19 Burst results for "Kernaghan"

Museums Get Virtual Help To Have Artwork Delivered During The Pandemic

Weekend Edition Saturday

04:37 min | 3 months ago

Museums Get Virtual Help To Have Artwork Delivered During The Pandemic

"When the pandemic force museums around the world to go dark. A lot of people working in the mother lost their jobs or had toe suddenly work under very different circumstances. Exhibitions out of canceled or postponed the network of people who helped get artwork safely from their owners to museum walls. Suddenly left with nothing to do. Sandra Shave member station W. Bur reports. Some are professionals. They're still able Find ways to do their job with a little virtual help. Contemporary art curator. Lisbon cell feels really lucky that most of the 120 borrowed works in her exhibition about painters John Michel Basquiat made it to the Museum of Fine Arts Boston before the museum shut down last March. When the pandemic began here in the U. S. It was Impossible to move anything. We didn't know about the future of the art shipping industry. That industry is huge, highly secure and completely invisible to museumgoers, says Los Angeles based collections manager Jacqueline Cabrera. They don't realize it took a year of legalese negotiations. Fabricating the crate and all this stuff to just get that one painting onto that wall. Managing. All of that is Jill Kennedy. Colonel Hands job. She's CMA Face, head registrar and the one who got all of those Basquiat's onto the M phase walls. Before the pandemic. Art was often escorted every step of the way by a Korea, which could be a hired expert curator or a registrar from another museum. Korea's used to ride on the trucks but not allowed in the trucks anymore. You know, we used to have follow cars in the Koreas would ride the follow car. They don't want to do that anymore. It's too close contact for too long, a period of time. Many of the flights that we would have normally used to get objects here have been canceled. These days When works arrive at the M F a Boston, Kernaghan and her colleagues rely on a virtual Korea during installation. It's kind of odd. It feels like having a robot or something in the room with us, but it's been working pretty well. The robot is actually an iPad attached it eye level toe a tripod on wheels. Kernaghan rolls it around the galleries while talking on zoom with registers and couriers. On the other end, they watch us unpack. They can Consult with the conservative about the condition report. And then they watch us as we put it up on the walls. It's a whole new world for registrars right now, while photographs and detailed reports on a pieces condition before and after its journey help Jacqueline Cabrera, who's also a contract, courier and registrar herself, says it's challenging to do such visual work from a distance. What you see with the naked eye versus a camera can be quite different. If you're not sharing about something, we will ask that person to kind of put that iPad right up to that painting. But that's the compromise that our people are doing right now. They understand the restrictions. Cabrera says the cost of transporting art have long been some of the highest in exhibition budgets. Those have been slashed because museums have lost millions and ticket revenue. Throughout the pandemic shows have been canceled or postponed. Staff members have been laid off. Now, instead of borrowing Cabrera, cesme or institutions looking inward, as she says they should. There's been plenty of Picasso exhibitions for the last decade, so Pull out that obscure artists who you might have a nice holding of and highlight that in your collection. The collection at Boston's Museum of Fine Arts includes more than 450,000 objects, truths of which visitors rarely see M F A director Matthew Teitelbaum acknowledges it's more cost effective and efficient. Develop and execute a show with what you already have. You don't have to go halfway around the world to select a work of art. On the other hand, I would say it over and over again. You still have to create a compelling narrative and you have to be convinced. Do you have the object to tell that story in ways that will attract much needed visitors to museums as they try to recover Boston's M F a hopes to reopen again later this month. Korir. Jacqueline Cabrera predicts things will continue to be rough for her and the others involved in getting precious paintings from one place to another. But she's hopeful I'm so looking forward to traveling again. And seeing my colleagues around the world

Jacqueline Cabrera Kernaghan Korea Sandra Shave W. Bur John Michel Basquiat Jill Kennedy Colonel Hands Museum Of Fine Arts Boston Basquiat Lisbon Cabrera Boston Los Angeles Matthew Teitelbaum Picasso Korir
Museums Get Virtual Help To Have Artwork Delivered During The Pandemic, Boston

Weekend Edition Saturday

04:41 min | 3 months ago

Museums Get Virtual Help To Have Artwork Delivered During The Pandemic, Boston

"When the pandemic force museums around the world to go dark. A lot of people working in the mother lost their jobs or had toe suddenly work under very different circumstances. Exhibitions out of canceled or postponed the network of people who helped get artwork safely from their owners to museum walls. Suddenly left with nothing to do. Is Andrea Shea of member station W. Bur reports. Some are professionals. They're still able Find ways to do their job with a little virtual help. Contemporary art curator. Lisbon cell feels really lucky that most of the 120 borrowed works in her exhibition about painters John Michel Basquiat made it to the Museum of Fine Arts Boston before the museum shut down last March. When the pandemic began here in the U. S. It was Impossible to move anything. We didn't know about the future of the art shipping industry. That industry is huge, highly secure and completely invisible to museumgoers, says Los Angeles based collections manager Jacqueline Cabrera. They don't realize it took a year of legalese negotiations. Advocating the crate. You know all this stuff to just get that one painting onto that wall managing? All of that is Jill Kennedy. Colonel Hands job. She's the M, a face head registrar and the one who got all of those Basquiat's onto the M phase walls. Before the pandemic. Art was often escorted every step of the way by a Korea, which could be a hired expert curator or a registrar from another museum. Korea's used to ride on the trucks but not allowed in the trucks anymore. You know, we used to have follow cars in the Koreas would ride the follow car. They don't want to do that anymore. It's too close contact for too long, a period of time. Many of the flights that we would have normally used to get objects here have been canceled. These days When works arrive at the M F a Boston, Kernaghan and her colleagues rely on a virtual Korea during installation. It's kind of odd. It feels like having a robot or something in the room with us, but it's been working pretty well. The robot is actually an iPad attached it eye level to a tripod on wheels. Kernaghan rolls it around the galleries while talking on zoom with registrars and couriers. On the other end, they watch us unpack. They can Consult with the conservative about the condition report. And then they watch us as we put it up on the walls. It's a whole new world for registrars right now, while photographs and detailed reports on a pieces condition before and after its journey help Jacqueline Cabrera, who's also a contract, courier and registrar herself, says it's challenging to do such visual work from a distance. What you see with the naked eye versus a camera could be quite different. If you're not sharing about something. We will ask that person to kind of put that iPad right up to that painting. But that's the compromise that our people are doing right now. They understand the restrictions. Cabrera says the cost of transporting art have long been some of the highest in exhibition budgets. Those have been slashed because museums have lost millions and ticket revenue. Throughout the pandemic shows have been canceled or postponed. Staff members have been laid off. Now, instead of borrowing Cabrera, cesme or institutions looking inward, as she says they should. There's been plenty of Picasso exhibitions for the last decade, so Without that obscure artists who you might have a nice holding of and highlight that in your collection. The collection at Boston's Museum of Fine Arts includes more than 450,000 objects, troves of which visitors rarely see M F A director Matthew Teitelbaum acknowledges it's more cost effective and efficient. Develop and execute a show with what you already have. You don't have to go halfway around the world to select a work of art. On the other hand, I would say it over and over again. You still have to create a compelling narrative and you have to be convinced. Do you have the object to tell that story in ways that will attract much needed visitors to museums as they try to recover Boston's M F a hopes to reopen again later this month. Warrior, Jacqueline Cabrera predicts things will continue to be rough for her and the others involved in getting precious paintings from one place to another. But she's hopeful I'm so looking forward to traveling again and seeing my colleagues around the world for NPR news. I'm Andrea Shea in Boston.

Jacqueline Cabrera Kernaghan Korea Andrea Shea W. Bur John Michel Basquiat Jill Kennedy Colonel Hands Museum Of Fine Arts Basquiat Lisbon Cabrera Boston Los Angeles Matthew Teitelbaum Picasso Npr News
"kernaghan" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

05:48 min | 3 months ago

"kernaghan" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Welcome back to the second hour of women to watch. My name is Sue Rocco and I'm having a really beautiful candid conversation this evening with Heather Kernaghan. Heather is the CEO of North America. Hotwire Global Communications NPR by saying that title right, Heather, Where's okay? Haitians? That's what we go by yet. Okay, great. And You know, we weigh spoke a lot about how you kind of got to the place you are, and I want to spend some time in this hour really talking about your industry How it's changed. Um, I actually have a young woman who is Just took a new job with a big international PR firm, and she wants she's excited that you're the guest this'll week and wants to get some advice from you. So I thought I'd start out with this is this I think is good advice is asking it of others who have been there and done it. And at one point you reached out to a colleague. Her name is Barbara Bates. Who was the CEO of her own communications agency on do you? You know you You wanted to talk to her to get some feedback and advice and she ended up hiring you. Which doesn't surprise me one bit on. Do you both went on to run, you know, Amazing, award winning firm for years. My first question about that is what did you learn from her that you still practice today? So many things. And Barb and I still work together s O the meeting bar. My attention was to hear how she had started her own agency and growing it because that was in my newly found realization that I could be a CEO. I thought I can start a company and build it or find a company that would like somebody to run it and figure out how to do that. So Suburban. I talked through her journey to build her firm, and she asked me what was I looking for? And saying, I want to be CEO someday that was she was the first person I said that, too. After I had the realization it was what I wanted, and that felt really scary. And she said, Oh, That's great. Why don't you come and work with me and we'll figure out how to, um we'll teach you how to run the business and we'll grow it together and she taught me and continues to so many things. The first thing people first. You know, everything is about people. Don't worry about clients so much. If if your team has looked after, and you've got the right people in the organization, you'll be fine. Andre So continues to teach me that having fun is as important as the work and I have a hard time with that and usually more about work, and Barb knows how to have a fun time. So I'm watching her always and seeing how she's doing that balancing big ambitions and also being fun outside of work. That's a great balance. Um, I would say when I think about companies today and how they're different from when when we were growing up, and I look at our your Children are millennials yet they're younger, but, um They are looking for that kind of different environment and culture at a company right. They want the collaboration. They want to feel a part of the company and not just an employee. So how would you describe the culture of hot wire? And, you know, what Are you proud of that you you? You bring to that culture. Hmm. Well, I I always think about transparency as a important part of our culture, and we had that. As part of the culture of Eastwick before we were acquired by Hotwire, and we've brought that over with us. The idea that we're limitless and anything is possible is part of the culture and that's both for the people that work in our business and also the work we do for our clients and the way that comes to life. That makes me incredibly proud is When people have a new idea about a new role they'd like in the business or a project that they would like to spearhead that it doesn't matter Who you like. What will you play in the company today? That is possible for you. One example is a young man who said after the 2016 election. He wanted Tonto work part time for us, and then go out and work for a nonprofit organizations. Tomo Pally change the next election's outcome. So we structured his job to do that. Then he came back after a couple months and he said, Actually, I'd like to launch a social impact practice at Hotwire. Do you think I could do it? And I said Yes. And I didn't know how. But to me. It was right for the business. It was right for the time and it was. I knew it was right for him and others in the business that really cared. And so we worked on a business plan together and we got it launched. Now he ended up leaving Hotwire after a little over two years, but he office might make me cry. So he printed off the cover of the business plan that we had worked on together, and he's that a framed But, he wrote, Keep allowing employees to do this. And I felt really from Well, Wow. Yeah, You know, sometimes it It's those moments where you know we're genuinely interested in helping someone else and we might not know the impact of that. Um Until later. Yes. Clearly he Woz, Um Tell me, Let's move. You know what for the listeners who? Just perhaps or not that familiar with the industry of public relations and communications. Tell them what you do. You know what? What kind of clients do you have? Who are they? And what are you doing day today? Yeah, well, um, it made in the industry, which is a really big industry, and we're trying to encourage more young people to come into the industry and learn about communications and brand and marketing and public relations..

Hotwire CEO Heather Kernaghan Barb Sue Rocco North America Barbara Bates Tomo Pally Global Communications Andre NPR
"kernaghan" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

05:12 min | 3 months ago

"kernaghan" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"I was working all the time trying to save money for this trip, and she went to the owners of the restaurant and said Can I come work there, too? But I don't want the paycheck. I wanna put it all on Heather's timecard to help her build up flower. But, yeah, So my mom came and worked at the restaurant to and which is insane because she had two little kids at the time. She would come on the weekends and we work together and she helped me afford it. And that's how I got to being involved in had a very formative experience living in Africa for a little bit. You know, I think a relationship between a father and a daughter can be very, very impactful. No matter which direction it goes, do you do you feel like you've made peace with him? And you know his his leaving? Yeah. No, it is probably thought. Honesty. That's okay. You know, I tried to understand his Point of view, and I honestly just can. I don't understand. Abandoned abandonment. I really don't So I guess I made peace with not making peace with it at this point, But yeah, What happened is just before I went to Africa, So I was 16 at the time I was at the restaurant working. So was my mom. And it was pouring coffee and I could see the area where reception was and I looked up that my mom was on the phone and she had this terrible look on her face, and I actually wondered if I'd been caught, you know, drinking or something like that. She found out one of the bad things I was doing, but she she came and got me and said, I have some really bad news. Your dad's been killed. And in an accident. Oh, my gosh. Yeah, And so I feel like, you know, I only got to the point of forgiveness with him. You know, the 16 year old Heather. I didn't really get more than that. You know that he died. He was in a car accident, and, um, my help. My mom helped me work through that and be able to go on that trip and sort of keep moving forward. Well, that's that's so that's so hard that so hard, um Here's a good kind of Segway. Yeah, You met your husband in high school, and I love the way you describe him. You know, it's really being a personal and professional rock and partner for you in life. Can you describe describe the day or the evening? It was a party, so it's probably a high school party at night. That you met him? Yeah. What was it about him that you know, sparked your interest? Oh, my gosh. Probably his eyes and a smile. Yeah, it was. I was 17 when I met Mike, and it wasn't a high school party at a hotel with just worried. I have a daughter almost that name age now and hope that doesn't She's not doing the same thing. They're much younger to us. Then we were. Yes, My gosh. Yeah, that I have a girlfriend. She's side as we came to that party. You know, there's this guy, Mike everything. He's really cute kind of hands off everybody and Mike and I ended up Chatting and talking throughout the entire night, and I lived about an hour away from where the party was. And the next day he got in the car and drove to the town and looked me up in the phone book because that's what they had and called me and setting here in your town. Do you know Could we have lunch and we've been together? Pretty consistently ever since a long time. He's a break. Yeah. That's that's unusual, right, especially today if you're just tuning in. I'm speaking with Heather Kernaghan this evening, the CEO of North America at Hotwire Global Communications just before the break. I'm going to share a quote. I love this so much. And this was back when your kids were small, I guess. And you were working and Mike was home. You said when I used to walk out the door every morning to go to work, I would yell back to my husband. I got this out here and he would yell back. I got this in here. And I think you know that says so much about what it takes to just Partners and have each other's back. Yes. What would you say to a man who feels that that's His role should beat it to leave the house and go to work. Call my husband. I'll talk you through it. That's what I would say. Yeah, I don't know how it works, or why he's like he is. I do know that you're growing up. His mom went to work in his dad retired at a very young age, So I think he saw a model where the woman left to go out the door every day, and he has just been very comfortable with that and understanding that I've got strength and he's got strength and they are different and I need him. As much as he needs me. Right. That's awesome. This and we're going to go into our first break. Stay with us for our watch team and we'll be back with Heather Kirk. Everybody is your cousin Brucie, Because if you've ever been injured because of the carelessness of another person you deserve a skilled and experienced legal team to fight America's most powerful insurance companies. Listen to me. For over 30 years, the injury.

Mike partner Heather Africa North America Heather Kirk Heather Kernaghan Hotwire Global Communications CEO
"kernaghan" Discussed on Security Now

Security Now

05:11 min | 1 year ago

"kernaghan" Discussed on Security Now

"Back to you Steve so get a Lotta this Leo oh boy UNIX is co Creator Ken Thompson's BSD UNIX password yeah has finally after thirty nine years been cracked Oh my God odd mean they couldn't log into his account now so so and it was a pretty good password I bet it was Ken Thompson who was of course the Co Creator of Unix He still has his any richie passed away but yes well he's at Google and he did go the go okay so the story begins five years ago when a developer Laya nerve new Kirch in new Kurkin new Kurkin spotted an interesting etcetera password file in publicly available source tree of the historical BSD version three from nineteen eighty ref the password violin yes it was is there it included the hashed passwords belong into more than two dozen UNIX luminaries who worked on UNIX develop including Dennis Ritchie Stephen Born Ken Thompson Oregon Yep the Bourne Shell Eric Schmidt was in the air turn at L. labs when they were creating UNIX the Eric Schmidt Stuart Feldman and Bryan Kernigan Kernaghan a Kernaghan s it occurs Shannon Richie is the classics book. Yeah that's right since those early passwords were protected using the long since deprecated D es based ADI's Script D. E. S. at should be cleanable CR Y P t and they were limited to at most eight import characters Laya decided to brute force them for fun this was five years ago my hands by the way this was aboard crew pie member cryptography research this was this was a prototype it actually failed the only got one chip on it but it was going to be filled with chips to crack Dez right this was all about it from Zia says eff Tiger fee research says they were gonNA prove that Dez was unreliable nice yeah and well and and itself it is a fifty six bit block which is now way too short but that's why triple D. es essentially essentially three of them creates a much longer block so anyway so five years ago she started to tackle this she successfully cracked the passwords for most of those UNIX luminaries using standard off the shelf tools like John The ripper and hash cat but the toughest ones to crack which she was unable to crack belong to Ken Thompson and and five other contributors who helped to build the UNIX system and so proud yes including bill joy of course as we yeah no later founded sun microsystems and Design Java for us so she wrote in a blog posting last Wednesday she wrote Ken his password eluded Mike cracking endeavor an exhaustive search back in two thousand fourteen through all lower case letters and digits it's took several days in yielded no result she noted that compared to other password hashing schemes such as MT L.. AM descript turns out to be quite a bit slower to crack and the problem was there were no special k software for no one was like bothering in weakened cracking Sha to fifty six in a blink but but DAS just no one had bothered to special case it so earlier this month she posted Oliver Findings on the UNIX Heritage Society Mailing List requesting help from other members to cry the remaining passwords and six days later an Australian engineer Nigel Williams responded with the plain text password used by Ken Thomson which he cracked after four days using an amd Radian Vegas sixty four Ronning Hash cat which was producing or testing about nine hundred and thirty million hashes per second thompsons past word as consequently has been revealed as monkey Ono p slash q two Hyphen q you for exclamation point. That's yes as a chess move exactly yes notation describing the move pawn.

Ken Thompson Dennis Ritchie Stephen Born Ke Dez Shannon Richie UNIX Heritage Society Ken Thomson Eric Schmidt Eric Schmidt Stuart Feldman Kernaghan Laya Bryan Kernigan Kernaghan Oregon Kurkin Google Ronning Hash Steve L. labs developer amd
"kernaghan" Discussed on The Tech Guy

The Tech Guy

04:18 min | 2 years ago

"kernaghan" Discussed on The Tech Guy

"I know that lately libraries have to look at other things they can do besides his books like the internet internet access is big in libraries. Oh, definitely definitely high school students books. Oh, that's. Oh my gosh. Yes. Should actually had a reading we have reading program this year, and we had a tie for people read thirty two kids for thirty six books for the years. Let a lot of readings that's three books a month. It is what can I do to make your job easier? Well, thank you. So I was wondering earlier this year kid came in asking for book them programming. We didn't have any I recommended him to coda cab PM network briefly choice, but good, man. Good code that one. Yeah. And wondering if you could recommend some something so that like we have some books and program coating, I know, you're at commended think python earlier that something you'd recommend. So the issue, of course, with that kind of thing is that they date themselves very quickly right there there. Yeah. I mean, there's nothing older than a book an old book on programming, but there are certain classics that I would absolutely. We have kids are going to be interested in the popular languages of the day. And that changes all the time this very programming languages of its faddish thing, but you play on safe. And that's a good choice. There's some classic books that if you could find them, I think would be so great to have in in your library. There's one by Kernaghan and Richie called the c programming language that is a thin little book, but is a gem. K A R N H I G A, N Kernaghan and Richie. All right. T C H. They it's it's so it's such a classic. It's called K in are almost universally. Okay. So that's a good one. There's there are two books that if a kid is actually serious and says I wanna learn to code their their timeless one is how to design programs it's widely known as H T DP. And it I recently just reworked my way through it. It is it is the most important programming. I think for a lot of people HT DP, and the nice thing about it. I while you free online. So you could point people to the online page, but you could also get a copy because a kid might be. I'm thinking you've got a kid really wants to learn browse in stacks is going to run across this. I taught myself to program with the c programming language way back when and I think it's still relevant. When I have the digital. Everyone has also just have it in this accident. We can. And so they can get HDP online. It uses a programming language that's free to download called racket, which is not a popular language, but is a really good teaching language, and it's actually based on lists for scheme. It's a real it's a scheme and and. So that's a good one. There's another one that's a little harder for a more advanced kid. Maybe you don't need to carry. This is called I c p the structure and interpretation of computer programs that used to be the first book in college for teaching programming in many many schools, including MIT. Well, this is obviously the I'm this is very fascinating. It is. It's it's gonna you're always going to get different answers, depending on who you talk to. And the problem. I have is you're going to get answers at tend to be faddish because you know, you gotta get Java. Scrip- the good parts, which is a great Java script book. But but then flash and Java are going out. I mean Jarvis script will be around for some time. It'd probably be a good. But I also think and I'm I'm very opinionated on this. I don't think a kid should start with Java script. It's too easy to learn bad habits. And that's why the the single best book for any high schooler to start programming with his TDP..

Richie Kernaghan Jarvis MIT
"kernaghan" Discussed on Talk 650 KSTE

Talk 650 KSTE

01:30 min | 2 years ago

"kernaghan" Discussed on Talk 650 KSTE

"Meteorologist, Steve Raleigh. News Radio seven hundred wwl w it's thirty five degrees right now. Another member of the family is pleading not guilty to killing eight members of the rodent, family and. Pike county over two years ago. Angela Wagner waves her right to a speedy trial and judge Randy Deering orders. Her held without bond. Wagner is facing twenty two counts against her including eight counts of aggravated murder with death penalty specifications. The basic prison terms for a third agree felony or nine twelve eighteen twenty four thirty four thirty six months. The maximum fine is ten thousand dollars. There are now gag orders in place for legal professionals involved in the cases, a pre trial hearing is set for January seventh and Columbus. Jared alley. Newsradio seven hundred wwl w he will be spending the holidays behind bars. A former assistant principal at Brookwood elementary school in Hamilton pled guilty to a misdemeanor drug charge. Police say they found met in the office of Kevin Kernaghan is teaching license has been permanently revoked Cincinnati public school says student enrollment is expected to rise for the eighth consecutive year. Not only your numbers clown. But the percentage of the. Market share that CPS s has been growing, and we watch that the same as some people might be watching a business cycle school board member e Bolton talking to our Scott Sloan since two thousand thirteen CPS enrollment is growing by about forty four hundred students the organizers of blink which brought over a million.

Angela Wagner Jared alley CPS Steve Raleigh Brookwood elementary school Kevin Kernaghan Randy Deering Pike county Cincinnati public school murder Scott Sloan principal Columbus e Bolton Hamilton nine twelve eighteen twenty fo ten thousand dollars thirty five degrees two years
"kernaghan" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"kernaghan" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"To artists for light base, sculptures and installations for next October. Blink in downtown Cincinnati. Applications are now being accepted. It does not include the projected light projects. Cincinnati public schools are seeing more growth and Atty public schools celebrating. That student enrollment is expected to rise in two thousand. One thousand nine hundred thousand twenty four the eighth consecutive year school board member e Bolton telling Scott Sloan not only your numbers clown. But the percentage of the market share that CPS s has been growing mostly credits. Parents switching from charter schools to CPS our remaining relatively flat. So there's not a gross van. So we are experiencing growth in the state since two thousand thirteen Cincinnati public schools enrollment has grown by about forty four hundred students Matt REEs, NewsRadio seven hundred wwl double d former assistant principal at an elementary school in Hamilton will spend the holidays in jail Kevin Kernaghan admitted to having meth in his office at the school. He was sentenced the seventeen days in jail apologized in court as part of his plea agreement. He will not renew his teaching license. The president's former personal attorney Michael Cohen pled guilty to lying to congress about Trump project plan for Russia. Outgoing house speaker Paul Ryan reacting to Michael. Cohen's guilty plea for lying to congress during the investigation into Russian election meddling. Well, he should be prosecuted to the extent of the law. Senate Democratic leader Chuck Schumer, the president actions clearly show, he has locked to hide that he is afraid of the truth Schumer pointing to the fact that President Trump has recently escalated his attacks on special counsel, Robert Muller. Kenneth Moton ABC news, the capitol on Wall Street near the close. The Dow down Twenty-eight points, NASDAQ off nineteen in the SNP dropped six points..

Cincinnati Chuck Schumer Kevin Kernaghan Michael Cohen president congress Trump Matt REEs Kenneth Moton Robert Muller Senate e Bolton Scott Sloan special counsel Russia principal Hamilton
"kernaghan" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

01:41 min | 2 years ago

"kernaghan" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"It's thirty two degrees. Now, the member of the Wagner family due in court today to answer charges of aggravated murder. Could San Angelo Wagner to the death row in Ohio? She's accused of being part of the plot to wipe out the rodent, family and pike. Kelly sons have already been arraigned both being held without bond. Former assistant principal caught with meth in his guests can handle the military school has pleaded guilty to drug charges in Butler county court Kevin Kernaghan holiday today, telling the judge will accept any sentence handed down. He says he let down his students the district and his family. He was sentenced to seventeen days in jail in those days have to be served over the holidays this year that means Carnahan will be locked up for Christmas and New Year's local chapter the N double ACP wants an apology anger following a tweet from the tax fighting group coast. They said councilwoman to my Denard was being hunted by sheriff's deputies trying to serve a subpoena for a grand jury investigation. And double ACP says the use of the word hunted is repulsive and polarizing rhetoric loaded with racist. Cope other members of council of criticized coast as Well Chris sale Bach calling for a police investigation. That is under way, we're told coast tells the Enquirer he's told the people. Authorized to send tweets on behalf of the group to tone it down. But he's refusing to say who wrote the tweet in question, the attorney who's handling civil suit that prompted this criminal investigation is Bill Cunningham guests coming right up at twelve. Oh, six. He was cut by Zona the day after the cardinals were blown out Sunday by the chargers now offensive tackle Andre Smith. The former Bengals is back in Cincinnati lineman wearing his old number seventy-one practicing today with the Bengals because of injuries. It is quite likely that Smith will be starting at left tackle on Sunday. Protecting.

San Angelo Wagner ACP Bengals Andre Smith Kevin Kernaghan murder offensive tackle Butler county Carnahan Cincinnati Kelly Bill Cunningham principal Denard cardinals Ohio chargers attorney
"kernaghan" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

02:06 min | 3 years ago

"kernaghan" Discussed on KOMO

"Four that's star star one two three four fired due in court next week this school administrator over alleged methamphetamines a former assistant principal at an elementary school in the cincinnati area is accused of having meth in his office kevin kernaghan resigned yesterday from his position with hamilton city schools police say they became aware of kernaghan after a vehicle rented by kernahan was involved in a reported burglary so far he is only considered a witness in that crime a search of kernaghan's office yesterday turned up a white powder that field tested for methamphetamine matt reese abc news cincinnati white house officials say fifty employees will work at a new us embassy in jerusalem when an officially opens on monday several trump administration officials will be on hand for monday's ceremony which coincides with the seventieth anniversary of israel declaring independence abc's mollie hunter in jerusalem issue of course is what that symbolism actually gene so we did see protests back in december when this was announced a lot of people saying this killed the peace process they are saying this really takes jerusalem off the table that this hurts be thorniest contra most controversial issue in that peace process discussion if negotiations do kick start stevie wonder calls out connie west for seeing slavery is a choice calling the idea of foolishness and likening it to holocaust denial was made the remarks may i in an interview with tmz this is abc news komo news time eight oh four triple a traffic every ten minutes on the fours here's justin davis and we have a new accident southbound five to south of albaro place this is partially blocking our carpool lane and is slowing you down to just about i ninety from there northbound we're starting to get a little bit of and due to other revived by five project will start closing down a few lanes be reduced a two lanes until monday morning southbound four or five continues to clear out meanwhile from about i ninety two kennydale hill and also sound five we're still seeing a bit of hesitation as you make way on the five curve to the pr river bridge next komo traffic is at a fourteen steve pool with the.

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"kernaghan" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

02:10 min | 3 years ago

"kernaghan" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"The forecast from your severe weather station news radio seven hundred ww it's seventy seven degrees right now four juveniles were arrested this afternoon after cincinnati police officers were shot at started during a stolen vehicle pursuit in the west end no officers were hit by the gunfire the shots rang out on john street the chase ended near the carl lindner family ymca on lynch street any witnesses to the shooting or asked to call crime stoppers at three five to thirty forty he was being considered to be the summer principal at the elementary the school now he has been charged with bringing meth into the school former assistant principal at brookwood elementary is accused of having meth in his office forty two year old kevin kernaghan resigned yesterday from his position with hamilton city schools police say they became aware of kernaghan after a vehicle rented by kernahan was involved in a reported burglary so far he is only considered a witness in that crime search of kernaghan's office yesterday turned up a white powder that field tested for methamphetamine mattress newsradio seven hundred wwl w a teenager who opened fire at his former high school in california today had a soviet style rifles shooting send students into a panic a fourteen year old former student at highland high school for an unknown reason opened fire hitting a fifteen year old in the arm before leaving campus la county sheriff jim mcdonald says shooter had an s k s rifle nacho way left the scene when he did but he did he fired the rounds and then he deliberately left the campus and and went into the adjoining neighborhood he alleged shooter was detained by an offduty police officer at a nearby strip mall the victim is recovering alex stone abc news los angeles there are two ovalles checkpoints tonight the first is in the township on route twenty eight at forty eight that one runs from now until eleven o'clock then in springdale another checkpoint starts at eleven thirty on springfield pike in front of the city building that one goes until three in the morning a reds update the reds are going for their fourth win in a row tonight when they take on the dodgers in los angeles matt harvey gets the start for cincinnati marking his reds debut our pre.

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"kernaghan" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

02:15 min | 3 years ago

"kernaghan" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Brian kernaghan is a professor of computer science at princeton university and the author of several books including the go programming language and these see programming language which is a book more commonly referred to as knr brian welcome to software engineering daily wasn't to be here you gave a talk recently called how to succeed in the language designed without really trying and in your talk you survey the history of programming languages as you have witnessed the birth and death of so many programming languages what are the timeless characteristics that define a successful programming language guinness that i would say the time was means survival and in fact one of the things i said in a talk at least is i remember it is that most languages don't die they may go into a sort of more abundant be state where there's there's code written in the too much trouble to rewrite and so the language in some sense remains alive but early most languages dumps seemed to die they just go into that state with the successful once the tech to your top ten twenty or widow it's hard to know what the what ordering there is for those top ten or twenty languages but languages look see your java wore python those seem to succeed because they are very useful for a wide collection of people they fit naturally into different environments their selfsustaining in the sense that theory is a commune a t o people that keeps them alive and well they're all open source was just looking earlier it's something in thinking are there any significant languages which is a tall that park proprietary at this point not many come to mind for temples shark was proprietary for quite some wild but microsoft has recently made that open source and i think that's a good move for all concerned have there been any languages whose success has surprised you.

Brian kernaghan princeton university programming language professor of computer science microsoft
"kernaghan" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

02:27 min | 3 years ago

"kernaghan" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"Deacons david go ahead kernaghan precede taken uh taking my call um i just wanted to you with the uh some of the other callers of talked about living in uh more formally all all barely are um you know conservative states primarily i'm in the south and um and my state is changing and it will probably within the next twenty years um you know go bulu young and and it's because of the migration from from on high tech states and you know i i kind of call him you know their team of parasites you know they devoured there they're hose it's dying macron's st mirren and played move to a healthy want him to continue the same poff us hey it's going on in virginia it's going on north carolina where you are it's going on it's going to happen in florida because of puerto ricoh and i love puerto ricans but their political philosophy is to the left an ansi pelosi which is why puerto rico is failed is the state and so right north carolina was deep red jesse helms red and right now it's purple trending blue also you take the parasites out of the northeast but add on top of that illegal migration chain migration chain immigration the southern border lack of a fence to the democratic party dozen appealed anymore to middle class americans so the democrats are replacing them with large numbers of hispanics from third world countries that have grinding poverty and so north carolina will become a blue state in the next ten years right now it's kind of a battleground state and i can't think of too many states that are going blue to read but i know a lot of states pentagon read the blue and can't i can't think of a state that his trip over the next five or ten years is trending republican because texas millionaire there was dreams that they had a flipping texas if the democratic party flips texas or florida it's over in fact ohio is again a state that's where i live you can't find a democrat here with a search warrant and it's because we don't have large numbers of illegal immigrants coming in ohio and we're not estate really were people flee the northeast and the northeast it's like it's like a funnel to virginia north south carolina florida georgia and mississippi and your state david how many years have you.

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"kernaghan" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

WFAN Sports Radio_FM

02:12 min | 3 years ago

"kernaghan" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

"To could just up from the myers shop glove save made by cory and he looks the puk says i'm very familiar with you tonight as in other onecent is way this one from dennis magi there is not very big was five non nifty little player though at of switzerland seajacked lie comes now al qaeda devils twenty seven shots for the florida panthers twenty more than the devils yes jack wins the faceoff back to john moore and john listed in the air to center rice past drew staffer though and pesic tries it into the devil zone cleared away by cevers rison now bounces back does the puck to damon who finds john morressy crossice dd and alan kernaghan recoup delivers it into this up taken over by pesic the it not being able to get to that part on the dumping at first guy in his spent a little slow to get their war board has been a little faster either way here's cbo with it the other way savior hasn't on the back and we need to the leftwing corner 615 ago flip sit in front blocked away by steve recede quickly up ahead to henry now does ha chips it into the zone tries to get a step on petrovac who clears the puk polo the goal i take in air by staffer now strip to the puk by pesic dumps it off the glass out to center ice lovejoy flicks sit in devils head clear to its at the laid off side florida will handle devils duke petric hands it off the pesic former buffalo sabre and now it's redirect out to the devil's and put your races after sense it behind the net for lovejoy shields the puk now it's taken away in the corner by hunt joy went doubt penalty coming up and it's going to beyond the devil's man it's going to be bleak coleman who will go off hooking is the call five thirty three to go in the second period devils will be down a man when we come back from this time out no score here at the rocket in the second you're listening to devils ocoee comma ban sports radio 66 in one on one night fm wfia.

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"kernaghan" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:44 min | 3 years ago

"kernaghan" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The best language for earth 20 no matter how pragmatic were idealistic a language plan we might manage to draw up the original blueprint is unlikely to hold even if esperanto word to take hold around the world it probably wouldn't be long before the esperon 'tests we spoke with went recognizing language evolves good divergence it constantly sparks its own offshoots consider a recent group of languages that were created from scratch computer languages are very definitely created missile somebody sits down of says this is the way we want to have our language brian kernaghan is a computer science professor at princeton used to work at bell labs the famous incubator of various operating system sms and coding languages kernaghan himself work on the eunuchs o s and the languages can ample the first major programming languages were invented in the late 1950s the first high level languages i would say would fundamentally be for tran cobol basic anoling which called algal which was in some sense more an academic exercise these languages were built for different tasks like scientific and engineering computation which was for tran or business computation which was cobol or even educational computation if you'd like which was basic they're definitely are created for a purpose as opposed to being a natural process on the other hand once they're created then there's a pressure for them to evolve just a few years later lincoln 61 in 1960 one a professional journal cold communiques uh uh in their january issue had a cover piece of art which showed a schematic version of the tower of babel and it listed on that probably two hundred programming languages the message was boy there's a lot of programming languages today there are at least 1500 programming languages do we need that many languages of course not do we use that many languages actually no new of serve most journeyman programmers is probably half a dozen two a dozen or something like that the parallel between programming languages and natural languages is not perfect but still striking a new language cost time effort and money to create to learn to maintain why then has there been so much growth people are trying to write bigger programs and they're trying often to address programming problems that is taking on tasks that were not part of the original and therefore the language.

brian kernaghan professor princeton bell labs operating system computer science tran lincoln
"kernaghan" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:38 min | 3 years ago

"kernaghan" Discussed on KQED Radio

"A language plan we might manage to draw up the original blueprint his unlikely to hold even if esperanto word to take hold around the world it probably wouldn't be long before the esperon 'tests we spoke with went recognizing language evolves it diverges constantly sports its own offshoots consider a recent group of languages that were created from scratch computer languages are very definitely created so somebody sits down says this is the way we want to have our language brian kernaghan is a computer science professor at princeton used to work at bell labs the famous incubator of various operating system kim's and coding languages kernaghan himself worked on the eunuchs o s and the languages auken ample the first major programming languages were invented in the late 1950s the first highlevel languages i would say would fundamentally be for tran cobol basic anoling which called algal which was in some sense more an academic exercise these languages were built for different tasks like scientific and engineering computation which was for tran award business computation which was cobol or even educational computation if you'd like which was basic they're definitely are created for a purpose as opposed to being a natural process on the other hand once they're created then there's a pressure for them to evolve just a few years later lincoln 61 in 1960 one for a professional journal called commincations of the acm uh in their january issue had a cover piece of art which showed a schematic version of the tower of babel and it listed on that probably two hundred programming languages the message was boy there's a lot of programming languages today there are at least 1500 programming languages do we need that many languages of course not do we use that many languages actually no the repertoire of sort of most journeyman programmers is probably half a dozen two a dozen or something like that the parallel between programming languages and natural languages is not perfect but still striking a new language cost time effort and money to create to learn to maintain why then has there been so much growth people are trying to write bigger programs and they're trying often to address programming problems that is taking on tasks that were not part of the original and therefore the language.

brian kernaghan professor princeton bell labs kim computer science operating system lincoln
"kernaghan" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:58 min | 3 years ago

"kernaghan" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Thing to consider when thinking about the best language for earth 20 no matter how pragmatic were idealistic a language plan we might manage to draw up the original blueprint is unlikely to hold even if esperanto to take hold around the world it probably wouldn't be long before the esperon 'tests we spoke with went recognize uh language fouls it gently sparks its own offshoots consider a recent group of languages that were created from scratch definitely created somebody sits down and says this is the way we want to our lead short brian kernaghan is a computer science professor at princeton used to work at bell labs the famous incubator of various operating systems and coding languages kernaghan himself worked on the eunuchs o s and the language is all can ample the first major pro languages were invented in the late 1950s the first highlevel languages i would say would fundamentally be for tran cobol basic anoling which cold algal which was in some sense more an academic exercise these languages were built for different engineering competition which was a war business in which was kobyl or even educational computation if you'd like which basic they're definitely are created for a purpose as opposed to being a natural process on the other hand once they're created then there is a pressure for them to john wall just a few years later 1960 one in 1960 one for a professional journal cold communications of the acm in their january issue had a cover piece of art which showed a schematic version of the tower of babel and at list on that probably two hundred programming languages the message languages today there are at least 1500 programming languages do we need that many languages of course not do we use that many languages actually no the repertoire of serve most journeyman performers is probably half a dozen into a dozen or something like that the parallel between programming languages and natural languages is not perfect but still striking a new language cost time effort and money to create to learn to maintain why then has there been so much growth people are trying to write bigger programs and they're trying often to address programming problems that is taking on tasks that were not part of the original and therefore the language evolves because the environment which lives is changing the resources that are available for programmers that is hardware resources are changing.

brian kernaghan professor princeton bell labs computer science
"kernaghan" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

KTLK 1130 AM

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"kernaghan" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

"The actions over the weekend of white nationalist in charlottesville virginia minnesota gop chair jennifer kernaghan's says racism and terrorism are unacceptable on any level and ads are epo five any time that uefa no rises in our country would relate to how they are like what happened in virginia they use it up not rigidity heard it and i and i think that that very dangerous and irresponsible and reckless trump had been called out for not explicitly condemning the actions of the white supremacists sooner one woman was killed nineteen injured during the clashes over the weekend a man is dead after a shooting last night in north minneapolis that happened around seven twenty officers arrived to find the victim inside a home with gunshot wounds he was taken to the hospital where he died the victim's name has not yet been released tomorrow is the last day to file for your two thousand fifteen at property tax refund there are income eligibility were i'd guidelines for both the homeowner and knee renter i refine and those are available on our website if you go to our website and type in the keyword property packed refund it will take you to the pages that explain eligibility and how you go about filing at state revenue commissioners cynthia bauer leave in a 22yearold maplewood man has pleaded guilty to attempting to murder his parents than woodbury last january david williams junior faces up to twenty years in prison this is eminent in your trip to our 2017 diehard where do you use it ryan seat over twenty degrees september 22nd a 2030 the table the arena loss beijing this is the.

jennifer kernaghan minneapolis woodbury david williams beijing charlottesville virginia minnesota property tax cynthia bauer maplewood murder twenty degrees twenty years
"kernaghan" Discussed on WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

02:00 min | 4 years ago

"kernaghan" Discussed on WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

"Com arrested friday night she stormed the stage at shakespeare in the park a peaceful protest in response to this nightly assassination a of a trump lookalike that's next stay connected stay here on news radio ted forty who staying informed tillis kernaghan's being detained politics a little bit a sports turn and they're pretty much curley within the community knowing what's happening in the world around you pay attention world news in general is what gives you an edge in an everchanging world peace me the most at today's styling beyond today unlike her then i saw divided just about everything it's in the news and said dole of that can happen here's what he four four seven views radio ted forty the who newsradio line resellers anericans student auto warmby or just returned to ohio in an unresponsive stain after being held a north korea has done weren't beer was detained by the north koreans in january of 2016 after he went to the communist country with a tour group he was sentenced to fifteen years hard labor ii feeling a propaganda banner from the hotel the north korean said he contracted botulism and fell into a coma after taking a sleeping pill the doctors who examined him in cincinnati say there was no evidence of that toxins jessica rosenthal the us supreme court ruling banning trademarks that might offend people is unconstitutional signing asianamerican mock band called the slant in an 800 opinion authored by justice samuel alito the court agreed with the band at a seventy year old law denying trademarks two names deemed racially disparaging violates free speech cox's jan halpern in washington knocks needs leave report you deci this is where you hear the jews that both sides of the story about the bottom of every hour.

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