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"kepler telescope" Discussed on Curiosity Daily

Curiosity Daily

07:14 min | 1 year ago

"kepler telescope" Discussed on Curiosity Daily

Kepler Kepler space telescope Ashley Better Business Bureau Cody gov James Webb space telescope Jia Lou Hamer business owner Undock Keppler five hundred thousand dollars one hundred thousand dollars one hundred percent ten billion dollars twenty-five percent
After 9 Years In Orbit, Kepler Telescope Leaves A Legacy Of Discovery

Curiosity Daily

02:32 min | 1 year ago

After 9 Years In Orbit, Kepler Telescope Leaves A Legacy Of Discovery

"kepler telescope" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

03:06 min | 1 year ago

"kepler telescope" Discussed on TechStuff

"We'll give us more information about those X oh planets. Visiting one however is going to take a lot longer the closest Exo planet orbiting in the habitable zone of its star is proxima centauri b that's orbiting the red dwarf star, proxima centauri and just to be clear Kepler did not discover proxima b that planet was discovered by the European southern observatory using the radial velocity method. You know, the good old wildly method. That star however is the closest star to our sun. But closest is a relative term. It's. Still four point two light years away. Now that means it takes more than four years for light from that star to reach us the space craft we have designed so far in the history of space travel in in all of human history. They travel significantly slower than the speed of light. And obviously, we can't get matter up to the speed of light because matter has mass so getting to this destination would take a really long time. However, one company called breakthrough initiatives has proposed a plan that would do it sort of they plan to launch small unmanned spacecraft that they call star chips these tiny spacecraft would use light sails for propulsion so light sales or solar. Sails us pressure from photons photons don't have a mass, but they do have a relativistic mass, which means they have momentum which means when they hit against something they transfer momentum to it. So you can actually acceler. Wait a spacecraft by having photons bounce off a solar sail? It does take a while to get up to a pretty fast speed, but you're under constant acceleration. So while the acceleration isn't so dramatic. You're not going like zero two point two five the speed of light in in five seconds. It takes a long time to get up to speed. But according to the company the starcraft that they have designed will eventually reach a top speed of about twenty percent that of the speed of light. So they would get the proxima B in around twenty years or so then you have to tack on another four years for the information. They were sending back to get to us. So twenty four twenty five years from the time that those are launched and they start heading toward proxima b before we would find anything out about it. But still pretty exciting and the search for extra plans. Continues Kepler is done, but it has served us. Well, it has given us a lot more information and told us that planets are way more plentiful than we might have hoped. Whether or not planets in the habitable zone are more plentiful that still remains to be seen. We're gonna have to really do a careful study with using multiple lines of inquiry to make that determination. But it's really exciting stuff. I hope you guys enjoyed this episode..

Kepler proxima b European southern observatory four years twenty four twenty five years two light years twenty percent five seconds twenty years
"kepler telescope" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

02:22 min | 1 year ago

"kepler telescope" Discussed on TechStuff

"Heard our expectations a bit reduce that number somewhere down between two and twelve in two thousand eighteen the power of crowd sourcing in science was proven again when an Australian car mechanic discovered a planet system that had at least four Neptune sized planets in it the had taken the data from the K two mission and a gone through it meticulously. Nasa would end up confirming his find and also the scientists who were looking into it. Discover that the planet actually had a fifth or the star rather had a fifth planet in its system. So cool stuff on April eighteenth two thousand eighteen the transiting Exo planet survey, satellite or tests launched into orbit. This is Kepler's successor. It's going to be looking for planets using the transit method much like Kepler dead on October thirtieth two thousand eighteen NASA essentially pulled the plug on Kepler could no longer operate as a run. Out of fuel that needed to help stabilize its position. It was too wobbly. It was just not going to provide reliable information. So it will remain in its orbit it safely away from earth. But it will be defunct out in space tests, which is more powerful than Kepler was is expected to detect perhaps more than twenty thousand new Exo planets and Kepler is giving us a lot to think about before Kepler. We didn't really know how common Exo planets were it could be that they were really really rare, but Kepler discovered hundreds of multi planet systems in a few small patches of sky so extrapolating from that information, we can estimate that there are possibly hundreds of billions of planets in our galaxy alone though to be fair. We don't actually know how many stars are in the Milky Way. Galaxy we can estimate it we think it's somewhere between one hundred billion and four hundred billion. So even if we. We are being conservative, and we say a hundred billion and even if we say that only a tiny fraction of the Exo planets out there are earth like an in the habitable zone around the respective stars. You're still talking about hundreds of millions of planets that might possibly support life in the Milky Way. Galaxy future telescopes..

Kepler Nasa
"kepler telescope" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

02:19 min | 1 year ago

"kepler telescope" Discussed on TechStuff

"Now that would mean the telescope would have to look at around four different sections of sky every year every three months or so it would change its orientation just because they could not keep it pointed at the exact same patch all year round while relying upon sunlight to study it. It. But it did mean that the telescope could keep operating it just wouldn't look at the same one hundred seventy thousand stars all year round. Instead, it was more like half a million stars in total throughout the year. But then keep in mind, if you're looking at different patches of stars every three months, or so if you aren't if it's not timed out the same way as a planet transiting its own parents star, you don't get any more data from that. Right. You may it may be that you look away just to something interesting happens, which is the story of my life. I should just title. My auto biography. I wasn't looking over the years. The information from Keppler kept providing researchers with more evidence of Exo planets and other interesting phenomena. So in two thousand fifteen data suggested that a rocky planet orbiting a white dwarf star was actually being pulled apart as it solar system was kind of dying in two thousand sixteen. Some interesting information showed odd fluctuations in a particular star's brightness. Which leads some people to theorize that perhaps some alien civilization had built a mega structure around that star. It was far more likely that the fluctuations were caused by dust cloud. But it was still super cool thing in the spring of twenty sixteen NASA announced that the team had found one thousand two hundred new Exo planets after reviewing Kepler data, and that was a huge announcement. And all of these were from that original mission of Kepler, not the k- to mission. This was still from its first run in two thousand seventeen NASA produced a report that stated Kepler had detected four thousand thirty four potential planets in its original mission with two thousand three hundred thirty five planets confirmed originally the team estimated that about thirty of those planets were likely close to earth size and were of Iraqi nature further examination. However temper..

Kepler NASA Keppler three months
"kepler telescope" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

04:36 min | 1 year ago

"kepler telescope" Discussed on TechStuff

"The Kepler telescope looked like a cylinder probably about twice as tall as your typical person. So fairly large telescope had solar panels along the sun facing side of the satellite. So it would generate electricity that would be used to power various parts of the telescope. It also had an angled opening. It was essentially a sun shade that would block the sun's light from interfering with the light. The telescope was trying to pick up from distant stars. You didn't wanna have interference there? Otherwise, the sensors inside the telescope would just be registering. The sun rather than the stars. It was looking for to keep Kepler pointed at the right patch of sky the telescope had four reaction wheels. I guess technically still has four reaction wheels. Just there's nothing to power them anymore. These were motorized components that could cause Keppler to move in the opposite direction of the spinning of each. Wheel and the wheels could spend really fast like around the thousand to four thousand revolutions per minute. The wheels were a known point of vulnerability as well. The the group knew that the wheels had failed on other spacecraft after a while. But they also realized that they needed components that would help keep the budget down for Kepler. And eventually once it got to the point where they were really worried about their reliability. It was a bit too late. So the vulnerability would become a true thorn in the side of the group in two thousand twelve that's when one of the four wheels failed a second wheel would fail in two thousand thirteen and the Keppler needed at least three working wheels to maintain its orientation that way, so in two thousand thirteen the primary mission for Kepler came to an end the aperture on the telescope measured. Nearly a meter in diameter the light. Detection comes from an array of forty two camera sensors which collectively acted like a ninety five megapixel camera now, specifically the cameras sensors were CDs or charged couple devices each one measured fifty by twenty five millimeters in size and each one had a resolution of twenty two hundred by one thousand twenty four pixels. The CD's wouldn't record information from stars below a certain luminosity that would limit the amount of data being fed back to NASA. Essentially, they were saying, you know, some of these stars are so faint that it doesn't make sense for us to track them because we're not getting enough data to be able to reliably say, oh, this represents a debt in that light on January tenth two thousand eleven just a bit more than a year after NASA had announced the first five planets discovered by Kepler the agency at a new announcement, which was that the telescope had discovered the first unquestionably rocky planet orbiting a distant star. This one K became. Kepler ten b later that year. Nasa would reveal the Kepler had found a planet that the team would designate Kepler sixteen b this one was special in that it was a planet in a double star system, which always makes me think of tattooing in the Star Wars series with the two sons at sunset and at the tail end of two thousand eleven NASA announced Kepler twenty two b that was the first plant to be found in the habitable zone around its respective star. And it has a diameter that's about twice the size of earth. So it's a bigger planet than ours is in two thousand thirteen after the second reaction wheel failure the team worked had to work on coming up with a way to still use the telescope without being able to to use the intended method to keep its orientation to make sure it was pointed in the right way. Meanwhile, researchers were discovering more Exo planets as they were pouring over all the day. Data that Kepler had gathered in its operations, and that would continue on for a couple of years just because the telescope wasn't in current operation. Didn't mean it wasn't providing really useful data for people to pursue because they could actually go through all the stuff that already been collected. And look for more signs of it in may two thousand fourteen the Kepler telescope would start a new mission called K two in this mission. The team would rely upon sunlight which actually does exert pressure. That's the actually the working principle behind things like solar sails, and they use the sunlight to help keep the Kepler pointed in the right direction..

Kepler Kepler telescope NASA Keppler one K
"kepler telescope" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

03:24 min | 1 year ago

"kepler telescope" Discussed on TechStuff

"It was a small patches sky which was occupied by part of the constellation cygnus. The swan and Lyra or liar. Also knows the harp. There's a term for this moment. When a space telescope like this sins back its first image. And it's called first light, which I think is kind of cool. Also it had the equivalent of a lens cap. It was a a very very large lens cap because the telescope has quite a large opening at one end. But that had to be jettisoned first before any images could be sent back, obviously. Otherwise, you just get if you've ever taken a picture with a camera that still had to Lynn skept on. You know, what you get you get pitch black darkness that same little small patch of sky, by the way, while it is a tiny tiny portion of the overall night sky. It's home to around four and a half million stars Kepler's job was to monitor around one hundred seventy thousand of those stars simultaneously. So its job was just to monitor the brightness of those stars and look for tiny variations in their luminosity regular ones periodic dips in their luminosity, which would indicate an echo planet in transit on January fourth twenty ten the Keppler team announced that the telescope had detected five planets, they had gone through the data, and they had found enough convincing data to say that in those five cases, they're certainly appeared to. Be planets in orbit around their respective stars. And they had exciting names like Kepler four b Kepler five b Kepler six b Kepler seven b and Kepler eight b they fell into a class of planets called hot Jupiters. These are planets that are of a similar size to Jupiter in our solar system. That's the biggest plants got a diameter that's eleven times greater than earth's technically could fit about one thousand three hundred earth's inside a single Jupiter. So what makes them hot? Well, it's that these planets are relatively close to their parent stars the orbits are very short compared to an earth year a year on one of those planets might only take three or four earth days. So every imagine that every three or four days you've gone through an entire year that is the equivalent of these planets years and made it easier to detect because they were big planets. So they have a big impact on the amount of light. That was hitting the. The Keppler telescope. So you could see the indication very clearly and because they were so close to their parent stars it happens. So frequently that you could keep that you could actually make predictions of when you would see the next Depp. And if in fact a dip occurred when you predicted it, it would be a strong support that yes, there is a very large planet that's in orbit around that star. So the telescope was very successful. It was indicating that there were bodies or in orbit around other stars in other solar systems that wasn't measuring. The wobble is just measuring the light. And it was showing that this method actually had a lot of validity to it. Now in our next segment. I will go into a little bit about how Kepler actually worked and what else it discovered in its lifetime out in space..

Keppler telescope Kepler Keppler Lyra Lynn skept Depp four days
"kepler telescope" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

03:47 min | 1 year ago

"kepler telescope" Discussed on TechStuff

"Planets in nineteen Ninety-six the free sip team had yet another chance to propose a flight mission. And this time they made a really big adjustment to their proposal. Actually, they made two big adjustments. It's just that one of them was perhaps more important. And more key to getting approval, and that was changing the parameters of the mission. The original proposal required putting a spacecraft in a LaGrange orbit. Now. That's a position in space where the combined gravitational forces of two large bodies equal this trivial force of a body. That's in that position between the two or around the two. So the two large bodies in the case that we care about our the earth and the sun. So there are five LaGrange points that are in that vicinity around the sun and earth. They have designations that go from L one up to l five so l one LaGrange orbit is that a point between earth and the sun it's much closer to the earth than the sun because gravity depends upon mass and distance and the earth is much less massive than the sun. So you need to get closer. If you wanna have all that stuff kind of bounce out L. Who is actually located behind earth with respect to the sun? So in an orbit. That's that's further out from the sun than earth is L three is actually on the opposite side of the sun from where the earth is l four and l five are in effect at an orbit sixty degrees ahead and sixty degrees behind the earth, respectively in its orbit. Now, a satellite at L one would have an unobstructed view of the sun. And that's why we've put the solar and Helius Feerick observatory there satellite at L to would have a view of deep space, and it would be shaded from the sun because it would be in the shadow of earth. That's where the James Webb space telescope will eventually be these orbits require a lot of adjustments to keep a satellite stable, otherwise, they would drift out of orbit and move into a collision course with a celestial body like the sun, for example, moving and telescope into one of those orbits and keeping it there would have required. A lot more. Fuel and thus added expense to the mission. So this new proposal for what was originally called free Sep suggested putting the telescope in a normal solar or orbit rather than Grange orbit. And that brought the cost down significantly in the mission. Also got a new name. This was the second big change. And that new name was Kepler after Yohannes Kepler the seventeenth century German astronomer the mission still did not get green lit at that time. However, then in one thousand nine hundred eight they tried again, and they got turned down. Again. The team were told they needed to demonstrate the Tommy tree system. They had in mind would actually be sufficient to pick up the transit of a planet across its star. So they build a testing facility at the Ames research center, and they began running more than a hundred fifty simulations to prove that their system would actually work in two thousand one NASA officials finally gave approval to Kepler this was the fifth. Puzzle for that mission. And it was designated as the tenth discovery class mission for nearly a decade engineers and scientists got to work building the actual telescope. I'll talk more about how it worked in just a moment. But the telescope launched on March sixth two thousand nine it was on top of a three stage. Delta two rocket. That's what was used as the launch vehicle and more than a month would go by once it reached its orbit before it would take the first image of a small patch of sky..

James Webb space telescope Grange orbit Kepler Yohannes Kepler Helius Feerick observatory Ames research center NASA sixty degrees
"kepler telescope" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

03:40 min | 1 year ago

"kepler telescope" Discussed on TechStuff

"Generation Intel core processor powering the thing that's incredibly powerful. It gives you up to thirteen and a half hours of battery life on a single charge. You can work where you want. How you want for as long as you want? So check it out the Microsoft surface. Pro six. Okay. We're back. Now one day. I'm going to have to do a full episode about photon Matry the history of atomic tree is fascinating actually dates all the way back to the ancient Greeks and Romans. But obviously by the time we're talking about the the events that would lead into the development of the Kepler telescope. Nasa was looking into something a little more sophisticated than what the ancients were capable of doing during the nineteen Eighty-four workshop on Thomas Trie the group had several goals. They wanted to achieve one was determine which astronomical problems would benefit by increased federal metric precision. So we've got this technology if we make it better. What could we use it to do? What would it be good for another was to get a handle on what the current level of precision was with the latest equipment? So not just what would it be good for if we made it better? But how good is it right now. Another goal was to identify any of the things that would limit the precision of automa- Trie. So what stands in our way of making this technology better. And finally the last goal was to make recommendations to overcome or sidestep any of those limitations. The workshop was considered a success. And that led to a second workshop that was held in nineteen eighty-seven. Nasa commissioned a study to determine if a multi channel Automata built on silicon photodynamic would be practical. And the researchers found that such Commodores were incredibly precise. But they would also have to be super cooled down to less than negative one ninety five degrees celsius or negative three hundred twenty degrees Fahrenheit, the temperature of liquid nitrogen in other words now since I'm going to do an episode about fo- Tommy tree in the future. I'm going to skip a deep explanation of how those devices work for now just know that they are all about quantifying the intensity. Of light that is hitting them. So let's go back to our history lesson leading up to the Kepler telescope in the early nineteen nineties. Nasa officials were considering a suite of new missions for the organization to pursue some of them were aimed at getting a more comprehensive understanding of our own solar system, but some were meant to search for planets outside of our immediate neighborhood. One of those proposed missions got the name, free sip or F R E S IP which stood for frequency of earth size inner planets like all the proposed missions the team had to outline these scientific and technical requirements to complete mission objectives as well. As how much they estimated it would cost and a proposed schedule and management plan. Free sip woodland on the chopping block. It would not make it through in that initial round and in nineteen Ninety-two there just wasn't sufficient evidence that the technical equipment would be sensitive enough to. The transit of a distant planet, and yet also be able to filter out noise. So what NASA HQ was saying was this is it's not that your idea doesn't have merit. It's that we cannot be certain that the equipment you would use would actually achieve the goals. And we don't want to spend millions of dollars on something that ultimately doesn't work the scientific community still felt that the objective was worth pursuing..

Nasa Kepler telescope automa- Trie NASA HQ Thomas Trie Intel Microsoft three hundred twenty degrees F one ninety five degrees celsiu one day
"kepler telescope" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

04:41 min | 1 year ago

"kepler telescope" Discussed on TechStuff

"We cannot make that determination. All we could say as well. In theory, water could exist on that planet, and that's the best we can say, so that's one thing, but detecting plants in the first place is actually something else. Just because we could say in theory, if a plant were to exist within this band of ranges around its star in might be able to support life doesn't mean we've actually found any planets, right? We have to figure out how to do that. So we have really powerful telescopes here on earth, but that's not really gonna cut it. Even with a telescope has an enormous aperture. Several meters across the conditions are such that we're not going to be able to directly. Image planets. They're just the stars are too far away the distance between us and nearby stars is enormous years and comparatively speaking the distance between a planet and its host star is nothing at all, right. A few million miles is nothing compared to light years. So the light reflecting off a planet, but also be much much much much less bright than the light coming off of a star. Like, maybe a billion times less bright. So if we're looking at star of comparable size and brightness to our sun, then the planet that orbits it it'll end up reflecting some light off of it. But it'll be a tiny fraction of the light this coming from the sun. So our Earth-based telescopes would blur this light together due to diffraction, and we wouldn't really be able to tell the difference. We wouldn't be able to distinguish the planet from the star. So direct observation with Earth-based telescopes is a non. Starter. However, we could look at indirect ways to observe the presence of a plant or to to guess whether or not a planet is there. So stars have gravitational pull on their planets, but plants also exert a gravitational poll on their host stars. And as planets move through their orbits around the star. They caused the starter wobble. A little bit the center of this gravitational pull is likely within the the diameter of the star itself. But it's not right at the center of the stars. So the star kind of wiggles a little bit as the planets orbit around it. So if you are able to detect this wobble, if you're able to see it, then you could then deduce that there's something in orbit around that star. We've used this methodology to detect binary stars that were too close together for Earth-based. Telescopes to differentiate between the two we call this the Astro metric method of detecting binary stars but planets are much smaller than stars. So the wobbles that are produced by planets are much smaller than would be produced by binary star systems. It is the oldest methodology for searching for exoplanets. But for many years, no one could confirm that any wobbles. They were seeing actually meant the replant it in orbit around those stars that changed in the air of space telescopes that changed in the area of more advanced telescopes in the nineties, but let's said the side for now the Kepler telescope would be powerful enough to use an alternative method to detect Exo planets. This is the so-called transit method and the transit method. Looks for indications that a planet is moving between a star and earth that is it is transiting across the face of the star from our perspective. Now, we would detect this by measuring the amount of light coming from the star the planet would still be too far away and too small for us to see it's not like we would see a tiny black dot moving across the star. The what we could do is measure exactly how much light are we receiving from that star. And if we noticed that there was a debt in the intensity of that light. It would indicate that something had passed between the star and us that something had blocked some of that light from getting at us a dip that happens with regularity would indicate that there is a planet in orbit around that star that if we're seeing every so often that little Depp happen. It would tell us. All right. There's something that's orbiting the star. And every time it comes across. That's when we see the debt, and that's why there's this gap between depths if it's regular that is if it were irregular, we wouldn't necessarily know what the heck is going on unless maybe it was multiple plans. Hits that were in orbit around the star..

Kepler telescope Depp
"kepler telescope" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

04:09 min | 1 year ago

"kepler telescope" Discussed on TechStuff

"Hey there in welcome to tech stuff. I'm your host Jonathan Strickland them an executive producer. And I love all things tech. And as I record this. It is the week of we'll Halloween in the United States, but on October thirtieth Tuesday of this week Tober thirty two thousand eighteen NASA chose to retire the space telescope Kepler which had been in operation not continuously. But had been in operation since two thousand nine I say, they retired. They didn't have much choice in the matter. The telescope had run out a fuel could no longer hold its orientation, which is pretty important if you are using a telescope any kind of telescope if you've ever used any sort of magnification, and you couldn't hold it steady. You know that it's not much use. But this mission was no failure. It was actually the conclusion of a monumentally successful scientific mission. The Kepler team. Projected a nominal mission. Lifetime of three years or maybe three and a half. The actual telescope was able to continue its original mission objectives for an additional year when it was first launched and then stuff started breaking down. But I'm getting ahead of myself. So let's start with the question. What was Kepler's purpose? What was it built to do? The simple answer is that it was built to search the galaxy for the presence of Exo planets. In other words, planets outside of our own solar system and that included looking for earth like planets. Scientists had very little information to go on to make conclusions about how many stars out. There might have planets is it common? Is it infrequent? You can't really draw any other, you know, theories or or make any more hypotheses until you get more information about how frequently planets are a thing out there. And that's before you get to the question of how many? Planets might be similar to earth or even more importantly in our our grand scheme of things. How many of those planets might be in an orbit around their respective stars in what we would call the h z or habitable zone, so the habitable zone, it's pretty self explanatory. It's the region surrounding star in which water could exist in its liquid state if it were on a planet. So there's not a single range we can give to describe the habitable zone, right? I can't just tell you. It's X many millions of miles away. And the reason for that is because there are different kinds of stars. So to determine the habitable zone of a star. I you have to ask yourself. The question is this star old enough that any planets that might be orbiting? It would have been around long enough to have time necessary for life to develop because it would probably take billions of years. So you wanna make sure that? The solar system. You're looking at is actually enough for that to have been a possibility on a similar note. The size of the star matters larger stars have shorter lifespans than smaller stars generally speaking, that's because stars with greater mass will burn through their fuel more quickly than smaller stars the process of fusion will be at a much greater rate for large star that as for a smaller star. So if you have a really big star, it may only live to be a few million years old before it collapses and explodes in a supernova. Now, I know a few million years it's a long time for humans, but for stars most stars like the smaller ones, that's not long at all a star of the size of our sun. Could stick around for maybe ten billion years the sun? Our son is currently around four point six billion years old. So we got a bit a minute or two before it burns out. And honestly before it. Burn out. There would be other things going on that would be of immediate concern to us. But yeah, we got billions of years before that happens. So really big stars. Are not good candidates for finding planets that might have life on them..

Kepler Jonathan Strickland NASA executive producer United States million years six billion years ten billion years three years
"kepler telescope" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

04:25 min | 1 year ago

"kepler telescope" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"So Danielle one don't you tell them what we're up to today. It's a little bit different this time. That's right. So we're actually going to be holding our first ever Halloween costume in 'cause play contests. Nasa inspired costume and caused flea contest. So if you're a NASA fan and like me you failed to get a Halloween costume together before. Now, you're in luck because we're going to show you a bunch of NASA inspired looks and we're going to brainstorm how you could recreate those looks at home. So so if you do and abusing any of these looks or you wear any of our space themed, costumes for Halloween, we wanna see it. So you can share your essence fired costumes with us on social media using the hashtag NASA costume so abbey. Where are you wearing? All right. So. You might remember Nasr's Kepler space telescope, right? So Keppler is a mission that we lead here at Ames. And it is that space telescope that his out there finding planet. So it's been staring at stars around the galaxy. Finding other planets circling other stars besides our son Exo planets. So what I am Kepler here. And I've got my star field. And I am the concept of Kepler's discovery of other worlds. Okay. What about you? So I am dressed up as the legendary flight director, gene Kranz ice. So remind us about him. So he actually helped write the go. No, go procedures that we still use today that allows missions to determine if they're going to be go as planned or if they're aborted in also as flight director during Apollo thirteen him and his team actually helped the astronauts safely return back to earth while that one Apollo thirteen. Nothing less amazing nothing. Also famously attributed to the quote failures not an option. But fun fact that actually was not him over real. He gets credit for it. But no does interesting. All right. Well, you wanna see some more NASA? Look. Yeah. Let's go for it. All right. All right. So we're going to head into our first category, which is called every day. Nasa looks so these are outfits researchers wearing in the lab or out in the field and around the center when they're doing their research. So leave your comments in the chat. If you like what you see here, you have any questions, and let's welcome. Our first guest to the set come on out Egli. Look at you. Here. You look amazing. So let's start off by telling us what you name. And what you do you. Hear it aims. So my name is Agla check another to. I am contractor scientists and the radiation biophysics lab at space biosciences division here at Ames. Okay. And I study the damage that is done by space station to the human body, and what determines sensitivity to radiation. Okay. So what's going on with your costume that you have here? It's pretty interesting. Right. So I think your standard lab costume for working, but some sort of more sensitive or dangerous samples such as human blood because this is what you've worked on their collecting cells from lots of healthy people, exposing them to simulated space radiation because we can't fly them to the moon. Marce yet. So we have to simulate those conditions here. All right under studying what happens to these cells? Okay. Finding out that different people have very different sensitivity in the same amount of three D ation the same does. Some people will have twenty percent of their cells by other people may have sixty percent of the. The question is why the termines that? And can we find out and the tap into it to develop countermeasures, basically therapies sensitivity? Yeah. So this is what you bear bevy Louis van you are working but samples in the lab..

Nasa Keppler Kepler space telescope Kepler director Danielle gene Kranz Nasr Egli Louis van Apollo twenty percent sixty percent
"kepler telescope" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

08:49 min | 1 year ago

"kepler telescope" Discussed on KPCC

"And you wanna know what's the biggest science issue in your state? Maybe your local community. Maybe your town will be taking calls and our number is eight four four seven two four eight two five five eight four four seven two four eight to five five can also tweet us at scifi. But I prepare to say goodbye to an old friend for nine years. Nasa Kepler space telescope has been orbiting deep-space giving us an unprecedented. Look at the objects within it. But this week NASA announced that Kepler has finally run at a fuel at the end of its life. That means the agency will soon be sending its final command to the telescope shutting it down permanent. Here to tell us about that story is whether maybe better more hopeful stories, aiming Jim Senator for the I Tripoli spectrum. Kepler's nothing to be ashamed. Him now. Has succeeded. I its mission. It has actually surpassed NASA's original expectations. Kepler was Nastase first original exit planet, hunting missions that exit planets are those planets that exist outside of our own solar system when the Kepler mission was first conceived. We didn't even know of a single one. And now Kepler has helped us build up a catalogue of potentially as many as four thousand it's confirmed the existence of hundred and even after it shuts down its data will be used to confirm what's expected to be many more because there's so much stuff. We have an analyzed, Jeff. Yes. The ads continued to send down data even while it's on it's kind of last legs of its mission. And scientists will continue to analyze that information. And then just in April NASA launched its next version of Kepler. It's known by its acronym tests and will continue on with Kepler's mission to hunt new exit planets, there's going to be going out there exploring deep space. Yeah. Different orbit Kepler was actually orbiting around the sun kind of trailing the earth. And this new mission I'll actually orbit around the earth and a very elegant bit. And it'll be able to look at whole whole port portions of the sky, whereas Kepler was sort of focused on a more narrow sliver. So the hope is that continues to build up that catalogue and helps us explore new worlds. Here was a very exciting mission wish all those mission specialists. Good work. Yes. Absolutely. That's move onto. There was a surprising study out this week about farmers markets. That was about that. Yes. Penn. State researchers visited farmers markets around the state and basically watched whether vendors were following common food safety practices. They wanted to know if the food that people were people were purchasing there was safe and some of these practices including wearing a hair covering when you're handling food. Our wearing disposable gloves or washing your hands in between handling food and money and pleasing vegetables on surfaces that can easily be cleaned, and they found that for the most part vendors farmers markets think that they're doing a good job at these things, but they're actually not so the most common violation that they witnessed was vendors handling money. And then switch never to produce without changing their gloves or washing their hands. And this is something that can transfer diseases and then fewer than twenty four percent of vendors used hair covering they thought they were doing it. But they were. Yeah, they also surveyed vendors the different group. Vendors and said, you know, what are your food safety practices? What do you do when you go to the market? And a lot of them said that they did these things but their observations approve different. So they were moving all that Bhagwati coli that kind of bacteria. Yeah, they sample the number of the different items that these markets to see if there is an impact. And so they found equal and forty percents of the beef samples that they collected twenty eight percent of kale president these markets and seventeen percent of spinach. And so, you know, take away for consumers is it's definitely important to wash your vegetables, no matter where you buy them. But they're also hoping that this research will inspire new food safety trainings particular to farmers markets because a lot of these vendors will go through trainings, but they're kind of the general training meant for restaurants. And they're not particular circumstances of a market where you don't have access all the time to running water and electricity, and you're working out of a tent. Do we know how that how it compares to your supermarket? Well, they did study a comparison of chickens so chicken sold at markets and chicken sold in the grocery store, and they found more contaminants on the chicken sold. That markets. And I think that this may be the result of federal law that allows you if you produce fewer than twenty thousand birds a year to be exempt from certain regulations like having an anti microbial program in place. And so they think chicken might be especially susceptible to that. They're not sure if it's the same for veggies JETRO next up for people who like to take charge of their health to consumer health stories, we should be following tell us about that was about the first one the first is that twenty three and me this week received the okay from the FDA to produce a new report about how consumers genetics may influence the way that they metabolize certain medications. So this is the first direct to consumer report of its kind in. It'll measure three dozen variants across eight genes that have been shown to affect how your body metabolize his medicines. The report will tell you if you're a faster slow metabolize of about fifty prescription over the counter medications, and in some cases when evidence is available. The report can tell you whether you're likely to experience reduced efficacy or side effects of these medicines. But it won't tell you what your alternate health outcome will be. Yeah. Don't tell you what to do eleven it here. I mean, the idea and this is definitely a part of this trend in medicine toilets known as personalized medicine. Our bodies all process things differently. That's, you know, food as well as medicine, and if physicians could know exactly how you are. I process these things they might be able to tailor medications or treatments more particularly toward us. But this report is really a starting point. It's not something that consumers would be able to take and apply. It's still important for people who have this report down to talk to their doctors and the FDA in twenty three and me both emphasize that in their announcements. Let's talk about your your second. Consumer health story is about well. This is the report that came out of this week's meeting of the American Academy of ophthalmology they had their big annual meeting in Chicago this week in one of the prisoners there took a look at a different consumer tool. It's web MD. This is a website. They'll people use to look up their symptoms and kind of self diagnosed their conditions and web MD has a feature on their site called symptom tracker. Symptom checker, and it lets you type in your symptoms, and basically returns, you a list of possible diagnoses that are associated with the symptoms and these doctors who did the study where like wondering how accurate those diagnoses were. And then also how accurate the next steps that the program suggests that are and they found that this tool is not very accurate. So they ran forty two different scenarios through the tool and found that the tool only included the correct diagnosis in its list less than half the time. And it only put it at the very top about a quarter of the time. So if you were consumer, and you're using this tool to kind of self diagnose or make decisions about what you should do next. You would be wrong. The vast majority of the time go see a doctor. Another way. Yeah. It's important to deer your research and try to be informed by that. That is definitely still aren't quite there you now I'm in wreck. News editor for the spectrum. Always good to have you. Thanks now. It's time to play. Good thing. Bad thing. Because every story has a flip side, you know, the ocean can be a noisy place. And when you consider all those motorboat engines, adding to all the sounds of life below the surface, so ocean animals adapt to this increase in volume. Researchers found that bottle nosed dolphins off the coast of Maryland are actually changing how they speak to each other their calls making their whistle. Simpler to be heard better through this background noise. Their findings were published in the journal, biology letters and here with the good and bad about that is Helen Bailey and author on that study and also research associate professor tested, biological lab. Been Solomons Maryland, Malcolm to science Friday. It's great to be here. So so the the bottlenose dolphins are simplifying their calls. They are just like us. If we go to a noisy Baugh, if you're trying to talk to someone you have to use it yet. Lisa. I wanna ask you something. Like oh. Where are your keys? I say yes that they're in my pocket and valley. What what? And you just thought yelling. Yes. You just seemed so high what you say that they can hear you Beth. And that's what needs to dealing with. They like an bar and onto the ocean. I'll bet you we have a clip of a dolphin whistles that you collected. And basically gives a double click. I we're going hear at the beginning. Just the dolphin calls. And then you'll hear a change when the dolphins calling with boats in the background give you an idea of what it sounds like..

Kepler Nasa Kepler space telescope NASA FDA Maryland Jim Senator Tripoli Jeff American Academy of ophthalmol Penn biology letters president Beth Chicago News editor
"kepler telescope" Discussed on AP News

AP News

02:14 min | 1 year ago

"kepler telescope" Discussed on AP News

"The Bank of England says the new fifty pound note in Britain will honor the country's scientific heritage. Governor Mark Carney, kicked off a six week public nomination process, and who should feature on the note and saying the Bill which will be made of polymer. Will celebrate the UK's contribution to science nominees. Could include anyone from physicist Stephen hawking who died in March two Dorothy Hodgkin who won the Nobel prize in chemistry in nineteen sixty four a committee will create a shortlist from the recommendations and Kearney will choose from that in twenty nineteen. Nasa suffered too big losses this week. I it was the Kepler space telescope now. The dawn spacecraft has stopped communicating with flight controllers propelled by three ion engines, the eleven year old Don was the first spacecraft to orbit an object in the asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter after circling the asteroid Vesta, Don went into orbit around the dwarf planet. Sarah's Dodd kept working longer than expected and mission director and chief engineer Mark Raymond insists he wasn't sad. He said Don was a spectacular success by any measure. It carried humankind and a truly amazing deep space adventure with stunning discoveries. That's Don will stay in orbit around service for decades. Residents of London's Neo bankside apartment complex enjoy spectacular views over the city, but as AP correspondent, Karen China's reports some are unhappy at being under splayed themselves disgruntled neighbors of the Tate modern gallery complaining that a viewing platform and the Tate just opposite. Let's hundreds of thousands of toys the year peer into that. Hanes and are taking the gallery to coats. They once a full the gallery too close of part of the tenth floor terrace, which office three hundred sixty degree views the London a lawyer for the Heyman is the judge that the platform news by up to one million people a year constitutes a relentless invasion of the residents privacy, the galleries pool it says the simplicity is for the residents to draw that blinds and as necessary to put up curtains Cantamessa London. Presidential style campaigning. I'm Tim Maguire than AP news minute. President Trump and former President Barack Obama agree on one thing as they hit the campaign trail people have to vote in the midterm elections. For one simple reason..

Don Governor Mark Carney Mark Raymond Bank of England Tate modern gallery London Kepler space telescope AP Dorothy Hodgkin President Trump Nobel prize Nasa Barack Obama Stephen hawking Neo bankside apartment Tim Maguire Britain UK physicist Cantamessa London
"kepler telescope" Discussed on 1A

1A

03:51 min | 1 year ago

"kepler telescope" Discussed on 1A

"He was actually I think he was India's first key Minnesota at a member of the congress polity will interestingly enough Indian prime minister and the random, oh, the he was chief minister of good era actually started this project and has been some government money. That's being put into the statue. There foam is in the states of Gujarat say some four hundred thirty million dollars for these massive Brome statue is just a waste of money when they need help. But now I've lived in reported from India, you see statues of gold's that huge all over the country, and in many ways, these kind of politicians all revered like gold as well. And we should not get too attached to the statue being the world's tallest because no India has plans to open another memorial in twenty twenty one on fifteen acres in the Arabian Sea. That would be nearly seven hundred feet tall, and that one would honor a warrior king who founded the kingdom and died in sixteen eighty. Let's talk briefly about Turkey who's president of type air to reported that his country has approved what he describes as a comprehensive and effective operation that would target the US back Kurdish militia in Syria, east of the Euphrates river. I know that the the Syria story kind of gets overlooked often. But I wonder if we could just kind of basically, explain what impact that might have white matters that the US has backing Kurds, and what Turkey's role is all this keys common. Definitely thrown a spanner in the works for the US with this warning of the plan to -fensive in Syria in very crude tons the US led coalition the US backed coalition, fighting ISIS and Syria. It's made up about fifty thousand mainly hour of code is fighters tikey house issues with the Kurdish links and sign saying. Democratic forces. Dan believes that linked to the PK K, the coach work has policy deemed Tara organization by tikey Unde, the US, and it's created real tensions between the US and untucked they were supposed to conduct joint patrols specifically under a deal to void clashes with Takeshe forces. I think such against very complex picture of courses, the US Taki relationship, which has changed changed dramatically over the loss. Three weeks pond driven by Takis responds to the custody, mud with tikey sort of refraining from sticking the knife all the way in the Saudis very much in the doghouse until his sort of returned to President Trump's embrace. But clearly, you know in terms of meeting of minds on Syria. It's very difficult to see Yunessi much less story before we go. You know, how terrible it is to run out of gas on a long trip. Imagine losing power when you're millions of miles from. Earth. That is exactly what happened to NASA. Kepler telescope this week NASA is retiring the revolutionary planet hunting telescope because it ran out of fuel. So in the next few weeks Kepler will receive its final command, basically, a sleep command to shut itself down since it launched in two thousand nine telescope has helped discover around twenty six hundred exoplanets and Exo planet is a planet outside our solar system that orbits different star from our son Kepler's data indicate that the universe has billions of hidden planets. There might even be more planets than there are stars this year NASA launched tests transiting exoplanet survey satellite tests will continue to monitor the stars. And look for more planets. Scientists estimated could find as many as ten thousand exoplanets on the stars close to us, and it might even advanced search for extraterrestrial life, Maria pots, director of global news coverage for feature story news. Thanks very much Jean-Yves ID enough in Washington. Correspondent. For the BBC an anchor of BBC World news, America. Thank you, rainy. Keeping and Clements gene Washington bureau chief for develop thanks Clements. A pleasure.

US Syria India NASA Kepler telescope Minnesota Turkey Gujarat prime minister Kepler congress BBC Brome Washington bureau chief Takis Arabian Sea Euphrates river Clements President Trump
"kepler telescope" Discussed on The Ross Bolen Podcast

The Ross Bolen Podcast

04:29 min | 1 year ago

"kepler telescope" Discussed on The Ross Bolen Podcast

"This is Jamie from boulder, I just moved here from Houston. I love your show, and I had a segment suggestion. It's stay trash. I just read about the Kepler telescope which has run out of fuel and as being retired after nine and a half years. It will be less to drift around the sun. Forever. Made me think about all the other things that we have drifting out there. Congratulations on your one hundred. I love your show, and I'm a huge clam fan as well. Shot up front Barrett. Can't wait to listen to battle the bastards. Also last shout out to my son Sachs Morgan at Michigan state, gang gang, gang. We are moms. We got moms mica this. Big mom's calling the hotline shouting out their kids who listen to and shit. It's it's called building bridges between generations. And it's what I always knew this show do. Right. What was our question? Space trash. This is never happened before. I'm just blown away. There's the shelves to her. Yes. You don't know anything about space trash, you got to imagine. She's probably a hot mom. I've I'm pretty confident. I'm pretty confident of that in saying that. Anyway, space trash. Yeah. No. It's actually really wild to think about we're such a shitty species that it's not enough to just trash our own planet were just throwing trash out into the fuck and universe as well. Satellites spaceships bombs who the fuck knows what's going on. How many satellites are even circling the globe at this point? It's crazy. Like is there going to be a point where you know, those cool shots, we get sent from whatever lunatic. They've convinced to go up into outer space for our country when they take pictures out the window, or whatever it what point are we gonna start to see like, you know, like a eighteen Wheeler flow by like some trash like a big pile like, Starbucks and subway cups and shit. Like just float by on the side like is going to be obstructing the view of the earth at some point. I just don't know how the space stuff works 'cause it floats forever. You understand is that it's not degrading of their biodegradable it it's floating around forever for. The turn the sandlot. Yeah. I don't know it just cracks me up we human beings. How are we gonna clean up the space trash fuck? Fucking would've aliens come down into vets their demand. They come down here. They point their massive guns. You know, down at the earth or whatever. And they're like, you fucks, you're gonna clean up this space trash or you're all done. We'd have to come up with a way to clean, the space trash that would be terrible. Heaven forbid next call this is Keith from the North Carolina region. I was wondering you talked about movies recently in movie theaters and complaining about people not buying food. They're complaining about freshest. But in the past I've snuck in several three items including a storm. So and h ridiculous thing is you have snuck in movie theater. That's it. Happen. All right straight up. No, no disrespect. I probably wouldn't have. Played this call if it wasn't for the nuclear alarm that went off at the end Keith what happened. It's like that's the sound. You hear it the PowerPoint when Homer Simpson falls asleep in his desk in forgets to fuck and keep an eye on the on the different levels or whatever, dude. What what was that noise? If that can't be the alarm on your phone surely in it sounded like it was like a little bit in the distance. I'm holding out hope that some kind of nuclear loan or some some terrible thing that Keith headed in running go solve immediately after making this hotline, call about ridiculous items to sneak into the dealer, look, man. I don't have one myself. I've never been a sneak things in the movie theater guy. I've done it on to time-to-time a water bottle or whatever like maybe a little thing Pianim's, but nothing like a foot long sub which I respect. But that's a psycho move. You don't at least get a six six inch. Man. Would you take a foot long sub into a movie? People have to look at you like, you're nuts. The other thing you have to keep in mind is the movie theater. I go to every time. I go to the movies is one of those ones where you make it into a meal..

Keith Jamie Kepler telescope Starbucks Sachs Morgan boulder Houston Barrett Michigan Homer Simpson North Carolina Pianim six six inch
"kepler telescope" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

01:41 min | 1 year ago

"kepler telescope" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"Here's a cool. One. Nasa says its first plane hunting telescope is officially retired. And it's all because of ran a gas NASA launched their Kepler space telescope from Cape Canaveral air force base back in two thousand nine with the mission to find new planets deep space in total. The Kepler telescope fell more than twenty six hundred new planets on its journey all throughout the universe. Taking Kepler's places the tests which NASA launched just back in April, Kevin reviews ninety six point five WDBO sheriff. Jackson, georgia. Take an extra steps to ensure that trigger treaters stay away from the homes of sex offenders sheriff Gary long has instructed his deputies to put up warning no trick or treat signs in the yards of the fifty four registered sex offenders in the area on Facebook long says that registered sex offenders are forbidden from participating in Halloween and that the signs are in accordance with Georgia law here in Orlando to find out if any sex offenders are in your trick or treating paths download the FDLE app. Samantha Jordan, news ninety six point five. WDBO's candy open mics over there. I do. Now, we do have Nick Gran awaits aka Nikki football who is over on ESPN five eighty with me. He's sitting in the studio today actually got a shot out from one of our listeners here go. Hello, Scott, the Nikki football, I like nine frozen Snickers six Muscat teams and point five baby roof topped is my bucket of love ninety six hundred five Helene. Thanks. We have a winner. Yeah. Thanks to Nick's, dad. Mr. Greenwich calling in today on. Football gets a shoutout, right? Twelve fifty one. Now here at news ninety six point five WDBO the five day brought to you by Tuffy.

Kepler telescope Nasa Nick Gran WDBO Football Kepler Cape Canaveral georgia Samantha Jordan Gary long Tuffy Facebook Mr. Greenwich Jackson ESPN Orlando Kevin
NASA's Planet-Hunting Kepler Space Telescope Is Done

Orlando's News at Noon

00:22 sec | 1 year ago

NASA's Planet-Hunting Kepler Space Telescope Is Done

"And it's all because of ran a gas NASA launched their Kepler space telescope from Cape Canaveral air force base back in two thousand nine with the mission to find new planets deep space in total. The Kepler telescope fell more than twenty six hundred new planets on its journey all throughout the universe. Taking Kepler's places the tests which NASA launched just back in April, Kevin reviews ninety six point five WDBO sheriff.

Kepler Telescope Kepler Nasa Cape Canaveral Wdbo Kevin
"kepler telescope" Discussed on KOIL

KOIL

02:43 min | 2 years ago

"kepler telescope" Discussed on KOIL

"Bureaucrats are saying yes we've been visited all along we've had other people saying for the longest time we even visited all along we speculate about what about span panspermia has basically seat the planet now there gene sequencing things on the on the find out of its a foreign body or not it says here the research took place entirely on the orbiting lab and came together into separate processes first nasa astronaut peggy whitson and her team collected microorganisms then they created multiple samples using a process known as parliament raged chain reaction this collar technique involves making new dna strands for old ones in order to produce potentially billions of copies of a particular section of dna using their samples scientists then transferred bacterial colonies from petrie dishes in the test tubes of first researchers in space they sequence dna to determine the exact order of the nuclear tides the genetic building blocks of course of each this information allowed the scientists to identify the organisers which were previously unknown as vows explain to their original announcement in april the success was attributed to combining two techniques that were not previously used together many pcr device that allowed the team to duplicate the samples and minion a handheld machine used to sequence dna for another coupling unknown dna to identify light from other planets on the space station and russia announced that they found by terio life on the space station nasa said the hell you did but they've been sequencing unknown dna now on the space station the whole time you see how this goes and then nasa makes their announcement oh by the way we found a solar system with eight planets thanks to google advanced intelligence i become like my mind year this is too much to this show graphs bond to right though there's so much to grasp on to with the story about the investigation you opposed now the sequencing a dna of unknown a horn package microbes on on the space station nasa said that they found the planets in a solar system's from two thousand lightyears away from planet earth the kepler telescope and artificial intelligence provided by google and i said no last hour they are also organizing and network to which that they can actually send simultaneously information to people all over the planet without having to hook up to it internet link it will be down to invite a.

peggy whitson russia nasa solar system kepler telescope artificial intelligence google