unity. They admitted their timing was too early but said they had faith the country would in fact come together in the future but just in case you think gap is alone in making this sort of fashion. Faux pas consider rival lululemon the luxury ath- leisurewear company is known for the one hundred dollar plus prices of its leggings with more and more professionals working from home and scarfing up comfortable fashion. Lululemon sales have soared but so to have consumers calls for brands to stand for something and lululemon tried in september. The brand went viral worldwide. For its case. Study of hypocrisy and marketing. The company highlighted the instagram accounts of five of its brand ambassadors one charlotte north carolina. Yoga teacher ready. Kern was promoting a workshop calling on people to resist capitalism the ouch factor of a multibillion dollar luxury brand telling consumers to resist capitalism. Well it drew attention from press all over the globe from the bbc. The new york post ultimately lululemon deleted that post it also distance itself from its own brand ambassador drawing criticism from kerns followers according to the charlotte observer in october struggling gap revealed that its latest strategy is to pump its own small but successful athletes. Your brand athletic taking direct aim at rival lululemon. At least they'll be evenly matched when it comes to brand messaging but the lesson from both companies missteps is for marketers everywhere. Those who choose to publicly support mission must be authentic about it and support it through and through a million ways to get mission driven marketing wrong and only Narrow pats to do right

Lululemon Catherine Lunchroom The New York Times Owen Lindstrom Berkeley Navy The New York Post Kern Charlotte North Carolina Kerns Charlotte Observer BBC GAP
Into the Goody Bag, and 10 Great Plugins for Podcast Audio Production

The Podcast Engineering Show

05:25 min | 1 year ago

Into the Goody Bag, and 10 Great Plugins for Podcast Audio Production

"Well Hello, and welcome to the podcast engineering show. My name is Chris Kern produce podcasts for companies and I also teach at podcast engineering school and every week on this show, we bring you podcast production techniques on a silver platter. We actually alternate between interviews with podcast producers and engineers and daily goody episodes like this one where I'm going to talk about six of the daily Goody blog posts that I write every day actually I don't write him almost every day. You can sign up to receive these daily goodies via email. You can receive a daily or weekly like a weekly roundup and you can sign up on the website podcasts engineering school, Dot Com. So we're going to cover the daily goodies. By the way the next semester of podcast Engineering School Starts January Twelfth Twenty twenty. One. Yeah starting to sound futuristic here, twenty, twenty one, and also after we talk about the daily goodies, I'm just going to share a little bit about what's been going on in my world just a bunch of random stuff I'm doing and kind of announcements like that just. But more personal. So we'll cover the daily goodies I but but let's talk about the focus right scarlet to two third gen actually the whole scarlet series. Third Generation because they are the sponsor of this episode and right now. So on the focus, right? Scarlet Third Gen. Units by the way, their audio interfaces if you didn't know and they're. The world's best-selling USB interface range with over three million units sold worldwide, and there's six different interfaces with different amounts of inputs. You want one input, two, four eight depends on how many mics you have and really good sound quality and works with it works with whatever recording software you're already using. Doesn't matter what software and there's also the air button I wanNA talk about this air button on the scarlet third gen series because it adds some nice high end and so in this episode, I'm not recording with my usual microphone. I. Think for the last maybe six or nine months I've been using the road mt one. Microphone, which is a condenser microphone. And today I broke out my old or my. I've had it for a while it's not old, but it's a sure sm seven be. And I used to use this Mike for years and it's a great Mike and I broke it out. So now I have the shore sm seven be plugged into the my focus right scarlet to I two. Third. Gen and I'm also right out of the microphone. I'm using an S. e electronics. DM. One dynamite. It's a game booster, so it's like a little. Little piece of hardware that adds about twenty five DB of gain. So works well the. With the shore SM Seven B., which is typically a darker microphone but I'm a little further from the Mike Today but anyway so I have the air button engaged on the two I to the scarlet to. And the air button. Ed's like some high frequency clarity and a little sizzle it just it can really just. ADD, a lot of clarity, the certain microphones and this microphone the shore sm seven be is one of those that usually needs a little brightening up. So right now the air button is in and I'm actually going to turn it off and read a couple more things about the scarlet series. So okay. So I'm going to turn it off right now. Okay. Now, the air button is off. And A. By the way these interfaces these scarlet. Third Gen interfaces works with any type of xl or microphone, which means if you have a dynamic mike or a condenser mic because it does have phantom power so it can. It can handle condenser mics and okay. So let me turn the air back on now. All right the air's back on and the air features great and also has. You can get a loop back up with with the scarlet series and it allows you to record skype calls or zoom calls directly into software on your computer. So the loop back little APP is really cool. So that's the focus right scarlet series. Thanks. Thank you focus right for sponsoring the show and they'll be link in the description. So Click through that and check out the scarlet series. Okay let's get to the daily goodies and I'm curious to you know you might want to rewind the podcast and listen when I had the air button off. Right because now it's on, it's been on the whole time except for that little window of time when I turned it off so I don't know be interested to see. If you hear any difference know there is a difference so you'll be able to hear the difference. So what do you think of that difference? Okay. So daily goody post, we're going to cover the post from July thirty first to August thirteenth starting with staying involved in podcasting groups and communities.

GEN Mike Chris Kern Twenty Twenty ED Skype
Could a perennial wheatgrass help farmers adapt to climate change?

Climate Connections

01:13 min | 1 year ago

Could a perennial wheatgrass help farmers adapt to climate change?

"As the weather gets colder. Carmen. Fernholz of Minnesota enjoys looking out at his fields of Kerns. This week grass is a perennial, which means it over winters and comes back and spring. It's so nice to see some Greenfield's late into November and December, and early again in March, April kerns gross chest high with roots that can extend nearly ten feet below ground. So over time, it helps build soil carbon improved soil health, and reduce runoff. We look at increased rains that we're getting even in Western. MINNESOTA. We gotta wait to take care of that extra precipitation. All better. In Kerns can provide farmers with two crops forage, for livestock, and grain that can be used in cereal and other foods. So it's promising but new Fernholz is growing a small amount and giving feedback to researchers. He says, his main concern is figuring out how to keep yields up over time but he says growing Carranza for a few years between other crops will improve his soil and so by utilizing the Kerns, it's just GonNa make that fueled much better for my major revenue crops of corn and soybeans.

Kerns Minnesota Carmen Greenfield Carranza Fernholz
Medical Residents To Receive Education On Health Effects Of Climate Change

Environment: NPR

04:05 min | 1 year ago

Medical Residents To Receive Education On Health Effects Of Climate Change

"Teaching doctors about the health effects of climate change is growing from medical schools to the residency programs where new physicians put their skills to the test. But skeptics wonder if it's appropriate for doctors to learn how climate change can affect Human Health Martha Bebinger of member station W. R. in Boston Begins Her story in clinic exam room. I just remember for so many months it was hard for you to walk. There are three people in this exam room doctor Gora. A resident he's training and seventy one year old Steve Kerns who is recovering from West Nile virus, Kerns remembers the mosquito bite on his neck but very little about the brain infection that landed him in the hospital for a week for at least six months after that. I felt like every five minutes I was being run over by a truck I couldn't work. I couldn't walk very well. And I couldn't focus. A wondered for bit if I'd ever get better now, almost two years later Kern says he's back to about five hours a day on the job making windows and doors, and he started reading again the sounds like you've made tremendous progress. Dr. Charlotte Roses is a third year primary care resident at Cambridge Hospital. It seems like tremendous progress. that. It was scary. It was scary. It was it was definitely scary us and I'm not scared anymore although. Can I get worse now over again, Dr seuss sympathizes with the fear West Nile is still rare. There were no cases in Massachusetts before two thousand and two in two, thousand, eighteen year a mosquito bit kerns cases had climbed to forty nine mosquitoes love warm temperatures and so when temperatures increase mosquitoes can have breeding seasons the virus itself West alka replicate faster and they. Bite more more active Basu learned a lot of this while treating, Kerns. He was buses i West Nile case when someone comes in with a fever and his confused, it's not what my mind thinks of as the diagnosis right away. This case has really taught me how much I need to be informed about the ways in which climate change is changing the patterns of infectious. Disease. Around the United States to inform his residence busu added the health impacts of climate change to an elective courses teaches Ross says residents need much more. This is something that needs to be more directly integrated into the curriculum because I think it's going to have such a huge impact on human health. There are no approved curricula for hospitals that might want to tell emerging. Lung specialists about longer pollen seasons as temperatures rise or teach new emergency room physicians to consider more waterborne diseases for patients with fever and diarrhea. But Pediatrician Rebecca Phillips born at Emory University has just published. A framework hospitals can use as a starting point. Patients want physicians to be able to provide guidance on things that affect their individual help. We have this accumulating body of. That climate change does just that it poses harms to our patients Dr Stanley Goldfarb, the former associate dean for curriculum at the University of Pennsylvania's medical school says hospitals trained doctors not. He worries that discussing climate change with patients might create mistrust I. Think there are concerns about getting into the political sphere because I'm against anything that's going to. represent a barrier between patients and physicians being comfortable with each other other physicians. See Wildfires, sweeping western states and hurricanes flooding the Gulf coast and say, we want to impart this information to our residents as fast as we can because it's so important that they gain this information sooner than later advocates say including climate change in residency training won't stick and tell doctors are tested on the health effects before they are licensed to practice medicine for NPR news I'm Martha Bebinger in Boston.

Steve Kerns West Nile Martha Bebinger Boston Kern Dr Stanley Goldfarb Dr Seuss Fever Cambridge Hospital Massachusetts United States University Of Pennsylvania Dr. Charlotte Roses Waterborne Diseases NPR Basu Associate Dean Emory University Rebecca Phillips
"kerns" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

01:32 min | 1 year ago

"kerns" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Russell, Edmond O'Brien, John Lund and Bob Bailey on this edition from 1952 will give listen to James Clayton matter while substituting for a friend who's out of town. Insurance investigator Johnny Dollar solves a case for a scared doctor who believes the patient is being terrorized by her husband. John Lennon stars as Johnny Dollar and Joseph Kerns plays Dr James Clayton from 1952. It's the James Clayton matter on this edition ofthe yesteryear. Major, both his shadow. No laptop, please. Hello, friend of any way to stop this suspense in the Whistler send, though she sometimes I wish that there was a strong Bert large. Audio rodeo Donadio. From Hollywood. It's time now for John Lund as Johnny Dollar High tech Graham, Johnny You wake up, boy check Graham.

Johnny Dollar James Clayton John Lund Dr James Clayton John Lennon Graham Edmond O'Brien Bob Bailey investigator Joseph Kerns Russell Bert Hollywood
7 Little Known Copywriting Hacks

Marketing School

04:20 min | 1 year ago

7 Little Known Copywriting Hacks

"Welcome to another episode of Marketing School I'm Eric Su. Today. We are going to talk about seven little. No. In copywriting hacks and kneels GonNa Start I with any, you're gonna Homey Star I. Okay. So number one, what's funny is most people being by copy like, Oh, I want to be amazing like Ogilby for. Oh. I wish I can have my words to slow super smoothly from just like how Frank Kern does it. So the first copy I have for you is you don't need to be amazing writer the key to converting in getting people to renew your copying buying becoming a lead is actually answering What issue someone may have when on your landing or potentially buying, you answer those objections. A good example of this is you can use survey monkey hot, whatever you want type farm to survey people on your page, find out what issues they have an integrate those within your copy answered, their objections to suck at writing more conversions. All right number two. So when I'm writing I like using sentiment analysis tool, so you can just sent him an analysis, but put him whatever copy you have whether it's a headline or maybe it's Longer form thing, and you just dump it in there and basically score how positive or negative your content is an in general. If I'm trying to write an ad I wanted to be generally more positive. I. Don't like to induce too much fear. Yes. Fear is certainly one emotion you can tap into, but the Jenner I tried to look for positivity. So just go sentiment analysis tool. The third copy hacked that I have for you is all about showing the right copy at the right time. So for example, you have a Webinar may have copied that convinces people to watch your Webinar. If someone doesn't attend your women but registered you wanNA email him copies about the missing the Webinar. In the next, they can go and watch the Webinar if they watch the Webinar ended in by you can have copy answering. Answering objections on why most people don't buy and results would get the by your art service. So figure out what copy you need a in each place to maximize your conversions and have it there. It's not about how smooth you're right. It's about answering objections at the right time in the right place. Number four is create a swipe file. What I mean by that. If you are scrolling through Instagram, you're scrolling through facebook and. And you see in that stops you that is known as a pattern interrupt. So what you should do there is if you actually like the ad and if you think you can draw some inspiration from it, save it, you can save these ads, put him into a collection, and then from there, the beauty of that is you can refer back to these ads, and then you can draw without having to create something from. From scratch, if you see headlines that you like put him into a swipe file, you WANNA create a entire swipe folder where you just pull inspiration from and you don't necessarily need to try to reinvent the wheel here. You can go swipe dot co to try to pull more inspiration. They have great long-form landing pages and sales letters in there. Just don't try to do everything on your own draw from lean on other people. People right stat under shoulders, and you're going to be fine as Ogilby said, and this gets into number five. As we said, eighty cents of the dollar spot on the headline. So what I want you to do is come up with multiple headline variations, fair copy, and you want to try to figure out which headline resonates the most deal customer. You can either upload look like audiences Melissa onto facebook and run ads with. Different. Different headline variations see which one gets the most cooks. All right. Number six for me would be using the framework from breakthrough advertising. So breakthrough advertising still think it's a really great book and you can get it for about one hundred, twenty, five bucks now, I google it, and so here's the framework, the life cycle or from someone going from the top to the bottom when people interact with you, a customer interacts with you. You is usually start unaware, and then they become probably wear. Then they become aware of a solution than your solution, and then you can make an offer to them. So think about that, you can use DA right awareness, interest, decision action, kind of similar, but unaware problem where solution where your solution, and then you give him off i. that is basically how you take from top to bottom when you're trying to actually get the. The convert this framework actually provides to go in with a video can go in with a sales letter can go within a long form. Add. It works really well,

Ogilby Facebook Eric Su Frank Kern Writer Instagram Jenner Melissa
Episode 85, Apple updates to macOS Catalina 10.15.6 and launches new audio and news features - burst 1

Mac Minutes

07:33 min | 1 year ago

Episode 85, Apple updates to macOS Catalina 10.15.6 and launches new audio and news features - burst 1

"In this episode, we will discuss the recently released Mac Os. Catalina ten point fifteen point six update which introduces local news audio features in the Apple News along with improving the security and reliability of your Mac. This update, which is now available for downloading introduces several new features for Apple News and Apple News plus including audio stories of some of the most read feature stories from Apple News plus a daily audio news briefing hosted by Apple News Editors and curated local news collections, beginning in five cities and regions and expanding to more areas in the future. Apple News is also adding more top local and regional news outlets for readers and subscribers including the Charlotte Observer, the Miami Herald and the news in observer, which is located in Raleigh. North Carolina. Lauren Kern editor in chief of Apple News said the following about the new features. Apple News showcases so much great journalism and we're excited to help bring it to life in new ways with Apple News. Plus audio stories and a new Daily News Show Apple News today. We also greatly value are many local news. Partners are new local news feature highlights work for readers who live and are interested in those communities finished Kern. Let's delve deeper into some of the new features. Apple announced including Apple News plus audio stories. Beginning with the update Apple News will produce about twenty audio stories a week across a wide range of interests. Narrated by professional voice actors these are audio versions of some of the best feature reporting and long form pieces published by esquire essence. Fast Company G Q New York magazine sports illustrated. Time Vanity Fair Vo wired and more and newspapers, including the Los Angeles Times and the Wall Street Journal audio stories are now available to Apple News plus subscribers in the US. Apple News plus is available in the US for nine dollars ninety nine cents. And for International Listeners Canada for twelve, ninety nine a month, the UK for nine, ninety, nine, a month and Australia for fourteen, ninety nine a month. Customers can sign up for a free one-month trial in the plan automatically renews after the trial and. Through family. Sharing up to six family members can share one apple, news plus subscription. I use family sharing, and for some. It's a great bargain. Next features are to apple news today with Apple. News today, a daily audio news briefing Apple News Editors and Co host guide listeners to some of the most fascinating stories in the news, and how the world's best journalists are covering them. Apple News today is free to all listeners available mornings Monday through Friday directly in the news APP in the US and apple podcasts. Productivity is a huge interest to me, and this is another way to learn the topics of the day. I am preparing for work or listening throughout the day. Audience Stories and Apple News. Today can both be found in a newly added audio tab located at the bottom of the news app where listeners can manage their Q. and get personalized recommendations both new audio features are available I. Phone, Ipod, touch and carplay. Apple Awful introduced support for the news APP in Carplay, so users can listen to audio stories and Apple News today while driving. Users will be able to sink listening progress across devices start listening to an audio story with carplay from your iphone and pick up listening to a reading it later at home. Also new is curated local news apple news introduced a new curated local news experience, currently available in the San Francisco Bay Area Houston Los Angeles New York and San Francisco featuring a variety of content from a diverse collection of local publishers, including a major newspaper in each city and region. Local news collections and Apple News include coverage of topics most important to local communities, such a sports dining and restaurants whether news and politics and more with curation by local apple news editors as well as personalization for each user. There is now even more local news apple news recently added even more top, local and regional newspapers. Do the Apple News plus catalog! A subscription to Apple News, plus in the US now includes access to the Charlotte Observer, the Idaho Statesman, the Kansas City Star the Miami, herald the news and observer and the state from Columbia South Carolina in Canada. Leading french-language newspaper lay divorce is now available to Apple News plus subscribers and the Globe and Mail. One of the country's most prestigious national newspapers will be available to subscribers later this summer. Apple News draws over one hundred and twenty, five million monthly active users in the US the UK, Australia and Canada and has revolutionized people excess news from all their favorite sources. Apple News is available for free in the US the UK Australia and Canada an IPHONE IPAD and MAC devices. Apple News plus is a single subscription with the prices previously mentioned earlier, which additionally provides access to written an audio content from hundreds of the world's top magazines and major newspapers, including the Los Angeles Times the wall. Street Journal as well as many local and regional newspapers, including the Houston. Chronicle and the San Francisco Chronicle. There were also several bug fixes in this update. So I would encourage you to update as soon as possible. If MAC minutes can help you with your tech. Please get a hold of me and I can answer them in a future episode. The maquis minutes web page is located online and MAC minutes dot be. L. U. B. R. Y. Dot net. Other places are twitter minutes underscore MAC and facebook at MAC minutes. So that's all we have for Mac men's for this week. I urge you to join the MAC minutes podcast group on facebook where I post articles from the top tech journalist people could discuss topics post articles joint special events in great tech happenings. All the MAC minutes listeners out there out all of you and your loved winter wealth and I look forward to seeing you next week. Thank you again for listening and Mac minutes is available on apple podcasts. spotify I heart, radio, cast box, Caesar and many other of your favorite podcasts yours take care of yourself during the upcoming week and we'll see you soon and the MAC minutes podcast.

Apple News Apple United States MAC Charlotte Observer Los Angeles Times UK Lauren Kern Carplay North Carolina New York Magazine Australia International Listeners Canada Facebook Canada Raleigh Miami Herald Editor In Chief
Could Science Build a Better Grain?

BrainStuff

05:34 min | 1 year ago

Could Science Build a Better Grain?

"The ever increasing need to feed Earth's growing population and not always cautious ways that we grow our food are some of the factors that have put our plants environment in peril. Farming accounts for nearly a quarter of human emissions that are warming the atmosphere, and as much as half of that comes from plowing the soil to grow crops, such as wheat, corn and soybeans, which releases carbon, dioxide, methane and nitrous oxide, the latter byproduct of fertilizer use, but researchers have been working on ways to reduce the harmful environmental effects of agriculture. One potentially promising innovation is a grain the goes by the trademarked name, her Kneza like familiar grains it can be made into flour for use inbred breakfast, cereal, and other foods, and also as an ingredient in products, ranging from beard ice cream. But unlike many other grains, Kerns is a perennial plant meaning that once it's planted. It'll keep coming back up year after year. It doesn't have to be replanted from scratch year, so it cuts down on labor. In addition, Kerns a has a deep root system it reaches over ten feet or three meters into the soil, and may help to sequester or capture atmospheric carbon that root system could also make more resistant to the impact of drought related to climate change in some areas. Currency was picked by the Land Institute a Salina Kansas based organization founded in Nineteen, seventy, six, the founder West Jackson recognized that a big problem of modern agriculture was that it was wearing the soil by focusing upon monoculture, growing a single crop in a certain area as that practice intensified on modern farms. It's destructive. Downsides became more and more evident in the form of erosion and worn out soil that required increasing amounts of fertilizer, creating increasingly polluted groundwater Jackson saw the development perennial grains to replace annual ones as a vital part of the solution to those problems. The Land Institute's website explains given that grains makeup over seventy percent of our global caloric consumption and over seventy percent of our. Our global croplands, transitioning from an extractive annual model to a perennial model is the best chance we have create truly regenerative food future, but developing new food crops is difficult and time intensive challenge back in Nineteen ninety-three scientists at the Rodale Institute and Other Research Organization identified a plant called intermediate wheat grass species related to wheat as a promising candidate that might be developed into a perennial grain. They worked with researchers from the United States. Department of Agriculture to breed the plant and improve its fertility and seed size in two thousand and three, the Land Institute began working with intermediate wheat grass as well after years of breeding the plant. They developed Kerns the trade name for their variety. In some ways, the process of developing a new crop hasn't changed much since prehistoric times. It involves breeding generation after generation of a plant taking the best from each new batch, and reading them together an effort to promote whatever desirable characteristics your seeking, however plant breeders these days have some tools that the ancients lacked the land institute employed a process called molecular breeding, in which they use genetic analysis to determine the traits of the plant should have even before it grows to full. Full size in order spot plants, but the most potential for breeding. We spoke with Rachel thrower the institute's Chief Strategy Officer. She explained it's taken us ten thousand years, and an intensified two hundred years of modern reading to get the crops. We have today. It's taken twenty to get Kerns to where it is, it might take another twenty to get it to competing at scale with the annuals. But in the effort to turn Kerns a into a commercially viable crop. There's a lot of work ahead. Stroller says that researchers are now working to increase the size number of seeds produced by each plant, and to increase the height of the plants. One drawback of currency is the unlike conventional wheat. It doesn't yet lend itself to free threshing, in which the edible grain is easily loosened from the plant. It instead requires another step called D. hulling to remove the skin of the seed before it can be turned. Turned into flour, that's because the stems remain green, after the plant matures conventional wheat withers, and is thus more easily separated in addition to breeding currency to make suitable for free threshing in the future, scientists are working to make the yield produced by real working farms match what they've been able to achieve on their research plots to that end. They're gathering data from the farmers to help figure out how to time the harvest. What settings would optimal for combines and other factors that might make the fields more productive. Researchers are also working with Baker's chefs, brewers and distillers to develop products that utilize curtains to help create a future market for it. One product already on the market is long route. Pale Ale who's maker Patagonia provision sites Kerns environmental positives in its marketing and last year general mills. CASCADIA and farms brand produced a limited edition. Honey toasted Kerns, a serial, which it sold to raise funds for the researchers. We also spoke via email was Steve, Coleman and assistant professor in the School of Environment and Natural Resources and Ohio State University, and the CO author of two thousand eighteen bioscience article on Kerns cultivation methods. He said up and working with Kerns F for ten years, and it's been a fun adventure. I think one of the things that I've really come to appreciate. Is that successfully? Domesticating developing a new crop requires more work than anyone can really appreciate.

Kerns F Land Institute Nitrous Oxide United States Rodale Institute Department Of Agriculture Stroller Salina Kansas Rachel West Jackson Chief Strategy Officer Cascadia Founder Baker Assistant Professor Steve Ohio State University Other Research Organization
Apps like Robinhood make investing easier. Maybe too easy.

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

03:37 min | 1 year ago

Apps like Robinhood make investing easier. Maybe too easy.

"APPs like Robin Hood of Made Stock Market, investing easier, but at what cost from American public media this is Marketplace Tech Jack Stewart in Hollywood. Maybe. You're one of the ten million plus people who've set up an account on the trading APP. Robin Hood the company's been in the news recently as people start to take a critical look at its business model. Robin hoods the highest profile example of APPs that say they're increasing access to the stock market by making trades free. Critics say their game `fine trading with psychological nudges and push notifications, which encouraged frequent and potentially risky trades. There are few controls or limits for what could be inexperienced users in June. Twenty year old Alex, Kerns killed himself after he logged onto Robin Hood and saw what he thought was a negative seven hundred thirty thousand dollar balance Professor Vicki Bogan founder of Cornell University's Institute for Behavioral and household. Finance researches the psychology of investing. Being able to trade online is nothing new, but beyond just the. Marginal incremental convenience of having on your phone versus on your laptop. Something about some of these, APPS is that they're designed to encourage people to trade and to trade more. because. It's part of their business model. They make more money when people make more trades, and so you know when you make a trade, there's confetti in congratulations that are encouraging people to trade more, so it's beyond just the reduction in transaction 'cause it's also the way the APPS are structured to nudge people to participate more and to trade more. So I suspect what these platforms would argue is that they're just making it easier for people to access the stock market and build wealth in the way. The wealthy people have always been able to do. Is that a fair argument? Yeah, I'm very sympathetic to that argument. I actually on some level. I agree that it's always a good thing to give. Households have access to financial markets. You're exactly right in that. Participating in the stock market is. With a long term investment horizon is a way that people. Can and have been able to build wealth. But these ads cannot exist in an unregulated unchecked environment. What sort of protections would you like to see? There are a lot of things. But. The person that can Pinatubo aside as a result of seeing this negative balance was only twenty years old. And so this is a person that can't. Buy Alcohol and can trade options in a way that could get him in very serious financial leverage. And so in the same way there were some guidelines protections with the credit card act in two thousand nine limiting access for young adults with credit card to credit cards. I think we need to think about some of those types of protections as well. That's freaky Bogan. Cornell University after Alex Kuhn's death Robin Hood released a statement saying it might restrict more complicated trades from some customers with checks to make sure they know what they're risking with options trading in particular.

Robin Hood Cornell University Alex Kuhn Vicki Bogan Jack Stewart Hollywood Kerns Founder Professor Institute For Behavioral
Delores

PODSHIP EARTH

06:06 min | 1 year ago

Delores

"C. Safeway or yes we can is a rallying cry for justice freedom and dignity that was born from the heart and mind of civil rights revolutionary. Dolores wet the chant of Si Se. Puede his been taken up by many movements. From Barack Obama's two thousand eight presidential campaign to the fight for climate justice to the continued struggle for workers rights to Spain's anti austerity campaigns of 2019. Martin Luther King Junior said that the arc of the moral universe is long but it bends towards justice we all know that it only bends towards justice because of individuals willing to put themselves on the front lines of the Civil Rights Struggle Laura Sweater who turned ninety on April tenth. Twenty twenty has never left the front lines. She's a force of nature that has transformed the lives of those who grow and harvest the food that sustains each of us creating the phone welcome movement with Cesar Chavez she is the mother of the modern labor movement also came up with the idea that consumers have the power to shape and push industries like great growers to improve farm worker conditions. She then that. Labor negotiations to memorialize will can benefit in the nation's first of their kind collective bargaining agreements. Deloris is a fearless and incredibly effective advocate legislation. She championed the landmark building nineteen sixty to allow people to take the California driver's examination in Spanish. And and she's never stopped last year. She helped enact leads to create California's Fund for safe and affordable drinking water Quetta who describes himself as a born again feminists consciously incorporated feminism into her fight for workers rights and push Gloria Steinem and the one thousand nine hundred sixty s to expand the feminist movement to include issues of race thereby helping make feminism and Movement for all women not just white women from the beginning. Dolores wet has also been an environmental champion fighting to protect workers from harmful pesticides sanding shoulder to shoulder with native Americans at Standing Rock and picking up litter after every rally she led. I Talk About a fiftieth anniversary with my hero and living legend Dolores Wetter Kelly. Working Fourteen hour days with Heff Foundation to make sure farmwork has have access to protective equipment food and benefits during this pandemic. And if you thought you knew everything about Delores also talk about why she loves burning man. Dolores where are you right now all right now? I'm in the belly of the beast. I'm in Bakersfield California Bakersfield and all of Kern county. You are going through really rough times right now. Dolores is a lot of people that have been laid off. I think it's over a thousand oil workers that have been laid off. One of the company is completely. Shut Down Lager. People EARN EMPLOYEES CIVILLY TRAGIC. But we know at the same time. And that's why we see that our air is a little cleaner a usually here in Kern county. We are women the worst areas of pollution for air pollution in the country. And we know that that air pollution really affects not only the physical health especially if the children but also the mental health of children. Here we have Not only to freeways that can make your highway ninety nine and highway five of but then we have all of the pollution that comes from the Agricultural Industry Caesar industrial growers that have not really converted their tractors They're so easy in a lot of diesel. It's a big struggle and when you try to bring to the attention they consider this to be an attack instead of thinking. Okay what do we have to do to make them more economically friendly jobs for people so these are the challenges that we have ahead of us as we try to convert all of the fossil fuel industries into industries. That are more friendly for everybody. So deloris in the late fifties and sixties when you have founding the farmworker movement and and really bringing those issues to the full when whether environmental issues like drinking water and air quality and pesticide runoff. How did those issues fest? Come to your attention right at the beginning at the very beginning you know. I grew up in Stockton California which is also like a cultural area. I was in a field in. I see this what I thought was fog rolling in but I thought how can you have fog in the summertime? Well it was a pesticide residue. That was rolling in. That was one of the first things that farmer who's complained about about the effects of Pesticides. And so we had so many cases of pesticide poisonings. Sometimes Terry crews like thirty. Forty people would been poisoned at the same time. How can this happen? Slow regard for the health farm workers so one of the first contracts that I signed a day. Employers tell exactly how many pesticides they were going to spray and where they were going to be spread out and then we passed legislation to make sure that the appeals are posted of when they sprayed some of these dangerous pesticides and then we work very very hard to get some of these dangerous pesticides restricted and banned forever and unfortunately a lot of pesticides we had because like Didi they were then shipped to Mexico to Latin American countries. And so here but we had all of these farmers could children that. Were being bored with these horrible deformities being born without arms without legs so horrific here you had children in Mexico and parts of Latin America. That were having exactly the same type of affection disabilities that were coming from pesticides

Dolores California Kern County Dolores Wetter Kelly Dolores Wet Twenty Twenty Barack Obama Martin Luther King Si Se Mexico Deloris Cesar Chavez Spain Gloria Steinem Laura Sweater Quetta Heff Foundation
Take Control Of What's Holding You Back with Ariel Kopac

Enterprise NOW! Podcast

09:27 min | 1 year ago

Take Control Of What's Holding You Back with Ariel Kopac

"I usually start out by asking something like tell us about yourself and on the record show I say feel free to go all the way back to the day you were born or you can start more. Kern Day and then I say. Tell us about yourself. My name is Ariel Kopech. I am the owner of Harnessed Hindrance coaching. I'll go back to. I was born in Kokomo. Indiana and moved. Wisconsin announced twelve Wisconsin. My home but I spent the past four years in California working out there now. I'm back loving. It can connect to the community and I consider myself sometimes a walking paradox. Because someone said don't swear on a podcast. I won't swear but I will say we're told twenty one but I looked dance. I also like whisky and cigars and sprott climbing. And I'm one of those people just loves hobbies got it. So how did you get into your current field? Kind of fell into it. Started with the training aspect of development so I was training financial advisers for large financial services firm and I became really frustrated with the question. Of Why is it that if they know exactly what they need to do it? Don't do it and how is that? You can lead a horse to drink so became obsessed with trying to answer that question of why I Y Y and that amongst some exposure to some coaches and lot of learning start to dig into that question of why and found that it's not usually a simple logical answer. That's the problem. It's all of the emotional and mental things going the background. When the answer's right in front of you and that became my passion for Dean to coaching. So what is the most unusual business? Type that you've worked with one of the most unusual business types I've worked with probably those in multilevel marketing. Those in that field have a lot of challenges coming up before they even get in the door and they have the same mental and emotional challenges. Everyone else does so. That's what I find with industry occupation. Everyone brings a bunch of personal baggage with them. We all do but the obstacles a little bit different depending upon. What's in rear? So this is my question so dig a little bit deeper in terms of Your Business Right. Harnessing your hindrance or does that me harness. You're hindrance means you can take control and make use of whatever is holding you back and ofttimes you can use it to the point where it will pull you. Forward for example ofttimes comes into play with people's insecurities you'll hear a lot of powerful stories about how someone was nervous about or one of the high became their strength and that was true for me. This was kind of came up after my name. I actually used to be a little insecure about how I couldn't have very shallow conversations sound silly but actually had a friend say to someone behind my back if you WANNA have a deep conversation talked to Ariel. If you don't want to have a conversation do not talk to aerial now. Not to interrupt you but we had our one on one. She's not lying like mind blown like I call them golden nuggets. I had so many in my head that I was like okay enough. I don't WanNa talk to you anymore. Like let's talk a weekly. That is true and it used to be a little bit of an insecurity of mine of. Why can't I just be casual like everyone else? My friend and I were at a bar and talking to some guys and she says to me later. Did I overhear that? He was sharing that his challenging with relationships right now is due to his parents getting divorced at twenty one and this and that said Yeah. Why would you talk about? She said sports so that was an insecurity. But now I've found ironic is that that is what makes me so good at what I do. Digging deeper to find the root cause not settling for the surface level. Answer the symptom but digging down to what is really really going on here and that is how I have harnessed by insurance. Well so my question again so talk a little bit about self awareness in how that has impacted your business in terms of when you decided to do this to today. Self-awareness journey one thing that I have to be really mindful of when I'm coaching is that I am fully present for whomever I'm engaging west and that requires me to be self aware of what's going on with me mentally and emotionally at that time and if it's an energy that I don't want to bring into that person's conversation I have to say okay. I can come back to this but right now. I am fully present for this person. I have to be a blank slate and receive whatever they have to give not give them anything that they don't need right now so for me. Self awareness has been extremely important as a coach to make sure that I am level for whoever I am there to serve and it's an ongoing practice then there's a lot of self awareness that comes with being a business owner as well as many here now So what failure? Business or personal. Allow you to learn your most valuable lesson. And what was that lesson? It's hard to pick one failure that I've learned from so many one failure though that comes to mind right away is actually the first time that I cried at work admitted my occupation for two years and I was one of those stone cold faces that held all emotions in and I believed growing up. That it's a strength to hold your emotions inside. I had one boss broke me. We're good friends. But he said to me at the time it's your fault. She quit and that made me angry and it made me cry. And he's response was. It took me two years. I did it I made to cry but the reason I made me cry was because I knew it was true I knew that my lack of willingness to let go and to delegate properly and communicate everything that was on my mind for this new hire was what led to her leaving Lynn. The long run is probably for the best in as far as everyone's pathways journey but in the moment that was a hard truths to be hit with and that failure led me to learning the importance of letting go and also that self awareness of being real emotions and saying I'm struggling to go this right now because it's been my baby or it's been my project and that's not an easy thing to transition definitely agree. I think one of the things that makes this giant exciting in both challenging is the self awareness rate a lot of times. We put a brave face on as if nothing affects us or like. I was telling somebody earlier. Today was one of those days where it was really high and really low and just being able to recognize that and then properly deal with it. I think is a really important thing. So if someone said unlock me what would your response be how much time you got. No I would say the amount to which you're willing to be unlocked as you say comes from you and I can't unlock anything that you have closed off so my process is a matter of you helping to discover what is going on inside and locked up for yourself but if you have something that's locked away. I can't get in there unless you let me in. And kind of let yourself wariness arnold question what is a key insight that your target audience looks forward to find you or work with you. So what does the prospect looking for in you to want to work with you? It's kind of two parts to answer that question one often times when someone gets introduced to me or you have initial conversation. They're looking for okay. So what strategies and tactics are going to give me to implement to make this work. Or what's the secret sauce and the ironic thing is that the foundation of my coaching is that majority of the time. You have the answer inside of you already know what the right thing to do is if you don't know how to get that answer but majority of the time you already have the answer within you. I'm just there to help draw it out. So that's a part to the answering of the question that a Lotta Times. What someone is looking for when they get introduced to me is not what the offer really is however it only takes a minute for someone to realize okay yeah there probably is some mindset work that. I have to do or I think I do actually know what I need to do. I don't need more information and more options to choose from. I just need to know which option to go west and move forward so if someone is looking for unlocking what they already know or building their clarity for action. That is a good thing to seek me out for but majority of the time. Someone's looking for a quick strategy and in reality they already know that is helping to find. Oh before we wrap up with. Do you have any questions that you would like to ask me my question for you is. What do you gain from having these live events? Some the biggest thing I gained is and when I say this I really mean it. I genuinely enjoy meeting. New People hearing their stories and really just sharing space with people who think as crazy as I do right who have big ideas and things that haven't been done before so I enjoy the energy of engaged with like minded individuals. And it's really fun. I like to embarrass people doing the job of that all right so if people want to reach out to you learn even more about what you do set up a mind blowing. Golden Nugget filled one on one. How can they do that? They can go to harness your hindrance dot com. Find out more information about me. Fill out quick form for or just an introductory call can also connect me on linked in Aerial Kopech Harnessing Hindrance coaching or this point reach out to L Z. And you can connect us as well

Wisconsin Kokomo Ariel Kopech Indiana California Business Owner Dean Lynn Arnold
"kerns" Discussed on X96

X96

01:37 min | 2 years ago

"kerns" Discussed on X96

"Dogs do seem to smile going. yeah well the is already the proud owner of another senior dog being Bucky and she said Bucky and munchkin get along great older dogs are great puppies are a pain I mean. it's a short lived pain but their pain given older dog let's see a forty two year old man is being held in the Salt Lake county jail on kidnapping charges after police said he held a woman against her will encourage for four days what would have been so bad but was in Kerns. according to arresting documents police took a report on Thursday from a man who wanted a welfare check done on his sister whom he believed was being held against her will somewhere in turns. through the brother officers were able to locate the victim on the street near Coulter circle the woman spoke only Spanish so though so through translation from her brother she stated yeah I'm being kidnapped by my ex boyfriend. and she was forced into his vehicle and other woman stated that the ex boyfriend threatened or with a handgun and said he would kill her if she left his basement apartment. well in the basement the woman said he said you can't leave and what she did find a way to escape and then she was out on the street but you'll speak English so she was having a hard time you know figuring out what to do. and but all is well and the guy who kidnapped her taken into custody. I hate.

Bucky kidnapping Salt Lake Kerns. forty two year four days
"kerns" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

01:32 min | 2 years ago

"kerns" Discussed on WJR 760

"Members of the operating engineers three twenty fourth kept Michigan moving for a century they're the heavy machinery operators driving the construction of Michigan roads and bridges airports and energy plants even pipelines nearly every large scale project you see there are even he three twenty four members tending complex boiler NH fax systems and the technicians that keep those systems running fourteen thousand members strong market to Monroe and all points in between they build they operate they maintain visit eat three twenty four dot org W. J. R. traffic is sponsored by current brothers hi I'm Mike Kerns from current brother and we do siding and gutters and brick work in concrete and kitchens and baths but what I really want you to focus on is your right contact us for a free roof inspection patterns brothers dot com all right Michael thank you to six twenty five we've got are W. J. R. traffic and weather first on the fives we've got John Bailey and there is a report a crash west of Brighton were on the brakes for about a mile and I ninety four eastbound approaching Baker road reported problems on the U. S. twenty three commute near Hartland township in Brighton is well traffic backed up for better than a mile on southbound U. S. twenty three between flight road and fifty nine in south of there heading into the I. ninety six interchange I'm John Bailey W. J. R. traffic and weather first on the five W. J. R. traffic it's sponsored by Comcast business every day Comcast business is helping businesses big and small go beyond the expected to do the extraordinary because beyond a simple transaction there's making.

Michigan Monroe Mike Kerns Michael John Bailey Brighton W. J. Hartland John Bailey W. J. Comcast five W
"kerns" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

01:32 min | 2 years ago

"kerns" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"We'll WTMJ's Melissa Barclay stopped by lake bluff elementary school in Shorewood to see how some students were feeling about schooling for another year. What summertime fun on the way? So are you excited about being out of school? Little bit. But I will miss many teachers. Sometimes maybe I don't know. What about you? Are you going to miss school? Or are you ready for summer? I really ready for some misquote, but I think I'm going to go to again, summertime. Oh, you're going to go to Wigan. Are you going to go to the water over there? What about you excited? I where you're gonna miss your friends to in this Kerns by I am excited thumping baseball and Milius. Fill out stuff about some tennis Folkard won a couple of times. They'll be playing Capri. I'm going to Germany, and I'm going on a cruise for the summer like lots of my family members birthdays in July. So I'm gonna go to mostly all of them. I'm gonna be going the smoky mountains lacks camps, and I also have two gold and one is to try to keep biking fill. So I can take a chaining off in my second goal is to be better at swimming,.

lake bluff elementary school Melissa Barclay Shorewood Folkard Milius Kerns Wigan Germany baseball
"kerns" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

01:40 min | 2 years ago

"kerns" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"Austin Kerns and Adam Dunn. The company Winkler's in in the first one hundred sixty four games of his major league career keep in mind in the minor leagues his career high in the minors was Dayton with sixteen. He had a season of fifteen had a season of thirteen Jesse Winker on a roll. And Joe look at it last night or the eight home runs four those have either tied the game for the reds or given them the lead. I mentioned this off the top. I think last night in many ways was a team win one. They picked up Tanner Roark who had it off night a short night three and two thirds innings. The bullpen had he's back five reds relievers combined for five and a third innings of shutout baseball nine hits last night by seven different players five runs by five different players. Get the theme here. A lot of different players contributing feeling good last night. In fact, seven of the position players had at least a hitter. A walk Suarez didn't have a hit or a walk. But he added an Rb. Sacrifice. Fly. Derek Dietrich came off the bench pinch hitting and he walked lot of different contributors up and down that not just the lineup last night. But the roster last night in a five four win for the Cincinnati Reds time to take a look at big sticks. In the big leagues brought to you by encore technologies and by defy would stain last year to longer than other. Dhec stains defy would staying dot com. In the American League Eddie Rozario the twins with eleven home runs in the National League. It's Christian yelich and Cody Bellinger with eleven or fourteen home runs each and the scoreboard tonight. Busy one..

reds Adam Dunn Tanner Roark Suarez Derek Dietrich Austin Kerns Cody Bellinger Winkler Jesse Winker National League Dayton Eddie Rozario Joe
"kerns" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

02:20 min | 3 years ago

"kerns" Discussed on KOMO

"Racist. Is a con man. And he's a cheat accusing the president of criminal activity while in office. Cohen said Trump directed him to make those hush money payments to porn star. Stormy daniels. The president initially denied those payments but Cohen brought documentation a check he says shows. Trump repaid him for the money. You don't have to take my word for it. I don't want you to I want you to look at the documents. And he said Trump told him to lie about the whole thing. What did the president ask or suggest that you say about the payments or reimbursements? He was not knowledgeable of these reimbursements. And he wasn't knowledgeable of my actions. He asks you to say that. Yes. Another allegation WikiLeaks. I love WikiLeaks. Coen claimed Trump knew ahead of time that WikiLeaks was going to release hat DNC emails damaging to Hillary Clinton. And he said Trump wanted him to lie to congress about at Trump Tower project in Moscow a deal. Cohen now admits was negotiated with Russia well into the campaign. Cohen says it was all typical in the world of Donald Trump. How many times did Mr. Trump ask you to threaten individual or entity on his behalf? Quite a few times fifty times more a hundred times more two hundred times more five hundred time probably Republicans came out swinging against Cohen who's pleaded guilty to lying to congress before. Michael cohen. Fraudster cheat convicted felon in two months. A federal inmate flyer liar pants on fire. No one should ever. Listen to you noted that they were not to defend the president's action. I just find it. Interesting sir between yourself and your colleagues that not one question so far since I'm here has been asked about President Trump, and he hinted that there are more potentially even bigger bombshells still to come. Is there any other wrongdoing or illegal act that you are aware of regarding Donald Trump that we haven't yet discussed today? Yes. And again, those are part of the investigation. That's currently being looked at southern district of New York. ABC's Mary Bruce reporting coming up, we'll talk with Deborah Stearns, Kerns of Banchory dot com about buyer's remorse when it comes to buying a home.

President Trump Michael cohen Trump Tower president Stormy daniels Hillary Clinton WikiLeaks congress ABC Mary Bruce Moscow Russia Deborah Stearns New York Coen DNC Kerns two months
"kerns" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

03:22 min | 3 years ago

"kerns" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Historians and writers biographers here guards Kerns Goodwin. Thank you very much for coming. How many people here how many people here have red team of rivals funny? Okay. How many have read bully pulpit? Wow. How many people read her book on Lyndon Johnson? What about the Kennedys? And that's Charles. Okay. All right. And how many people here agree that she's one of our foremost writers? For those who don't know her background. Just great briefly grew up in New York, Brooklyn. And ultimately went to Colby college. Got her PHD at Harvard. She was a White House fellow and the Johnson ministration help president Johnson with his memoirs. And then ultimately went back to teach at Harvard and for the last number of years, she's been writing extraordinarily a well received and terrific. Biographies and histories, and whenever the Pulitzer prize for one of your books as well. So you're going to be writing a new book that's coming out September the eighteenth its own leadership, and it's about a book on the leadership skills. Four people you've written about one is ABRAHAM LINCOLN. One is teddy Roosevelt Franklin Roosevelt and the other is Lyndon Johnson. So we're going to talk about that today. And I wanted to ask you first, why did you decide to write a book about four different people? You've already written books about them. Why not pick somebody new and write a book about somebody knew what happened is each time. I finished writing one of the books, and I have to take all of that person's books out of my study to make room for the next guy. I felt like I was betraying the person who was there before it's like having an old boyfriend and moving to a new boyfriend, so. I could keep my guys together this time instead of doing that. But I knew I'd have to do it by having a chance to look at them a new in a new way, and I've always been in leadership. I mean once upon a time when I was a graduate student. We would stay up late at night discussing questions about leadership in those days. You're reading Plato and Aristotle and you're thinking about where does come from. And does a man make the times of the times make the man is for leadership traits born or made, and we also talked about boys and girls, and what was going on in the world. But those were the kind of things really interested in that. So I decided what if I look at these guys, I call them, my guys, it seems maybe a little disrespectful, but I've lived with him so long each time that I feel familiar to them. What if I just take them? And I look at them through the exclusive lens of leadership. And so it became a great project for me it took five years not as long as some of the others. But not as short as I thought because I didn't know as much about them as I thought I should. And I loved every minute of it. It's really been a great great only one of these. The president's that you actually knew of course, was Lyndon Johnson. And before we get into the book, you might relate. How you actually came to know then Johnson and how you almost lost your job. Article you wrote true. So when I was chosen as a White House value, I was twenty four years old, and we had a big dance at the White House. It's a fabulous program. The White House fellowship, Colin Powell White House. Bella Wesley Clark, Senator Tim Wirth. We had a big dance at the White House. And I we were selected he did dance with me that night not that peculiar. There are only three women out of.

Lyndon Johnson White House fellow White House Kerns Goodwin Colin Powell White House teddy Roosevelt Franklin Roose president ABRAHAM LINCOLN Harvard Senator Tim Wirth Pulitzer prize Bella Wesley Clark Colby college Kennedys New York graduate student Brooklyn twenty four years