26 Burst results for "Kerner"

"kerner" Discussed on Sex With Emily

Sex With Emily

04:31 min | 2 weeks ago

"kerner" Discussed on Sex With Emily

"I'm cool to change name. Oh in stay tuned. I've so miss talking to all of you live. So i we're going to be setting up a sex with emily hotlines. You can leave me a voicemail and then look for news for some time that you'll be able to call in and talk to me because i miss you remember. You can find me an all social media at sex with emily right. Everybody enjoy the show. My guest is an exciting one for me. He was on the show a few years ago and today. Dr ian kerner is here to talk about his latest book. he's a sex couples therapist and the author of numerous books including the infamous. She comes first which has been translated in more than a dozen languages and his new book. So tell me about the last time you had sex. He's helped so many couples more than twenty years as a practicing therapist. I really admire ian. And i love his books. You can find more about ian on twitter at in kerner and instagram. Ian kerner l. f. T tell me about your new book so tell me about the last time you had sex amoy. It's great to be here to be talking to you and you know i've been doing sex therapy a long time now and sometimes i feel like i'm like a dentist because people wait really too long to come and they're often hang so the thing is you know people come in china hopeless and i really wanna help them in that first session so i kind of over. The years have developed what i call kind of a saxon action methodology. You know where. I kind of i. I learned about the problem. I sort of look at it at the big. From the big picture perspective. I walk around. And then every first session. I will ask a couple so tell me about the last time you had saks and i do that because i believe that every sexual event tells a story. It has a beginning a middle and an end. There's a sequence of interactions that are of course physical but they're also a national their psychological and you put them together and that creates what i call a sex script and i believe that most couples especially ones that start to settle into longterm relationships. China have a sex script and if it works. They're not coming to see me and if it doesn't work they are coming to see me. And there's something about the sex script that's reinforcing a problem that they're having so i literally wanna help couples rewrite their sex scripts away from the problem and towards pleasure. Okay so let's talk about this sex script which you spend a lot of time unpacking in the book chapter by chapter with homework assignments and every chapter that really. Just couples can take this at their own pace. I mean they might find that just even the first chapter. They stay there for awhile to those homework assignments with the second chapter. 'cause you you give so much in this book just feel so much of yourself in so much of your years of doing this work. So let's talk about the sex script. How would you explain that. And also is there a common sex script. Interestingly about ninety to one hundred percent of my heterosexual couples. If i ask them tell me about the last time you had sex and i'm not using this like oh we're rewriting a sack like that of what's in my head. I'm just asking them to tell me about the last to my med set. Half the time. i don't even remember. They're arguing about when they had sex. They can't even agree on it but with heterosexual couples especially i would say ninety percent to one hundred percent either had intercourse in their last sex script or wanted to have intercourse and failed to and if i asked most heterosexual couples will. How long did it take you to get to intercourse. Most of my couples will say two minute one minute two minutes three minutes five minutes. If we're getting to seven minutes were already getting extended. I'm not kidding. I you know so. So the sex script is so dominated by this one behavior. Now here's an interesting question. Because there was actually a study done and they literally ask twenty five thousand gay and bisexual.

Ian kerner ninety percent seven minutes one minute china two minutes two minute ian today second chapter twenty five thousand instagram twitter first chapter three minutes one hundred percent more than twenty years first session five minutes emily
"kerner" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

01:32 min | Last month

"kerner" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"It is it is, and then let me just be clear here on this around the tension 60 minutes thing. I'm not a lawyer, obviously. But I have been around the block of it on a definition lawsuit that I was intimately knowledgeable of. And this idea. I'm let me read Guy Benson wrote this up over town hall in order to win a defamation lawsuit. Public figures face a very high burden of proof. Actual malice. The allegations from Moscow. It's in colonel come close to meeting that standard. But 60 minutes appears to have affirmed those officials version of events. So 60 minutes is basically 60 minutes is is Jack Nicholson on the stand saying yet you're damn right. I ordered the code Red. They're saying, Yeah, we talked to Moskowitz. He just wouldn't go on the record, but yeah, we he told us the story was Monk Moskowitz has said Yes. I talked to 60 minutes. I told them the story was bold leap. And he told him why it was Bs. Yeah, we talked to Kerner. Ah, I mean and now 60 minutes is confirming. That both of those people talk to them and confirmed what they said. So not only has 60 minutes, I think disgraced itself. Here's what's amazing. I think they're in very legal jeopardy writ very real legal Jeopardy. If Rhonda Santa's takes up this fight, and I got to tell you, I know it's important to win elected office. I know it's important to have a title in front of your name president. The stances would be great and he could change the country if you sue CBS News and 60 minutes for what they've done here. You do Maura than what you could do is president. I'm not.

Jack Nicholson Monk Moskowitz Rhonda Santa Guy Benson Maura 60 minutes CBS News Moskowitz Kerner both Moscow Bs
"kerner" Discussed on Bitcoin Radio

Bitcoin Radio

05:52 min | Last month

"kerner" Discussed on Bitcoin Radio

"This <Speech_Male> <hes> <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Silence> <Advertisement> <hes> great company <Speech_Male> right so they have all <Speech_Male> of these invoices <Speech_Male> <hes> <Speech_Male> and They <Speech_Male> can now be used <Speech_Male> to mit die <Speech_Male> and actually give <Speech_Male> a a return <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> You know in an interest <Speech_Music_Male> rate <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> You know a <Speech_Male> but <Speech_Male> those <Speech_Male> invoices <Speech_Male> in that money are <Speech_Male> centralized so <Speech_Male> that creates <Speech_Male> risk <Speech_Male> that di- <Speech_Male> didn't have originally <Speech_Male> when all <SpeakerChange> you <Silence> use was ether <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> and <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> ether an especially <Speech_Male> here is <Speech_Male> what is the underpinning <Speech_Male> of the <Speech_Male> vast majority of the <Speech_Male> market and <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> that's kind of the big <Speech_Male> headline <Speech_Male> was last week <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> was the launch of <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> the two point. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Oh sticking contract <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> kind <Silence> of a big step <Speech_Male> with the beacon <Speech_Male> changing relaunch <Speech_Male> now <Speech_Male> It's gonna be the big step <Speech_Male> towards <Speech_Male> each super know <SpeakerChange> that we really <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> been waiting for for so long <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> In <SpeakerChange> this space <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> and <Speech_Male> there was a big discussion <Speech_Male> there because it <Speech_Male> required a certain <Speech_Male> amount of <Speech_Male> effort to <Speech_Male> be staked in that <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> contract a nor <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> to watch <Speech_Male> and there was this <Silence> debate <SpeakerChange> over. <Speech_Male> Should <Speech_Male> anyone actually take <Speech_Male> either there. Because <Speech_Male> what came out <Speech_Male> was you wouldn't be able <Speech_Male> to actually move <Speech_Male> that it for <Speech_Male> a year and a half to two <Speech_Male> years until <Speech_Male> the actual full <Speech_Male> functionality launches <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> this question <Speech_Male> is why would <Speech_Male> anyone steak <Speech_Male> either there. When you're a <Speech_Male> you could get higher <Speech_Male> returns <Speech_Male> with higher awards. <Speech_Male> High <Speech_Male> risk of course for higher returns <Speech_Male> elsewhere <Speech_Male> or you could <Speech_Male> a <Speech_Male> get steadier trends <Speech_Male> elsewhere <Speech_Male> but keep your <Speech_Male> more liquid <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> so in your is. <Speech_Male> Is there any reason <Speech_Male> to have to <Speech_Male> stick your your <Speech_Male> in that contract <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> other than <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> hey ideologically <Speech_Male> i just want to support <Silence> you. <SpeakerChange> Know <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> will right <Silence> if you take. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> This <Speech_Male> is all community. <Speech_Male> I think community is <Speech_Male> what's at the <Speech_Male> center of <Speech_Male> of all of this <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> so <Speech_Male> as <SpeakerChange> a <Speech_Male> member of the community <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> by staking <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Some portion <Speech_Male> of your heath <Speech_Male> you <Speech_Male> are hopefully than <Speech_Male> increasing <Speech_Male> the value of <Speech_Male> all of the other <Speech_Male> east so even <Speech_Male> if on that you <Speech_Male> might not be making a return <Speech_Male> if <Speech_Male> you look at it on a more macro <Speech_Male> basis on your total <Speech_Male> holdings it <Speech_Male> can actually really be <Speech_Male> a a <Speech_Male> smart investment <Speech_Male> as <Speech_Male> a member of a community. <Speech_Male> Can you <Speech_Male> take advantage <Speech_Male> of being <Speech_Male> a free rider <Speech_Male> short <Speech_Male> and there are lots <Speech_Male> of free writers. And <Speech_Male> that's a problem that <Speech_Male> you <Speech_Male> know that every <Speech_Male> community has <Speech_Male> but if <Speech_Male> you have enough community <Speech_Male> members which apparently <Speech_Male> we do <Speech_Male> who feel comfortable <Speech_Male> giving presented <Speech_Male> since taking it <Speech_Male> to to move the community <Speech_Male> forward <Speech_Male> then you have <Speech_Male> you know <Speech_Male> The progress <SpeakerChange> that <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> we've been saying <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> have you <Speech_Male> personally staked any <Speech_Male> lethem <Speech_Male> contract <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Truth i <Speech_Male> am <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> a in the process <Speech_Male> of finalizing <Speech_Male> divorce. <Speech_Male> The trial is over. <Speech_Male> And that has hampered <Speech_Male> my ability <Speech_Male> to move as <Speech_Male> around without <Speech_Male> the. Because i need <Speech_Music_Male> my ex's <Speech_Male> approval <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> though. I am looking <Speech_Male> forward to getting massively <Speech_Male> more active <Speech_Male> than i have been <Speech_Male> Hopefully <Speech_Male> we'll be getting something <Silence> back from the <SpeakerChange> court at any day. <Speech_Male> Now <Speech_Male> crypto market. Watch <Speech_Male> out because luke <Speech_Male> is about to get on the <Speech_Male> scene <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> very excited <Speech_Male> and yeah and <Speech_Male> and by the way right. <Speech_Male> I mean that's <SpeakerChange> my own <Speech_Male> personal experience. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> I got stirred <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> <hes> <Speech_Male> four months <Speech_Male> before <Speech_Male> i saw the crypto light <Speech_Male> in june of two <Speech_Male> thousand seventeen <Speech_Male> and so <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> yeah. <Silence> <Speech_Male>

last week june a year and a half four months two thousand seventeen point Speech_Male
"kerner" Discussed on Bitcoin Radio

Bitcoin Radio

03:25 min | Last month

"kerner" Discussed on Bitcoin Radio

"Yet. Because we're so early seemingly every new a update or new development of don't know what's going to happen and we're learning as we go along so i think that one end is to look at what you did on the other hand. We see with sushi swab. This is the second time they've successfully exists. Many van -pired a lot of liquidity from union swap. The first time. I actually being the first to offer governance token lp rewards and then then you soft copy them there And then now once you need swap canceled or stopped program actually when after those four schools. Because there's only four liquid pools were actually be rewarded on municipal and sushi swap. You know they're not embarrassed their openness possible say we're we're trying to get liquidity from. Hey all you unique. Lp's come to us. We're gonna provide reward there. So i think this now shows Another avenue this. There is a business model here. India copy paste at feature or copy paste and do and just do a different choice than the competitor associate swap a serious contender here or will they always be following a unicef obsolete. Well i think the question is. Can you know sue swap actually bring innovation..

second time first first time India one end four schools four liquid pools
"kerner" Discussed on Bitcoin Radio

Bitcoin Radio

04:37 min | Last month

"kerner" Discussed on Bitcoin Radio

"The last few weeks is poker. Sites now are not only leading people pay with bitcoin. But they're letting people take out when they take their cash out in bitcoin and so there's a lot of people that's been growing very rapidly. Bitcoin radio is powered by most belt. Blockchain accelerator and multi dot. Io and we are continuing to reimagine twenty twenty one. The following interview was broadcast in december of twenty twenty as part of our version five point. Oh conference welcome back. Imagined twenty twenty. I'm going to walk out. And i am honored to be joined by demand. The myth the legend lou kerner founder of just stable and stable coin analyst. Four quantum economics lou joining you on a great to be here now lou. The beauty of this industry that we work in is that it changes so rapidly. Last time we spoke which. I think it was like three two or three months ago. A whole lot has changed since then not just price brosseau innovation and product us. Jump right into it. Last when we met Defy huge was blowing up Yield farming was all the rage and there was this. It was kind of the start of this phenomena of reward programs for liquidity providers. Pretty much all these particles. They wanted liquidity on their protocol. And so there were given away tokens and two free to liquidity providers. The big news recently in the.

december of twenty twenty three months ago three Defy huge two last few weeks lou kerner of people twenty Four quantum economics one five price brosseau
"kerner" Discussed on Bitcoin Radio

Bitcoin Radio

01:38 min | Last month

"kerner" Discussed on Bitcoin Radio

"Welcome back. Imagined twenty twenty. I'm going to walk out. And i am honored to be joined by demand. The myth the legend lou kerner founder of just stable and stable coin analyst. Four quantum economics lou joining you on a great to be here now lou. The beauty of this industry that we work in is that it changes so rapidly. Last time we spoke which. I think it was like three two or three months ago. A whole lot has changed since then not just price brosseau innovation and product us. Jump right into it. Last when we met Defy huge was blowing up Yield farming was all the rage and there was this. It was kind of the start of this phenomena of reward programs for liquidity providers. Pretty much all these particles. They wanted liquidity on their protocol. And so there were given away tokens and two free to liquidity providers. The big news recently in the field is that unicef actually ended that reward program and what we saw was that initially they lost half quitting offense took the liquidity seemingly most sushi so But what is your take on this idea that that seemingly even the gold standard of desmond unit swap couldn't hold on really with liquidity. Once it got rid of that war program well so You're obviously going to have what you would call hot money. which is you know. they're going after. Whatever the reported aid why might be

december of twenty twenty three months ago three Defy huge two last few weeks lou kerner of people twenty Four quantum economics one five price brosseau
Interview With Lou Kerner Founder of Just Stable

Bitcoin Radio

01:38 min | Last month

Interview With Lou Kerner Founder of Just Stable

"Welcome back. Imagined twenty twenty. I'm going to walk out. And i am honored to be joined by demand. The myth the legend lou kerner founder of just stable and stable coin analyst. Four quantum economics lou joining you on a great to be here now lou. The beauty of this industry that we work in is that it changes so rapidly. Last time we spoke which. I think it was like three two or three months ago. A whole lot has changed since then not just price brosseau innovation and product us. Jump right into it. Last when we met Defy huge was blowing up Yield farming was all the rage and there was this. It was kind of the start of this phenomena of reward programs for liquidity providers. Pretty much all these particles. They wanted liquidity on their protocol. And so there were given away tokens and two free to liquidity providers. The big news recently in the field is that unicef actually ended that reward program and what we saw was that initially they lost half quitting offense took the liquidity seemingly most sushi so But what is your take on this idea that that seemingly even the gold standard of desmond unit swap couldn't hold on really with liquidity. Once it got rid of that war program well so You're obviously going to have what you would call hot money. which is you know. they're going after. Whatever the reported aid why might be

Lou Kerner LOU Unicef
Delta plane skids off taxiway at Pittsburgh International Airport

Airline Pilot Guy - Aviation Podcast

06:13 min | 2 months ago

Delta plane skids off taxiway at Pittsburgh International Airport

"A delta plane skins off the taxiway at pittsburgh international airport. No injuries reported. This is from the pittsburgh post gazette and for all of you out there. yes. I do fly An airplane very similar to this. One a boeing seven. One seven four A sister airline. And but there. I got a lot of Messages from people. You know kind of worried that could have been me inside this jet but it wasn't wrong airline this delta An airplane carrying nearly eighty passengers and crew slid off the taxiway at pittsburgh international airport on wednesday evening air last week. Airport officials said that. A delta airlines plane a boeing seven flight. Two to three one was departed for atlanta with seventy seven people on board when it quote exited a taxiway just prior to take off near a runway at about six thirty pm. And there's a picture in here of it kind of the nose wheel hanging over the edge of the tax away Officials said that no injuries were reported in the buses were dispatched to help. Passengers exit the plane the passengers were then shuttled to the airside terminal. Delta airlines released the following statement while on. Oh you want me to show that picture. You're saying oh i thought when you alluded to it you're gonna show it but that's okay. No i don't feel like all right okay. Pardon the interruption. When we're recording the show live. The only person who can hear me is captain jeff. Now he's decided to include my audio here in the post. Show edit lucky. You enjoy okay here. Share share screen and here we go and then boom except for do that okay. I'm just gonna leave it like that. Can you guys that no this. They see their got it. Okay for wonder. yeah actually. That picture isn't as bad as some of these others. This one makes it look a little worse and Here's the the back end of the jet details clan thing out the bank. Well rather not say. I don't go seven one. Seven five data a non inflated slide. That comes out of the telecom now. I don't know if you know. This is one of those pictures. Aftermath pictures after the passengers have already left the airplane I did see some pictures. What they had some stairs kind of butted up to get it taken by accident and Up to the back end here and sorry and passengers i keep. I'm really not doing that. The the rear portion of the is the anal portion of the jet They left via the stairs now. I don't know if they if the slide was inflated You know or if it wasn't played in the deflated. Or what. But i've got two things the first one i wonder i wonder if the The the slide The telecomms light there would be effective given the deck angle at the airplanes. Yeah that's that's a good question right. Because i don't think it would be. Maybe it would. I'm not sure what angle it you know. It has to have to be effective dangle dangling banks on the show title about liz you got that angle angle okay and then the other one is I know from from my previous airline. And mike kerner line in the You kind of have to be familiar with with the flight attendant manuals and all that stuff when you carry passengers durant. I know that it's in their manual. That if they well if they find the airplane or in in their in their estimation in a unusual position in the ground or after he rejected takeoff. And they don't hear from the crew in fifteen seconds they're supposed to automatically Beginning evacuation themselves. Because the the the cockpit crew flightdeck crew might be incapacitated and unable to command that evacuation. Yeah so it's you know it's it's it's the manuals as well so Maybe but i mean again again. We don't we don't know an app communication's very important Bring up a great point. And that's why immediately after this happened and you know we're we're just gonna have to like say we're not sure what happened because there's no official officially released Reason that The jet didn't make that final turn. I'm just on this tax away a couple of days before this and On a s airplane and it was in similar conditions as well and let me tell you what you know when the when they do all the snow removal and stuff on the usually do a really good job of of the runway snow removal. And making sure the frictions good and that kind of thing but once you get off on the taxiways and the ramps you gotta be really careful. Because they're usually very very slippery. So i mean i'm very deliberate now. I think we've talked about this. Before that i tend to like to taxi on the higher end of the speed scale But in these listen yeah you But in these conditions. I'm very very slow and deliberate because yeah you know. I'm just not sure what you're going to get and you don't want to end up. I'm not saying this is what happened here but it kind of looks like maybe they were going a little bit too fast for the conditions and tried to make that left. Turn the runways right there. You can see it behind it so it's just like a little bit of a ninety degree turn from the direction this airplanes facing right now and it looks like it just you know. It could have been a mechanical issue as well so i don't know

Pittsburgh International Airpo Pittsburgh Post Gazette Delta Airlines Boeing Captain Jeff Mike Kerner Atlanta Durant LIZ
LinkedIn Wants to Help You Find a Transferable Career

Business Wars Daily

04:30 min | 4 months ago

LinkedIn Wants to Help You Find a Transferable Career

"Lincoln has built. Its following of more than seven hundred million people by promising to help you find a job now at wants to help you find a new and totally different career. With millions of americans and employed right now an entire laid flat by the pandemic. It's undeniably difficult for many people find new jobs without changing roles and industries. The first challenges identifying your transferable skills. That advice is as old as the hills. The much tougher challenges to figure out how to apply transferable skills in jobs in industries. You may never have considered. That's where linked ends new career explorer to comes in if flip typical job searching on its head rather than searching for a particular job say operations manager you enter one of your most recent titles by mining linked ends. Massive data set the to identify multiple skills. You probably already have then. It suggests other roles where those skills overlap according to a company blog. Post tool references. Thirty six thousand career skills and six thousand job. Titles results are matched up by the percentage of skills that can transfer for instance enter the job of co founder. And you'll see that eighty percent of your skills are also used by board members. The example linked in uses is more common an out of work food server. It turns out a waiter or waitress. Typically has more than seventy percent of the skills needed to succeed in customer service role. The good news linked and also identifies high demand jobs as it happens. Customer service specialists or at the top of that list. Career explore then identifies open jobs in that new career in a third column. The tool suggest skills. You may need to build to help make the leap not. Surprisingly it directs you. To linked learning courses offering such clear direction toward a new career makes a lot of sense more than forty five percent of people never explore career change. Because they don't know where to start. According to a survey of two thousand unemployed professionals commissioned by linked in paul heads up economic policy research at linked and he told the new york times many members didn't necessarily know what job transitions were available to them. Moreover about a third of the survey respondents said they felt unqualified for other industries had no connections. There were didn't know how their skills translated the times reported linked in made the new tool available late last month. In beta to try it out navigate to opportunity dot linked in dot com. It's free not part of lincoln's premium subscription which ranges from thirty dollars to one hundred twenty dollars a month with more and more people using linked in as the pandemic continues to take a toll on the economy the platforms revenues are way up sixteen percent over the same quarter last year. But most of that growth is coming from lincoln's advertising business. not it's talent solutions which includes recruitment and job search. According to tech crunch reporter ingrid london by showing job seekers a path toward a new career and guiding them to link to ends classes the platform can build its recruitment business and it's training and education division simultaneously. London suggests although note that many of those classes are also free such a seemingly. Comprehensive system means the online job. Search business has evolved dramatically. It's far more complex and sophisticated than it was not that long ago when online platforms mainly mimicked classified ads. Like linked in smaller rivals ziprecruiter also promotes training to job seekers. Late last month ziprecruiter announced a new platform offering two hundred fifty different classes. The classes come from training companies collaborating with the company including core. Sarah skill share x. You'd acidy among others and this month ziprecruiter announced another kind of partnership altogether with financial services app acorns which helps users save and invest money. From within the acorns app users will be able to search for jobs. The job portal is made possible by ziprecruiter acorn. Ceo kerner tolsey net. The company wants to help its users. Earn more money since income shortfalls or the biggest obstacle to investing with. Us unemployment still at close to eight percent and record high. Pandemic case counts no. Recruitment executive says job. Hunting is easy but they do still see quite a bit of hiring forty million people search for jobs on lincoln weekly and three people get hired every minute company officials claim so for the unemployed all is far from lost but a better more comprehensive job search plan complete with training and a good dose of imagination about alternative careers should make a very big difference

Lincoln Ingrid London The New York Times Sarah Skill The Times Paul Ceo Kerner Tolsey London Acorn Lincoln Weekly Pandemic United States
Hurricane Zeta Makes Landfall in Southeastern Louisiana

AP 24 Hour News

00:55 sec | 6 months ago

Hurricane Zeta Makes Landfall in Southeastern Louisiana

"Louisiana top sustained winds 110 MPH fast moving storm, bringing heavy rain high winds and a strong storm surge from south of New Orleans to the western Florida Panhandle. National Hurricane Center director Ken Graham. We're already going to have the system as a tropical storm in Alabama early tomorrow morning, and then by tomorrow afternoon, this system is already in Virginia. So moving quickly, so be careful the nighttime hours You could have damage you're gonna have to have debris and power lines down. So be really careful. It's better to just be be inside. Tim Kerner is the mayor of Jean Lafitte, Louisiana. But those 4 to 5 hours we're gonna We're gonna get a lot of water. We just don't know what's expected with these storms. We're gonna prepare for the worst hope for the best, but you know, we will get water. But the good news is the over quick. The Hurricane center says the storm is now racing to the north at 25 MPH. Each of the major indexes lost more than

Hurricane Center Louisiana Tim Kerner Ken Graham Jean Lafitte New Orleans Alabama Director Panhandle Florida Virginia
"kerner" Discussed on Planet Money

Planet Money

04:51 min | 10 months ago

"kerner" Discussed on Planet Money

"Sixties. <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> It was clear <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> that neither <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> president. Johnson <Speech_Music_Male> nor congress <Speech_Music_Male> was going to champion. <Speech_Music_Male> Most of the proposals <Speech_Music_Male> set forth by <Speech_Music_Male> the Commission. <Speech_Music_Male> and Mayor <Speech_Music_Male> Lindsay was <Speech_Music_Male> vocal <SpeakerChange> about his disappointment <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> as <Speech_Music_Male> the vice chairman of that <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> commission. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> which spent seven <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> long months analyzing <Speech_Music_Male> last summer's <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> riots <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and drawing <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> solid proposals <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> to stop them <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> at the source? <Speech_Music_Male> I'm <Speech_Music_Male> severely disappointed <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> by the <Speech_Music_Male> failure of the federal <Speech_Music_Male> government. <Speech_Music_Male> To implement the <Speech_Music_Male> commission's bipartisan <Speech_Music_Male> recommendations. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> We are <Speech_Music_Male> not moving fast enough <Speech_Music_Male> or far <Speech_Music_Male> enough. <Speech_Music_Male> We are not convincing <Speech_Music_Male> the people <Speech_Music_Male> in the slums <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> that our government <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> truly <SpeakerChange> wants <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> to help them and <Speech_Male> Otto. Kerner <Speech_Music_Male> echoed <SpeakerChange> these <Speech_Male> sentiments. Well, <Speech_Male> there's been no action. <Speech_Music_Male> There's really been no discussion <Speech_Music_Male> about it <Speech_Music_Male> and the committees <Speech_Music_Male> in the Senate. <Speech_Music_Male> It's just lied <Speech_Music_Male> fallow. <Speech_Music_Male> No movement <Speech_Music_Male> at all pro <Speech_Music_Male> or con. <Speech_Music_Male> In my judgment, <Speech_Music_Male> the <Speech_Music_Male> primary responsibility <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> for absence <Speech_Music_Male> action rests <Speech_Music_Male> with the Congress of the <Speech_Music_Male> United States. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> Most <Speech_Male> were <Speech_Male> disappointed. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> That <hes> <Speech_Male> despite all <Speech_Male> the attention <Silence> that got. <Speech_Male> That <Speech_Male> most of the <Speech_Male> programs they ambitious <Speech_Male> programs they call <Silence> for were not enacted. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <hes> in terms of <Speech_Male> major initiatives <Speech_Male> that came <Speech_Male> out of the Kerner <Speech_Male> Commission that lasted. <Speech_Male> You know <Speech_Male> there's there's <SpeakerChange> not a <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> whole lot. <Speech_Female> But I do think <Speech_Female> one of the lasting <Speech_Female> <Silence> impacts of the report. <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> Is <Speech_Female> that it does <Speech_Female> put <Silence> white racism <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> as <Silence> a factor. <Speech_Female> into. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Structural <Speech_Female> inequities that we <Speech_Female> see <Speech_Female> and differences <Speech_Female> in outcomes <Speech_Female> that we <Speech_Female> see <hes> <Speech_Female> <hes> between White Americans <Speech_Female> and Black <Speech_Female> Americans <Speech_Female> and that <Speech_Female> was huge <Speech_Female> to have <Speech_Female> a presidential commission <Silence> <Advertisement> report. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> Making <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> those <SpeakerChange> <Silence> <Advertisement> claims. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> The <Speech_Male> kerner commission <Speech_Male> came along in a time <Speech_Male> of great upheaval. <Silence> In America <Speech_Male> in addition <Speech_Male> to the unrest <Speech_Male> in many cities <Speech_Male> there was the anti <Speech_Male> Vietnam War <Speech_Male> movement and a series <Speech_Male> of political assassinations, <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> and the findings <Speech_Male> of the kerner commission <Speech_Male> just added <Speech_Male> to this volatile <SpeakerChange> environment. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> It created a sense <Speech_Male> of America. Was Unraveling <Speech_Male> was falling <Speech_Male> apart and <Speech_Male> it. <Speech_Male> <hes> allowed <Speech_Male> Nixon to create this <Speech_Male> language <Speech_Male> of cultural <Speech_Male> of that was his <Speech_Male> appeal, law and order, <Speech_Male> so it definitely <Speech_Male> set the stage <Speech_Male> for not just <Speech_Male> Richard Nixon <Speech_Male> but. <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> The, Modern <Speech_Male> Republican Party. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> Every Republican. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Candidate <Speech_Male> or president since then <Speech_Male> has. <Speech_Male> Their <Speech_Male> the appeal to law <Speech_Male> and order, many ways <Speech_Male> is sort of <Speech_Male> a habitat <Speech_Male> below the need to <Speech_Music_Male> bring back. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Memories of <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> racial unrest <SpeakerChange> in <Speech_Male> the nineteen sixties. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> Kirk <Speech_Male> Commission <Speech_Male> believed that having <Speech_Male> A. Having <Speech_Male> a bipartisan <Speech_Male> commission, the mainstream <Speech_Male> people <Speech_Male> to produce a report like <Speech_Male> this. They really hoped <Speech_Male> that it would change <Speech_Male> the conversation <Speech_Male> in America about <Speech_Male> race and <Speech_Music_Male> unrest, <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> but did <SpeakerChange> not. <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> In fact, <Speech_Female> following the Kerner <Speech_Female> Commission report <Speech_Female> the police force <Speech_Female> in the United States <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> became more <Speech_Female> powerful, <Speech_Female> not more regulated. <Speech_Female> Nixon's <Speech_Female> war on drugs <Speech_Female> gave police more <Speech_Female> leeway to arrest <Speech_Female> drug dealers and <Speech_Music_Female> users <Speech_Female> and many police forces <Speech_Music_Female> began <Speech_Female> their steady process <Speech_Female> of militarization <Speech_Female> by acquiring <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> surplus equipment <Speech_Female> and weapons <Speech_Female> from the military. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> And the harsh reality <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> is that the diagnosis <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> of the problem <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> lead out <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> in the Kerner Commission. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> would. Be <Speech_Music_Female> Accurate in. <Speech_Music_Female> Many American cities <Speech_Music_Female> <SpeakerChange> today. <Speech_Music_Female>

"kerner" Discussed on Planet Money

Planet Money

05:57 min | 10 months ago

"kerner" Discussed on Planet Money

"In February of nineteen sixty eight. The kerner commission completed its report. And Man! Was it a report? The Comprehensive Four hundred twenty six page document was intentionally written as a compelling narrative in the hopes that its policy proposals would really pop and catch the public's attention. The summer of Nineteen, sixty-seven, again brought racial disorders to American cities, and with shock, fear and bewilderment to the nation. The worst came little. Quartz proposals were big proposed major changes to housing policies, urban planning, education, anti-poverty programs and policing. With the price tag wrenching between thirty two hundred billion dollars. A lot of these proposals aligned with President Johnson's priorities. However at the heart of the report was something Johnson and many others did not see coming the commission's. Belief that white racism was the cause of death urban unrest? The kind of report said and I quote what White Americans have never fully understood, but with the Negro can never forget. Is that White Society is deeply implicated in the ghetto? Why institutions created white institutions maintain it and white society condones it. The report was set to be released on March first. What happens is it gets leaked to the Washington Post. The day before the members of the commission were so afraid that Johnson going to try to bury the report. That someone leaked it to the press and the Washington Post. LEADS WITH A headline that says white racism is blamed. Riots very close to that, and so that becomes the headline. Dat gains a lot of momentum in the media. It made a huge splash was remarkable that a presidential commission got the type of attention that. The President's National Advisory Commission on Civil Disorders gave this warning to Americans tonight front page of every major newspaper. Our nation is moving towards two societies, one black, one white. Separate and unequal long stories inside detailing the findings of the commission the recommendations for Change. UNLESS, drastic and costly remedies are begun at once, the commission said there will be continuing polarization of the American community and ultimately the destruction of basic democratic values. And when the report was officially released through a publisher. Let's just say it did better than most novels do today. The report turned out to be a runaway bestseller. Seven hundred forty thousand copies were sold the first three weeks. More than a million are now in print. Nature Newspaper Your Times why Post Los Angeles Times all praised liberals also embraced it embrace it recommendations, but President. Johnson wasn't so happy about the report's findings, even though he had to give tepid support publicly privately, he was enriched. The main reason for his anger was the price tag and the scope of the reports recommendations things like creating two million jobs within three years, giving loans to high-risk business ventures, drastically increasing support the schools in black communities, producing six million new housing units in five years. And putting in place, specific police reforms to curb police brutality president Jack Johnson felt that the report did not give enough credit for the work that he and his administration had gone. Through the Great Society programs in the world poverty. He thought it was so unrealistic. For these people this commission to ask him to spend thirty billion dollars when Congress cutting funding for his existing programs, and he just felt that it. It made him look bad. When Roy Wilkins. One of two black members of the commission was interviewed a few years after the report came out. He said I think that the word racism and particularly white racism frightened President Johnson. He didn't feel like the president wanted to go down. In history as the president who wanted his finger at his own people. the Lyndon Johnson wasn't the only person who was unhappy with the commission's report. There was a significant portion of the country who responded negatively not only its recommendations, but to the reports emphasis on police brutality. smooz papers in the south and the West. Were dismissed it as another liberal grab bag another expensive government program That was unrealistic. That spent too much time criticizing the police, not criticizing the protesters themselves, Richard Nixon who's gearing up you know for his presidential campaign develops that line of attack, arguing that it spent too much time criticizing the police. This is mark. His platform is the mall in order platform. It dowse back completely. Any implications were white Americans. It's more on behavior, individual behavior and lawlessness, so it's while the overall. It's impact was enormous in terms of of the amount of coverage gut. It also revealed these these deep cultural divisions that were emerging coming out of the nineteen.

President Johnson kerner commission President White Society National Advisory Commission Washington Post Lyndon Johnson Roy Wilkins Los Angeles Times Richard Nixon publisher Great Society Civil Disorders Congress
"kerner" Discussed on Planet Money

Planet Money

04:23 min | 10 months ago

"kerner" Discussed on Planet Money

"And wasn't interested in pandering to Johnson's agenda. He and other commissioners pushed for more independence from the White House in order to figure out the answer to the first question. What happened to cause the riots? They hire a whole bunch of investigators teams that would go into these areas where where there was unrest in these teams would interview. Local residents about their experiences in life and learning about their stories in seeing their communities in all of that, there were then be a team. Social scientists in the social scientists were charged with answering the second question. Why did they happen? And then the commissioners going to obviously filter all this information and come up with the answer to the third question, which is what should be done? Meanwhile. Johnson was getting angrier by the day. This wasn't the commission he'd expected. It was highly ambitious and being led by a liberal. He tried to throw a wrench in the investigation by blocking any more funding for it. But the commissioners managed to recruit help from other departments. As. An Star to come in from the field, the commissioners traveled to different cities to see for themselves. What was going on? And those first hand up front personal conversations I think allow commissioners g here see and understand the realities of deeply entrenched structural racial inequalities. They were struck by. Just how horrible conditions were in these areas? How unresponsive local officials are everything from housing to education to sanitation was in desperate need of repair. Keep in mind. Most of these commissioners had spent little to no time in black urban neighborhoods. So this was all really shocking for them. There was one issue in particular that kept coming up in almost every city, the one common denominator that united all the rights. They were all initiated either by. Police brutality, or by someone who believes they witnessed police brutality. They were hearing stories from some of the local residents about how how the police would. Beat people up for no reason at all how they're costly being harassed by the police. And on young kid said to them to the police are just thugs with badges. This finding set off a lot of debate among the commissioners and the word riot was part of that debate. Given the issues. Black Americans were facing some of the field. Investigators thought those riots might be warranted. If, you decide that they're rational. They're not riots anymore. They're uprisings. They are a form of protests. And was the only thing that was available to them, because all the other avenues of change where. Blocked off, but the more conservative members of the commission refused to support any report that condoned riots as rational. As the commissioners began to put pen to paper, they were determined to accomplish two things. Come up with a report that had unanimous approval from the commissioners, but still conveyed their findings accurately and right in a way that the average American could understand so they meticulously went through draft after draft rewriting sections cutting others making compromises finessing language especially when it came to. To policing the evidence suggested the police brutality was at the heart of the unrest, but finding the words poof contentious very disappointed in the section. It condemns all police. Early drafts emphasize just how rampant police brutality was and how poorly police officers were trained to deal with racial unrest, and some commissioners thought the language was too strong. Police have human fees to. And they got caused to be fearful in the ghetto back to the drawing board again and again. Finally after eight months it was ready a version of the report that every member of the Commission agreed on..

Johnson White House
Several beaches nationwide close for the holiday weekend due to the spread of COVID-19

Rush Limbaugh

00:26 sec | 11 months ago

Several beaches nationwide close for the holiday weekend due to the spread of COVID-19

"Jack a hand before heading to the beach over the holiday weekend. Some beaches are closed due to the pandemic, but some are open. Those social distancing is required. Palmbeach County Mirror David Kerner says it was an easy decision to close his beaches and then the audience of that analysis. The fact that Broward County in Miami Dade County to ourselves both close their beaches, we had real concerns about over, asked the issues and community spread.

Miami Dade County Broward County David Kerner Jack
Miami - These are the rules for wearing masks in Palm Beach County

Todd Schnitt

00:51 sec | 11 months ago

Miami - These are the rules for wearing masks in Palm Beach County

"At a press conference alongside other county officials Palm Beach county mayor Dave Kerner announced that commissioners voted unanimously to implement a mandate that everyone in Palm Beach county must wear a mask Dave Aronberg the state attorney for Palm Beach county urged residents to follow the mandate that's where the mass the county commission passed this ordinance as a way to educate people of the importance of wearing these face masks Erin Burke says although there is not a criminal penalty attached to violating the ordinance it will be enforced not wearing a mask in public could cost you in Miami the city commission voted to impose fines for those who don't wear face covering when out and about after warning for first offense fines could range from fifty to five hundred dollars there are one hundred twenty two thousand nine hundred sixty confirmed cases of covert nineteen in Florida and three thousand three hundred sixty six

Dave Kerner Palm Beach County Dave Aronberg Attorney Erin Burke Miami Florida
"kerner" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

01:36 min | 11 months ago

"kerner" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Civil unrest in American cities President Lyndon Johnson, responds. The shemmel peace has been shattered in a number of set h. The American people are deeply disturbed. They're baffled and dismayed by the wholesale looting and violence. That has occurred both in small towns, and in great metropolitan centres. No society can tolerate mashed violence. Anymore than a body can tolerate massive disease. And that disease must be diagnosed. Johnson said Ooh what happened. Why did it happen? What can be done to prevented from happening again and again? And so as governments do Johnson commissioned a panel. It was led by Illinois Governor Auto, Kerner and the Kerner Commission, work and insights were blunt. The disease was racism and inequality. This is our basic conclusion. Our nation is moving toward two societies. One black one white. Separate and unequal. Well. That was nineteen sixty eight more than fifty years ago, and of course it's not news at all that racism and inequality have damaged the nation. It wasn't even really news back then, but why didn't Johnson? Why didn't the country do more about it could? Decisions have been made back then based on the kerner report that could have changed the course of the ensuing fifty years. That could have changed what this country looks like today. Well.

Lyndon Johnson Kerner Kerner Commission President Illinois
Violence in Resistance

Scholars Strategy Network's No Jargon

08:46 min | 1 year ago

Violence in Resistance

"Cities and towns across the country. Protests have broken out telling the police killings of George, Floyd. We honor Taylor Tony mcdade others while many of these protests were peaceful. Others have turned violent with buildings, being destroyed or looted in clashes, breaking out between the police and protesters. In light of these events, we wanted to bring you an episode from our archives to better understand some of the history behind the black lives matter protests why protests sometimes turned violent how governments often respond and what the role of social media is all of this? This episode was originally recorded with Avi Green in two thousand seventeen, and we're bringing it you a bit earlier this week. Our usual schedule given this weekend's offense. Hi I'm Miranda Kelly, and this is the scholars strategy network Snow Jargon. Each week. We discussed in American policy problem with one of the nation's top researchers without jargon. In this archive episode Avi spoke with Professor Ashley Howard She's an assistant professor of African American history at the University of Iowa shears their conversation. Professor Howard. Thanks for coming on new jargon. Thank you for having me. Why did these protests happen? Well there's no one easy answer, but if I were to give an umbrella term to why they happen is that people feel that they are not receiving equal treatment under the law or in society, and they feel that all of the established means getting equal treatment have failed them. You mean in a way. They're sort of fed up and sick and tired, absolutely fed up in sick and tired I think this is something that people often forget when we think about not only the uprisings or the violent protests that happened in the past two or three years, but also looking historically that there are lots of preceding events that occur beforehand there. There were marches there protester letters of indignation. There were speeches given fun of City Councils, and for whatever reason those cries. Those grievances were gone unheeded unheard, and because of that people take to the streets, and it gets attention, and it's a very loud cry for help and for acknowledged professor. How can you just tell me about one protests from beginning to end? I would love so I'd like to start with kind of the protests. That's been nearest and dearest to my heart. It's the one that I've been researching the longest, and it also takes place in my hometown of Omaha. So in one, thousand, nine, hundred, sixty, six fourth of July weekend. There are a group of young people. In a parking lot of the Safeway Grocery store on North Twenty four straight. And this kind of an area where people congregate and it was. Evening. GOOP young people were setting off firefighters or firecrackers. A police officer comes. They begin to throw firecrackers at this police vehicle, the police kind of get scared and equipped takeoff they come back and forth, and this kind of sets it off people. See Police as indicative at this time of the state of unfair treatment, and oftentimes these police, public attractions are the catalysts for these uprisings, so over the course of three days young people go up and down North Twenty Fourth Street in the black enclave, and they set small fires. They break windows. They steal goods out of these stores, and the very much engaged in property, violence as protests, but meanwhile has this is going on. You have the mayor of the city Av Sorenson actually meeting with these youth activists listen to their grievances listening to what? What they feel is going on the community. And why love, starting off with Omaha is because Omaha had a long history, a civil rights activism prior to the nineteen sixty six engagement, and what was so notable is at the end double ACP, an urban league had been begging the state for years to open up an unemployment office on North, Twenty Fourth Street, and for years that desire for a building was met. You know was ignored, and by the end of the week of those three days of uprisings North Omaha got their unemployment office. While you know it's funny because I think the words are so charged when we think about uprisings or protests that end in violence that involves some aspect of violence on TV you hear about riots. Can you tell me a little bit about why you call them violent uprisings, and what you think of some of those other words? I mean in some ways. I think riot is pejorative, because it seems that when people use that term, it's divorced from the context in which people are participating at it seems as it's just want violence as a social and Beran, and not actually rooted in issues, and you don't violence approach as protests had along and storied history in the world, so if you think of Labor bread riots. In France in England. Through the green corn rebellion in the United States hey, mark an uprising working class people people without a lot of political capital engage in violent protests as a way to make their voices heard, and it seems that really in the nineteen sixties when blacks began to use this as a primary tactic in their. Repertoire of protest actions that really begins to be demonized in not lauded as you know the underclass kind of going up against those in power and so for me, I like to use rebellion or uprising, because I see these actions on a political. Continue up that you have protests, you have marches, you have demonstrations and at one end of that spectrum. Is this violent protests? It's not divorce from the other things that have come before, but it's the next step when those issues are continually ignore it. Well. It's interesting to think about the more recent violent protests in the context of that long longer history of protests and the longer history of civil rights and racial relations in the in the states as a white person and also somebody who's gone through sort of the standard His. You know I'm not a student history just like history and high school and all that sort of thing. Boy. Is there a difference in the way that we hear about the non violent protests. Martin Luther King. Gandhi all that sort of thing, and and then the way that Events like watts are described and certainly the way that the media today traits events like Ferguson. And there's a difference between how they were portrayed in the moment, and how they're remembered so watts south central l., A. Nineteen, sixty five. This is one of the first when the earliest large uprisings, and so there is the infamous McCone commission that came out where Ronald Reagan is referring to these folks as mad dogs and lawbreakers, and so even though they're pathologising to actions of the people who are engaging in this type of protests they. They. Still understand that it's rooted in politics. The kerner commission, which came out in nineteen, sixty eight, which looked at that. What's been called the long hot summer of nineteen, sixty seven, and that and that was summer with a whole bunch of protests and uprising. Something about that's correct. That was the deadliest summer and the one with the most amount so in the aggregate, the most amount of in terms of scale and scope the largest. Amount of uprisings, this is when you're and Detroit. Both happened and the Kerner Commission looked at this, and said that this is actually rooted in the fundamental desire to have full inclusion American Society and that it's this notion that had as Robert, focus and a scholar who wrote about this in the contemporary moment, said it's not a attempt to overrun America but to alert America. That's something is very wrong and I think when we look at it today, you know it seems. A bit as an anomaly, I at the time Ferguson has time of Baltimore. There was a black president. I think many of us had kind of been lulled into this false sense of security of a a sort of colorblind society. That racism was over. No longer are people using the end where no longer is. The clan burning crosses on people, Yar People's yards. It's over, but in many ways is racism became more systematic or structural, more institutional and hidden, and so these issues still exists is that people don't realize that they're

Omaha Kerner Commission Professor Ashley Howard Ferguson Avi Green Miranda Kelly Taylor Tony A. Nineteen Safeway Grocery Professor George Martin Luther King Ronald Reagan City Councils United States America Assistant Professor
Former Wall Street Analyst Goes All-in on Crypto w/ Lou Kerner

CRYPTO 101

09:24 min | 1 year ago

Former Wall Street Analyst Goes All-in on Crypto w/ Lou Kerner

"Give the one on one on Lou Kerner. Who are you in? How did you come? into the CRYPTO world. Sure will real quick The first part of my career was a Wall Street analysts last four years Goldman in sacks I then ran a couple in companies including the top level domain dot TV and the social network vote which was largest social network in the world before my space Angel invested for a number of years before starting a small DC in two thousand twelve. After a couple of years I became a Ortner at a firm called flight ventures We did about ten percent of everything on the list was a one of our deals And I I ran. The Israel Founders Syndicate for flight has invested in companies founded by Israelis wherever they live and that was awesome. And I saw the your yeah. I joked that I'd gone down. The crypto rapid whole long enough two thousand thirteen two thousand fourteen That Wall Street Journal wrote a story on Bitcoin. Quoting voting me as wall. Street's Bitcoin expert but as I say you know I looked at the light look polite but I did not see it in June twenty ninth two thousand seventeen that I the crypto light in Crypto twenty four seven. Ever since that's really fascinating. So what are your ears on the ground back in the traditional finance world saying about crypto these. Today's is still being left out or are they treating it. I imagine like all the all your buddies over at your old trading desk or whatever They still laugh at it or they. They think it's a real thing what's their deal. I mean I think they're largely laughing at it. I think like most people. They don't understand it. I think it's really funny. That go there are obviously a lot of naysayers but not one of them ever points out. I mean there are a lot of negative things you can say about bitcoin. If you really understand bitcoin but the naysayers they say never say any of those things because they don't really understand it I think there was a more motivation for them to understand it when Bitcoin was twenty thousand. Now that it's eight thousand. They conceal they. They feel like they were right not suspended anytime one hundred percent I mean. What do you think come defy? We talk about defy lot decentralized finance and what's kind of your vision for how this is going to progress and you know there's one side of the the camp that maybe thinks that defy is going to you know in the next ten years re architect all the traditional financial structures that are currently apparently in place. Right where you're gonNA have no longer. You no middlemen and you know but for exchange brokers and all this stuff. It's going to be all peer to peer and encounter. The other camp is that there's just going to be an alternative system but the traditional structures will still be in place so just kind of interested just off the bat to hear what your your opinion would be sure. So I'm a big believer in Marez law. He was a professor at Stanford in the seventies when he coined it. No Maris law is the fact that the impact of all great technology crypto is overestimated in the short run into underestimated in the long run. So yeah people get really excited I did. And then when it's not huge overnight people say oh it's not a thing and I think to some degree that's where we are and you know I think whether it's five years Kenya's for twenty ears. The impact is technology's going to be far greater than anybody sex but I also think that that what it ends up feed is also different than what anybody thinks it's going going to be and generally things don't totally rebuilt new things generally don't totally replace old things. Mike is is that you know what you'll see is an emergence urgence of a new way of doing a new asset class similar to your forty years ago there weren't any junk bonds and then Michael Milkin created in every other bank on Wall Street said it was trash and garbage and they would never do it and now forty years later. It's the exact same thing for the exact same way traded the exact same places as everything else house and I believe. That's where CRYPTOS. So what can the average person do to change their financial fate today. I mean you know exactly how all the systems work is there any really simple things that the average consumer can really do to change their life without getting a brand new job or up ruining their house and moving short. Look I'm I'm a big believer in a lot of the very trite seines. Would pop says about get off zero a big believer that you know the ideas. Even if you don't I don't understand it The way to understand it is to start investigating start reading and start understanding what it is and the I believe in science sir something called Portfolio Science and it would tell you just by a little bit. You know every period of time whether it's every day week month on said state you cost cost average over time and you know depending on how you risk averse or risk seeking you. Are you know you should only put. A percentage edge of your assets. Encrypted shouldn't be one hundred percent in it I know Ansi pompilio talks about like half his assets speeding crypto. And that's that's a very very very aggressive. I think if you put ten percent of your assets in Crypto that's stats on on the high end. Would I would suggest most people give him the volatility and given the significant wrist. But I'm in Bitcoin because I think it's it's the world's most amazing asymmetric bet in other words. Of course you could lose one hundred percent of your bat but you know what other opportunities do. Most people have to get a Tan acts or twenty x one hundred x like you have the opportunity of doing with Bitcoin one hundred percent and I think a lot of us here probably listening you know maybe went a little overboard on that ten percent allocation uh-huh missing zero. Yeah and I get some people or twenty or thirty percent. Yoed all depends. I think where you are or in life. Yeah I've got three kids. I've got a lot of college paid for so you can't afford a ninety nine percent drawdown aids. Learn about not being able to go to college but I really thought big always going to be a thing to be like the worst father in America. I love it loo- Lou tell us a little bit more about this. A symmetry that you're talking about what is an asymmetric bet mean and are there any other examples in history. Look you know I think we all see. I was an equity analyst on Wall Street and one of the first lessons that I learned when I got there in nineteen ninety four was oh my God. The market is really efficient. And that's why in traditional finance. You what we've seen gene is a growth of ATS which enable people to get very diversified portfolios at very low cost and that has been the smartest way way for ninety nine point nine percent of investors to play the investing game whether it's inequities real estate or bonds is through. ETF's through minimizing the minds in the cost in getting diversified portfolio. But myself you know as an equity analyst my job was was to give investors. Good ideas yes and I really felt that if I came up with one really good idea where I saw something that other people didn't see if that happened once a year. That was a really good year. If I sign as metric bet in other words I saw that I thought that the upside was yoked significantly greater than the downside You know in you know given the risks involved also and so kind of my first asymmetric bet that I saw was American line. I was the first analyst large Investment Bank to pick up coverage of America Online in Nineteen Ninety six. And that's all right exactly and that you know that had over the subsequent for ears you know more than one hundred x On that it doesn't come along very often I think. Did you see something that other people don't because markets it's a really efficient. You know so now I feel like I come up with a good idea once every three or four years and so I my hope is is that creek. Does the last good idea that. Actually I'm going to execute on because I think this is the biggest thing in the history of humanity and I have absolutely no interest in moving over its any or sunny optics Holy Crap. I mean there's just so much to unpack in that that lasts two minutes. Where do I want to start? I guess the first question. I'll I'll just unpack pack. I WANNA talk about efficient versus inefficient markets. And I want to also talk about what it was that you saw in. AOL that made you so bullish and see. If there's anything anything similar any you know fly Hallmarks that are similar in a crypto. But I also WanNa talk about you know why you think Cryptos the biggest first thing in the world so there's three things there but let's just start with inefficient verse. Efficient markets unpack that for us. Cher look at the truth is is your information is your more available today been ever and your investment in these companies is based on the information so everybody has the same information. It's a question of what they do with it

Bitcoin Cryptos Lou Kerner Wall Street Journal America Israel Equity Analyst Goldman Founders Syndicate Kenya Cher AOL Michael Milkin Fly Hallmarks Nineteen Ninety Portfolio Science Professor Mike
A Not-So-Thrilling Ride For U.S.-Made Roller Coasters

NPR's Business Story of the Day

03:35 min | 2 years ago

A Not-So-Thrilling Ride For U.S.-Made Roller Coasters

"China is growing its population. It's Connie, we've heard this before, what you might not know, is that within the next few years, China is predicted to become the largest theme park market on earth ride manufacturers in the US are set to play a big role in that growth. But the US China trade war means tariffs on everything from soybeans two parts for amusement, rides and some American companies are feeling squeezed. K ers were Becca Ellis reports pretend you're bullet hanging out in the barrel of a gun, the triggers pulled. And then you're hurled into the air at turbo speed. Zero to eighty miles in two seconds that's being on a rollercoaster made by s worldwide is like these organ jumbling rides have turned the northern Utah company into one of the largest amusement ride manufacturers in the country. Earlier in may Preston perks and executive director s was overseeing roller coasters bound for Bari, New Jersey, Pittsburgh, Chicago, and China in the center of the factory to massive white steel police part of a sixteen million dollar ride going up in eastern. China's newest military themed amusement park sons. You cultural park soon a truck will cut off these police to Los Angeles. Across the Pacific in an ocean container and arrive at the Xingdao port southeast of Beijing. That's when the customer will have to pay tariff of a little over twenty five percent. Her says there's going to be some sticker shock liver. Would they have thought that they'd have to pay such a high duty and tax just like sweepings cars lithium batteries and thousands of other goods roller coasters have gotten caught up in the escalating trade war between the US and China since last fall? Beijing has hiked up the tariff on American-made amusement rights twice potentially, costing customers in China more than a million dollars in extra fees. It's enough perk, says for some buyer's remorse to creep in there when our customers are having to pay more money because of added tariff, they're gonna look other places. And that's what they've done this year, only one Chinese customer has reached out to purchase a ride in past years. Prick says about half of their business came from China. John Gerner, managing director. Of leisure business advisers in China. He says American companies are known as the go to guys for high tech rides pricey, but worth it. And so they've been able to compete on the value of, of innovation quality of intellectual property characters and brands if the new tariffs stained place, Kerner, warns American rights could lose their appeal as Chinese companies are encouraged by Chinese, Dave Tolman is a right, packager at the company, one of its hundred or so, please, he says, it's not just the Chinese duties that have made the trade war such a bumpy ride for us NS with tears zone stealing aluminum affect us in this business a real big amount. That's two of the main things that we use since last March. When the Trump administration announced tariffs on all steel and aluminum imports the price of the metal parties by s has risen by as much as seventy percent. Perk, says they had to rethink parts of their supply chain, seeking out, cheaper steel for the ties at old roller coaster tracks together and for the walk. Quays for ride means we have to change our country of origin. We have to build things and other countries to avoid the tariffs since the mental tariffs were imposed last year. He says that work is now done closer to much of their customer base in China for NPR news. I'm Rebecca Ellis in Salt Lake City.

China United States Rebecca Ellis Beijing John Gerner Connie Utah Los Angeles NPR Salt Lake City Executive Director Dave Tolman New Jersey Prick Managing Director Pittsburgh Xingdao Bari Kerner
"kerner" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

News Radio 1190 KEX

13:42 min | 2 years ago

"kerner" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

"John Kerner, the author of exploding the truth JFK junior assassination, and we will open up the phone lines at the bottom of the hour for questions and comments. Now, here's a the young prince of Camelot, John he could have written his political ticket at any time. And yet he decided to go into publishing was he afraid of of the Kennedy curse. Do you think? I think he'd probably was aware of it. And that might be why he took so long to get into politics. You talked about this several times that once you go in you must be all the way in and at that point in his wife when he you know, his late twenties early thirties. He just wasn't ready yet. But once we get to late nineteen ninety s and you get into his white thirties. I think he feels allegation beginning bald. And I think he realized that that point and his father is white. It was the same time. It started was was, you know, getting involved in the congress. And of course, I mentioned in the book, but this past would continue on election day in two thousand four if it was his plan to run for the presidency. And then on that day would have been the same day same age installed. There was when he was president in nineteen sixty three. So I I think maybe the timeframe matches father's timeframe picked that was on his fine a lot. Okay. So let's get back to George magazine for a moment. And again, this is naming it George as you've determined was kind of a veiled threat innocent symbolic sort of way because he was essentially naming. The individual. He believed was responsible for his father's assassination. Q think when he named the magazine George that he had signed his own death warrant, essentially. I think that's that's probably true. I mean, he was according to author John Jeffries. What a book about conspiracies. He said that Wayne Madsen reporter was gonna meet with JFK junior week after this horrible tragedy investigating getting connection. And we can just spend some time talking about the fact that there is a lot of evidence that connects George Hw Bush to the Kennedy assassination. Jim garrison even talked about in his own research that George H W Bush was arrested in Dealey plaza and taken under custody and questioned. Tells police he was leaving Adele tax building, and we probably can easily pin him down by several photographs that were taken there one. He's working in front of the Texas. Schoolbook depository building is coming up against the wall. They're looking to the side, but a photograph he's walking with Edward, Lansdale. Who are also score the three tramps way from Dealey plaza. So there photographic evidence of him in plaza. Well, it's interesting. There are two people on the planet. Who don't remember where they were November twenty second nineteen sixty three one was Richard Nixon. And the other apparently was George Herbert Walker Bush. They don't believe they don't remember where they were. But he was I mean, if he was the ideas, he's part of this cabal that orchestrated the assassination of JFK, but he was in the oil business at that time wasn't he absolutely. He was it was president of world oil company, which of course, name for the bay, pigs invasion, and we also to point out. I if he was lying about this, which he was why is he lying about it? Why cover that up? You must be hiding something. He's a could just say he was watched motorcade most Texans were there under the president. Why he was there? The night before he was making a speech at a local Dallas hotel share it in the night before we also know there was that Mirka sin meeting while they won't big oil company executives were there. The planning meeting where LBJ was there to Clinton Mirka sins house? And was most likely there are to Kennedy was about to get rid of the oil depletion allowance which was going to make all of them, much, less wealthy. So so much more than just because of that. So we also know that they takes invasion was in part plan by him. The two ships were codename, Houston and Barbara. So he's all over all of this assassination and the motives, well, he he would go on to head the CIA. I believe in the nineteen was nine hundred seventy six. Or thereabouts. I might be wrong on that date. But he was also an ambassador to the United Nations, but he was head of the CIA. But the theory is that he was a CIA officer all the way back into well nineteen sixty three and people point to a memo a Herbert Hoover. Or is there? An Edgar Hoover J. Edgar Hoover memo head of the FBI naming a George Bush as a CIA officer tell me about that memo. Right. Hoover writes, a memo to the State Department to Roger Hill's men and a memo is basically saying that there is information that they acquired it from George Bush in Miami. That was saying that don't worry about the Cubans trying to use the assassination stage invasion of Cuba. We're not gonna use it for that. And they got this information from George Bush, the CIA agent so later on when this was published by the New York Times in nineteen ninety age just before the election for the presidency that year in October just before the election, right then Bush denies this that this was him. He says it was a different George Bush now curiously enough when this came out the George Bush's talking about gets a lawyer and swears under oath affidavit that it was not him. It was the other George Hw Bush could not have been him. So this definitely was George poppy Bush. That was writing about on that very famous nemo. Okay. So let's say that George Herbert Walker. Bush was a CIA officer in nineteen sixty three. He is the George Bush that is mentioned in the J. Edgar Hoover memo. Let's say he was involved in the bay of pigs in the planning of it. And that those ships that were involved in the invasion were named after his wife, Barbara Bush and Houston. And the codename was also the name was oil company. And let's say that there were patriots of him at. In Daley plaza on that date. How does that necessarily prove that he was involved in the assassination of of JFK? Well, we can take this one step further with a man named Orlando Bosch so early to very strange men after the assassination takes place in Dealey plaza. One is calling Bella man to this tall dark complected, man. Everyone in the plaza is running towards digressing no or trying to find on the places to hide these two men sit down on the curb next to each other. And they're the last two people that JFK song his life. The umbrella man pumps the umbrella and turns it, which was just running subverter filming change that as you probably know and dark complected man row raised up one of his hands says a signal so they both had walkie-talkies and both of these men were probably par conspiracy. And the dark complected man was a man in Orlando Bosch, and this man was age in the fasten this man all throughout his life was protected by George Bush. He was well, my director Bush ordered this man to do several assassinations and protected him for asylum and extradition entire life. So this particular person Orlando Bosch is one way we connect to the assassination. We also know that when he was director of the agency when there was this investigation by the house as director Bush several times. Yeah. I'd access to documents to the house committee on assassinations. Redacted documents Nelson took with him. We liked the presidency in nineteen Ninety-three. All right. So why wouldn't? John F Kennedy, jR, have written about this in George magazine. If this if this was all apparent to him, and he knew this, and he went so far as to name the publication after George is a veiled threat. Why didn't you expose them through the magazine? Well, as I say look like at this point in time there were two sources, I look out in the book. I it seems like he was positioning himself to do this as the final thing. The magazine would do before he sold it, including investigative reporters that he was going to meet with and then he also would use presidency as way to investigate the assassination to also keep in mind that if he was aware that the agency, and George W Bush, h you're H W Bush conspired to kill his father. Then he probably would use your presidency to open an investigation to like his uncle wanted to do as well, Robert Kennedy. Now, we also should keep in mind just in general, whether it was Bush or not he also felt it was talking about with magazi- ony, but he was seventeen years old. He was way back in nineteen seventies already thinking and knowing that there was evidence in his nine. The official version of events was not true. So I think that the time we got to late thirties. He was prepared to make a move on this for politics to get involved with politics to extols the truth in service country. I think that's exactly what was happening at that point in his life. And had he. Become governor of of New York in two thousand and two and then waited two years and then through his head. He thrown his hat in the ring for the the White House in two thousand and four oh lucky would have been up against George W Bush. So there's another perhaps another motive is that is that the idea. It does make some sense. Yes. And I think nothing we can look at this too is directing lawn. Current events of events here with this agency targeting the Kennedy family, I mean, you can easily prove from research of other people that JFK's assassination assassination, Robert Kennedy, even teddy Kennedy being targeted to talk about this in the book all targeted by the by the CIA. So this seems like an extension of the anger that was still towards his family about the agency. It goes back to bay takes invasion in nineteen sixty two which of course, was in part plan by George Bush. Now, here's what I don't understand the the Clintons who were close to the Kennedys the Clintons were also close to the to the bushes because well, certainly after leaving office a ex President Bill Clinton, and George Herbert Walker Bush collaborated on a number of sort of relief agency efforts and so forth. So how does that square? Well, again, this happens years after JFK junior's death. I mean, this is fairly typical for ex-presidents to do this. I mean, you look at one president's leave the White House there a single purpose after that is to make sure to legacy is is intact. They wanna look like statesman. Why didn't they want to work with other presidents? They got different events together. So they easily become friends. I want to show that they can work across party lines to become better known to the public as an honorable person in the states means so this happened many times in history. Or across party lines. You tend to work together for the good of the country. And do you think the Clintons know this? Well, I think the Clintons. Not interested in this. I mean, it's not the type of thing that they're focused on really, I think the Kennedy family, though, I have some hope for. I mean, you think about Robert Kennedy, Sean, pretending junior. The courageous thing that he did meeting with Sirhan Sirhan and coming to the conclusion that the agency killed his father. Now, if that can happen that we can know now through your hands your hands own admission. That there was the truth that comes out years later for that assassination. I think we can have the truth for this one too. Do you think John F Kennedy, jR, would have been a shoe in first of all for for the governor of New York? And then what he won that election. I mean, there's no really any way of knowing for certain, but what are your thoughts? Well, there are some polling done when he was thinking about running for the Senate in New York and his ringing approval was sixty seven percent..

George Herbert Walker Bush CIA Kennedy John F Kennedy George magazine Barbara Bush Robert Kennedy president George George Herbert Walker Dealey plaza JFK Orlando Bosch Clintons White House Edgar Hoover J. Edgar Hoover Sirhan Sirhan John Kerner
"kerner" Discussed on KARN 102.9

KARN 102.9

02:27 min | 3 years ago

"kerner" Discussed on KARN 102.9

"The system worked but not in real time kerner said the tactics zapped groups did not disclose donors lois lerner said that if tax exempt groups didn't meet the requirements the irs could revoke their status iras official nan marx said the system didn't work the tax exempt groups did not disclose donors prompting mccain's guy kerner to say perhaps the answer was to audit so many of the taxes groups that will be financially ruinous for them as judicial watch has reported on the twenty thirteen meeting senator john mccain than issued a statement decrying false that this is a quote now false reports claiming that his office was somehow involved in irs targeting of conservative groups mccain said the irs previously blacked out the notes of the meeting oh no i'm sorry mccain decried false reports claiming his office was somehow involved in irs targeting of conservative groups judicial watch says the irs previously blacked out the notes of the meeting but you should watch found the notes among subsequent documents released by the irs mccain was urging the irs to audit so many conservative political advocacy groups that it would be financially ruinous for them see i'm old enough to remember mccain feingold it was the campaign finance reform act the george w bush said when he was running for president two thousand he would never sign into law and once congress passed did signed into law saying well the supreme court will fix it they didn't tell many years later judicial watch also points out the april thirtieth twenty thirteen meeting came just under two weeks prior to lois learner's admission during a meeting of the american bar association that the irs had inappropriately targeted conservative groups in her may twenty thirteenth answer in which she admitted to the absolutely incorrect insensitive and inappropriate targeting of tea party and conservative groups lois lerner suggested the irs targeting occurred due to an uptick and.

irs nan marx guy kerner john mccain president american bar association lois lerner official senator george w bush congress two weeks
"kerner" Discussed on 850 WFTL

850 WFTL

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"kerner" Discussed on 850 WFTL

"Nan marks janine cook susan brown catherine beret suzanne sinow judith kendall and when you read through this you know i've gotten to this part that's very disturbing where henry kerner literally asked about the time lag for filing from an election cycle and how taxpayers that need extra time to complete forms for tax exemption how they can get an extension for the time to do it think back to the tea party groups that were denied nonprofit status kerner then asked about the penalty part what happens if there is a problem lois lerner said that if the organization is generally compliant but there was one issue we may issue one advisory letter henry kerner asked what is an advisory letter lois lerner explained that an advisory letter was issued when we saw an issue but it was not sufficient to result in a change what might be a problem if the organization continued we would close the exam by issuing the no change letter with advisory telling them that they were not making a change to their exempt status or tax obligations in the future we have found that for the most part exempt organizations are a compliant sector they want to comply with the law they also wanna look good because of the public disclosure of the form nine ninety so for the most part they fix any problems we identify and then she went on to outline what five oh one c three which i have a five oh one c three i've actually to what what what goes on in there and it's amazing to me because not everybody knows who henry colonel is.

judith kendall henry kerner lois lerner henry colonel
"kerner" Discussed on WCPT 820

WCPT 820

02:55 min | 3 years ago

"kerner" Discussed on WCPT 820

"With approved credit we are back on the zero hour this is richard rj 'scale fifty years ago a report was issued which rocked the nation it was in the wake of riots and urban unrest it was called popular popularly known as the kerner commission report the official title the report of the national advisory commission on civil this orders and its findings sadly are still relevant today perhaps more relevant than ever here to talk to us about that is the last surviving member of that commission senator fred harris was the united states senator from the great state of oklahoma he was a supporter of the great society he was however an opponent of president johnson's escalation of the vietnam war he is an author as i say a co author kerner commission report and recently coauthored in up ad making its discussing its conclusions in the current context so first of all senator harris thank you for coming on the program all right well thank you for allowing me to do so and i hope this i i keep seeing you described as the last surviving member i hope that doesn't make you feel like you're being thin from the herd or something you know my own populace texas friend jim hightower sent me an email after something like that appeared in the paper the last surviving member he said those would be good words for your tombstone the last survivor last man last man standing yes i know jim hightower he always says why why don't you have me on your program and i always say because you never answer my emails well let's let's let's talk about the kerner commission report you know this was such a powerful statement beginning with its basic conclusion as you you all wrote our nation is moving toward two societies one black one white separate and unequal the nation was i think really rocked by those words those words had certainly had an effect on the discussion any better since then things any better well we made progress on virtually every aspect of race.

senator oklahoma president johnson jim hightower richard rj kerner official senator fred harris united states texas kerner commission fifty years zero hour
"kerner" Discussed on Reality TV RHAP-ups: Reality TV Podcasts

Reality TV RHAP-ups: Reality TV Podcasts

01:51 min | 3 years ago

"kerner" Discussed on Reality TV RHAP-ups: Reality TV Podcasts

"And you said you were jasper thought i didn't think he was like good either i thought it was fun to see that this kid had a very high pitched voice had this sort of crooning voice come out in but it was also not but i'm more surprising the justice reactions they got up up and started dancing with him and on her hands yes she did have the kitty sox and i think she started going crazy i would too i would too but like she really had trouble controlling it and some of the some of the scenes but yeah i do think like they definitely overreacted to him i maybe just because they hadn't heard voice like his at throughout the audition process yet but i i liked him but i didn't love him he was no like what is that guy's name macree i never know how to say his name the guy who won who was like a kerner oh what nevermind scotty mccreery cuts game crew was a country singer yeah but he had a kerner voice we're mixing i'm scotty mccreery with colin creevey the harry yeah he had like a low really low pitch boys you know so like i think that that's like what they were saying like oh this tiny boy has low pitch boys let splits finishing off here with dennis lorenzo who had an innocent do you always assume that the last person who's gonna addition really emmy singing show is going to get in no no different case here but dennis his stories about how you know he grew up in what he calls the bottom in west philly his dad sadly got murdered when he was five and so he is now a father and he wants to serve like basically do you know do things that is that obviously was not somebody that they did like a little member i mentioned to you if you if you weeks before this air that they were doing little snippets of this on in between the bachelor.

kerner scotty mccreery colin creevey dennis lorenzo philly jasper
"kerner" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"kerner" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Joining us now from washington is ben domenech he's publisher of the online journal the federalist ben welcome to the program gregory review well healing are divided society looks at the fifty years since the current commission report and has a lot of discouraging news when you look at america what do you say well i think it's important ready to begin with with back from with data and i understand that you just let mr kerr to go which is i think unfortunate because i wanted to respond to the very first point that he made which he started this interview with you by saying that the child poverty rate has gone up since uh the original kerner report that the that's simply not true um the center on budget and policy priorities which is a non partisan but progressive wing a think tank in washington reported last year that the child poverty rate hit historic lows i in fact uh it it was cut an almost in half in making sixty seven the child poverty rate in america was twenty eight point four sent it's down to fifteen percent in the last year and it fell across all s necessities uh this is something that happened not just due to increased growth in terms of wages an and other factors but actually included progressive policies of the war on poverty actually had a significant impact as well as a child tax credit the earned income tax credit increases in food stamps and in in terms of and other entitlements and that ended up get cutting the number the percentage of children in america who live in poverty in half over the course of the past halfcentury now is that still a problem that we have essentially eleven million children in america who live below the poverty line of course it is and it's something that needs to be addressing but we shouldn't exaggerate the degree to which things uh you know have have failed to shift in the past halfcentury the fact is that we've seen improvements in the in the flynn the experience of of nearly every sector of the american economy and in terms of of the out through the outlook of americans today the pew research center found just last year.

washington publisher mr kerr america flynn pew research center ben domenech gregory kerner fifteen percent fifty years
"kerner" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

02:43 min | 3 years ago

"kerner" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Hi ray thank you for having me well um when you look at the pages of healing our divided society when you hear some of the overview conclusions about how we're doing a does it ring true in a community that's been riven by racial conflict in and around saint louis it does ray um and it is uh shockingly similar uh that the conditions that we face today or very much like those that we faced fifty years ago i was listening to the segment before me and certainly it is true that we have made progress in some areas uh but for the vast majority of people who live at the intersection of race and poverty uh the landscape remains the same and so uh it saddens me that we haven't come further along than we have if you look at the uh reports from various um social science researchers opinion researchers a gallup pugh and others they ask white people every year uh whether things are getting better and the divergence between their answers and the answers of african americans about the state of the country about the racial climate in the country about whether or not being black as a handicap uh there's always been a split but the divergence in recent years has been getting wider and wider why that split view that almost mutually contradictory understanding of the state of play in america well in my opinion ray is uh has multiple factors um as was reported in the original kerner report there's no one reason that we're in the condition that were in uh but in response to your question i will list a couple of factors of first and foremost is the invincibility of the poor are we are a nation that has begun to criminalise poverty and we do that whether you are black or white clearly poverty is not exclusive to the black community um this is also the fiftieth anniversary year of the assassination of dr king and and the next phase of his movement was to be to address this lease common denominator which is that of economic oppression so the invisibility of the poor the fact that there are so many people who have been elevated in terms of class uh there are so many white people who can live their entire lives and not really have to encounter directly of the poverty.

saint louis america dr king ray um kerner fifty years