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"kernel" Discussed on KCBS All News

KCBS All News

02:05 min | 2 weeks ago

"kernel" Discussed on KCBS All News

"We have a lot of businesses that understand that this could dramatically increase the quality of life for the people who work for them in Santa Clara county Jennifer Hodges KCBS John legend Gabriel union an ava duvernay or some of the many black cultural leaders who have signed a letter to fight against racism promote equal pay and ask industries to disassociate from police letter was released yesterday by a new organization called the black artists for freedom which describes itself as a collective of black workers in the cultural industries let's check in with Darcy David circumstance has become a real favorite summer veggie in our home the word itself derives from an eighteenth century native American word meaning broken corn kernels it was originally corn scraped off the cob and cooked with beans in the south they almost always use Lima beans and in fact in most people's minds it's a Lima bean and corn dish it's just been that way and very popular that way but it can be done with any kind of beans most historic recipes include some red bell pepper and there's always going to be a little bit of on the internet so any kind of beans can work with the corn pre cooked beans can be frozen beans canned beans are fresh beans but the corn must be fresh your slice the kernels off the cob then turn your ninety four over and scrape the entire cobbling flies because you get those wonderful little knob in the center so sweet at the base of the comp now saute some chopped onion with a little bit of diced red bell pepper in olive oil until the onion is transparent then add the cooked beans and the raw corn all you have to do in our store until it's warmed through if it gets too dry moist and it was a little bit of water or white wine and sprinkle a little salt and pepper and that's it as soon as is heated through its card I'll tell you it's a real summer favorite Narstie David KCBS.

Lima Santa Clara Jennifer Hodges Darcy David David KCBS
HBO Max removes 'Gone With the Wind,' will add context

1A

02:29 min | 3 weeks ago

HBO Max removes 'Gone With the Wind,' will add context

"Landrieu this is also become a discussion about cultural artifacts and and I want to put this first to you and then to Aaliyah because there are a lot of people who are angry with that gone with the wind is still one of the most popular if not the most popular movie worldwide and in fact HBO Max pulled it off they may re establish it with context what are we to do with things like gone with the wind in the cultural artifacts that didn't have context when they were made welcome one looking like a couple of the if you've noticed a lot of the questions actually come up with excuses for not focusing on the thing that's in front of us let's not take the monument down because that's not a big thing the big thing is changing other stuff so let's not do that less let's not taken down because it might lead to taking other stuff down and then we don't know where it's gonna end let's not take it down for a whole bunch of other leading venture with Matt Watson said I think you said these Confederate monuments represent a specific thing at a specific time in a specific wage data historical lives and that are offensive and at three thousand of them and so in America right now that's where the focus is we may very well have conversations about other things later and the attitude to people's question of where will this end you know we don't really know but we know where she began and we know we should we should compete with secondly with the cultural artifacts I think that you know the idea in people's taxes they should start to recognize how not collect those cultural providers those movies were are and to put them back into context to explain to people what was going on what was right what was wrong with that a deep discussion of why gone with the wind was not an honest reflection of what happened I think is really important and the same thing could be said sure can be set up of a birth of a nation and a whole host of other cultural artifacts that are out there that obviously did not tell the correct story about what happened in the past although we don't really watch birth of the nation much anymore and we still watch gone with the wind and things like that but more in Sarabia but they did it one time and and so I'm not trying to be quick but you love them but that but but some of the kernels of what people are talking about related to those occurs at

Landrieu MAX Matt Watson America Sarabia HBO
Boston - 19-Year-Old Stabbed And Killed In Weymouth, Woman Arrested For Murder

WBZ Midday News

00:19 sec | 2 months ago

Boston - 19-Year-Old Stabbed And Killed In Weymouth, Woman Arrested For Murder

"An arrest has been made in the killing of a Weymouth man nineteen year old Ryan Martin staff to death Thursday night in a wooded area near kernels Dr twenty six year old Kelsey debello arrested yesterday in Hanover and charged with murder she will be arraigned on Monday reports indicate that you did know each

Kelsey Debello Hanover Murder Weymouth Ryan Martin
What's in Lisa's Amazon Cart

Hungry Girl: Chew The Right Thing!

07:41 min | 2 months ago

What's in Lisa's Amazon Cart

"We're GONNA jump right in now and start because we have a lot of products and then we have that crazy interview so rather than take up the entire day for people by the way. I don't know what else to do where to jump in and start talking about products. I wanted to start by mentioning a beauty product that I think is very relevant right now because I keep hearing from everyone that they're Harris so grey and they don't know what to do and I always joke like if I don't get my hair color on a month that I Albert Einstein so it's like wishful thinking actually Bam Bam looks exactly like Albert Einstein. But she does not use this product. I do this is a product that I highly recommend to anyone that has any kind of routes that they had issues with. And it's something called. Wow or color while I just call it. Wow powder that's like my shorthand name for it and it looks like this like it almost looks like it would be like some kind of makeup like a plush or something and it comes in a little black case and it comes with a little brush and you could just touch up your roots and it really works so guys. I know you can't eat this but if you're out there and you're wondering why your hair's not looking as good as it did a month and a half ago this color. Wow is the answer to all of your needs honestly. You're wearing a hat today. Did you not put on your color while I did? Not if I took my hat off I would for writing you. We'll be putting my collar. Wow on later before I agree. My facebook live all right all right but now we'll get back to the food. So let's jump into the snack category because I don't know I find myself snacking throughout the day. More eating fewer like big meals and more snacky type things. I don't know if you guys are doing the same thing. I'm totally doing that. Mike is very snacky the other day he came into the Kitchen. And he's just like. I need carrots yesterday. At least see snacking healthy. Good for you. Did you put peanut butter on an even think about that. Wow what is wrong with me? You know what it is is. I think. Peanut butter a peanut butter as a as like dessert. And putting on carrots takes a desert out of it so I have Hamas that I got yesterday that I'm GonNa probably my carrots into. Yeah My love. Carrots in homeless But this one snack that I have to tell you it shocked me. But it wasn't until the corn that I really discovered it and I think it was because early on when I was still going to stores I went to this market that I loved And it had this there and then I realized that on Amazon and then it just changed my life. But Brad's I don't know if you know Brad's a lot of people out. There probably are familiar with breads. I if there is a Brad. He makes a lot of great crunchy kind of vegetable items. He makes chips and Dried fruit and he makes this stuff called. Brad's Crunchy Kale. And it comes in all these different flavors added. These are absolutely the best option if you like Kale and you don't want to make your own Kale chips but you still want them to be healthy. I think Brad's is basically the only option lease. It's the only option for me because serving only has eighty calories. There's two servings bags so even if you accidentally eat the whole bag which is exactly what I do. Eat the whole bag and I always do the math. Like if you get a bag of something. Don't you always the math to find out what's going to happen if you ate the whole bag? So smart That's what I do like. Everybody you guys probably do. 'cause you're hungry Earl Campbell? We do because you. I feel like Oh this is such a you know. There's so many food fakers out there when you go. And there's like three and a half servings and their one hundred ninety calories and fourteen grams of fat this is a real find. It really is and the flavors are amazing. My favorites are Nacho and cheese. It up and they're just like cheesy flavorful crunchy but not greasy and the bag is a good size to serving. So it's not like an eight serving bag where you're going to accidentally eat eight servings and then feel sick afterwards. One of those is up but I think the cheese might actually be Vegan. That sound right. Oh yes there's a big giant V on the bag that I'm holding now isn't that doesn't stand for very good at Stanford. Yes no wonder why Lord these are disappearing and now I know why are you know Lawrence been eating them highly recommend and they have by the way two to three smart points. Serving not bad. Have you tried the vampire killer? One is it's super hot or is it just kind of mild hot. You know. I never tried that one. I've only tried the cheese. It up the ranch. And the NACHO It must be sold out. I don't think you kill a vampire with heat. I think you kill vampire with garlic garlic. Yeah you wonder why. All the Vampires Mike's life are still alive. Okay next NAK. This is something that I have loved for a long time and actually out of the now and I have to order more Bader bean. Boom I like I just like to say that might have been better boom crunchy broad beans fava beans or broad beans. They come in hundred calorie bags in every flavor. Under the Sun there brought to us by our. Bff's at enlightened people who make the best ice cream on the planet these beans come in nine hundred million flavors exact and they just keep creating more flavors and I don't know how they keep doing it. But it's like flavors like sea salt. They're Saracho a barbecue. Ran to sweet onion and mustard. Which is my favorite Nacho cheese buffalo wing garlic and onion cocoa dusted and sweet cinnamon wildfires meadow. Good like I don't know how they make them so crispy crunchy like they're just unbelievable. I've turned so many people onto these snacks I know I always give them out at our events and people go nuts for them and they go nuts they're not not actually stats are way. Better than nuts But they go crazy because of how they satisfy whatever craving for whatever like potato chips type snack you would want and these are just better for you. They have five grams of fiber in each little. Tiny hundred dollar back and only two smart point right. Yeah and protein to write your. There's like seven grams of protein. Forgot about them. That's unbelievable and very satisfying. The kind of reminded me of Member like in Grade School. You'd get corn nuts in your bag of your lunch bag coordinates but one hundred times better than corn nuts. That's so funny that you say that because the next snack that I have is actually exactly what you're saying. So yes they are a little like nuts but if you really do like the real thing or not this next neck which is called love. Corn will like blow your head off of your body honestly. Oh No north. Imagine like you have corn nuts. They they almost like it. Feels like they're gonNA break your teeth. I don't care if you were like two six eleven or ninety seven years old. It feels like your teeth can't stand up to the core nuts but love corn. It's like the size of a regular corn kernel and the texture is. It's got that bite and that crunch but it doesn't threaten the enamel of your tooth you don't feel like your teeth are GonNa fall out of your face when you eat them. And they're so good again little bags ninety calorie bags and their little sweet and they come flavors like sea salt and there's like a chilly flavor that super spicy and then a smoked barbecue flavor that I love and you can get variety packs. I am not kidding. I have like forty eight of them in Mysore right

Brad Albert Einstein Facebook Hamas Harris Earl Campbell Mike Amazon Grade School Mysore Bader Bean Lawrence Saracho
Ian Freed - Bamboo Learning

Future Ear Radio

05:27 min | 3 months ago

Ian Freed - Bamboo Learning

"I am Co founder and CEO of bamboo learning and bamboo learning is a startup dedicated to developing voice. I applications in education Really aimed at Children Teens and their families And we actually have five products out already. that cover range of different topics From math to reading As well as history and music so Cited to be here with you on the podcast. We'll awesome thank you so much for joining me today. And the reason I wanted to bring you on I had heard you on Colin born podcast voicing startups. It was an excellent episode. Everybody should go check it out But in that episode You know as you were describing. Bamboo learning I kinda dawned on me that this was really interesting application that you were building in so I tweeted out You know. Keep an eye on bamboo learning because I think it's one of the most interesting You know basically applications that are being built within the Alexi ecosystem. So I wanted to have you on today on the podcast. Actually kind of flesh out why I think that is. I think there's four main reasons why So I kind of wanted to go one by one with you as to I think you you all are so interesting so the first is your background in your Co Founder. Arenas background in the way in which is combining together so rather than me steal your thunder. Can you share a little bit about you? Know your time at Amazon In how that led you to Bambu and then arena in her background in education in how the to have sort of mixed together to lead to bamboo learning Absolutely so I Have been running Bamboo for about two years and prior to that had a twelve year about twelve and a half year career Amazon. Most of the time I was leading a one or more different device businesses And the last of ice businesses that actually ran were echo and Alexa and Iran. That team from the very beginning of the idea. that Really the kernel of the idea came from a review with with Amazon Ceo Jeff Bezos and We started building A team developed to develop ECO and Alexa ray around Two thousand Ten or so and Started working on that Pretty early and from the very beginning Rethought of Alex as broad based computing platform. So that's No other things I did. At Amazon I led the Amazon kindle. Business the e book reader and Also the fire phone which maybe wasn't the best Amazon hardware product but it was a lot of fun and had quite a bit of innovation in it and a number of those engineers are An end product folks are working very successfully on everything from Alexa Fire TV. We actually also incubated fire TV within my team And I was pretty adamant that the voice interface for Fire TV was absolutely critical to the today My co-founder Irina fine As much as I've spent three decades in technology she spent the same amount of time In education including everything from being a teacher of elementary school kids and older students as well. She also trained teachers at at Hunter College And she's done research and curriculum design for many many years and also worked Both for A startup in In education content development that was eventually acquired by McGraw Hill and also spent some time as a consultant at McKinsey so she has a really strong background in education and And as well as just kind of curriculum and development etc We actually know each other because she used to work for me. In the early nineties I had a consulting firm in Russia and She was one of the first people I hired there. And one of these great employees that you hire Who whatever you give them in terms of Some additional work to do she did that. And you know was done in about a third of the time of most normal humans and so gave her more work etcetera so we Probably about a two and a half years ago we started talking about. Could we combine our expertise Both her deep knowledge On Education and education theory and practice and mine on devices and Echo and Alexa in particular and create a brand new company where we could build education applications And try to create these long-form experiences on Alexa that we've as far a we've been reasonably successful at doing through Through our bamboo products.

Amazon Alexa Co Founder CEO Children Teens Irina Fine Colin Jeff Bezos Hunter College Russia Echo Mcgraw Hill Bambu Mckinsey Iran Alex Co-Founder Consultant
White vs. Wheat: The Food Fight of the Centuries

Gastropod

08:52 min | 3 months ago

White vs. Wheat: The Food Fight of the Centuries

"To make white flower. You have to get everything brown out. That's the brand or the outside part of the wheat kernel as well as the Brown inside part called the wheat germ. What's left is the stuff in between. That's white white. Flour might seem like something modern and industrial. But actually people have been separating out the wheat bran and the wheat germ for a really long time and people had the the ability to sift and separate brand from flower for a long time if they had the power to command the Labor that it took so there are mentions of something like shining white bread going way back in history. This is Aaron. Bob Ro strain. He's a professor of politics at Whitman. College and the author of a book called White Bread. A social history of the store bought low. Farren says back in history. It took a long time and a lot of human power to manually Diaz colonels and sift flower to get it fine white so why would rich people bother? What was great about white flour so if you look back in time white bread white flour was an elite product. Because it meant there weren't sticks and rodent droppings and dirt in it things like that and say and Steve Jones is a wheat breeder and head of the bread lab at Washington State University. Okay so if you are rich in the past your flower might be hand cleaned while it was being hint sifted so there would be nowhere for rap to hide and all that shining whiteness but would it have also tasted better. We know Steve is creeped out by white flour but AARON SAYS WHITE. Bread has some advantages. Well I mean some people would argue that. It tastes finer. You can get a softer later loaf. As a result of that rich people could and did make white bread but it wasn't just fluffier and cleaner whitebread quickly took on a bigger symbolic meaning. It very quickly goes from being a question of taste to being a question of how bread mark certain people as affluent or powerful. And for as long as there's been white lower there's also been a debate about it not just what it means but also whether or not we should be eating it. White versus wheat is one of the first recorded. Food fights in history. Plato and ancient Greek philosopher had students debate whether the ideal city should be fed on refined white bread or gritty whole grain porridge. The debate wasn't really about what's for breakfast. Of course it was about whether city-dwellers somehow lost something important. Some essential grit just by living in a city and these debates around bread have been going on so long and so intensely because the stakes are so high. The Biblical phrase bread alone is not far from the truth. Aaron quoting from the Book of Matthew. Here man cannot live by bread alone. But actually the only thing matthew suggests that you need is a top up for your all bread diet is the word of God so really most of your calories. They're still coming from bread. In Europe. For example it would vary by time and place but people in Europe got between say forty to sixty percent of calories from bread from at least the sixteen hundreds to well into the twentieth century in the United States in the Nineteenth Century early twentieth centuries about a third of calories came from bread so it's an incredibly significant food product and even the English word. Lord it's demolished goes back to the phrase bread giver in Old English. The word layoff meant loaf and Boardman Guardian and together. The two words formed Love Board which eventually became Lord the one who ruled over the bread even the word companion is to do with bread and social hierarchy companion comes from Latin the word com which means together with and puffiness which means bread so your companion is the person you're able to share bread with because you're in the same social class so bread has been incredibly important for thousands of years and throughout that time the color of the bread. Signified your social standing. If you were rich you could afford the Labor to make that flower white. The very richest had the very whitest bread and the poor. You're the darker your loaf. Which means that for most of history for most people bread has been brown and it's been pretty damn rustic. Aaron says that was true all the way up to the mid eighteen hundreds in the US and at that point about ninety percent of the bread and the United States was baked at home by women and maybe ten percent was baked All mostly urban bakeries throughout the seventeen hundreds and early eighteen hundreds. The world was industrializing but bread. Pretty much stayed the same until some enterprising. Engineers invented mechanical rollers in the early eighteen. Hundreds Roller Mills meant that bakers could produce white flour and lots of it with minimal effort. These steel rollers were a huge leap forward compared to the old stone mills which really couldn't get wheat very white without a lot of human effort to sift it. Steve showed us a mini roller mill. He hasn't a room in his bread. Lab TURN IT ON. This is basically peeling a kernel of wheat. Like an apple and this type of meal that meant that white flour was no longer just an elite product but the mid eighteen hundreds the masses could afford it to the eighteen fifty s was also the last time the majority of bread was made at home in the US. Just like in. Plato's time people immediately started arguing about whether we all should be eating. This well sifted flour at the same time as those roller mills started coming online. Amandas name you know better. Attached to a similar started to fight against the spread of white bread. Servicer Graham I guess. Today we had maybe Remember him because we associate his name with Graham cracker that some followers named after him crackers aside Silvester was immoral Crusader and food reformer who gathered a huge following during the first half of the eighteen. Hundreds you saw white flour. As denatured product that was out of harmony with creation than would devastate the bodies and souls of those who ate it in flaming their joints and fibers and unhinging their their moral rectitude and call Sylvester Graham America's first significant whitebread critic and his followers certainly bought his argument and avoided white bread at the time the US was going through a major cholera epidemic. And people were desperate for anything to keep them. Healthy and Graham offered exactly that path to health based on. What you individually eight and didn't eat something you could control. As opposed to the public health approach of shared investment in prevention and sanitary water systems. The cholera epidemic eventually ended not because people eat Brown bread of course and while Graham's followers might have continued to eat whole wheat bread the rest of the country. The majority were into this newly inexpensive white flour. Meanwhile white flour and white bread had some big shot advocates of their own so progressivism was a social and political movement of the late Nineteenth early twentieth century. And it believed in the possibility of perfecting the nation. It was a moment. When scientific expertise was rising importance and when there's great concern about the upheaval of the nation. That's produced by massive urbanization. The United States going from being a largely rural country to being largely urban country at the same time that there is large scale immigration happening. The progressive movement was made up of a lot of middle class white women and this was the time when everything was becoming quote scientific babies to be born with doctors and midwives. Home Economics was a science said. Not all of America's newest citizens knew about these modern scientific ideas for domestic hygiene that surgeon immigration that Aaron mentioned those people were coming from eastern and southern Europe and there was a widespread fear in the middle classes that these poor people would bring their traditional ways of baking and running their households with them the progressive reformers thought that new mechanized white flour and newly mechanized bakeries making white bread were pure and safe and a huge step up from uncleaned immigrants who were baking most of the nation's bread at the time and so in that moment and the kind of the production of anxiety around bread and food in general the shining white loaves turned out in by gleaning white factories offered consumers are reassuring sense of safety. Steve Jones the Breeder. Who's so creeped out by any form of white bread that he doesn't like to be in the same room as it. His Own Immigrant. Great uncle ran one of these gleaming white bread factories back in the twenties. So my great uncle's bakery in Newark New Jersey was called the up today bakery years ago. I thought well that meant. He looked in the Polish American dictionary. Modern set up to date the up to date. Bakery was a franchise what it meant and their tagline is human hands. Did Not touch the dough. The human hands were southern and eastern Europeans in many cases so my uncle was to not put his thirty in quotes hands into the

United States Aaron Steve Jones Europe Graham Cracker Cholera Bob Ro Professor Lord Matthew Whitman Plato Farren Newark Diaz New Jersey Loaf Bakery Sylvester Graham America Apple
Katrina Adams on making tough decisions

The Tennis.com Podcast

06:41 min | 3 months ago

Katrina Adams on making tough decisions

"Hear from former pro and former US TA president Katrina Adams. Okay Katrina welcomes the tennis dot Com. Podcast it is an honor to have you joining us today thank you. I'm happy to be here kind of want to start with the biggest the biggest news these days which is the kernel virus and how it's affecting all of us in large scale form and everyday forman in nine. Oh you mentioned that you are on self isolation. What is life like for you right now? It's pretty boring right now Being by myself in my apartment or been since Sunday night You know it's it's pretty. It's pretty scary as to what's happened in America and across the world But I was In close contact with someone who contractor buyer at a and Doubt on Monday or Tuesday that they were actually contaminated or or a heck and track with it And I've been in isolation fence fortunately I had cancelled a trip to Switzerland for my ICS board meeting Chose to come to New York and just do it by phone. Prior to any knowledge of of what has what has transpired so actually. I've been home since Sunday. Night was up at three. Am on Monday on the call. You know to Switzerland and for the next two days and and so it's just been. It's been quiet around here. I know you have a bunch of different job roles especially when I was trying to figure out and research your life story but one that stands out to me in this time right now and how things have gone and tennis in the past week is a VP at the ITF. So were you involved in that. Big Decision to cancel tournaments. Well we did have just mentioned. We had a board meeting That was in Switzerland on Monday. Tuesday Wednesday of which I participated by phone and the world of tennis is is Kinda turned upside down as the world of sport has so you know following a Lotta. The statements Indian Wells was the first tournament too close and Miami and then both tours made statements of Stopping event We made the decision to postpone a Fed Cup finals which is To be played in Budapest for the first time the second week of April. That's postponed to a later date and from an ICS perspective with The other many other hundreds of events that they operate around the world all of those cease as well in conjunction with The ATP and the WPA towards so I know that Obviously Italy is in just a state of crisis We have to mention that and I know China's one of the first places to be affected by it but here in America. Did you ever feel like no chance? It can be that bad like. Were you ever thinking like no ways is really going to actually affect the sports world or were you in a sense of? Oh My Gosh. This is really about to happen. And a bunch of tournaments are about to be cancelled and a lot of people's lives are about to be affected. Well you know what I'm an optimist and always think for the pie you think for the best but I'm also a realist And I'm literal so when this really started to unfold you have to think that it was only a matter of time that the sports world was affected. I think initially you know what we were looking at was the upcoming March madness events when they started saying that people shouldn't be in you know bigger crowds excetera and then you started looking at the NBA and then you realize that it affected more than just those arenas that affected all arena and it wasn't so much Just about fans and attendance. But what about the athletes and the players? They're the ones that are breeding all over each other. You know every second of the game almost And you have to think about their health and their well being and not just them the other thing about families who they're going home to At night so you know it's a trickle or a ripple effect on everyone and I think you know the decisions that have been made in the sports world as drastic As they may be. I think it's the best thing that has happened to. At least protect those athletes and their families and to at least to be owners of slowing down the transmission of Kobe. Nineteen so the three of us have something in common. We all played college tennis. And I know that there's obviously bigger storylines and not even talking about sports way beyond that but NCAA has been hugely affected. All these seniors are are not gonNA get their chance to end their year. So you know. I think you guys are both phenomenal. College players arena. Nci AS Katrina. You want and say doubles titles. I mean can you guys imagine having your senior year taken away from you not because of injury but because of something that's so far beyond your control and it's something that we haven't really talked about. Well I mean listen. It's it's disappointing an athlete You know who was collegiate athlete and champion as you mentioned to not See these young athletes be able to fulfill their dreams or at least you know play in their national championships. No matter what sports they may be an you know. I was supposed to call the tennis. Men's and women's tendency AA Championships Alonside Sam Gore And of course disappointed that we won't be going to tell the Oklahoma state this year To call the championships. Hopefully it'll be back You know in session in twenty one back at the USC campus in Orlando Twenty one but you know I just feel for the athletes. I filter the Seniors. Even more so those that you know this is their last hands to go to the to the dance to say perhaps win a national title and and have that on their resume for the rest of their life I know what it feels. Like to be referred to as a champion and you know my heart goes out to not to see athletes but the coaches the institutions and the families. You know everyone who's pour their heart and soul into getting these athletes to the best position possible

Tennis Switzerland America Katrina Adams Katrina United States Forman TA NBA Oklahoma President Trump ITF Ncaa Italy Sam Gore Indian Wells USC China
Tom Hanks and Rita Wilson diagnosed with coronavirus

Mornings with Keyshawn, Jorge & LZ

01:10 min | 4 months ago

Tom Hanks and Rita Wilson diagnosed with coronavirus

"We learned yesterday that Tom. Hanks Rita Wilson down in Australia. Tested positive for corona virus. They're making a movie about Elvis. I would've already well. Let's table that conversation later because we may need it like during this dry months. Thanks GONNA be Elvis now. I think he was going to be the kernel. That was my readers coming on the old fat Elvis. Maybe a young. Wow well get a little chunky can definitively is being big man. Yeah big man down the stretch but I I would assume I don't know this for a fact But I would assume that that production is going to be shut down at least for a little bit just to make sure that the people that were around Tom. Hanks Rita Wilson haven't been exposed to say though. His instagram pitchers very artistic. You said here with the sort of like yellow has met sort of garbage can and then he has like one single medical glove draped over the edge of it. It's very artistic also too. I mean it's. It's very typical positive. Tom Hanks like trying to put the sunniest spin. Possible trying to make people smile a little

Tom Hanks Elvis Rita Wilson Australia Instagram
Scientists gather to study risk from microplastic pollution

Larry Elder

00:50 sec | 4 months ago

Scientists gather to study risk from microplastic pollution

"Most people familiar with the growing crisis caused by plastic bags water bottles and other large plastic debris contaminating oceans worldwide but is Jeremy house reports another type of plastic is causing alarm among researchers and conservationists scientists say microplastics in turning up everywhere in oceans dozens of scientists from universities government agencies aquariums and even water sanitation districts across the U. S. west will gather this week to discuss the problem their goal is to create a risk assessment for microplastic pollution similar to plans developed for disasters like earthquakes research into the impact of these tiny bits of broken down plastic is just getting under way the largest of these plastic bits are five millimeters long roughly the size of a kernel of corn and many are much smaller and invisible to the naked eye Jeremy house

Jeremy House
Scientists gather to study risk from microplastic pollution

Michael Medved

00:33 sec | 4 months ago

Scientists gather to study risk from microplastic pollution

"Scientists say microplastics of turning up everywhere in oceans dozens of scientists from universities government agencies aquariums and even water sanitation districts across the U. S. west will gather this week to discuss the problem their goal is to create a risk assessment for microplastic pollution similar to plans developed for disasters like earthquakes research into the impact of these tiny bits of broken down plastic is just getting under way the largest of these plastic bits are five millimeters long roughly the size of a kernel of corn and many are much smaller and invisible to the

"kernel" Discussed on MacBreak Weekly

MacBreak Weekly

13:50 min | 4 months ago

"kernel" Discussed on MacBreak Weekly

"Though it's not even about it is about like what you can or can't do it the phone but if I'm going to buy a new phone and for four hundred dollars I can buy a phone. That's a basically the same thing as a phone from five years ago or for two hundred dollars more. I can buy a phone. That's Today's tech standard. I'm going to go with that one. You're just even not even to dig into the details of it but just from a person going to buy a phone. It doesn't matter if it's a brand new. Se if all the specs inside it are still from three years ago. Then we're GONNA look at that phone like it's three years old people what my my wife finally upgraded her phone. Because every time she sent me a picture of the kids I text back going. You need a new phones. We need a new phone. Honestly she didn't care and I might question. What would you say Lori? Because I don't know people people know that the guts are three years looking at that. They're saying well that black slap glad. They don't buy them they do. Maybe later their spouse says what's wrong with the picture. Well anything sir. She saw them start taking pictures. She was like Oh. I can't believe I post which which she have noticed. If you hadn't message ster- well she does. She has been a lot. My wife doesn't know a lot of time on social media so she probably wouldn't see a lot of other things. But I bet you normal. You isn't a verizon store. Talk about normal people. I was in a verizon store. Yes and they live in a different world than you and me. My Mom's still uses a razor the world of carrier incentives. Yeah and the world of a off brand products that I'd never you know it's like Weird Smart Watches with names I've never heard of. I mean they it's like it's a different universe that they j phone. It's fine just by love it. That is important for us. As as journalists early adopters are kind of in a different kind of live in a different slightly different world in the rest of the. Yeah it is important to like when you're on the subway and if you're if you ride buses make sure you pay attention to what kind of phones people using on subways and buses. Because that's the one that's I think the one place where people of really wide economic range from people who are making six figures but the subways easiest way to get from point. A. TO POINT B. DO people who don't have cars You don't you see people using a lot of older phone. You see a lot of new phones that you can recognize at the very very top of the range And there's a reason why Ah Google for instance did so well with five hundred dollars. Version of their pixel phone. Now the The iphone market is not the same as all the other markets. But there is a case to be made that as exciting as these eleven hundred. Twelve hundred dollars phones are. It's also very very exciting to the marketplace to have an affordable solution that that that does not mean. Let's have a little time a seller on ship powered of of LCD. Flip phone but it does mean that there. It's easy to mistake all this wonderful augmented reality and all this wonderful nights. Night mode and computational photography for things that are non negotiable and important things to have on a phone. They'RE GOING TO BE PEOPLE. Who Walk into the rise in store. Walk into the Mall Kiosk and they just save I just I draw. They're they're not. They're not unhappy with their phone. They're unhappy with the fact that they dropped it in the toilet and now they need to buy another one and if they see one that does what they think is substantially with their old phone. Could do that will save three hundred bucks. They're going to a lot of these. People are going to be going up in the cost. Two hundred bucks quarters and the question really is. Is that a market. That apple wants to compete in you know and I don't know if they don't have to force people. There's a lot more people going to McDonald's and Ruth Chris but Chris couldn't produce McDonald's hamburgers at that price. You know an apple may not be able to produce a solid phone at at a discount it just may not be how their You know and and so I think that you know. Bmw CAn't produce a you know six thousand dollar car either. So there's a flip phones too because like Samsung can lose a ungodly amounts of nation state. Money on all these phones and it's not a major part of their business because they're fine. They make oil rigs and bathrooms. It's great apple if he'd make a bad mistake if they bet wrong that's a substantial part of their business but also Samsung. We'll take a flutter on it. They they do that. They don't have the they. They have the position of making a lot of phones at aren't really that thrilling. Make a lot of really boys when you get a free phone at the phone store for signing up it's almost always crap. Samsung phone on it. And you're fine right whereas every time. I think I think I I I do think Alex is right. That apple apple may not have optimized self to figure out how to be a thrifty manufacturer but also that it would be a huge deal if they if they were to even explicitly to our long keynote in which one hour and forty eight minutes of this keynote. Is Tim at all kinds of other engineers saying we just happen to think that flip phones are really really cool and we know that there are some people who love to have like something. That's very very new. So we are explicitly telling you everybody that there's GonNa be some problems with this one but if you want to help us develop it by all means. Be One of these early people but again we're saying there's GONNA be problems with it as soon as these phones ship and one percent of them have problems. It's going to be apple as doom like. Oh Gosh I this would never have happened under. Steve. So yeah. They're they`re. They're higher expectations for apple both internally and externally and. I think that sometimes it makes it harder for apple to do a part of the natural evolution of engineering. Which is we have to ship. But we have to ship because we're not going to figure out how to make it perfect inside the campus. We're only going to make it perfect. Once we start getting feedback from customers damaged phones back into the house so according to a website. I don't know how sketch it is. I'm more DOT COM. It's a rumor that comes from another website. That probably is pretty sketch. March thirty first is the date for the Apple. I don't know so here's the thing it's it's sketched in the fact that that's a total iphone ticker it's it's a it's a prediction based on the past so the loan it's not. I don't think this is some kind of amazes me as much as it's just well. Apple usually hold march event the last Tuesday in in March. And that's the last Tuesday in March. So if they're going to hold the event is GONNA be March thirty five seven really kind of it's less exciting than it. Sounds kind of sources within apple have confirmed that however and then See this is unclear according to the sources with an apple. I can't read German so I'm reading your translation more. According to the site sources with an apple of confirmed the details and reveal that the company will be hosting a march of at where it will reveal the successor to the beloved Iphone S. E. Tuesday March thirty first with the launch of the new phone following Friday April third. So is it is it just based on past performance or is it that they do have some information. I didn't so you can tell that I didn't write this particular news piece because I wouldn't have said this successor to the beloved iphone. Se Well Joe. It ain't an essay Joe. Yeah exactly well iphone. Nine voice stolen on the Mars. It's a to the IPHONE. Se Price Point. Yeah factor. What will they name it? Nine nine dragons stick with us seeing the iphone moines. I'M GONNA SAY THEY'RE GONNA call it iphone Turtle Shell Literally. Lake Cayenne can walk up to the system and put in any name they want. They'll just do that based on what they think. They'll will sell the most phones. I we're having a discussion about that though. And there's there's this idea that I think is a Goodwin. Not that apple would do it. But that the nine or or S. e. two or whatever you WANNA call it would just it would be the first in the line of iphones that just stop having a number associated with it or an extra name associated with the ipad right and and with Mac. They just don't they don't have another title. They're either based on their size or their based on the year that they came out and it makes it actually a little easier to determine you know which which device you're talking about but also harder to figure out which your model you have someone who has a lot of these. It's so confusing and frustrating. I wish you'd give them a number because of a radio show said because I said we'll get through twenty nine dollar. I Pat. She said well. What do they call that? I said this IPAD. It's it's the seventh generation. Two thousand. Well that's not gonNA help. Her Nissan called everything cars car. The car don't do Toyota. Corollas always a Toyota Corolla. You say the model year but we don't even I mean that's like BMW is like. Oh I've got an three okay. What is an m three body style? Whatever lots of threes? Yeah so I didn't know about this but in digit times They said the upcoming Air POD PRO light earphones. What the Hell's that? I don't think this is yeah. Okay randomly accurate digitize air light and Internet explodes an entry level version of the airports pro. Which are not entry level? The level version of the airports Airports Yeah so like the one thing that I can think is. Maybe this is based on some sort of information that maybe they're going to start making air pods with ear tips. That's not airports pro. There's a lot of things that the pro model have like active noise cancelling that it wouldn't have but maybe yes. So maybe. That's what we're going to possibly see in the future is air tips for the air pods. That seems to make sense without calling. It pro lite. Which is you know. That just doesn't make any sense to me. I think digitize today said the twelve inch ipad pro. Now everyone's wondering is that a new one or the twelve point nine did not know how to type or leaking device. We don't know no clue. I still can't tell so. We don't know what the impact to get back to the original story of Coq nineteen will be in the long run but it might slow some things down. It might hurt this year revenue I guess slow the world down but if it gets out of China I mean it's this thing it's a big already slowing things down even like a even garment manufacturers outside of China while the gang zippers from China. And so they don't know when they can meet their their their manufacturing goal so it really is how dependent we all are gonNA say like one of those. A lot of those articles were saying like Oh look depending on China and I just have to keep reminding them if anything happens in Silicon Valley. It's not GonNa be funny either. Like aliens land is Silicon Valley. We're going to have a really bad year. So maybe it's not interdependent in this modern world. We're all interdependent on one. Another the real question over the next two to four years is or five to ten. Years is whether China can now maintained being the supplier for everyone after this after the trade war this will stimulate. There's a kind of a lot of people are going to be about like you know. Where else can we? Billy Joel India. Brazil there's priority their cases because of tariffs in those two countries or or restrictions on what can be sold. That isn't area Bulgaria. But there's one thing that we're there's one component that we're missing out on that it's not that Is that the factories. And it's not the supply it's the Labor every single business is dependent upon labor and yet this is the resource that taking the United States. We are treating the most poorly. So if you want to see Armageddon coming in the future find out a situation which you see that You cannot find people to do the work that you need them to do. Well I I think that's number. One is definitely as computers as machines continue to Augment Human Labor. I think you're GONNA actually able to pay the Labor more and and put it in different places because you're going to have right now. It's just so many people that are required to do stuff by hand and and that's typically going to continue to move you know along but there's plenty of places in the world that can still be built. I mean affordability rene fill fill us in on the blue male story Apple Band Blue Mail and has now brought it back. What is Blue Male? Actually I have not been okay. I only follow this remotely but yeah it was another case of them saying that apple was stomping on their rights to individual APPS for their own benefit and apple saying that no. This APP introduced valid concerns into the into the system and then everyone losing it over it apple okay. Blue Male says apple stole it's anonymous Sinan feature for signing with apple we created apple made it signing with apple and then blew mail says they kicked it out of the APP Store on Flimsy Pretenses to suppress competition apple says no we removed for security reasons but now blue male is back in the APP store..

apple BMW China verizon Samsung Lori Mall Kiosk United States Toyota Armageddon Nissan Billy Joel India Alex Bulgaria Brazil
Permaculture 101

The Easy Living Yards Podcast

09:25 min | 5 months ago

Permaculture 101

"Super excited though. Talk about today's topic. which is what is permaculture? And why should we care. So if you guys don't know I haven't really talked about a whole on the show but I am very passionate about this thing called permaculture. Maybe you've heard of it. Maybe you haven't maybe already have some conceptions of it. It's actually kind of a polarizing word for some people blue heard it I'll be flat. Honest I love permaculture permaculture. Well a lot of people have different definitions of it. A lot of people who haven't haven't really dove deep into the subject. Also have these sometimes misconceptions about it to essentially what permaculture is again the definition intimate but as a whole this is kind of this. The synthesis of it is this design. Concept is designed process or design sciences. What some people call it As a way of perceiving things specifically with the focus of food production is kind of where it originated but it's a mindset a design process that really encompasses everything. It's so it's a way to look at things to minimize inputs and maximize yield in a way that takes care of the world around us. Takes Care of ourselves to that so it's really been applied now to not only agriculture Home setting but also community design fine community resilience business design. That's actually where a lot of what I've designed my business around this concept of permaculture as well so I've tried to design signed my business in a way that applies permaculture concepts to my business so kind of funky there right so let's get into what it is and really. This is going to be kind of a two part series today. I'm GonNa Talk to you mostly about defining this concept what is permaculture rate. And why why should you even care. Why should you keep at this episode going? And why shouldn't you just turn it off. So I really want to get to the synthesis of what it is and how it can help us and then in next episode road. I'll go more deeply into really why it matters to you. And how you can apply it to your life into your landscape more specifically and and how this this permaculture concept can really change your life in a way of how you approach things and how you approach your yard your life. That sort of thing sounds kind of lofty so I wanNA make it more granular in next episode this episode we will be a little bit in the loft definition stuff but of course I don't WanNa make it boring at the same time so I try and make it as interesting as possible possible. Provide you some examples that sort of thing and Let's just dive right in so this concept of permaculture just really really short history is is is a there's two founders of the permaculture movement this dude named Bill Mollison and his dude named David Home Grin there to Australian guys they worked together at a the university and basically they started to come across all these. The local indigenous aborigine populations some of the tactics they use to address the climate that they lived in To address you know resilience and that sort of thing and all these other resilient agricultural tro design concepts and processes and tools that were being used across various geographies across the world. They started to pull that together into this. This more more synthesized concept which they called permaculture abbreviation of two two different terms permanent culture an permanent agriculture so the first application of course was this permanent agriculture thing so a more resilient agriculture design but it quickly became realized that it was more broadly applied. If you have if you WANNA have permanent permanent agriculture systems you have to have permanent cultural systems as well and so it came to be more more applied to this just general overview of how to live basically in a more resilient way that addresses some of the major questions of our our day this was back in the nineteen seventies and it's certainly true today in the the twenty twenties right and of shortening Availability ability of resources or a restricted availability of resources whether it be water oil Food all sorts of things minerals right. It's how do we address those those massive questions on a global scale but also apply it to be more resilient at a community in personal skills while so that's kind of the history of it so they came up with these this kind of overlap laying concepts And basically just published it to the world and and it became this kind of growing growing movement across the world so now there's kernels of permaculture practice communities across the world in almost Burma every geography with actual practical applicable systems growing food or resilience in pretty much any climate. You can imagine so it's pretty cool stuff And so so it's really really like that's kind of why it's hard to define actually because it's this all encompassing processor concept with a bunch of different tools in applications just depending on your geography or climate conditions and that sort of thing or what you're using it for whether it's agriculture on a large scale or home setting or community designed developed develop a resilient community or business designed to develop a resilient business. All of those things take different tools and tactics but they have the same general mindset if if that makes sense okay so in my own words. Well let's let's talk about the founders words I I guess all right so so bill mollison one of the main you know the two founders He calls permaculture is such permaculture permaculture is a philosophy of working with rather than against nature of protracted and thoughtful observation rather than protracted in in thoughtless labor and of looking at plants and animals in all their functions rather than treating any area as a single product system. Okay that's a mouthful fool so I'm just GonNa go through it again and then Kinda tease apart would in my own thoughts. What he's trying to save? permaculture is a philosophy of working with rather than against nature of protracted and thoughtful observation rather than protracted and thoughtless labor and looking at plants and animals in all all their functions rather than treating any area as a single product system. So let's take for example maybe instead of using my words I'll just use an example so let's take the example of the conventional lawn landscape since as what we talk about a lot on the show here right is is our landscapes right so if we think about our or yard the grassy lawn so protracted and thoughtless labor is basically this launch system. Right we have it's really an artificial system usually compacted active soil with low fertility which grass does not like we want to grow grass there right so we we grow this grass. We treat it with chemicals to make it Like with Weedon feed right so we want to get rid of the CRABGRASS. We want to get rid of the DANDELIONS and the clover we I mean most people I- I extract myself itself from this group of we So that's generally the thought right is is to have just your one species of let's say bluegrass or being Bermuda aggressor whatever so you cover it with Weeden feed you. Get rid of the plants. You don't want you put crabgrass preventer on it right and then also you treat for grubs right you don't want grubs grubbs eaten those routes so basically you have this really synthetic system. That's highly has lots of inputs. And then of course. You have to irrigate right to keep it. Keep it watered watered when it's dry and then you have to fertilize it. Because there's low fertility in the soil and then you have to mow it right because you just put fertilizer on it so it's growing faster and you just watered it so it's growing growing faster rate but it's not brown at least right so So that's a protracted and thoughtless labor system right so permaculture says okay what what are the issues. What are the the high input pieces of this? And how can it may be different right. And so likewise looking at plants and animals in all their functions rather rather than treating any areas a single product system. So if you think about the lawn is a very specific single product system. You're looking at one species of grass or maybe a blend of just a couple species species of grass. And you just want that you don't look at it as a holistic process you look at those grubs as a pest right as opposed to maybe they're eating again grubs are generally really eating the the The rotting or injured roots of the grass plants. That are struggling. Because they're in a low fertility system. So maybe if you improved proved fertility the system. It would help you know reduce your inputs of fertilizers and GRUB preventer stuff because then the GRUBS wouldn't be there is in high numbers numbers because the grass is healthier that will make sense. And then you wouldn't have moles come to eat grubs for example and so seeing as a holistic system and and you know accepting thing that some of those those grubs are going to be there accepting that every once in a while you have a couple of moles and just you know embracing that as a as a more holistic system that has Is More self maintaining could be one solution.

Bill Mollison Burma David Home Bermuda Grubbs Weeden
Super Bowl 54 Recap

Around the NFL

06:32 min | 5 months ago

Super Bowl 54 Recap

"Kansas City Thirty One San Francisco Twenty air it. It is Mitchell as he's been waited his whole damn life to make that call and cheese fans. They've been waiting fifty years for their team to Hoist Lombardi and it finally finally happened on this. The second of February two thousand twenty the Kansas City chiefs are the super bowl champions after that thirty one to twenty win over the San the average Cisco Forty nine dollars a game in which they were down like they were all their postseason games by double digits. This time in the fourth quarter and yet Patrick Mahomes and company would not not be denied. Dan Heads here the around the NFL podcast presented by little caesars. And yes I'm coming to you from a hard rock stadium that is filled with heroes mark. Sesser Chris Wesseling and Greg Rosenthal. What is up boys? Hey Dan still filled with some chiefs fans and employs employs. Usually I feel like we start the taping after midnight. got going a little quicker like there's still an MVP chant going on the exciting. These fans. Don't WANNA leave. They've waited. You know half a century for this. Yeah usually when we're here it feels like we're ghosts like passing passing through a stadium and and and you can't. You're not sure if you're humid or not until you get back to the hotel but in this case where here. The field is is covered in confetti. Where on the third level the really Nice hardrock stadium here in Miami was great Super Bowl Week? A lot of fun a great city for a super bowl the eleventh and Super Bowl in this area which is most just past New Orleans and If you're a cheese fan this was the dream come come true and I got to watch the second half of this game in the seats With my cousin Matt and I just you know watching an older gentleman guy looked like he was in his fifties with his wife Cheese FAN IN JERSEY. As that game it became clear. After obviously the Damian will even before the Damian Williams run that clinched it it was becoming clear then the Williams touchdown and then there was this release. Like Oh my God the chiefs are GonNa win the Super Bowl and it was a well-earned win and one that didn't look particularly like it was heading in this direction even halfway through the fourth. That's quarter the chiefs to me. Their players and coach Kinda remind me of the fans. It's been so long since they got that Super Bowl in Randy read. It's been so long a guy like Frank Clark find his way there. Honey Badger finds his way to Kansas City to make this happen. Terrell suggs is lucky enough to come along for the ride at the end of the year. A lot of I just find their way to Kansas City and end up winning this one and you're right fourth quarter at midway through the fourth quarter forty nine hundred ninety five point six percent win probability. I know that's not your stat. The latest evidence that people need to stop talking about win probability it means nothing other than a twitter talking boy. It means it means it's unlikely the other team's GonNa win and now know Kyle Shanahan. Would it peaked at about ninety nine point wait. Six percent against the Patriots early in the fourth quarter always had ninety five point six percent. The percentage. I don't think takes into account Patrick Mahomes uh-huh it just doesn't or the chiefs offense or Andy Reid like the way that you have to dominate Patrick mahomes and make his life. If uncomfortable for sixty minutes I think is the hardest thing to do in the NFL. The forty niners balled out on defense. Not Unlike I believe the the Seahawks balled out on defense against the broncos. They did so many things right for the first three quarters. I think in a lot of scenarios and with a lot of quarterbacks that game would have been twenty seven to six at with eight minutes left in the fourth quarter and they're never could've been a comeback but mahomes got out of a lot of plays blaze. That could have gone worse. He had a lot of negative. Plays the chiefs defense. Did just enough and it just shows you. Yeah you can. You can do a lot while. They held him to five point three yards per play which is a very very low number for the chiefs and she's still put up thirty one points in nine drives. They barely have the ball. They still went over not surprising. Because that's what they've been doing for for months and months and if we had one kernel of information going into the for the last two weeks to to base our analysis on that the chiefs and Patrick Mahomes I would open the third quarter with back to back picks by Patrick Mahomes and that the niners would be nestling a twenty two ten lead minutes into into the fourth. You would think this is a perfect setup for San Francisco to run away with this thing but if you give Patrick Mahomes even ten minutes to operate and it gets hot. Aw everything's off the table. Fifty fifty two and a half minutes of game time the niners down day and I remember thinking as has the game was reaching as it's ticking through the fourth quarter and they have a twenty two ten lead and thinking what made the chief. So unstoppable all when they were humming the regular season but especially in those two comebacks in the AFC playoffs it. was that big play ability. That the niners there's through their dominant front four. Were taking away. Mahomes running for his life just by his brilliance kept the game close because is almost any other quarterback decided. Lamar Jackson has a couple sacks. Fumbles and the game gets away. Like what Von Miller Cam Newton a few years back but he was able to stay on his feet. Keep the game from getting away and the what really sticks out to me at that moment again. Midway through the fourth quarter after the tyreek hill catches is overturned on review. And you feel the entire building is psyching up. It feels like the niners are about to make the big play. Plays away from winning the super. Aw It is third and a miles third and fourteen. I believe third and fifteen and I leaned to my cousin Matt. I said the most likely play. Is You get try to get half of this back and then make a manageable fourth-down fourth and five and get it done. But no that's not what the chiefs do that's not how they operate and even a game where they never made any big plays with the season on the line mahomes dropback. This time found tyreek Hill West on a busted coverage and that changed

Chiefs Patrick Mahomes Kansas City NFL Dan Heads San Francisco Matt Damian Williams Nice Hardrock Stadium Terrell Suggs Mitchell Kyle Shanahan Chris Wesseling Twitter Honey Badger MVP Tyreek Hill West Seahawks Miami
Pay Your Dues Now: Living for Another Life

Risen Motherhood

08:15 min | 5 months ago

Pay Your Dues Now: Living for Another Life

"I have been talking about this. We've been talking about it a lot don today right over the past several months and we've been kind of working through it and processing what it means when we say it how we receive it it from other so we want to have this discussion today because we think that the advice that we're going to share with you and talk about some that a lot of us have received as Moms uh-huh who have children who are still young and we think that a lot of us probably need to pause Lauren. I included and really process through what's being said and how our hearts to responding. Yes so the phrase or maybe it said in in various different ways but the phrase that we wanna cut dissect talk about today goes something like this typically from an older woman or the influence or popular teacher or even emily and I or your friend who remain lots people say this they say something along the lines of. Hey if you're faithful and the small things right now God's going to give you big things to be faithful in later or maybe it's the best thing you can do is be faithful where you're at right now. Do that unseen work or later. There will be time for you to do those other things. Yeah I think basically. It's this idea that what you're doing now. The unseen the faithful will eventually give way to this type type of visible fruit. And I think a lot of times when we hear this advice given this word of encouragement it's really delivered to like. We said a MA. Maybe she's got young children and she's just feeling a little discouraged. I mean I think about this season of life. Maybe she feels like she's getting kind of tired of making some of the sacrifices that she's making she's feeling like I'm having to say no to a lot of opportunities for advancement so that I can care for my children. Maybe feeling feeling like she's reached her limits and so again the older woman or the influencers friend. We've done this kind of comes in and shears her own story and can maybe you look back and say you know like when I was a mom of young children. I wasn't able to do all that I wanted to do. But then later when my kids grew up I I did end up getting opportunities -tunities to do some of those things I just needed to be patient and then as I was faithful in those little years I was willing to do unseen things. Those were great practice for what I have and where I'm at today. Yeah and we think there's definitely a kernel of truth to all of them. Yes and that women who say this are coming from a really good place again we we WANNA be the first to say. Hey we we probably version of this ourselves we have had dear friends say this to us and we see it online. It's very it's just very popular. I'm very prevalent. Yeah and I was GONNA say like even as somebody who now has okay. I have a first grade him so far along. But I can even look back and can imagine myself self sitting next to a mom that has a toddler and a baby and going here in a few years like they're probably going to be it's going to change and there's probably GonNa maybe less demands and you may have more time to other things like I can imagine saying we've probably on record our show so don't hold us do it with the point I mean is that it is it is true there is a lot of truth to that and it comes from a good hardware. I think that we're trying to remind one another to be focused on the right things right right. Older women are not younger women to work hard to let their husbands and children to live for Christ and so they're trying to encourage us to be faithful. Live according to your design. Yeah we're doing a lot of unseen work as as Moms of young children just as moms period and so that's an encouragement to stay focused on those those right things right I think another another heart behind it. It's kind of this reminder like following Christ requires leaned on your life it require sacrifice so we see that keep going. Your Life is not your own on keep following Christ or share that share that monastic. And we're saying that we're yearning belting. I thought that was okay. So wow I don't even know where you get an example. Yeah okay so in monasteries. I Dunno go to your own fact checking but in monasteries I think they have bells that ring throughout the day. Like some some monasteries would maybe have seven bells. That ring throughout the day in the point is every time the bell rings the monks stop and pray and the bell is this constant reminder that no matter what they're doing when the bell rings their time is not their own time belongs to God and so it's almost like this forced interruption into what they're doing so that they can continually turn their hearts toward the Lord so I heard the saying that children are like the monastic bell for moms and so every time they come and interrupt us it's this reminder in the little years at our time China's non our own it's meant to sacrifice and I think that that's some of what women as they're saying this to maybe MOMS have young kids like hey. This is the season where the children are. Are that bell that reminds you follow. Christ yes oh. I love that. I thought that was so good. Another thing it encourages us that we actually don't know what God's going to do with our lives you know. There are seasons in life that do bring different opportunities and limitations just like we were talking about what to Cheer Aside They WanNa remind us that. Hey you know in all of of this God is working for our good and his glory and there is greatness. That comes with that. I think another thing that is often wanting to be expressed is this desire desire with maybe decades of life experience of following Christ is saying look. There's a true connection between what you're spending your time on. And what comes of that later in life like God is is working in you things that he's going to use later and I think it's encouraging us to say there's eternal things happening. Just hang on because God is preparing you for something later. And that's a true thing. Remain instead what we invest our timing. Yeah so all of this. This encouragement we think people what they really really mean. If you were to kind of pin them down and ask when by that they're just trying to keep following Christ raced keep giving him everything. Trust Him with your life. No that won't always look the same way it does today. And we know that probably some people might mean this is in a prosperity Gospel e type ways. Caveat for that where like you do x. then you'll get Y but we're not talking about those people we were talking about women who or sharing this in an effort to encourage you and do all the things we kind of just said right and so what we want to transition to as Lord I were processing through this. We're realizing that. Sometimes when we hear this it falls on our hearts and it falls on her ears and such a way that kind kind of like angst and US or maybe it tempts us to respond. In a way that's like inconsistent with what they mean. I oh I think for me personally like when I would hear this especially years ago when I was in the thick of really young children I would think I'm just putting my time in now like I'm I'm GonNa the Sacrifice I'm going to do the hardest thing. I have no recognition. That's okay because someday that's coming. These kids are going to grow. And I'm going to do the bigger better thing. I've just got to be safe. I've gotTA prove proved that can be faithful in these small things right now and when you're tired and you're maybe appealing disappointed about the stuff you're sacrificing or discontent or you're starting to think think. Hey life will be better when kids get older like I was. I think that often it can. This message can fall on us in a way that we cling to him the Prosperity Gospel take it that way yes exactly and I think that this can tempt us to kind of undervalue. Our Work Today Day and so we start to rank. What we're doing now is like well? This is kind of smaller. This feels like a little bit boring or like you're saying like this is my pain my idea because the later data work the work. I'm going to get to June five years or ten years or when my kids go off to school when I'm an empty Nester. Whatever it is then it? Life is going to be more fun in and more satisfying and I'm going to get some of the things that I'm giving up now. And then I think we also start to potentially think of our work for the Lord as a bargaining tool like okay. God like I'm GonNa give you this now but I'm expecting you to pay me back

Lauren Emily China United States
Edge Computing Platform

Software Engineering Daily

12:11 min | 6 months ago

Edge Computing Platform

"We're GONNA talk about edge computing today and particularly red hat's strategy strategy around that. Give me two recent applications that you have seen of edge computing so to very often reasons. Why the applications WANNA run the etch is latency which means you want to have very fast request response and the second one is reducing bandwidth over the network and those are very to have very often mentioned once? They're way too many other reasons why to do that. And for me. These two reasons are mainly the consequences of what I want to achieve and if I want to improve user experience does are probably the two The latency is probably the first one if I want to reduce the cost probably reducing. The with is another one but then there are other reasons for example risk factors. I want to improve resilient therefore I want to run my applications nations at the edge and have them running in very completely isolated environment so there are really many reasons by the two. Most mentioned wants is definitely latency latency and bandwidth so the type of edge competing. We've had for a pretty long. Time is CDN infrastructure CDN infrastructure is fairly basic. It's if I make a request for an image for example apple that image is GonNa get cashed at the edge and then subsequent requests to that resource will be sent to the edge because the edge can be closer to the user and the edge. Might it'd be a content delivery network. That is pushing out that content to a lot of different locations so that a user news Becca Stan has rapid access. A user in Texas Texas has rapid access the kinds of edge computing. That we WANNA do. Today is very different than that type of simple request response for an image for example. What kinds of computation do we want to do at the edge today? I don't want to repeat myself but it's always it depends ends on the use case and there are many industries which are doing competing for different reasons. All let's take for example Industrial Iot in the production. Shen lines where they are running. They are having multiple sensors in their production lines to control quality production for example of the product the sensors are generating a lot of data data and this data is being analyzed and is being responded is the product quality. Okay can I continue in the direction or do I need to interrupt and just a process. This is kind of application which needs very fast rapid response you cannot really rely on sending that over the network to centralized location do the processing there and then and get the response back so this is very often reason why you want to push the edge computing to location of the IOT industrial but there are also reasons. Why want to centralize? You don't want to do everything only at the edge. There are reasons why you want to do centralization so imagine I have the industrial plans and I have them all over the country but I need to train my machine learning models from different examples and I want to gather those examples from different locations therefore I need to centralize them somewhere then do training model. They're likely in the centralized location and then push out only the train models to do the fast decision making at the edge so this is one of the examples right and that architecture makes a Lotta sense because in order to train the machine learning models you need all the data centralized in a particular place or you need some large subset of the data or you need the new training examples. Whatever the data to train the models takes a lot less space than the actual models that can make a decision that can improve application infrastructure? So we need to start deploying thing these models to the edge now if we talk about the types of CDN infrastructure that has been there for a long time where you're caching an an image and then you can request the image at the CDN layer if we're talking about hosting machine learning models versus hosting basic images. Do we need different different infrastructure to run those machine learning models instead of simple. CDN Type of infrastructure. Absolutely we do and it depends on the context. What kind of application I WANNA run? Therefore the machine learning very often or for example video processing or similar requests we we might need data processing. We need real time kernels we need. GP use use very often to speed up. The processing can reduce the cost of the processing power so the type of the hardware which is enabling the the use cases is specific for the application which needs to run on top of that the CDN is very simple. Use Case as you mentioned you don't really need much of the processing Specific processing processing. But if you need to run for example containerize network function. It has very high requirements on the fast data path and networking or it needs to access the real time kernel which difficult CDN networks don't need Ari talking about machine learning stuff. I've also heard of widespread bread edge competing use cases in the telecom industry. Can you tell me about those applications. So S Forty Telco Day one to do editing edge competing for multiple reasons. I would separate it into two categories first. One is to run their own brighter X.. Networks and for that that is the containerization containerization of their network functions. As you know there was a progress of running network functioning onto bare metal itself with specific hardware than it moved to. VM's and now it's to moving through containers and here the Yukon. We actually saw demo of the proof of concept how to do the five G. fully running on carbonated. That is one of the kind kind of the application. Because at the antenna level you need to have the processing as close to the signal as possible so that you again reduced latency NC and you don't have to push all the data through the network to raise the swap that is the main requirement for five G. or main features of the five G. The second use case for the telcos is to monetize their infrastructure. which they are building for the five and that is to provide mobile edge edge computing platform for all the independent service vendors or other enterprises running their applications? So I can be an enterprise fries which has branch offices and in order to get access from those branch offices to pass processing. I might want to run my applications closer to those branches not necessarily centralized in my data center which might be private cloud one national data center but I might take an advantage of my telco provider either to run the application closer to my branch office and not a very common use cases gaming or augmented reality where you take advantage offbeat as close to the end user with a cell phone or the smart devices possible so that they have the good user experience and then to date on experience instaflex so I understand correctly. Telecom like verizon. They need to build essentially data center infrastructure telecom data center center infrastructure to support five G. for their basic cellular customers and in order to get additional value. Oh you add that infrastructure. They are adding the capability to essentially lease out those resources to enterprises that might need similar functionality to that same five G. infrastructure basically they're already building data centers and they're like well we might as well reuse this for edge computing. That's exactly right amazing. So as red hat you basically have an opportunity to help a telecom like horizon that is not historically thought of itself as a cloud provider to the extent that I understand it become a cloud provider. Essentially yes I would not necessarily called provider but mobile computing platform provider. Absolutely the and any of these telcos or service providers in general. It doesn't have to be Telco. Only it can be Internet service provider as well think of comcast or others that is to raise. Is there infrastructure which they need to build to support five G. we can think also of the other use cases when they want to place a device to the end user premise itself. So you can think of Smart Stadium. It's aware you have broadcasting of different games for example you need a server which needs to run there you you need high bandwidth. You need to broadcast it. So what verizon or other Telcos do they place the server there at the stadium at the end user premise and the a US benefits of their infrastructure behind or s in consumer for example. I'm a comcast user. I have my set top box at home. Currently the setup boxes being used for very specific services for example to get my TV streaming on my screen but but in order to use this device to be more generic we start talking about the universal customer premise equipment to turn these very specific use case oriented devices into more generic computing platforms to turn on your home into smart home and connect the Iot devices devices to it and provide different kinds of applications running there. Okay so that's a very different kind of edge computing. It's very different kind of competing but it is still edge computing. Okay Eh. What role would red hat have in that kind of application? The like. I'm comcast I've given you a dumb set top box and now we WANNA turn into like a smart connected home thing. Comcast is still owner of that server or of the device which is running at your home so they need to run some operating operating system. There they need to run some platform which is enabling to run applications on top of that. And guess what the applications are very often containers so we can and think of for example taken to the extreme Kluber not seen at box so real quick the applications running on my dumb comcast sorry to call comcast dumb calling the box. I'm not calling comcast dumb. Those applications that are running on the set top box. They're running in containers. They might some of them might rerunning depending ending on the vendor interesting. Okay sorry continue. So and then you can think of that device to have a marketplace of different applications which can run at that device. So he doesn't have to the only TV streaming you can now have audio streaming or you can now connect your light bulbs and half the LIGHTBULB manager running on top of that box so beat really generic computing server. which can run any kind of applications and then the Internet service provider can give you? This is the marketplace of APPs these vendors who are contributing there you you can deploy your APP or on your up there. And is that to say that coober netease would be useful as essentially a consumer operating system in that environment or maybe open shift is the operating operating system or is it just a lennox just a single node. You don't actually need to distribute system. You're you need new elites distributes have containers running on the same note. But it's just a single all note it is just a single note in our homes so in our home you probably don't want to have free service to have physical H. A. So so you have one single server which is transformed tobback's which is a single box running operating system which is always the core of everything you need need to enable the hardware in some way and then you need some platform or you need something which is orchestrating the workloads on top of that depending on the level of orchestrations auto healing or other things. You need there then. You need difference of services from for brands to run on

Comcast Verizon Telco Industrial Iot Texas Becca Stan Smart Stadium Apple Tobback United States ARI
Edge Computing Platform

Software Engineering Daily

12:11 min | 6 months ago

Edge Computing Platform

"We're GONNA talk about edge computing today and particularly red hat's strategy strategy around that. Give me two recent applications that you have seen of edge computing so to very often reasons. Why the applications WANNA run the etch is latency which means you want to have very fast request response and the second one is reducing bandwidth over the network and those are very to have very often mentioned once? They're way too many other reasons why to do that. And for me. These two reasons are mainly the consequences of what I want to achieve and if I want to improve user experience does are probably the two The latency is probably the first one if I want to reduce the cost probably reducing. The with is another one but then there are other reasons for example risk factors. I want to improve resilient therefore I want to run my applications nations at the edge and have them running in very completely isolated environment so there are really many reasons by the two. Most mentioned wants is definitely latency latency and bandwidth so the type of edge competing. We've had for a pretty long. Time is CDN infrastructure CDN infrastructure is fairly basic. It's if I make a request for an image for example apple that image is GonNa get cashed at the edge and then subsequent requests to that resource will be sent to the edge because the edge can be closer to the user and the edge. Might it'd be a content delivery network. That is pushing out that content to a lot of different locations so that a user news Becca Stan has rapid access. A user in Texas Texas has rapid access the kinds of edge computing. That we WANNA do. Today is very different than that type of simple request response for an image for example. What kinds of computation do we want to do at the edge today? I don't want to repeat myself but it's always it depends ends on the use case and there are many industries which are doing competing for different reasons. All let's take for example Industrial Iot in the production. Shen lines where they are running. They are having multiple sensors in their production lines to control quality production for example of the product the sensors are generating a lot of data data and this data is being analyzed and is being responded is the product quality. Okay can I continue in the direction or do I need to interrupt and just a process. This is kind of application which needs very fast rapid response you cannot really rely on sending that over the network to centralized location do the processing there and then and get the response back so this is very often reason why you want to push the edge computing to location of the IOT industrial but there are also reasons. Why want to centralize? You don't want to do everything only at the edge. There are reasons why you want to do centralization so imagine I have the industrial plans and I have them all over the country but I need to train my machine learning models from different examples and I want to gather those examples from different locations therefore I need to centralize them somewhere then do training model. They're likely in the centralized location and then push out only the train models to do the fast decision making at the edge so this is one of the examples right and that architecture makes a Lotta sense because in order to train the machine learning models you need all the data centralized in a particular place or you need some large subset of the data or you need the new training examples. Whatever the data to train the models takes a lot less space than the actual models that can make a decision that can improve application infrastructure? So we need to start deploying thing these models to the edge now if we talk about the types of CDN infrastructure that has been there for a long time where you're caching an an image and then you can request the image at the CDN layer if we're talking about hosting machine learning models versus hosting basic images. Do we need different different infrastructure to run those machine learning models instead of simple. CDN Type of infrastructure. Absolutely we do and it depends on the context. What kind of application I WANNA run? Therefore the machine learning very often or for example video processing or similar requests we we might need data processing. We need real time kernels we need. GP use use very often to speed up. The processing can reduce the cost of the processing power so the type of the hardware which is enabling the the use cases is specific for the application which needs to run on top of that the CDN is very simple. Use Case as you mentioned you don't really need much of the processing Specific processing processing. But if you need to run for example containerize network function. It has very high requirements on the fast data path and networking or it needs to access the real time kernel which difficult CDN networks don't need Ari talking about machine learning stuff. I've also heard of widespread bread edge competing use cases in the telecom industry. Can you tell me about those applications. So S Forty Telco Day one to do editing edge competing for multiple reasons. I would separate it into two categories first. One is to run their own brighter X.. Networks and for that that is the containerization containerization of their network functions. As you know there was a progress of running network functioning onto bare metal itself with specific hardware than it moved to. VM's and now it's to moving through containers and here the Yukon. We actually saw demo of the proof of concept how to do the five G. fully running on carbonated. That is one of the kind kind of the application. Because at the antenna level you need to have the processing as close to the signal as possible so that you again reduced latency NC and you don't have to push all the data through the network to raise the swap that is the main requirement for five G. or main features of the five G. The second use case for the telcos is to monetize their infrastructure. which they are building for the five and that is to provide mobile edge edge computing platform for all the independent service vendors or other enterprises running their applications? So I can be an enterprise fries which has branch offices and in order to get access from those branch offices to pass processing. I might want to run my applications closer to those branches not necessarily centralized in my data center which might be private cloud one national data center but I might take an advantage of my telco provider either to run the application closer to my branch office and not a very common use cases gaming or augmented reality where you take advantage offbeat as close to the end user with a cell phone or the smart devices possible so that they have the good user experience and then to date on experience instaflex so I understand correctly. Telecom like verizon. They need to build essentially data center infrastructure telecom data center center infrastructure to support five G. for their basic cellular customers and in order to get additional value. Oh you add that infrastructure. They are adding the capability to essentially lease out those resources to enterprises that might need similar functionality to that same five G. infrastructure basically they're already building data centers and they're like well we might as well reuse this for edge computing. That's exactly right amazing. So as red hat you basically have an opportunity to help a telecom like horizon that is not historically thought of itself as a cloud provider to the extent that I understand it become a cloud provider. Essentially yes I would not necessarily called provider but mobile computing platform provider. Absolutely the and any of these telcos or service providers in general. It doesn't have to be Telco. Only it can be Internet service provider as well think of comcast or others that is to raise. Is there infrastructure which they need to build to support five G. we can think also of the other use cases when they want to place a device to the end user premise itself. So you can think of Smart Stadium. It's aware you have broadcasting of different games for example you need a server which needs to run there you you need high bandwidth. You need to broadcast it. So what verizon or other Telcos do they place the server there at the stadium at the end user premise and the a US benefits of their infrastructure behind or s in consumer for example. I'm a comcast user. I have my set top box at home. Currently the setup boxes being used for very specific services for example to get my TV streaming on my screen but but in order to use this device to be more generic we start talking about the universal customer premise equipment to turn these very specific use case oriented devices into more generic computing platforms to turn on your home into smart home and connect the Iot devices devices to it and provide different kinds of applications running there. Okay so that's a very different kind of edge computing. It's very different kind of competing but it is still edge computing. Okay Eh. What role would red hat have in that kind of application? The like. I'm comcast I've given you a dumb set top box and now we WANNA turn into like a smart connected home thing. Comcast is still owner of that server or of the device which is running at your home so they need to run some operating operating system. There they need to run some platform which is enabling to run applications on top of that. And guess what the applications are very often containers so we can and think of for example taken to the extreme Kluber not seen at box so real quick the applications running on my dumb comcast sorry to call comcast dumb calling the box. I'm not calling comcast dumb. Those applications that are running on the set top box. They're running in containers. They might some of them might rerunning depending ending on the vendor interesting. Okay sorry continue. So and then you can think of that device to have a marketplace of different applications which can run at that device. So he doesn't have to the only TV streaming you can now have audio streaming or you can now connect your light bulbs and half the LIGHTBULB manager running on top of that box so beat really generic computing server. which can run any kind of applications and then the Internet service provider can give you? This is the marketplace of APPs these vendors who are contributing there you you can deploy your APP or on your up there. And is that to say that coober netease would be useful as essentially a consumer operating system in that environment or maybe open shift is the operating operating system or is it just a lennox just a single node. You don't actually need to distribute system. You're you need new elites distributes have containers running on the same note. But it's just a single all note it is just a single note in our homes so in our home you probably don't want to have free service to have physical H. A. So so you have one single server which is transformed tobback's which is a single box running operating system which is always the core of everything you need need to enable the hardware in some way and then you need some platform or you need something which is orchestrating the workloads on top of that depending on the level of orchestrations auto healing or other things. You need there then. You need difference of services from for brands to run on

Why Are Macadamia Nuts So Expensive?

BrainStuff

06:22 min | 7 months ago

Why Are Macadamia Nuts So Expensive?

"First things first macadamia nuts are not actually ups. Yes I know it's ridiculous. It's right there in the main for goodness sake but much like Brazil L.. Nuts again what is it with. These misleading names. The Macadamia is in fact a seed and although they've become a signature staple of Hawaiian Agriculture Macadamia. His are actually native to Australia. We spoke with Glen Soko an economic development specialist with the Hawaii County Department of Research and development he explained leaned Macadamia. Nuts are originally from Australia but much of the early research breeding work quality development were done by the University of Hawaii on the island of Hawaii. These cultivars are suited for the Hawaii. Climate and do not produce the same high quality nut when grown in foreign conditions cultivars is short for cultivated varieties and these are specific types of plants selected and cultivated by humans. In this case. The plant is a large bushy tree that starts producing macadamia nuts spy the time. It's about four or five years old. So how exactly did these Australia cultivars and up in Hawaii for that you can think. One William Purvis office. Who planted the first Macadamia tree on the Big Island in eighteen? Eighty one purpose didn't initially intend for the tree seeds to be a hit. He planted the trees as wind breaks as for the sugar cane fields. The plants were functional and also happens to be quite pretty but he didn't suspect they could bear such delectable and profitable. See it's about a decade later. One are Jordan planted some macadamia trees on Oahu. The trees that researchers think is the ancestor most of Hawaii's trees and the not quickly became a popular snack among businessmen who came to Hawaii to profit off of sugar plantations in the early nineteen hundreds. The Hawaiian Agricultural Experiment Station was established published to get new crops growing on islands since this newly established United States territory was relying almost exclusively on sugar following the collapse of the coffee market. In the nineteen twenties. The government offered a five year tax exemption on land that was used solely for Macadamia production. But most farmers were interested. That is until roasted it. BECA Damian that's started popping up in stores and consumers went wild demand finance went up and the number of trees planted for nut production more than doubled from nineteen eighteen thirty two to nineteen thirty. Eight sales slumped a bit after that. But by the Nineteen Fifties Hawaii was turning out macadamia goodies to stack fans throughout the world and major companies. Ladies were making a pretty penny off of them speaking of why are Macadamia so expensive while Macadamia is clearly have an interesting past. And they've tastes taste heavenly coated in thick layers of chocolate. Do they really merit they're often exorbitant price tag after all around twenty five dollars a pound. They're considered the most expensive have nuts in the world. So what's the deal. A bunch of factors go into the price but a lot of them. Come down to the fact that Macadamia can't be grown effectively. On the continental dental United States and shipping them in from Hawaii is costly and growing things in Hawaii is costly to begin with because it's a small archipelago that some three thousand miles title. That's nearly five thousand kilometers away from anything in two thousand. Eighteen Macadamia has made the news for a seventeen percent price. Increase which sacco attributed to Hawaii's fixed harvest acreage and a higher global demand. Furthermore Issaquah said it takes seven years for a Macadamia nut tree to produce a crop. Demand remains high and prices are up to a dollar twenty per pound despite this. There's tremendous pressure on the industry. The agricultural labor shortage continues and that's caused wages and benefit costs to increase invasive. Pests continue to affect the Orchard Health and production. The Hawaii land prices are so high. Hi Orchard Expansion is too costly and producers can't wait for seven years therefore the production acreage remained steady despite the increased demand for the nuts. Okay so that explains the cost but are they actually good for you. High fat foods used to be the most demonized of all kitchen staples basically because of a very effective and sort of insidious marketing campaign put out by the sugar industry but thanks to current research and slightly Leila systemic marketing hype such things as nuts oils and seeds are getting their due as healthy options. We also spoke with registered Dietitian than yell. Birger she said Macadamia nuts are high in monounsaturated fats. Low in net carbohydrates and a good source of copper manganese and thion monounsaturated unsaturated fatty acids have been shown to lower. LDL cholesterol levels. The bad kind especially when they're used in place of saturated fats and refined carbohydrates in one's diet it net carbs are important. Consider because it clues you in on how much fiber something contains in relation to the amount of total carbohydrates present. Having we're fiber is crucial to gut health copper assists with iron absorption and transport in the body while manganese and vitamin are central for carbohydrate metabolism. And while all of that sounds sounds great we still live in a society that tends to obsess over numbers. So at two hundred and three calories and twenty one grams of fat per serving a single serving being just ten to twelve nut kernels. and that's just nuts. Nuts dust chocolate are macadamia is really a wholesome snack. Birger said Ed. Although nuts are high in calories they're also packed with fiber heart healthy fats proteins vitamins and minerals essential to our diets. Having a small handful is a filling rolling nutritious snack to tide you over between meals or can be used as a way to round out a meal on top of a Salad or yogurt bowl. They are particularly good substitute for packaged packaged. Ultra processed snacks. Like potato chips calorie-for-calorie. An ounce of chips than outs of nuts are equivalent but the protein and fiber in the nets will keep you energized full. Oh and focused. She said don't fear fats. They're essential for hormone health optimal brain function and absorption of nutrients and end. According to Sacco Macadamia. Aren't just a delicious treat for humans. They can be healthy. Snacks for rodents to he said some pet owners by the nuts in the shell L. to give to the rats to not on this wear down the rats teeth.

Macadamia Hawaii Sacco Macadamia Australia Hawaii County Department Of Re University Of Hawaii First Things First Birger William Purvis Glen Soko Hawaiian Agricultural Experime Big Island Issaquah United States Orchard Health Jordan Damian
"kernel" Discussed on The Android Police Podcast

The Android Police Podcast

11:12 min | 8 months ago

"kernel" Discussed on The Android Police Podcast

"WanNa say I that sounds about right I remember I because I feel like the one that I were you at the I feel like you were at the event. The first event I went to the you were with ours. That was in New York was what's the LG was it the G. Five something like that. That wasn't event I went to. I don't know they all blur together. The one that was like the World Trade Center after one year office because we did we went to the cafeteria word. Yeah wow five years. We had eric on the other week and I also so got feel sad about how long I'm coming up on my tenth anniversary Next year run. It's been a long time. So what are you doing these days at our society so like you write about android but obviously there's more to the world and android are you. Are there any other topics you're like breaking into into these days. I mean I started doing all of this for fun so like android kind of what I want to write about so not really I mean occasionally get to write about cars Which is fun? I wrote a thing. I don't know a couple years ago. There was a car like various car. INFOTAINMENT systems like comparing and trashing them the same way I would have cell phone. Superfund yeah I don't know I wanNA start writing styles but there's so many cellphones I I don't really have too much time for any of that. Yeah smart there are a lot of funds but I feel like phones are getting to the point where they're getting so much just being a commodity like it's hard for for me to personally get very excited about a given phone for more than like five minutes anymore. I learned like the list of features that make it slightly different than every other phone and and then like mostly move on. I don't know that I have like I will say that. I've lost a lot of the lust for reviewing funds. I it's not something I really enjoy anymore The car stuff is interesting. Though like the God infotainment reviewing infotainment systems like you could be the most brutal critic in the universe talking about like just so terrible. Yeah I managed to hunt down. What operating system was under like each infotainment system awesome and it's always like Lennox or like Hugh Annex which either is the company that owns blackberry or blackberry? Owns them when one of those it's links and sometimes android and like the oldest saddest version of android. You could possibly imagine like gingerbread ice cream sandwich. It's super bad but I think I'm going to get a hold of a pulse star. Is it a pole star to android automotive. Yeah and yeah look at android automotive. That'll be super fun. Yeah I'm pretty excited for that. have been talking with them about getting on that launch. I feel like so i. I know their partners. So far. They've got post. Are I think they announced a Fiat. Chrysler is going to be a partner with them but Fiat. Chrysler won't bundle the Google APPs which which is so weird they're just going to have the OS and then shoes application partners. which okay? Yeah so I. I think it's a way for them to make money right. There are sales to be made. Yeah exactly which to me is gross. I can't believe Google's allowing them to do that. That's that's not nice but I feel like there's another automaker announced that they they were getting on board with it too. Because you're right like I know that Hyundai use ice cream sandwich on their infotainment for years. I'm not sure if they still do but I think it's because a lot of these car. Companies like Harman Kardon is their supply partner in harmon develops the software like so Samsung is the company that actually technically supplies a lot of this stuff. Now it's L. G. TO LG does like all of GM stuff like so whatever like is on GM's cars it's an LG LG infotainment system. You'd think they'd be better at this than I mean how long does Samsung by Hartman Garden. That was a couple of years ago. Okay okay enough. Enough to matter in the glacier slow development of a car payment system probably everything takes five years in everything everything is five years old as a result. There's no there's no magic to it. It's we started developing this five years ago and we released it today and yes. That's how old version Asian of Android you're going to get. Yeah Yeah exactly guys talking with the Pollstar guys about this and I was talking to some of the Google Project Product Manager for android automotive. He's like yeah when we started working with pollstar they're like. Oh yeah you know usually like to do software freeze A year ahead of production and the Google guys like. That's literally never going going to work. You have to have to pick a different INFOTAINMENT system partner. If you want to do that. So Google is we were thinking of shipping. Final software scored like thirty days. After the car came out. Exactly like you can't wait for the first reviews to be like Full disclosure closer. This car is running a Beta software build representative of final retail unit experience. But it will be cool. I think have like Google will like updating stuff like maps. You know like so that they can then break things But also you know keep them up to date like that's the worst thing about a car like the infotainment system agent's out in in horrible ways I have a Mazda infotainment system and it is trash it is just garbage. No good very bad. It's one of those crappy Lennox destroy ones and like you can be upgraded to run android auto on it but honestly it performed so terribly like I'm just like why. Why would five hundred dollars to add android auto to my objectively terrible infotainment screen? You have to pay to add android auto. Yes because it's a rhetoric rate because they also have to install eight Point one APP USB hub into the car because it only ships with a one APP hub like my car does not charge my phone appreciably. Oh okay like it's so slow so I'm happy to see like I'm going to be excited. Try at the pole. Start to like it should be pretty awesome. But I think they're also doing android auto auto automotive on some kind of Sev's at like an x q exporting execute. Yeah a Volvo is the other one because those same companies pollstar so that makes sense right so if they won't give you a pollstar try for the SUV. It doesn't matter. It should all be the same software. One of our listeners says full disclosure I worked with the Dallas based Toyota the CV team on their camera and Lexi unit platform I that was all of the old Toyota. Like infotainment systems are among the very worst. I I think because they're licensed from Subaru or is it Subaru that licenses from Toyota. They're like they have been the most harangue of any of them out there I know Subaru just got android auto like in the last year. It took them that long. Cars are such like a reviewing cars ars from a technological standpoint. I would probably just eventually tear my hair out. I would not want to do. It would be so dead. I say it. It's back to like early android funds back in the day. Where just? There's nobody knows what they're doing. It's a crazy wild west of abandoned software and hardware that doesn't work and it's super fun to write it is i. I love to write about it like it is really really not. It's it's pretty brutal Quite frankly like I was driving a Hyundai last year to see yes and like their infotainment system is not changed appreciably early in like four or five years now you know just because the development cycles are so long but so cars Let's see what else can we talk about today. Sorry usually it's a little more. It's I'm kidding. It's not usually more structured than this. Well let's talk about like let's talk about Pixel for a little bit. I think we're always good for a little pixel for bashing here. And Ron your review was I think the most brutal to date really yes. It absolutely was didn't an end with it in a trash can so it can't be that. Oh that's that's that's my benchmark that is a piece of android police history. Oh that's good content. The the Pixel Four. Yeah I mean it just seems cheap like I don't mean like the materials build qualities bad. I mean it just feels like Google build it down to a price and and and to get there. They had to cut the SPEC sheet down considerably but then they didn't pass any of this onto consumers like it seems like. It's a cut rate eight phone. Did they still sold for nine hundred dollars. I mean there's less rammed another phones. There's less storage. The storage is slow. If you're GONNA do the multi camera thing there's there's not enough cameras because everybody else has three and you've got to the battery super small. There's Wi fi six even built into the QUALCOMM. Sec and you just need to add an antenna thing to it. They cut back on the inbox accessories like the headphone Jack Adapter headphones they cut. Cut The cloud storage so like there's all of these things where they made these changes for. I'm sure Google would make some kind of stupid argument in favor of them but like they made among these changes to increase their profit margins. It seems like and I don't really understand why but it just seems like remember the old one plus phones that would come out like five years ago where they would you know. Here's a high end phone with the latest. Sec for like three hundred bucks or whatever and it's like yeah they cut a couple of corners but for three eight hundred bucks. It's fine but then for eight hundred or nine hundred. It's not fine at all. Yeah I have to agree this year that it's just not a good situation. I feel like wants the Pixel for a comes out next year like the shoes gonna drop like so Google can make two decisions to me with the Pixel for a they can either choose is to keep the camera ray from the Pixel phone for Excel or they can keep it single camera on the back just out of spite in differentiation and I think if they put the oh camera on the back like game over every review is just going to say. Don't buy a pixel four. Just buy the cheaper one. If you want Google software experience and I feel like that was true this year to most people like if you don't really care about having the latest tech in your phone spy pixel three. It's good it's fine. It's cheap yeah. Other than the he said Wide Angle Lens yet or telephone other than the Telephoto Lens. It's the same camera I think it's certainly the same sensor. They back boarded the astro photography. You and all those other features so like you're you're not a camera was the only thing that takes a line did well. If basically the same ones on the on the cheaper one get that yeah I just don't I don't really get how their business strategy is going to work going forward if they're just gonNA keep undercutting themselves every six months of me like well you know all that cool stuff. We showed you in the phone from six months ago. We put most of it in a much cheaper phone here you go. That doesn't seem like a good way to sell your flagship. The Pixel four seems like a business strategy change where like somebody knocked on their door and was like. Hey if you're going to keep doing this hardware thing. The profit margin needs to go way up..

Google LG Hyundai Mazda infotainment Subaru World Trade Center New York Fiat eric Wan Samsung Harman Kardon Toyota Volvo Chrysler Superfund
"kernel" Discussed on The Android Police Podcast

The Android Police Podcast

11:16 min | 8 months ago

"kernel" Discussed on The Android Police Podcast

"If you consider the meaning of life to be about the struggles one goes through then between the Pixel foreign. Sadia bugles full of life right now. So let's Dawson Lennox while we're at it. This is the android police podcast. The it's Wednesday November twentieth. I'm David about time we had on our guests today. He's in to Penn Tabula sears. A before leaving and spending every minute since kicking the butts at ars technica another fantastic. A write in from jewels there It's Ron Ron Ron. D'Amato what's up High Ron. It's been a little while since you think you've been on the show. I feel like the last time was maybe like the Google podcast. Yeah yeah the Google podcast. I is a tradition. Where all of drunk idiots get together and and podcast from couch it's awesome yes and Arm Refuses to join us out of out of principle So we have a few things talk about this week. But Ron you've spent like the last you went to this thing. I didn't even know I didn't. I didn't go to a thing. You didn't go do the thing. No I watched it three hour video on Youtube Man. Oh God even worse So let's let's talk about this. I was even aware this was happening or like that. There would be the android related announcements at this event. It's the Lennox Plumbers Conference which is like the least like? It doesn't sound official or important at all But apparently some very low level stuff happening with the Lenox colonel and some of it relates significantly to android right now. So Ron what did you. What did you learn well? Well yeah I mean I lennox links. Plumbers conference happens every year. And it's like we're used to Google al.. I guess where it's like you know the people onstage Google developers and then like like everybody audiences like a lower to your APP developers and journalists and stuff like that the Lennox Plumbers Conference. I guess it's like invite only and it's like fifty or some some people that all work on Lenox and they're all like peers so like the people on stage and the people in the audience are all like that the big name Lennox developers. So so you're yeah like crazy stuff gets talked about. They're and they're they're talking about bringing the like Android Karnal picket shift on your phone and kind of merging that with Lenox kernel that that actually gets used in desktop computers and this was basically a A Youtube three hour like brainstorm session session between between the various parade of Google's on stage and the people in the audience about how to how to make these things come together and like they talked. You Bet it last year and they kind of pitched the idea last year and this year they had a lot more information to talk about and how they want to do it and stuff like that interesting so like I guess probably. They're discussing this at such a low level that extracting any kind of analysis in terms of what it means for android right might be a little difficult but was there anything that kind of like I mean for me even. I don't really understand a lot of this stuff. And so I like struggle to understand unlike what what would be the benefits to bringing androids Lennox colonel and Mex- colonel other than the obvious stuff. Like obviously it's going to get off security benefits that are in the mainline Lennox colonel. I'm it'll be more up to date more frequently And hopefully not break things. But I don't know these are all really big questions. I'd have wouldn't even know where to begin again. Like looking for answers to them. Well I mean the obvious F is a great place to start. I mean right now. The Colonel Ends up in your device is a brand new device device ships with a two year old Lennox Journal. So you lose all of the all of this security patches. In new features that get added to the Leonard Journal and Lynch Journal is is the the world's biggest software project so like if you are not on mainline the amount of things that just happen every day is happens that such an insane pace. It's so hard to keep up with your crappy fork of the lyrics colonel but also part of the reason that android is. This is kind of Like insulated imbedded system that you can't move from device to device is because every Lennox kernel that ends up on an android device is specific to only that device and all of the hardware support is like baked in to the kernel for that one item. And you can't like move move it around the way you can like limits on a desktop and yeah Google just talked about all of the ways. We can change things so that that doesn't happen so I see one of a little items we have in the sheet. Here says that abstraction essentially locks in the base colonel version and Google will be forces support six years of Lennox long term support releases. So that it. We'll do we think that's going to have any kind of effect on like the update lifetime of phones. What makes them easier to support longer? Or is this really just all very specific to the Lenox. Colonel Title I think the the core of how long phone gets supported kind of up to qualcomm because they need to. I think they need to continue supporting supporting the whole update process of their. SS's I don't know if they would be willing to do that for longer. But it would certainly make it less work like Google draws a a lot of comparisons to project trouble with this new colonel thing which doesn't have a silly project name yet. I don't know why. But it's kind of like the the like separation and modular rising of hardware like dependencies so that code can be more portable and more easily updated and like they talked about. How like a glimpse colonel gets on your phone? And it's like a series of fork so like Google takes the the Colonel admit and turns it into the android colonel so they added special android code to basically. That's a fork. And then they give that to qualcomm and then qualcomm forks that android Carl and they add all their qualcomm specific code for like like the snapdragon eight fifty five. And then that gets sent to Samson in Samson folks that and then they add towed specific for Galaxy S. ten and then that ends up on your it only works on that because it's been fort like three or four times by now and that's why everything's two years old and why everything's so slow and and difficult to Ford around rant interesting so I guess like the kind of speaks to a broader effort. I think on the ANDROID team where I've seen a lot of investment in reducing using the amount of work partners have to do like I feel like that motivates so much of what's going on with android anymore and it makes it harder to explain to people like why this matters in the end like if Samsung has to do less work on the colonel. If Samsung is not going to have to deal with this they can focus probably software development resources on other things they can. You know feel less rushed I mean. Phones are always on a rush time on for software we review phones. We know we get phones with unstable software to review like all the time like. It's it's gotten better. I won't lie about that like I remember like back in the day. You get some seriously rough. pre-release builds on review units. But I think Google really is making a big effort just to try to. I just activated my Google home Is Making a big effort to try to really. I guess like the Word Ivanhoe make android much more modular and make it such that they can ship big chunks of it out to their partners and say this is set up. You don't need to worry about it like we have these hooks in here for you. Work with Flit stop tinkering with the low level parts of the system right and that that works great for Android. When it's something Google controls but you know Google goes up in front of the audience is like listen? We should really old Lennon's journalists the away. We're GONNA fix that is to have you guys do a whole bunch of work and totally change the layout of of how the external works and isn't this a great solution. Let's all let's I'll do it. Let's have you do all of this change so that it makes our lives better and like is the next community going to do that. maybe maybe so. This is just a proposal. Oh yeah yeah I mean they. Sometimes they would go up there and say this is a problem that we have. Does anyone in the audience know how we can fix this because because because the people in the audience are the people that you want to talk about about fix these things and sometimes were other people from Google from different divisions sometimes they were people from Lennox so yes it sounds like it's a crazy the environment but also like the the mood in the crowd. It didn't seem like people were skeptical or against the idea. It seemed like everyone was kind of like brainstorming rainstorm. On how to make this happen because injured after all is probably the biggest lennox distribution of course far and they did get the Lennox community recently to extend the timeline for colonel support so like long term support used to be two years or four years or something and now at six and they did that specifically because android take so long to ship these things and they want them to ship kernels that get security updates. Yeah Yeah I think. That's I think the fact that android is so big now. It's hard to drive for the lowest community to ignore the reality of like this is this is what a lennox destroying the wild looks like. Now do you WanNa make it better. I mean they have to have some level of like you know pride and self respect say like well I guess we should probably make it such that. The most those popular Lennox distribution for the foreseeable future like is at least a little more updateable a little more portable. Because you know it's it's never going to be the year of clinic on the desktop and the cool thing is like they've they've made a ton of progress like somebody had a phone there from Larry was like a it was a POCO. F One chief Xiaomi. It was running the regular Lennox Journal with Android. And I guess that's the first phone on earth to do it and it works for that only only and they need to kind of do an ecosystem wide investigation of like well this hardware works. What do we need to do to make the other hardware? We're working you know Samson's fingerprint or heart rate scanners and all of those all of those weird crazy things that android phone chip with need to have a modular logical arised plugging for external. And there's so many I mean obviously like you know you have that extra layer with qualcomm where they are adding so many things because vulgar custom hardware you now so they are such a big player in this too. I wonder if qualcomm had people there right yeah. I didn't see any but like the the the suggestion that Google made is to have a stable. API or a bi where like just like project trouble where like okay this is. This is like the code that you can plug into. And then you can write modules as they plug into this code for like your speakers and microphones and SS's and whatever else and this is suggested so frequently in the lyrics colonel community they have like a document on. Why don't want to do this? And what the document says is like..

Google Ron Ron Ron Dawson Lennox Lennox Journal qualcomm Lennox Plumbers Conference Leonard Journal and Lynch Jour David Samson Penn Tabula sears Lenox D'Amato Samsung Karnal Lennon
Do Humans and Bananas Really Share Half Their DNA?

BrainStuff

06:04 min | 8 months ago

Do Humans and Bananas Really Share Half Their DNA?

"During Party conversation or a Trivia night you may have heard the fun little fact that humans and Bananas Sheriff Fifty or even sixty percent of the same DNA there it seems to be a lot of differences though between a person and a piece of yellow fruit starting with the fact that one is an animal and the other is a plant but actually there is some truth to that startling statistic but it's not the whole truth. This urban legend of sorts likely originated from a program run by the National Human Genome Research Institute back in two thousand thirteen. Although similar similar data may have been run elsewhere genetics expert. Dr Laurence Brodie at his colleagues generated some banana human information to be included as part of an Educational National Smithsonian Museum of Natural History video called the animated genome that video noted that DNA between a human and a banana is forty one percent similar so in order to find out how this similarity was determined. We talked with Dr Brody himself. He explained that. I it's important to understand the difference. Prince between DNA and protein products. You can think of DNA as the blueprint of a house and protein products the actual house because all of the information is in there Then think of human DNA is the blueprint for a ranch home and banana. DNA is that of a condo in each house. A bunch of things are similar. The plumbing bathrooms kitchen and products are both quite different. That's how it works with humans versus just about everything else from bananas to chimpanzees. The second thing to keep in mind is that genes which are the regions of DNA that code for these proteins. Only make up about two percent of your DNA in order to compare humans and bananas scientists. I looked at the sequences of jeans and a typical banana. Genome Brody said we then used these DNA sequences to predict the amino acid said sequence of all the proteins that would be made from those genes. We then did the same process for all human genes. All of the protein sequences were placed in a file file next. The scientists compared the protein sequence from each banana gene to every human. Jean Brodie said the program compares. How similar the sequence of the banana genes are to each human? Gene Program. Kept any matches that were more similar than one would expect by chance. The program continued doing this gene by gene seen all told more than four million comparisons were done resulting in about seven thousand best hits between the two genomes then the percent similarity score score for each of those hits was averaged Brady said this gave us the result of about forty percent this is the average similarity between proteins gene products. Not What genes gene products or proteins are the biochemical material resulting from Jean becoming functional. Brody continued of course there are many many genes in our genome that do not have a recognizable counterpart in the banana genome. Ns Versa in case. That's a bit difficult to chew and swallow. Let's let's break it down. Essentially they took all of the banana jeans and compared them one at a time to human genes from that they called a degree of similarity. If the banana had the gene. But the human didn't that didn't get counted and about sixty percents jeans have a recognizable counterpart in the Banana Genome Brady explained and of those sixty percent. The proteins encoded by them are roughly forty percent identical when we compare the amino acid sequence of the human protein twins equivalent in the banana. Uh it may seem shocking that so many genes and so many of the proteins that they create are similar in to such vastly different beings as a person in a banana. But when you think about it. It's not that shocking. Brody explained if you think about what we do for living and what a banana does. There's a lot of things we do. The same way. Like consuming oxygen a lot of those genes are just fundamental to life so when people repeat the percentages being a similarity of DNA. Actually actually what the research looked at was the similarity of gene products. Brody reassured US. It's a pretty minor mistake. The kernel that you would take home is that we have something in common with a banana and a potato and the pine tree that part is true. The fine points about the gene products or the DNA is easy to see how that would get translated incorrectly so the scientists looked at the DNA sequence of a banana and compared it with the DNA of human it would not align. We also spoke by email with Mike Francis a PhD student in Bioinformatics at the University of Georgia. He explained you share fifty percent of your DNA with each of your parents but with bananas as we share about fifty percent of our genes as we said earlier genes make up just two percent of your DNA. So what's the other ninety eight percent made up of well. Eight percent of the rest of your DNA regulates genes as to whether a gene should be turned on or off other ninety percent appears to have unknown functions or functions that have been lost through evolution. Francis said these unknown sections of DNA used to commonly called junk DNA because it was thought to do nothing I hesitate to use the phrase junkie because each year. It seems we realize more of this junk is actually functional. Humans don't just share a high percentage of protein protein encoding genes with bananas. We also share eighty five percent of those genes with a mouse and we share sixty one percent of disease causing genes with a fruit fly. Brody Brody said the remarkable thing is that despite being very far apart in evolutionary time we can still find a common signature in the genome of a common ancestor. These are preserved served because the genome of an organism that lived billions of years ago contained genes. That helped cells live and reproduce. Those same jeans are preserved in US and plants Francis added that humans likely share about one percent of their DNA with other as well. He said this is because all life that exists on earth has evolved from a single cell fell originated about one point. Six billion years ago in a sense. We're all relatives

Genome Brody National Human Genome Research Mike Francis Jean Brodie Gene Program Dr Laurence Brodie Educational National Smithsoni United States Brady University Of Georgia Fifty Percent Forty Percent Sixty Percent Two Percent Ninety Eight Percent Eighty Five Percent Six Billion Years Forty One Percent Sixty One Percent
Earthquake App Provides Early Warnings

Weekend Edition Sunday

03:42 min | 9 months ago

Earthquake App Provides Early Warnings

"The LA area shook early Friday thanks to a magnitude three point five earthquake centered near Compton but on Thursday Californians got access to an early warning system the could allow a heads up of up to twenty seconds just enough time to stop drop and take cover the early warning alert is available through an app called my shake developed in part by Richard Allen the director of the Berkeley seismological lab he joins us now from the UC Berkeley campus welcome great to be with you Lou Lou first things first to the app alert users to that Compton quite so no so that as quick as you said was any magnitude three and a half of quake and so we only send out alerts when the earthquakes of greater than a magnitude four point five and then we only send out the alert to regions expected to see shaking intensity three which means most people feel a bit of a jolt and how does it work what does it use to sense an incoming quake and then what does it do so what underlines the system is a system called chez Collette shaken that is a system that has traditional seismic sensors across all of California it detects the earthquake when it's under way and then with very rapid algorithms we analyze that data and we determine the area that is likely to experience shaking and so that's what creates the kernel of an alert and then once we have that the my shake system takes it it identifies the phone so that are in within a region that are gonna feel shaking and it pushes the alert out to those phones is there hope of increasing the time of the warning period to say minutes hours days is that something that you foresee might be something that science will be able to do so it's important to understand that earthquake early warning is about rapidly detecting an earthquake that's under way and then pushing out to know that ahead of the shaking so that gives us the limitation on the time how much time is that between when an earthquake starts and when people might feel the shaking our best estimate so that we can provide a few seconds to a few tens of seconds of warning with both the technology and the science we have at our disposal today now in the really big earthquakes that time cannot should be a few minutes and of course the research continues the development continues and we can see whether we can increase that for more than just a few seconds to a few tens of seconds we'll have to see what we cannot do is go beyond those minutes so when we talk about a few days now we're talking about prediction with talking about predicting when the earth quakes going to start that's a completely different problem we don't know how to solve that problem and so I think most seismologists would agree that's unlikely in the foreseeable future and obviously California is not the only place in the world that suffers earthquakes is this technology available elsewhere in the world it could be used anywhere else in the world so they're just a few places that have early warning today it's Mexico Japan and now California or the the big ones I'm in the challenge there is that they have to have these traditional seismic networks that are expensive to run and so that's one of the research pieces here with the my shake cap is it in fact in every X. S. smartphone is an accelerometer senses the deacon to tech to earth quakes and so what we're doing is we're exploring the ability to also detect the earthquakes with smartphones and if we can do that then we could do a quick early warning wherever they are smart phones and they're all basically smartphones wherever there are people so the ultimate goal here is to actually be able to deliver earthquake early warning around the globe and I assume you have the app on your phone of course I've had the app on my phone for quite some time I've been faithful genet to be getting the leads a quite a few months at this point Richard Allen is the director of the Berkeley seismological lab and help develop a new earthquake early warning app thank you

Compton LA Twenty Seconds
Cardinals Beat Writer Performed CPR on Videographer in Dugout Sunday and Helped Save His Life

Overnight America with Ryan Wrecker

00:34 sec | 10 months ago

Cardinals Beat Writer Performed CPR on Videographer in Dugout Sunday and Helped Save His Life

"Says seamless videographer collapsed in Chicago dug out ahead of the match up was briefly without a wholesome then it beat writer Derek gold perform CPR before the cubs training staff emergency personnel give the videographer more attention the man was transferred to the hospital gold a lifelong lifeguard trained in CPR and to the dugout right before the cards were going to my announce manager Joe Maddon says missile wow how about that kernels ended up winning the game nine nothing today as you know but scary moment over at over the ball

Chicago Cubs Joe Maddon Writer Derek Gold
"kernel" Discussed on Data Engineering Podcast

Data Engineering Podcast

14:59 min | 10 months ago

"kernel" Discussed on Data Engineering Podcast

"I am the CTO. I guess of Long Duration I've been around for a long time and it's a privilege to swim folks who have been building this fabulous APP platform for streaming data for about five years and do you remember how you first got involved in the area of data management. Well I've a PhD in Applied Mathematics and probably saw 'em kind of that data management guy. I'm an analysis guy like what comes out of you know streams of data and what in Prince you can draw from it so my background is more on the analytical side and then only way I sort of beginning to how to build big infrastructure for it and now you have taken up the position as CTO for a swim dot org. I wondering if you can explain a bit about what the platform form is and how the overall project business got started Shula so here's the problem we're all reading time about about these wonderful things that you can do with machine learning and streaming data and so on aren't all involve cloud in the magical things and in general most organizations chest doesn't know how to make head. Rotella for bunch of reasons. It's just too hard to get there so if you're an organization with assets that are chipping out lots of data that could be a bunch of different times. You know you probably don't have the skill fit in house to deal with a vast amount of information Toma Out Boundless Dennis Associated Things that never shut up and so to deal with these data pipelines to deal with did itself to to deal with the learning and inference that you might draw from that and so on and so- enterprise huge skillset challenge there is also a cost challenge because today's techniques related to drawing in from from dead in general resolve with enlarge expensive dead lakes either in house or perhaps in the cloud and then finally there's a challenge with the timeliness within which you can join insight and most folks today believe that you stole dead a- and then you think about it in some magical way in you draw inference from that and we're all suffering from the Hoop Caldera. I guess aftereffects and really this notion of story and Dan analyzing needs to be dispensed this with in terms of Fawcett said nipple bound that will never stop. It's really inappropriate so when I talk about boundaries said we're GONNA talk about this. Just never stop ambrose the need to derive insights from that did did on the fly because if you don't something will the wrong so it's up the type that would stop your car before the full. You hit the across that kind of stuff so that kind dated there's just no chance to no still the hottest and then and how would you differentiate the work that you're doing with the swimming. Ai Platform in the Swiss colonel from things that are being done with tools such as flank or other streaming systems such such as Kafka that is now capabilities for being able to do some limited streaming analysis on the data flows through or also platforms such as Wall al-zarou that are built for being able to do stateful computations on data streams so P- festival there have been some major sips foyt and anything when we do we stand on the shoulders of John's. Let's start off with distinguishing between the large enterprise skill set that's out there and the cab world and all the things you mentioned living clap world so at that referees distinction most people in the price. That's when he said clink wouldn't know what the hell are you talking about. Similarly suggests wouldn't know what you're talking about and so there is a major problem with the tools and technologies the built for the cloud really for I guess for love of cloud native applications and the majority of enterprises who just that step with legacy. It end application skills the and they still come up to speed with the right thing to do and to be honest getting the headache okay so then if we talk about cloud world there is a fascinating distinction between all of the based projects which have started to tackle streaming and there have been some has been made so much progress there. Jambi out some being one of them and happily into each one of those projects in detail as we go forward the point being that first and foremost the the large majority of enterprises just don't know what to do and then within your specific offerings there is the data fabric platform arm which year targeting for enterprise consumers and then there's also the open source kernel of that in the form of swim. Os and wondering if you can provide some explanation nation as to what are the differentiating factors between those two products and the sort of decision points along when somebody might want to use one versus the other yeah let's cut I at the distinction between the application layer the infrastructure needed to run largest distributed for pipeline and so for swim all of the application layer stuff the everything you need to build nap is entirely the open source some of the capabilities that you want to run a log distributed Poplin are proprietary and that's really just because you know we're building a business around this plan to open source more mortgages more features of time and then as far as the primary use cases that you are enabling with the swim platform and some of the different ways that enterprise organizations are are implementing the cases where using something other than swimming might the os where the data fabric layer would be either impractical or intractable if they were trying to use more traditional approaches such as deep as you mentioned or data warehouse and more batch oriented workflows so let's start off describing describing what swim desk can. I can do that then that that might help argue it's our job to build the pipeline and and indeed the model from data okay so so. I'm just wants data and from the data we will build what Bankhe- build the State Department and indeed from that we will build a model of opera truly interesting in complexity allows us to solve some problems okay so this twin perspective stops with data the because that's where all customers Jenny stotts they have lots and lots of data the Dune what to do with it and so the approach we take swim is to allow the dated to build the model nine you would naturally saved that's impossible in general oncology at the edge which describes the dead you could think is a Schema in fact basically to describe bribe what data items me in some to useful sense to us as mothers but then given data swim. We'll build them up so let me give you an example given a relatively simple for traffic equipment so petition lights the loops on the road unsown swim will build a model level which is a stateful digital twin were for every sensor every every source of data which is running in concurrently in some distributive fabric and processes its own role data and stay they truly volvos okay so simply given that on swim knows how to build stateful eight full concurrent little things we call wave agents. Actually I'm using that term. I guess the same as digital twin twin these concurrent things which are going to stay n represent that in a meaningful way and the coconut that is that each one of these little digital twins exists in a context a real world context take that swimming is going to discover for us so for example a an an section might have sixty two. AD sensors notion containment but also into sections are Jason to other in sections in the real world map and so you're that notion of adjacency is also real gration and in swim. This notion of a link allows us to express ice. The real world relationships between these little digital twins and linking in swim has this wonderful additional property which is to allow us to express essentially sub swim. There's never a pub but there is a sub and if something links to something else filing to you then it's it's like blenkton two things I get to see the real time updates of in memory state still by that digital twin so digital twins linked to digital twins courtesy of real world relationships. Sach is containment or proximity. You can even do other relationships like correlation also linked to each other which allows them to share data and sharing airing data allows interesting computational properties to be derived for example. We can learn and predict okay so job. One is to define sons early simply goes on builds groff digital twins which is constructed entirely from the data and then the linking happens as part of that and that allows us to then construct interesting competitions Zet you saw yes. That's definitely helpful to get an idea of some of the use the use cases and some of the ways that the different concepts within swim work together to be able to build out to what as sort of conceptual architecture picture would be for an application that would utilize swim so the key thing here is. I'm talking about an application. bitches said the applications to predict the future the future future traffic in any city or what's going to happen in the traffic area right now. I could do that full bunch in different cities what I can tell you that need model for each and there are two ways to build model one way as I get a data scientist to of maybe maybe they train it into a whole bunch of things and I'm going to have to this every single city where I want to use the application the other way it to build them all from the data and that's the swim broach. What swim desk is simply? Give them now tall judy build these little digital twins which representatives of the real world things get them to Stapley evolve and then link the two other things in to represent real relationships and then set me. Hey presto you have built in a large growth which is effectively the mobile that you would add. Davidge a human build otherwise right so it's constructed in the sense that in any new city you go to this thing has gone on bundle in just giving a stream of day that it will to build a model which represents the singing said are the source of data to end their physical relationships dem accents yeah and I'm wondering if if you can expand upon that in terms of the type of workflow that a developer who is building an application on top of swim would go through as far are is identifying what those on holidays are and defining how the links will occur as the data streams into the different nodes in the swim last Askraf so the key point tears we think we can do and then we can build like eighty percent of an APP okay from the data Asia and that is we can find all the big structural all structural properties of residents in the data and then let the the application builder drop in what they want to compute.

CTO Shula State Department Hoop Caldera Toma ambrose Stapley Kafka Dan scientist Fawcett Jason Jenny stotts developer Asia
"kernel" Discussed on Data Engineering Podcast

Data Engineering Podcast

16:24 min | 10 months ago

"kernel" Discussed on Data Engineering Podcast

"From Uber per month per intersection is love right all right by the way older stuff is open source. You can go grab it in play and hopefully make your city better so what from that you can go that it's not out of high enough value for me to do anything other than say go grab it run so voss amounts of data and relatively important but not commercially rather than bed and another aspect of that case in particular is that despite this this volume of data it might be interesting for being able to historical analyses but in terms of the actual real world utility it has a distinct expiration period where you have no real interest in the sensor data as it existed an hour ago because that has no particular relevance on your current state of the world and what you're trying to do with it at this point in time yeah you have historical interest in the sense of wanting to know if your predictions were right or wanting to know about a traffic engineering hostesses which runs time scale sub some full buckling vetera- whereas some more tasteful recording is useful and sure that's easy but you Sydney did not want to quoted the original Deidra and then going back to the other question I had earlier when we were talking about the workflow of an analyst or a data scientist pushing out their they're analyses live to these digital twins and potentially having some real world impact. I'm curious if this swim platform has some concept of a dry run mode good where you can deploy this analysis and see what the output of it is without it an NC. Maybe what impact it would have without actually manifesting in the real world for cases where you want to ensure that you're not accidentally introducing error or potentially having a dangerous outcome particularly in the case as the or mentioning of an oil and gas rig yeah so I'm with you win sent actually everything we've done. Thus far has been open loop in the sense that when informing another human or an another application but we're not directly controlling the infrastructure and the value of a dry run would would be enormous. You can imagine in those scenarios but thus far. We don't have any use cases the weekend report of using awesome for Derek Control. We do have used cases where on a second by second basis we are predicting whether machines are GonNa make an they they make as they built. PCB's for servers and and so on again what you're doing is you're quoting raids brady's. Come over and pick some machine you not you know you're not trying to change the way the machine bags at now digging deeper into the actual implementation of swim swim. I'm wondering if you can talk through how the actual system itself is architect and some of the ways that it has evolved as you have worked with different partners to deploy into real world environments and get feedback from them and how that has affected the overall direction of the product roadmap so swimming his company megabytes of job extensions okay so it's extremely lean we tend to deploy in continuous using growl. VM So very small we can run in probably a hundred megabyte so so and so people tend to think of when people tend to think of age they tend to think of branding educate blazel things we don't really think of edge in in that way and so an important part of the finding edged as far as we're concerned is simply gain access to streaming data. We don't really care where it is but swimming small up to get on limited amounts towards physical age and the you know the product has evolved in the sense that virginity wasn't away building applications for the agent you'd sit down write them in Java and so on latterly this ability to simply let 'em lit the abdication data the data ability APP most of the APP can bonus in response to customer needs 'em but it is deployed typically in containers and for that we have in the current release relied very heavily on as your iot edge the framework and and that is magical to be quite honest because we can rely on Microsoft's machinery me to deal with all of the painful bits of deployment and Life Cycle Mansion Faw code base and the application as Iran's these things things we are really focused on what we're trying to build a capability which will respond to date in do the right thing the application developer and so we have fully published in the as your. It have you can download Essen and get going through and so in several use cases now what we're doing is we they are used to feed foss time skill insights at the physical age we are labelling there and and then dropping it into azure. AD less gen two and feeding insights into applications built in power Bi so it ju just for the sake of machinery you know using the azure framework for management of the it not by the way I think is the worst possible name you could have a pick because all you want is a thing to manage the life cycle management management of capability which is going to do with data whether it's at the physical edge or not is immaterial but base Cubal we've been doing is relying on Microsoft's fabulous laughs friend would full that plug into the Iot hub and all the Azure i-it-it's all as your services generally for back end things which enterprises love and then another element of what we were discussing in the use case examples that you're describing particularly for instance with the traffic intersections is the idea of discover ability and routing between these digital twins as far as how they identify the car analogy -ality of which twins are useful to communicate with and establishing those links and also at the networking layer how they handle network failures in in terms of communication and ensuring that if there is some sort of fault that they're able to recover from it soon builds to ledge one is the APP player the other one is the infrastructure which you gonNA run. This effective is distributed graph and so soon is going to build this cross for us from from data what that means is the digital twin by the way we technically coldeze web agents these little web agents are going to be distributed somewhere in a fabric of physical instances and they may be widely geographically distributed and so there is a need nonetheless at the application layer for things which are related in some way linked physically or you know in some of the way to be able to link to Joel that's assuming curtain of Assab end so links require that object which of these digital twins have the ability to inspect each other stayed right there members and of course is something is running on the other side of the plants and and you're linked to a town of exact on work so we're all familiar with going languages in objects in one address space. That's pretty easy we know an object handle or an object reference or pointer or whatever we get it but when the distribute that's hot and so if you're an application Asian program that you would send us object references but these resolve to your eyes so in practice at run time the linking those when I linked to you I linked to your and that link once result by swim enables a continued stream of updates to flow from new to me and if we happen to be on different instances running different address spaces than net I will be over a mash of direct web sockets connection between your instance in mind and so in any swim deployment all the incidences are interlinked so each linked to each other using a single web sockets connection and then these links permit the flow of information between linked digital twins and what happens is whenever a change in the in memory state state of a linked you know digital twin happens what happens is that it's instance men streams to every other linked object an update to the state for that thing right so what the quad what's required is in effect a streaming update update to to Jason by because we're gonNA record muddling some form of like Jason State or whatever we would not need to be able to update little bits with as things change and so we use a per cold cold war for that and that's a swim capability which which we've open source and what that does is bring streaming to Jason right streaming updates to parts of adjacent model and then every for instance in swim maintains its own view of the whole model so as things streaming the the local view of the model is changed but the view of the world is very much one of a consistency model based on whatever happens to be ex-king locally and whatever needs to view state benchley consistent much every note eventually when she learns the entire thing and generally eventually here means you know a link to link away from real time right so links delay a away from real time and then the other aspect of the platform is the state fullness of the computation and as you were saying that that state is is eventually consistent dependent on the communication delay between the different nodes within the context graph and then in terms of data durability ability. One thing. I'm curious is the length of state or sort of the overall buffer that is available and guessing is largely dependent on where it happens to be deployed and what the physical capabilities are of the particular node and then also as far as persisting that data for maybe historical analysis my guess is that that relies on distributing the data to some other system for long term storage and I'm just wondering what the overall sort of pattern paradigm is for people who want to be able to have that capability those a great question so in general the Magog from some her perfect raw data full on the wire original physical thing too you know something much more efficient and meaningful in memory and generally metro concise so we get a ton of data reduction and so two MS folkestone streaming. We don't stop you stung original data. If you want to you you might just have to have discovered or whatever the key thing is. We don't do that on the hub. Pause okay so things changed the estate Tim Memory End may be compute on that and that's what they do I inform us and then we ll as lead throw things out to disk because this happens so relative eligible to compute and so typically we'll be end up. Storing is the semantic state of the context described as you put it not original the that is for example traffic world. You know we store things like disliked. Turn rented this particular time not the voltage on Woodley registers in the light and so you get massive did reduction and that form of data is he's very amenable to storage in the Cloud Sale Morales and it's even affordable at them at reasonable rates so the key thing for swimming storage is you're GonNa remember as much as you want. As much as you have space for locally and then storage in general is on the is not a hot pot on the computer in strata and generally beginning huge huge did reductions for every step up the growth we make so for example if I go from nola states traffic sensors to predictions than I've made a very substantial reduction in the data remind anyway right as as you move up the computational graph reduce the amount of days you have to saw and stepped you really pick what you want to what you went store in terms terms of your overall experience working as the CTO of this organization and shepherding the product direction and the the capabilities of this system wondering what you have found to be some of the most challenging aspects both from the technical and business sides and some of the most useful or or interesting or unexpected lessons the learned in the process so what's holidays that the real world is not the cloud native world so we wall seeing Abbas Abbas examples of Netflix in Amazon. Nobody else doing cool things with it. Do you know if you're an oil company and you have regarded got it. You just don't do this so you know we can come at this with whatever skill sets we have. What we find mind is that the real world lodge in prices of today are still acres behind the cabinet of folk and that to challenge wjr okay so getting to be able to understand what they need because they still have lots of assets generating tons of data is very hard second this notion of edge continually confusing and I mentioned previously that I would never cozinne as for example as your name because it's not about Iot Omay be this but you may be two examples? The one is traffic light say physical. Things is pretty obvious that you're what the notion of veggies it's physical edge but the F. One is this we build a real time model for millions tens of millions of headsets for lodge mobile carrier..

Jason State Microsoft Iot Omay Sydney Derek Control brady analyst Life Cycle Mansion Faw MS Iot scientist Cloud Sale Morales Cubal Joel F. One Iran Assab
"kernel" Discussed on Data Engineering Podcast

Data Engineering Podcast

14:59 min | 10 months ago

"kernel" Discussed on Data Engineering Podcast

"I am the CTO. I guess of Long Duration I've been around for a long time and it's a privilege to swim folks who have been building this fabulous APP platform for streaming data for about five years and do you remember how you first got involved in the area of Data Management Well I've a PhD in applied mathematics and probably saw 'em kind of that data management guy. I'm an analysis guy like what comes out of you know streams of data and what in Prince you can draw from it so my background is more on the analytical side and then only way I sort of beginning to how to build big infrastructure for it and now you have taken up the position as CTO for a swim dot AI wondering if you can explain a bit about what the platform form is and how the overall project business got started Shula so here's the problem we're all reading time about about these wonderful things that you can do with machine learning and streaming data and so on aren't all involve cloud in the magical things and in general most organizations chest doesn't know how to make head Rotella for bunch of reasons. It's just too hard to get there so if you're an organization with assets that are chipping out lots of data that could be a bunch of different times. You know you probably don't have the skill fit in house to deal with a vast amount of information Toma Out Boundless Dennis Associated Things that never shut up and so to deal with these data pipelines to deal with did itself to to deal with the learning and inference that you might draw from that and so on and so enterprise huge skillset challenge there is also a cost challenge because today's techniques related to drawing in from from dead in general resolve with enlarge expensive dead lakes either in house or perhaps in the cloud and then finally there's a challenge with the timeliness within which you can join insight and most folks today believe that you stole dead a- and then you think about it in some magical way in you draw inference from that and we're all suffering from the Hoop Caldera I guess aftereffects and really this notion of story and Dan analyzing needs to be dispensed this with in terms of Fawcett said Nipple bound that will never stop. It's really inappropriate so when I talk about boundaries said we're GONNA talk about this. Just never stop ambrose the need to derive insights from that did did on the fly because if you don't something will the wrong so it's up the type that would stop your car before the full you hit the across that kind of stuff so that kind dated there's just no chance to no still the hottest and then and how would you differentiate the work that you're doing with the swimming. Ai Platform in the Swiss colonel from things that are being done with tools such as flank or other streaming systems such such as Kafka that is now capabilities for being able to do some limited streaming analysis on the data flows through or also platforms such as Wall al-zarou that are built for being able to do stateful computations on data streams so P- festival there have been some major sips foyt and anything when we do we stand on the shoulders of John's. Let's start off with distinguishing between the large enterprise skill set that's out there and the cab world and all the things you mentioned living clap world so at that referees distinction most people in the price that's when he said clink wouldn't know what the hell are you talking about. Similarly suggests wouldn't know what you're talking about and so there is a major problem with the tools and technologies the built for the cloud really for I guess for love of cloud native applications and the majority of enterprises who just that step with legacy. It end application skills the and they still come up to speed with the right thing to do and to be honest getting the headache okay so then if we talk about cloud world there is a fascinating distinction between all of the based projects which have started to tackle streaming and there have been some has been made so much progress there Jambi out some being one of them and happily into each one of those projects in detail as we go forward the point being that first and foremost the the large majority of enterprises just don't know what to do and then within your specific offerings there is the data fabric platform arm which year targeting for enterprise consumers and then there's also the open source kernel of that in the form of swim. Os and wondering if you can provide some explanation nation as to what are the differentiating factors between those two products and the sort of decision points along when somebody might want to use one versus the other yeah let's cut I at the distinction between the application layer the infrastructure needed to run largest distributed for pipeline and so for swim all of the application layer stuff the everything you need to build nap is entirely the open source some of the capabilities that you want to run a log distributed Poplin are proprietary and that's really just because you know we're building a business around this plan to open source more mortgages more features of time and then as far as the primary use cases that you are enabling with the swim platform and some of the different ways that enterprise organizations are are implementing the cases where using something other than swimming might the os where the data fabric layer would be either impractical or intractable if they were trying to use more traditional approaches such as deep as you mentioned or data warehouse and more batch oriented workflows so let's start off describing describing what swim desk can I can do that then that that might help argue it's our job to build the pipeline and and indeed the model from data okay so so I'm just wants data and from the data we will build what Bankhe- build the State Department and indeed from that we will build a model of opera truly interesting in complexity allows us to solve some problems okay so this twin perspective stops with data the because that's where all customers Jenny stotts they have lots and lots of data the Dune what to do with it and so the approach we take swim is to allow the dated to build the model nine you would naturally saved that's impossible in general oncology at the edge which describes the dead you could think is a Schema in fact basically to describe bribe what data items me in some to useful sense to us as mothers but then given data swim. We'll build them up so let me give you an example given a relatively simple for traffic equipment so petition lights the loops on the road unsown swim will build a model level which is a stateful digital twin were for every sensor every every source of data which is running in concurrently in some distributive fabric and processes its own role data and stay they truly wolves okay so simply given that on swim knows how to build stateful eight full concurrent little things we call wave agents. Actually I'm using that term I guess the same as digital twin twin these concurrent things which are going to stay n represent that in a meaningful way and the coconut that is that each one of these little digital twins exists in a context a real world context take that swimming is going to discover for us so for example a an an section might have sixty two. AD sensors notion containment but also into sections are Jason to other in sections in the real world map and so you're that notion of adjacency is also real gration and in swim this notion of a link allows us to express ice. The real world relationships between these little digital twins and linking in swim has this wonderful additional property which is to allow us to express essentially sub swim. There's never a pub but there is a sub and if something links to something else filing to you then it's it's like blenkton two things I get to see the real time updates of in memory state still by that digital twin so digital twins linked to digital twins courtesy of real world relationships sach is containment or proximity. You can even do other relationships like correlation also linked to each other which allows them to share data and sharing airing data allows interesting computational properties to be derived for example. We can learn and predict okay so job. One is to define sons early simply goes on builds groff digital twins which is constructed entirely from the data and then the linking happens as part of that and that allows us to then construct interesting competitions Zet you saw yes. That's definitely helpful to get an idea of some of the use the use cases and some of the ways that the different concepts within swim work together to be able to build out to what as sort of conceptual architecture picture would be for an application that would utilize swim so the key thing here is. I'm talking about an application bitches said the applications to predict the future the future future traffic in any city or what's going to happen in the traffic area right now. I could do that full bunch in different cities what I can tell you that need model for each and there are two ways to build model one way as I get a data scientist to of maybe maybe they train it into a whole bunch of things and I'm going to have to this every single city where I want to use the application the other way it to build them all from the data and that's the swim broach swim desk is simply give them now tall judy build these little digital twins which representatives of the real world things get them to Stapley evolve and then link the two other things in to represent real relationships and then set me. Hey presto you have built in a large growth which is effectively the mobile that you would add Davidge a human build otherwise right so it's constructed in the sense that in any new city you go to this thing has gone on bundle in just giving a stream of day that it will to build a model which represents the singing said are the source of data to end their physical relationships dem accents yeah and I'm wondering if if you can expand upon that in terms of the type of workflow that a developer who is building an application on top of swim would go through as far are is identifying what those on holidays are and defining how the links will occur as the data streams into the different nodes in the swim last Askraf so the key point tears we think we can do and then we can build like eighty percent of an APP okay from the data Asia and that is we can find all the big structural all structural properties of residents in the data and then let the the application builder drop in what they want to compute.

CTO Shula ambrose Toma Kafka Davidge State Department scientist Stapley Jason John Dan Asia Fawcett Jenny stotts Askraf
"kernel" Discussed on WCBS Newsradio 880

WCBS Newsradio 880

01:32 min | 11 months ago

"kernel" Discussed on WCBS Newsradio 880

"Is that even a kernel of hope the Blasi in a decidedly unscientific Iowa state fair poll even after his food and game filled Sunday at the fair where he gave a twenty minute pitch to voters of that famed political soapbox the New York City mayor is registering at zero percent in the fares corn colonel poll attendees of the fair over the age of eighteen can place a kernel of corn in a jar to select their top caucus choice the end of the day results showed the mayor's percentage add zero Facebook confers a people linked to the Saudi government have been spreading propaganda the company says that it is removed more than three hundred fifty fake a counseling to a covert campaign is aimed to garner support for the kingdom and attack its rivals Facebook says this type of abuse is an ongoing challenge but eat is making progress scene it's Dan Patterson explains how the Saudi government operatives are able to use Facebook for their propaganda purposes one of two things one they use a compromise the count meaning this is a real legitimate account but maybe it was forgotten or dead and hackers were able to log into that account which is great because it has authentic content on it real photos that kind of thing the other thing that they do is create fake accounts the operation mainly targeted the Middle East and North Africa and most of the content was in Arabic it is twelve thirty six we will always be on the.

Facebook Saudi government Dan Patterson Middle East Iowa New York City North Africa twenty minute zero percent
"kernel" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

02:35 min | 1 year ago

"kernel" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"What Joe Biden says? No, I'm offended by what the other people are saying why is that? Well the highschool. Peter, I've seen girls go from being fantastic students to suddenly dating and nothing about school is in their care anymore, and they end up really blowing Chris collar ship. Some of them have ended up dropping out of school. So I tell my girls, no date at well message. Okay. My students know dating till the thirty five which is a joke, right? Them once you start dating you start. And I've seen it all along that changing your world and I tried to encourage my students, girls and boys and that thinks so much about dating, but to think about their futures, and think about the course working getting salad ships. So it's something that you may say obviously, thirty five you say it in jest, but there is a kernel of truth in the message you're trying to convey in your situation as a teacher, and I think, in Joe Biden, isn't that somebody who I would vote for, but I think that what he's trying to stay is the exact same thing. I think he's Saint throughout his lifetime. People who've totally film, their lives away, because of deciding to start dating at a younger age and ending up in trouble or. I'm not sure if I understand that the general point you're making Peggy. Thanks for the call. Let you fly when you start dating there is from the from the girls perspective. And for the guy's perspective, too. But most of them the girls perspective. There's a certain. That is one of those seminal moments in their lives. It things son talking to boys. I'm going with boys. That's things are changing times are changing the dynamic between the parents and the daughter changes a little bit. I know your father of a daughter will get maybe come back here. It is interesting bigs. Another question. How old is or how young is too young to date? It will get into that. Just a couple of moments. It is eleven thirty. So let's get caught up now with Erik Scott. President Trump is now weighing in and how the US may respond to Iran for shooting down a US drone Iran. Shut down the drone claims it was over its airspace. The US head denied that let's get the very latest from ABC news. President Trump says we'll soon find out if the US will retaliate with.

Joe Biden US President Trump Peter younger age Erik Scott ABC Iran Peggy
"kernel" Discussed on Security Now

Security Now

01:37 min | 1 year ago

"kernel" Discussed on Security Now

"The payloads drop a kernel mode driver, named randomly and placed in affidavit a local temp. It's compile time suggests that it had been created in two thousand sixteen. Nevertheless, most av engines, do not detect the driver as malicious. We found that the driver had a digital signature issued by VERA sign the certificate, which is expired bears. The name of a fake Chinese company. It's hangs out who tin network technology, Garda core labs. Contacted VERA sign and provided with the relevant details, which resulted in the certificates, revocation, not that it matters because I think they said it had been it was expired. Maybe not I remember taking. Look at it myself noticing that, it, it did not look like the malware was time stamped. So if the certificate expired Mauer we're no longer be trusted. Anyway, they said this would have been less awkward had the driver, not been packed and obfuscation. Unlike many other militias drivers, this driver is protected an obvious skated with VM. Protect a software tool that attempts to frustrate reverse engineers, and malware. Researchers the drivers designed to protect processes and prevent the user from terminating them. It creates a device, named essay twenty four eighty two allowing processes to communicate with it. The device.

Mauer
"kernel" Discussed on NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

07:29 min | 1 year ago

"kernel" Discussed on NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

"You'll be behind and we'll be behind for some time. In man flight bought we do not intend to stay behind. And in this decade. We shall make up and move ahead. President John Kennedy and his remarks in announcing that we had fact were going for the moon and incredible tale and its culmination is outlined in the book American moonshot by guests. Douglas, Brinkley a good question that he posed there certainly Doug for many a year. It was a very good question. Why does rice Playtex, but? That's not over talking about here tonight. You were getting into a story just before the break if you care to finish that. Speech. He played, you know, I looked at the original speech that Kennedy was giving it an in. He had a road a lot of things in there. And that was the last minute addition that rice Texas line he wanted in his own and stuck it in there? And it got actually the largest applause of the day that speech was given before about thirty five to forty thousand people at Rice University in ten thousand of them were boy scouts that were there to hear that speech. So Kennedy really got us going on this. And after he was assassinated in Dallas Lyndon Johnson met with Jackie Kennedy in Jackie asked Linden. Keep her husband's dream alive. Go to the moon Lyndon Johnson said he would change the name of Cape Canaveral to the Kennedy Space Center in throughout the nineteen sixties whenever congress thought about the. Funding the Apollo program the ghost of John F Kennedy was pushed forward by Lyndon Johnson. But we almost got derailed in nineteen sixty seven because a power one. We had a horrific accident where three of our finest, astronauts, Ed white. Watch your Chafee in Gus Grissom, all blew up in a test at Cape Canaveral. They were incinerated in a fireball. And this would this did not vote well for continuing on with Apollo and many people wanted to define the program. But eventually there's too much momentum going to go forward with it and the Apollo program continued, and then there was an effort made was starting to save before break again, you'll Patrick moynahan. Former New York Senator and moyers who was an LBJ speechwriter turned PBS commentator. They started lobbing Nixon to name the rocket to the moon, the John F Kennedy, and I got to see document that HR Haldeman wrote nixing this idea saying we are not doing it in the he wrote palm in the Knicks. This is an NBC plot. To Kennedy is the mood. And if this is to be continued the next thing that the Democrats are going to want us to name the moon Kennedy. And so and so just stayed away from a mentioning Kennedy where when Apollo eleven occurred, but at NASA the soon as we picked up and rescued Armstong Alderney Collins, and they were safe their splashdown, and we're on the the US hornet they put on the mission control board. John Kennedy's pledge to go to the moon by the end of the decade and underneath that in big letters. It said cask accomplished July nineteen sixty nine an incredible tale. Again, that's the kind of insight you'll find in this book, America's moonshot, this is a call from David enterprise, Alabama for our guest Douglas Brinkley. Good evening, David. Hey, guys, glad to hear. You guys are talking about Neil. I met him back in the late eighties at Sheppard air force base. Which is where by the way, those who don't know Sheppard air force bases in Wichita falls, Texas. Okay. Very good. Okay. Do you? Remember, the actual launch, and such my parents made sure that I did not miss it on the television. Yeah. I'm retired military, and I'm currently still working as a contractor for the military. So I've been doing this for about thirty four years outstanding I was on lease. And I was the last person in the states that used to mix the chemical to make the custom helmets. I got cold in told that I don't wanna miss this. And I told my boss leaving. No, not an option you're coming in. So I get into the shop. There's an older gentleman there. Wear short-sleeved plaid shirt. Very nice looking clean cut and heater himself is Neil Armstrong. Well, I knew exactly who he was. And I was kind of. They told me not to ask him any silly stupid questions. I was just a young buck sergeant. And I told my commander the kernel that you do know I'm going to have him in my chair for forty five minutes. And everybody kind like lead in chuckled and such. But I did ask him. Both of from. I asked him when you step down where you thinking about what you were going to say when you step on an excellent question. I'd like our guest to get into that. Well, active. I'll tell you what let's ask David. Did. He did he answer the question. David. Question. What did he say? He told me that he was not thinking about what he was going to say he was more concerned about whether or not when he stepped off whether he would fall in somewhere sinking. All right because they didn't they didn't know. Exactly what you which is tightly true. I guess to respond to what David had to say. Both in terms of of concerns about about sinking into lunar quicksand. And also the words Douglas Brinkley. Absolutely, correct, arm storms. Biggest concern was just what it would be like when he actually stepped whether it would be kind of squished down those spaces were very, bulky and hard to maneuver. So though the worst thing in the world with all the world watching would be slipped and in of fallen not just for barris -ment sake. But if something happened to that space suit, it could approved lethal the famous line about, you know, one giant step wind. He came up with that on his own. He only person we know that he ever said he was going to say that to his brother, they said at a kitchen table, and he his brother he went into his brother and his mother looked at it on a piece of paper and said, wow, I don't see how you do any better than that. And so that was the only person need test marketed on at. He added you know in his head. That would be what he would say the moment was white. And it was any did it. He did a deed. We must.

President John Kennedy Douglas Brinkley David Lyndon Johnson Kennedy Space Center Jackie Kennedy Neil Armstrong Texas Cape Canaveral Rice University Sheppard air force Ed white Apollo Doug Patrick moynahan Dallas New York barris US congress
"kernel" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

04:05 min | 1 year ago

"kernel" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"You'll see cuddle revision and three dot something or fold out something that is the actual cardinal lluhvision. That they might freeze on like, for example. We'll how we have do you do, you know, how the you probably don't have his ability to to all of the stuff we deal within the cuddle space. Right. So what Linda Susu may get mainline that is continuously moving. It's it has the new features coming in. And we do lease once in about a tweaks once every eight weeks in new cardinal release comes out so during those eight weeks seven to eight weeks, we are doing integration, continuous integration. You're talking about. So there is a two week window between releases this eight weeks is part of that first two weeks after a new release comes in. That's when all of the maintainers, and we are sending patches pull requests to us. Linda's post them in. And then the first two weeks is that is just ending this'll end the Sunday for five dot one. So after that. We are fixing stuff that we found in this the code base. We just did Linda just pulled in two weeks. So that continues depending on the comfort level depending on how many patches that are coming in fixes coming in that'll settle in the four to five weeks. And then the next release comes out very often the products like, for example, foreign sort of Samsung and Google or any other phone vendors, and even some of the destroys who to or they all to say, okay. This is what we want to be our next release on or this product does Samsung galaxy ten this is the kernel release we want to pace it on the usually always use is stable release and Greco. Hartman maintains maintains stable releases. He's been our show. Very interesting. So he probably went took you through that. Don't remember very much. Deep detailed show. So what Greg does is as soon as five zero for example, just came out like two weeks ago he'll start to maintain that as a stable release. And there's a couple three other leases that are always always stable release that keep keep getting fixes from the main line. So when we fix a say security problem or a driver bugger, and we look at it and say, this is maintain decide that are maintainers dollar pursuer fix that problem will decide whether this is should go into stable or not. And then it'll go into the stable soc stable releases. We have a couple three stabilizes, and then renders sometimes request and say, hey, we would like this particularly to be long term stable which is longer length. Then think it's like five ten five years. I think. It we it. It's decision is made at the time. How long it should be? So the way it works is a very new feature goes into the main line, which is Lynn asus. Cree and then stable trees get fixes from there. So product teams, I mean, individual companies than phone product teams, they decide based on the tried to get their dry worsen. So on that need to run into the one of the main lines, and then they use that whichever one house all of their content to get their product running. They will stabilize on that. Meaning they will pick that as their release to do the release. And after that, they will be they will keep moving they cardinal to with the fixes..

Linda Susu Hartman Samsung Greg Greco Google Lynn eight weeks two weeks five ten five years five weeks two week
"kernel" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

04:56 min | 1 year ago

"kernel" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"So you would the test of karnal softest tests used that to exercise the kernel, of course, cutting testing is very important as the part of rally dating qualifying cardinal is really important because it is the foundation piece in any of the lyrics ecosystem you want to help those bits. So it it. So we have various methods to in the cardinal to verify things like, for example, we have if I am writing ape changing driver, for example. I would go torn on configuration options in the cardinal that make sure that my locking is seen. That means I'm not locking here and leaving the law leaving that lock not unlocking. It those lock and unlock are balanced. So I can I can go into the cardinal and say I want to turn on those options. So which which which is I do so and then in other cases, they we have other DiBa GOP shins that will go and say look at case on for example, are just stunned as Asian so we can turn dot on. And then it'll go make sure it's these are all not something that you would turn on in the field. Right. But you would do it during the Dell of -ment or you do it as validation mechanism. Before saying everything looks good. So you would go and say, hey, I'm going to turn on a DOE sanitizer. And tell me if I have any memory that. I am using after free or. Any kind of memory issues? I might have. That's one example. So we have various tools within the kernel configuration options compile time configuration options that we can turn on and debugged. So we use all of these mechanisms. And in addition, we in some cases, we have tracing we can turn on tracing on Chrissy events. Like, for example. You are you have a host. And then you are you have a VM running. So you say, hey, I want to take this device and assign it to the VM. So we can if we are interested in looking at, hey, how this process is working is it correctly working so we can go and turn on Tracy events. So during run time and then turn them off. If we want tracing is an interesting one because. Done. Some shows about in distributed, tracing I'm assuming tracing somewhat just non-distribution raising somewhat similar where it's measuring the late and sees through the different paths that it's that a call might be taking or measuring at least that the call is is making its way through the different lower levels. I guess maybe define what tracing in this particular case, these Tracy events if for us to get a feel for how it particular user action might be taking paths it's similar to that. It's kind of taking baths in the Colonel. And we want to make sure we are facing the path. It's taking it could be used in two ways. It could also be used how fast something happens performance racing. And the other aspect is is it taking the right paths in the kernel that we expect you to take right? So as a debugging tool, so those are. Two different uses of that. I think what I'm what I'm getting at is that we have multiple ways to debugged and test the Colonel, and then we use depending on the depending on what we are doing as Colonel downpours. We all we do we use all of those avenues to test the cardinal doing dveelopment, integration and debugging. So if I had some change, and then I ran a performance trace on it. And there was a small increase in latency due to that change. How would you know, if that performance penalty is is like a bug or is something that would be considered a regression because sometimes it's tolerable increase in latency? It's not a big deal. Nobody's ever going to recognize it is there some judgment that's involved in that process. Yes. Yes. Depending on how bad the performance impact is. And why that? Whites introduced you have to fill the bay. I go go about it is I have to I root costs and say, why did why am I seeing the change? So what happened is that change can the change be explained? Or is it is it avoidable. Maybe that is something in the path..

Tracy karnal GOP Dell
"kernel" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

02:36 min | 1 year ago

"kernel" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"For being a sponsor, the co founder of digital ocean. Moisy Eretz KE was one of the first people I interviewed and his interview is really inspirational for me. So I've always thought of digital ocean as a pretty inspir-. Company. So thank you digital ocean. Hugh, Akon you are a Lennox core. Commissioner welcome to software engineering daily. Thank you. I wanna talk to you today about operating system. Kernels. Let's start by just explaining what is the role of an operating system. Kernel operating system is you have a piece of hardwood laptop, for example, in everything that a human needs to do on that operating system provides dry woods and unquote cardinal. You have memory in the laptop and how do you initialized the empty? How do you set up the hardware? How do you get the dry woods, different pieces of hardware to state working? For example, audio on the laptop awed you screen all of that is what operating system going to do foot you. It's essentially making the. Hardware. Usable footer you to do for the user to do what they need to do with that piece of Harvard. You've spent a lot of time on the testing process for the lenox Colonel when you're talking about these different elements of an operating system like media playing for example, how do you test something like that? That is a good question. I do contribute to Lennox media subsystem. And so how do we tell you how you have a dry with apart? Obviously the media drivers. And then you use various user space up legations in terms of to do the testing the different levels of testing. We do like, for example. We would just to do does it boot. For one thing the sofa slow of testing and operating system does the cuddle would come up to us a prompt. Can you log in can you start up legations rows of since? Oh on so say, you are talking about a particular media. Would you have a USB stick that does digital TV your and log TV and so on so he he connect not as a dozen pilot up with that..

Moisy Eretz KE Lennox media co founder Hugh Harvard Commissioner
"kernel" Discussed on Accidental Tech Podcast

Accidental Tech Podcast

03:34 min | 1 year ago

"kernel" Discussed on Accidental Tech Podcast

"Now, one of you is an anxious to talk about Mojave stability, I'm guessing that's John. But you do have an ancient MAC though. I mean, I'm not talking about that. When I was talking about the five Camac that is always the latest operating since my Tamale. Anyway, I didn't want to pass judgment too soon because the point zero was always weird and give it a while. But now, I'm ready to declare that Mojave is less stable on all the systems that run on which is a my MAC, and my work laptop than was high Sierra, and it's not like there is some terrible problem that happens all the time. But there's just enough problems. And I say stability, I mean, like stability stability as in my computer doesn't work anymore stability, not like an app crashes, or does it weird thing or there's a bug both my work computer in my home, computer exhibit problems that it's like game over you must restart the computer with power. Kind of thing. It's not a hard freeze or says everything. So the laptop one is kernel panics, which I hadn't high Sierra to it's because it's a laptop and laptops, do that. And I have to plug it into plugged into a USB hub thing with an external, monitor whatever. And I've never still never been able to determine is this the problem of the hub devices at the problem of the laptop is it a software problem. I don't know who or what to blame. All I know is that I get slightly more kernel panics in Mojave than it did with high Sierra, I got them with high Sierra too. I guess. Anymore? The only upside to Mojave on the laptop is that I can for the most part plug and unplug it with the laptop lid close. I get kernel panics at different times. Usually like when it's Br plugging my laptop for the first time during the day when it's been in my laptop bag the whole night. Sometimes it had a kernel panic in the night. Sometimes I think packs when I plug in thing for the first time, whether it's open or close any that's the laptop and at home this my five Camac is on all the time. It's not, you know, there's no real weird software on it. I still a crash playing because I thought it might be to blame for all this stuff because running on a memory, whatever. But don't that wasn't thing. I got on my five Camac, which is on all the time. As the computer in the morning or the first time, I use it for the day, and I will make it up, and I will enter a password or whatever time unlock it. And on the screen in front of me. I will see a bunch of dialogues com. Either asking for like, an I cloud password or a key chain unlock password. And I'll see a bunch of them stacked on top of each other very often than menu bar will be gone. And I have learned from experience that there's nothing you can do this situation, you can enter whatever password is asking for and it will just re prompt you or you'll reveal the dollar boxer, and you can't sell his dog boxes and new ones will spawn as fast as you can hold down the escapee your computer spatially, did it thinks it's not logged into it thinks it's not logged into cloud anymore. You can't switch to a different account usually can't restart the way usually restart as open a terminal which brings back the menu bar, and I repeat from the command line, which I think counts as clean restart, then I suppose, but sometimes the power button is required. Because you can't even get the terminal to launch because command space doesn't work or the. Doc is unresponsive. I don't know what it's problem is what happens during the night that that it suddenly thinks it's keychain locked in isn't logged into on cloud on the best thing is when it comes back up. Everything is fine. But then you get a dialogue all your devices saying you've just signed into such computer with your new apple, and do you know that thing? And so it doesn't it doesn't happen every day or every week or even every month..

Mojave apple
"kernel" Discussed on Accidental Tech Podcast

Accidental Tech Podcast

03:43 min | 2 years ago

"kernel" Discussed on Accidental Tech Podcast

"That i could find but i'm not i'm not an expert in digging information out of those things but it is resulting in a software kernel panic it seems and it is usually while i'm doing things in x code very heavy echoed works so i actually think it might be software related exco does all sorts of weird stuff to enable development i'm running a beta version of mexico trying to debunk owed on beta iphone and beta watch so it's probably doing all sorts of weird stuff with you know with low level system functionality so i i'm not worried yet that it might not be software related but i'm an boy am i so glad this happened once before i left but still i i'm not happy about this but i was also working today it didn't happen at all today's i don't know and i've been i've been monitoring thermals with istat menus and thermal seemed totally fine totally in line with both cpu edgy pew with like where they should be so i don't think it's that it could be the weird power i thought it might be the weird power and this beach house that's what i was gonna ask but he did the same thing at home in a really nice ups so that's why i think it's probably not that no thunderball monitors were all along key i'd get the same symptom kernel panic but it's in response to some hardware thing that ends up doing something that the colonel doesn't expect so i'm still thinking maybe hardware it yeah i'm not ruling out hardware yet but because it has never happened untended it's at least it seems at least to be like load related but the load on putting on it has been echoed and exco and i'm doing like i mentioned last year like i'm doing a lot of stuff that max out all the correlate doing big build and stuff like that and and so you know all the cores are peaked for a minute but it doesn't seem to be doing then it's doing it like at places where x codes sometimes crashes when things like the like the source editor tries to do syntax highlighting and just explodes and echoed crashes case you know about this from running swift's oh yes so it's it could be something like that i don't know to answer hot vaa in the chat no the pro is not running mojave i don't run beta mac os i guess run all the betas iowa's devices like a crazy person so you saving the kernel panic reports and finally radars for them i've been hitting these send to apple button instead i figured this is their problem not mine well it's their fault it's my problem when i had my thunderbolt thing was doing it i saved every single one and i just kept piling on a radar that word someone something i mean they will kernel panic is one of the types of radars that people will look out and there and you if you have report you're hoping someone will look at it you know what we'll say aha see what that is that you know but if it ends up being hardware thing they're never going to do anything about that it's going to be like well that should never happen your computers probably broken they won't tell you that but the that's what i assume is going on when like the reports tell them nothing about some kind of software glitch they just look random or look like they've encountered in exceptional condition that should never ever happened in in basically means that your hardware soest also another news tiff is totally sola my laptop so i kinda no longer have laptop that's not really surprising to be honest with you turns out people like computers who knew who knew so you're gotta buy another one of these ancient laptops no i this point i i gotta wait till the new ones come out it's okay mark mark this moment listeners will see what it happens i will say you know what's really nice having a mac with multi user support and having an operating system in a platform that supports multiple users correctly when tiff needed to do some work here on vacation and i have my laptop and i'm like hey i can just set you up a user account you can log in as you and all your eye clouds stuff shows up like it was amazing just how well it worked and i.

"kernel" Discussed on The Tech Guy

The Tech Guy

01:53 min | 2 years ago

"kernel" Discussed on The Tech Guy

"Creates a file single file that is the windows machine the image of the windows machine that's the drive and everything that's why it's unlikely the parallels in its normal operation would trash your mac because it's just it's not operating on your home act just on a file however when you do an update too parallels it doesn't stall i'm sure a an extension probably a kernel extension or k xt file in order to work and i suspect that's the problem it also when you license it a lot of programs do this it probably puts down a hidden file somewhere or maybe a not a hidden file in in the you know the applications support folder somewhere like that that says yeah this is registered here's a serial number this is the owner so if you re if you reform at the drive yeah you're going to have to reregister parallels but so you're saying it wants to reregister perils not windows right oh parallels works just fine at the window and well yeah you're you've lost your vm probably did you lose the whole vm yes yeah so you have to reinstall windows as you did in the you know in the first place that that installs into a single file i'm i'm not sure it seems pretty bad to crash your system i hope that it's not just a coincidence sometimes people often say oh yeah this i'd stall something in my system crash because of it but it it might have been merely that the system was you know on its last legs and that just pushed it over the edge should do when you're still parallel should really cause a problem so you when you installed your windows ten on parallels did you have licensed in the first place or did you start with windows seven started with windows.