19 Burst results for "Kent State University"

"kent state university" Discussed on KCBS All News

KCBS All News

04:35 min | Last month

"kent state university" Discussed on KCBS All News

"Workplace exhaustion is something many of us are far too familiar with and for some it can trigger burnout. And that is different than depression. So we need to sort out those two for more we're joined on the CBS RingCentral news line by doctor Angela Neil Barnett, psychology professor and at Kent State university and author of Sue your nerves, the black woman's guide to understanding and overcoming anxiety, panic, and fear. Thank you so much for joining us. Oh, thank you for having me. So let's talk about burnout. What is that versus depression? We need to get those two sorted out. Yes. So burnout is generally associated with the workplace. And it's kind of feeling disgruntled about work or just really exhausted or weary around your job as if you don't have any control over it. And so you feel like just quitting or you feel like, why am I doing this? You may just kind of go through the motions of work. And that's different than depression, which is a clinical diagnosis, and so when someone is depressed, they are sad, most they more often than not, they are. They can be irritable or angry most days more often than not. And that nothing that they do gives them pleasure. Okay, so if you're burned out and then you go on a lovely two week vacation, you might feel regenerated and your mood might lift and you might feel better versus depression could be even if you went on vacation, it might stick around. If it's depression, if you go on depression, even if you even if you go on, vacation, it will stick around. But vacation is not going to help with the sadness. It's not going to help with the irritability. It's not going to help with nothing giving you pleasure. All right, so at work, you mentioned some of the things not having control over what's going on at work, a lot of people are stuck with that. What are some things people can think about are actually due if they're feeling burned out and they recognize that and they just don't have a vacation coming up for a few months. So now they have to deal with it. How can we reframe things? How can we go into work and feel a little bit better? Well, one of the things that you certainly can reframe things, but I think it's really important to let someone know how you're feeling and that is what HR or employee assistance programs are for because too often we keep we try to do it all by ourselves and oftentimes that epic fail for us we are burned out. So first of all, let someone let a trusted person know what you are, what you are feeling what you are dealing with burned out, call it what it is. Secondly, then we're talking about using these reframing techniques and oftentimes the before you even frame you just have to step back and do that self care type of thing. You may have to take a day off each week each week for a month, just so that you are taking care of yourself and your and what is and your burnout. Then reframing things is absolutely something that one can do. I see this as this when it is actually the what we teach people to do is something called the so what chorus. So what's bothering you? So what? Well, well, because of this, I can't do this this this. So what? And what you want. Continuing to ask that question, you get down to the core issues. And once you know what the core issue is in the workplace with the burnout, then you can change the recipe change the way you think about it. All right, well, thank you so much. Doctor Angela Neil Barnett, psychology, professor at Kent

depression Angela Neil Barnett Kent State university CBS Kent
"kent state university" Discussed on Living to 100 Club

Living to 100 Club

04:56 min | 6 months ago

"kent state university" Discussed on Living to 100 Club

"Our guests share insights and recommendations about successful aging, stories of perseverance and inspiration about our future. Today's program focuses on the science of dementia and the latest research on preventable causes of dementia. Our guests for this podcast is doctor Paula, Hartman Stein. A gero psychologist and co author of a chapter preventing what's preventable in dementia. This is in a new text, handbook of evidence based prevention of behavioral disorders in integrated care. Paula has been a previous guest on our podcast. She joins us today to discuss what we've learned about risk factors for dementia and the lifestyle factors that may account for as much as 40% of dementia cases worldwide. Can we change or modify these risk factors? If so, does the risk of developing dementia decrease how big a role does better nutrition and diet play and reducing our risk will tackle these questions and others first a little background on Paula? Doctor Hartman Stein is a nationally recognized clinical psychologist. Gerontology educator and journalist after retiring from full-time work as a clinician in private practice and associate professor at northeast Ohio medical university and adjunct professor at the university of Akron and Kent State university, doctor Hartman Stein currently works part time as a consultant and educator. Offering lively presentations to community and professional groups on healthy aging and improving memory skills. This fall she has a new role as adjunct professor at Brevard college, provide North Carolina teaching, lifespan development. Broadening her promotion of the power of the pen, she also leads writing workshops on Zoom or in person. As an approach to reduce stress, deep in spirituality and enhance optimal aging. Paulette's great to have you back on our podcast. Well, thank you, Joe. Thanks for inviting me. This should be hopefully a fun and interesting conversation between the two of us. I think so. I think so too. I think it's going to be a very informative inspiring conversation. So I always like to open by asking our guests to tell us a little bit about the journey. I went through some of your professional history, but tell us about the journey that brought you to our today. Okay, try to make this succinct. Well, I'm from western Pennsylvania, from a working class background. In fact, I'm half Croatian and half Ukrainian. So I'm very interested in all the world events, tragedies that are happening in the Ukraine right now.

dementia Hartman Stein Paula northeast Ohio medical univers university of Akron Kent State university Brevard college Paulette North Carolina Joe Pennsylvania Ukraine
"kent state university" Discussed on Black History Year

Black History Year

07:40 min | 7 months ago

"kent state university" Discussed on Black History Year

"Don't want to digest how colorism is a thing and how light skinned people operate in this world differently than dark skinned people. It's the same thing with that phobia. And people not wanting to accept the or people wanting to hold on to the little bit of power that they get. And if you're skinny and you can, you know, feel empowered because you're fit and because you're whatever and you know, have an element of being able to, you know, step on top of someone else, especially as black people when we experience so many other things that make us feel small. So I get it. But then I don't get it. And I want us all to be realistic and honest about it and stop disguising it under you being worried about someone else's health because that's just not the truth at all. And who are you to be worried about somebody else's health? Let's just start there. I think it also speaks to the complete lack of empathy that people have, because I think there are some people who are thin or who are privileged who ultimately don't give a crap, but then there are also people who, because they have never gone through something. They say that that doesn't exist. And it's like, well, actually, you can find out it exists by one researching to listening to people who've experienced it. It's simple. And it's a big empathy problem that we have too. Yeah. Absolutely. And I think the problem with labeling sadness as repugnant is that it affects everyone, right? Everyone, it truly does affect not just black women, right? Because now you have a problem where, regardless of your gender identity or your class status or your racial background, there's this pressure to be thin. But time, small bodies, the virtuousness is dangerous, right? Because then Finn does not always equal healthy. I think someone said that in the comments section, right? Right. It doesn't always equate to healthiness, especially not when we consider mental health, right? Our country is full of big and small people struggling with mental health crises, spending from body image struggles, right? And that's something that ought to be addressed more urgently than criticizing perfectly healthy individuals who happen to naturally be bigger than what a BMI chart And so kind of bring it all together. One point that broke, I think you brought up when we were phrased rather when we were talking about this is like, it put it into perspective for me, perception versus reality, like people oftentimes receive fat people as lazy and unmotivated and not doing, not doing anything, to change their circumstances. Again, as if that equals unhealthiness, like someone said in the comments. And I think that oftentimes that's number one, again, as someone who struggled with my way, that's hardly the reality, doing the mental work is just as taxing as doing the physical therapy, being around black women who love themselves, positive images like lizzo, those were all integral to my weight loss journey, more so than the doctors I went to who only expressed displeasure in my BMI and made the assumption that I just sat around and did nothing. Like there's so many other things that contribute and I think that one, externally, as just people, people do that to people, but also on the back end doctors. Like, this is what people experience when they go to their doctor's office. And they see you, they see your BMI and it's like everything else goes out the window. And speaking to different elements too, that could cause fatness like let's not even talk about the issues like food deserts and access to affordable and healthy foods, the time and energy to prepare those foods. There are so many factors that are out of our control that can contribute to weight gain and obesity, especially as black people. For stress is one of the top ones. And we all stress on the daily. You don't have stress in your work. You got stress in your life as a black person. And these blanket beliefs of irresponsibility are extremely dangerous in the long run. And I think people don't realize that. And dangerous on the mental front, but also when it comes to our health and actually getting quality care. Yeah. I mean, the black community struggles with fighting off chronic disease and higher death rates, not because of their weight class, but because systemically, we lack access to the tools and resources that would help us actually lead those lives of vitality, right? So we need America to answer for air and water pollution in our neighborhoods and looking at you, Flint, Michigan, right? We need corporate America and the food industry to make nutritious food available in our communities. I'm looking at you and deserts, or food swaps, right? And we need to do stigmatize mental healthcare and make access to therapeutic solutions more affordable. Like all this and more is what we need to put our energy towards pushing back on rather than fat shaming and body shaming and demeaning people with larger bodies. Yeah. So that's gay man. You have a list of the solutions book that people just need to run with because it's not, it's not complicated. It just needs to be prioritized. And it's also a hurtful part of this whole thing. But so there's this doctor, her name is doctor Mary, himmelstein, and she's an assistant professor at Kent State university. And she actually studies how weight stigma affects our health. And she speaks openly about the discrimination, people of a higher body weight experience, especially at the doctor. And so, and she concluded that larger people often receive poor medical care, like there is research, like stories, you should listen to those period. But if you need research, that exists as well. And himelstein, she mentioned, she says, when you come into the doctor as a higher weight woman, if you're complaint, could be related to your weight, that's what it's often assumed to be. They don't even look at anything else. They're going to automatically just tell you to lose weight. And it often translates into the doctor requiring a patient to lose weight before they can run any other tests to get another diagnosis. And time is precious when it comes to receiving medical care, like a lot of these things can be very time pertinent. And you know, like, terrible as old as time, my favorite movies. When people don't feel heard, they stop showing up. Leading to even poor health outcomes. So this is doing a disservice and so many different ways because it seems like doctors just can't relate to the humanity of bigger people. And it makes me think of sorry to cut you off. The black infant mortality rate. It's the same thing where they perceive us as being able as black women. Take away the weight, so imagine adding the weight on top of that. More capable of. What's the blanking. Taking pain and not really seeing us for what we're saying or like assuming it all lends together. So when you layer these things, like to be a black woman, is already dangerous enough to be a black woman and having kid is dangerous and then add

phobia Finn himmelstein chronic disease America himelstein obesity Flint Kent State university Michigan Mary
"kent state university" Discussed on Food Heaven Podcast

Food Heaven Podcast

08:26 min | 10 months ago

"kent state university" Discussed on Food Heaven Podcast

"Know what you think, and we're going to hop back into our episode. When it comes to social anxiety, like are there tools in your practice that you have seen to be helpful, like you said, role playing, which I think is a really good one. Are there other tools that you think might be helpful for people struggling with this? Sure. The gold standard to help people were struggling with anxiety is to teach them cognitive behavioral techniques or for them to engage in cognitive behavioral therapy. We will hear people call CBT. And that is how your mind and your body work in conjunction with one another. And so the most important thing is to call it what it is. It's anxiety. And many, many people suffer from anxiety. And over the pandemics, it has gone up the amount of anxiety experienced by people, particularly women, has increased. So call it what it is. So by calling it what it is, then we can begin to address one of the things that we know is that even when one is anxious, it is important to do what you have set out to do. So if you're in this meeting, you become really, really anxious. I don't want you to leave, I want you to stay because what you will find is that anxiety will only go so high and then it will come down. But most of us don't stay, and so we don't learn that. So we run from the anxiety. And then self talk. This is just the anxiety, you know? It is social anxiety. I need to start my presentation. I need to make it through slide one. Great. I've made it through product one. It's just anxiety. Let me make it through slide two. So self talk is very important. You know, in there's a form of CBT called act. Which is acceptance and commitment therapy. So it's about accepting that I'm anxious. You know, what does that mean? And let me go forward. So all those types of things can be extremely helpful in combating social anxiety. So that you don't have to live, you know, bound by being anxiety, that you can reclaim your life. You can perform of things that you want to some people self medicate, you know, they use alcohol. Or they use drugs to combat the social anxiety. So, you know, we know that marijuana that there are lots of people particularly black, black Americans, black men who will smoke a blunt before they do something. Just to decrease their anxiety. CBT works better. And there is medication in the medication takes the edge off the anxiety. But you still have to do the work. You still have to do some form of CBT. To overcome the anxiety. That's such helpful advice. And also just considering medications when appropriate because I know so many people where the medications have helped them so much and it's necessarily like you said to take the edge off. So I'm sure that's going to help a lot of people. Absolutely. The decision to take medication is yours. But there is nothing wrong with taking medication. It's just important to understand that the medication alone is not enough. You want the medication with some form of cognitive behavior. Okay, so kind of in wrapping, I know that with COVID, there's a spectrum of how we're all coping, right? Like I have friends who don't feel comfortable seeing anyone inside and I have friends where they're not even thinking about COVID anymore. So how can we realize this that everyone's levels of anxiety are different and everyone's comfort with things are different? How can we kind of work towards respecting where people are at and not minimizing or disregarding their anxiety? Yes. I didn't know how that doesn't happen. That's the big controversy here in Ohio. Again, we need to understand the different people are at different places. Where am I at? So first of all, you need to be very clear in your identity in terms of where am I at in terms of, I don't know how we teach grown folks how to respect each other's values. I certainly know how we teach our lessons, which is through values clarification. And to be respectful, but we are at such longer heads in this country, where people think nothing of yelling, that mask wearers in public places. Or people think of nothing of yelling at non mask wears. Places. You know, I teach at a university. And right now, the regulation is that when you're being taught, you have to wear a mask. And so we practice and generated ideas of how to be respectful of our non mask wearing students. While at the same time, getting them to wear the mask. Again, they're just different ways to do that. You might just walk by the desk and place the mask on. And then there are some people who have had to dismiss class because people have said you're not going to violate my rights and I'm not going to wear the mask. And the fact is there is no good way to do this in this country. Because we have chosen not to listen to one another. Yeah. It comes down to respecting where someone else is as. And like you said, knowing where you stand, it's really important to be very clear on that because they used to set that boundary, like maybe someone that I don't want to be around or someone that I am not anticipating talking to and I think a lot of that has come up during the pandemic because people use them things have really been exposed with everything that's been going on. But it's all been very interesting to see play out. But in rapping, can you tell us for listeners who want to learn more about your work and where they can find you, can you let us know? Sure. They can follow me at Twitter at doctor Angela and Anne, let's go with the J or I am a professor at Kent State university in the psychological science. This is department. So they can log on to the psychology department website and learn more about me. And I know that the actual website for the program for research on anxiety disorders which I direct will be listed in the show notes. Thanks so much for listening to another episode of the food having a podcast. If you haven't already, make sure to connect with us online where most active on the gram at food heaven, but we're also on Facebook and Twitter at food heaven show. If you like this podcast, make sure to rate review, subscribe and share with a friend. Yup, our podcast is released every Wednesday in each week. We take a deep dive into topics like health at every size, food and culture, intuitive eating, mental health, and body acceptance. If you're looking for a sustainable and inclusive path to wellness, come hang out with us to learn how to take care of yourself from the inside out..

anxiety Ohio Kent State university Twitter Angela Anne anxiety disorders Facebook
"kent state university" Discussed on The Beauty Brains

The Beauty Brains

05:52 min | 11 months ago

"kent state university" Discussed on The Beauty Brains

"I had to laugh. What should the next generation of aestheticians and hairdressers know or understand? But first, that inane chit chat. How is the kitty stuff going? Well, I've got a visiting kitty this for the next couple of weeks. Yeah, my sister in law, they did their spring break and so we get to take care of their cat. Oh, very cool. I thought you were saying it was like a new porch kitty in residence or something. Yeah, well, I don't know. This is the thing about cats where boy cats like women and women girl cats like men. Because this is a boy cat and he doesn't seem to like me that much. But he likes Shannon. He loves my wife. And of course, and of course, you know, she's allergic to cats. Oh yeah, she's allergic, of course, but you know, of course, I'm the one who feeds him and cleans up his litter box and stuff, but you know, that's what I do. You're gonna have to work for his affection. I will. You know, I did see that the, you know, the porch kitty crew. I think they got, I think they got booted out of their house. There's a new crew that came in. Really? This new gray kitty and there's this menacing big black kitty. I don't know. And tuxedo is gone. I haven't seen tuxedo or Lou, the whole clan is gone. It feels like an episode of The Walking Dead quite frankly. It's catworth. That's what it is. Well, they're all still eating my food, so it's good. Yeah, well, I miss seeing you yesterday. I was traveling home for Ohio. I had a board meeting at Kent State university, and I had a layover in Chicago, but due to mechanical problems, the plane was late, and then the plane couldn't take off because of more mechanical problems. And then I was stuck in Chicago for the night, and I thought, you know what? I had a call period and have him help me out, but, you know, all the flight was early in the morning, and yeah, it was a big disaster. So I got home late. But missed opportunity to see you. Well, let's head over.

Shannon Lou Kent State university Chicago Ohio
"kent state university" Discussed on It’s All About Health & Fitness

It’s All About Health & Fitness

03:54 min | 1 year ago

"kent state university" Discussed on It’s All About Health & Fitness

"To file an affirmative action case against the fashion school. And that's how I ended up getting my job. Well, I have been in and out of Kent State university for a long time and have set with some search committees and diversity stuff and I remember saying maybe two months ago, I forgot what meeting Zoom meeting. I was on, but I remember saying to everyone listen. You know, we keep talking about diversity. I've been talking about it since me being there, what 2000, 2000, 2002. And at this point, you just got to do the damn thing, you know? Instead of just talk about it. Absolutely. That's it. Put your money where your mouth is. That's it, and stop insulting people, period. Yeah. And that's a whole, yeah. I could do a whole show on that. But we will move forward. Yes, yes, yes. So people reading your book. It talks about overcoming our fears, but I love how you say, make fear your superpower. For African Americans out there, everybody, but most especially for African Americans, we have a lot of stuff that we have to deal with, but most especially our own fears. So as we close out, what major tips would you give us to help us to overcome our.

Kent State university
"kent state university" Discussed on It’s All About Health & Fitness

It’s All About Health & Fitness

02:57 min | 1 year ago

"kent state university" Discussed on It’s All About Health & Fitness

"Or what do you think? You know, it depends on what school you go to some schools are better prepared than others. Okay. Kent State university has been recognized as a first gen. I think it's called first gen success school, which means that they have significant support for first generation students, which they do because they have several of the government funded programs on their campus such as the upward bound programs, such as the mcneer scholars program. They also have a program called students discuss sinner, which is specifically for students on our first generation. So kids at university and the regard to firsthand students has done a great job with support. But there are other schools that still don't have adequate resources for first generation students. And a lot of times you'll see that with, you know, some of the smaller private schools. Okay. You know, because of their demographic and possible locations, you know, some of those places are like in really small rural areas and they really don't. They don't have the resources. They don't really understand what resources they even need to be able to support the first generation students. I know I keep sticking on this first generation, but. That's your whole movement. You're the CEO and founder of first generation revolutionary. So can you explain what it's all about? Yes, absolutely. So first generation revolutionaries is a movement that I created to support those students who are first gen as well as the faculty and staff that support those students. So through the platform, I provide them with professional development, networking opportunities as well as spiritual fulfillment. I truly believe that if you're going to be successful in this life, you can't just focus on just one of those things. You can't just focus on professional development or academics. You have to be a well rounded person. You have to be a whole, you know, a whole individual, which includes Tapping into that spiritual fulfillment as well. And so I'm a speaker educator author and advocate for those first gen students. And I truly believe that because I've gone through and I have firsthand knowledge about what it means to be first gen and the struggles that they have, you know, it's my duty. I really truly feel like God is.

Kent State university
"kent state university" Discussed on The BBQ Central Show

The BBQ Central Show

08:16 min | 1 year ago

"kent state university" Discussed on The BBQ Central Show

"Good evening and welcome to the really big barbecue central show. This is joe. The talks about all things important. World of barbecue and grilling show originates from the rock and roll hall of fame city of cleveland. Ohio aka bomb city usa and more importantly the barbecue capital of the north coast. I am your program host. Greg grumpy happy to have you aboard here on your tuesday evenings alive. Fire fun and from violent. Show if you want to jump in another show tonight. Here's how you doing. You can get in touch with the show by sending an email to greg at bbq central show dot com or on the twitter and instagram said bbq's central show anything else. You wanna find out about the show or anything that is corresponding it can be found out the main website which ironically is the bbq central. Show dot com. And here's what's happening case you get the newsletter coming up in about twelve minutes from now the longest running sponsor of the show a championship. Pit master points away from winning the jack daniels world championship a number of years ago. He's brought a number of great products to market here over the past number of years and friend of mine. We welcome back. finally bob trodden to the show from the barbecue. Guru looking forward to catching up with bob. It's gonna be great conversation then. At thirty five past. The hour is the force tuesday of a method in the first hour. That can only mean a visit from none other than grizzled veteran of the barbecue journalist world derek rich notwithstanding that in the second hour because it is the fourth tuesday and then the second hour you know what that means at least two and potentially a full panel of three embedded. Correspondents will be joining the show and we have plenty to talk about with all of these folks. So don't think for one second that this is going to be some kind of cockamamie mail in show. No nothing like that. Is i. Try and buy time to send derek his link. Because i don't know if i send it to him or not. That's the wrong link. I want to send that link. I want to send this link to derrick here. We go and and we can have a visit with derek. Little bit later on here in the first hour. So that's how it lines up. Bob neck shortly derek riches after him a betty correspondence taking the balance of the second hour. We're looking forward to that. Don't forget you can follow me. Socially instagram twitter tick tock at bbq central show snapchat at bbq central for live video. Feed of the show you can go to the following websites. Facebook in twitch slash. Bbq central show. You can also find one over at youtube slash are directly. You can also get nad. Free podcast feed of the show. If you're not a live take your inner. You can go to different places to try that out. You can become a patron over at the show patriot page which is patriot. Dot com slash. Bbq central show. Or if you subscribe through apple podcasts. You can do it directly within that app if you feel the need if not. Don't worry about it. just do it as normal by the way. If you pay attention in the apple podcast feed even if you didn't subscribe to the ad free on accident in the second hour for a while on thursday. You got a free look of what it's like to have an ad free show by. Thank you so if you ever wondered if you were one of those lucky few as i was listening to the show back and apple podcast i was like oh so at some point later last thursday i was able to fix it and update the feed. You get that experience now but if you get into the morning first thing thursday you got a sneak peek. An unrealized sneak peak. So there you go before. We get to listener feedback from past shows. Let me thank the folks over at a podcast called real food real people. I was a guest of theirs last night and while i am a great guest. It's not something that typically happens. Where i'm against on somebody else's show which is a shame. But i was very happy to have been asked to go on their show. We talked a bit about the history barbecue central. We talked about different styles cookers and wood types and much more. I'm not sure exactly when the show will be released because they have post production to do and all this sort because it is a traditional podcast. But i'll post a link unsocial when it does. I'm also reaching out to them to see once. The show is finished. If they might send me a copy. And i would post it in my show feet as well as a bonus episode of sorts so stay tuned for that also wanna mention this. I don't know if she's watching praying to the lord and baby jesus that she is but we delivered kid number two to college. Kent state university this past weekend. Oh my law. There was a moment in time. When i was like. Will they ever get out of the house and now they are full leading out of the house blink once and they're gone so she's only a couple of days in if you have any kids or cousins or you know anybody that goes to can't and you're looking for really cool kid to hang out with drop me a line and i'll put you in contact with a beauty a smarty pants. Quick as a wet. So we wish. Good luck this year. At kent state university the hallowed halls of ken state and beautiful portage county ohio solicitor feedback from shows. Here of last few weeks. Pete in saint. Louis reiten. Greg thank you and thanks to rusty for the last segment last week about getting a barbecue vending business together after hearing what he has to endure. I have decided. That's just something. I'm going to continue to do privately for some family friends and some of my own friends co workers. That seems to be the best way to go at this time for me. Rusty's info was i opening to say the least. I look forward to hearing his progress over the rest of the year. Thank you greg and thank you rusty regards. pete pete. Thank you very much for writing in. I'm sure thanks you as well. Probably thank you. And the second hour. Because he'll be part of the embedded correspondent segment. Of course i agree. I thought rusty's information was brutally honest. His candor was refreshing. And as we come to find out getting into the barbecue catering business whether it's a food truck whether it's a trailer whether you're doing traditional catering where you deliver a whole bunch of stuff to somebody else's location. There's a lot to consider there so a lot of things you need to get down. There's a lot of things you do to get legal in europe. And they change from county to county and state to state so even though rusty was sharing what was going on that was unique to him. And i believe he did a good job of pointing that out. You're doing it somewhere else in this great land of ours. You gotta make sure that you're touching base with your proper healthcare professional fire department as we learned last week. That can be a big deal so plenty of things you want to look at it. If that's your passion just helping you lessen the learning curve if you will so.

derek bob trodden derek rich Bob neck apple jack daniels north coast twitter instagram Greg greg cleveland derrick Ohio joe usa bob ken state Louis reiten youtube
"kent state university" Discussed on The Joys Of Binge Reading: The Best in Mystery, Romance and Historicals

The Joys Of Binge Reading: The Best in Mystery, Romance and Historicals

07:32 min | 1 year ago

"kent state university" Discussed on The Joys Of Binge Reading: The Best in Mystery, Romance and Historicals

"But the here's where here's where the tender land came from. It's another story that. I have wanted to write for a long time when i was eleven years old. That would have been in the fifth grade toward the end of that year. Our teacher read the class. The adventures of tom sawyer should do to buy greeting half an hour after lunch every day. I loved that book. Here was this kid. He was just like me and he was out there on. The mississippi river having is really great adventures. And after that of course i had to read adventures of huckleberry finn which i loved even more and so across my entire career as a writer. I have wanted someday to write a novel that would pay homage to mark twain. That might be in. Its own way. An updated version of huckleberry finn in. That's where this tender land came from and it was the success of ordinary grace. Really both the critical monitors successive ordinary grace. That allowed me to launch into that particular project because prior to ordinary grace by publisher really only wanted corporal connor novels from me so that ordinary broke me out. I have extended my reach with this gender landon. I'm at work on a third standalone. That be a companion novel to both ordinary grace and this gender land great also. It's probably no coincidence. That you spent many is working and research development that so you've got the academic strand alongside your personal experience. I guess that has also helped feed into your understanding of what is going on with these characters has other driving forces like us in the works that i create with children is my understanding. That children are incredibly resilient if you look at the four vagabonds at the heart of this tender land. They have all undergone incredible trauma incredible loss and yet they're able to rebound and build a family centered around the the forum and together using all of their resources and their love for one. Another make an epic journey in the summer. Nineteen thirty two. Yeah yeah the turning to your own reading because we're starting to come to the end of our time together. We like to ask people about their reading and ask for the recommendations books that they think listeners might like to read themselves so tell us a little bit about your reading and had you been binge reader as such. I am typically not a binge reader. I pick and choose dabbled here i dabble there. I have to be honest with you so much my reading these days or what's called. Ar sees advanced readers copies or bound. Galleys and these are books that won't be available to readers For a very long time. I've been asked to read them with an eye to offer us jacket quote readers listeners. I'm sure are familiar with that quote that goes across. The you know the top of every book. Stephen king says this is the best thing since sliced bread or the bible. So a lot of my reading is done for that but i also lead a book group for my Church and doing good reading. But when i'm able to pick those books that i would like to read for pleasure very often pick books that are similar to what i write and very often said in the mid west or the set set a heartland of the country. My most most recent read for me that Mice socks off was a book. Written by kristin hannah called the four winds which like this tender land is set during the great depression that was set in the dust bowl area of the united states. And she's just so beautiful in her evocation of the The incredible hardships that the dust bowl years in the depression forced on those people. Another book that. I had to recommend for anybody who's read this tender land and enjoyed. It would be a book called before we were yours. By lisa wingate also set during the great depression and based on the tragic tragic real situation in which children essentially stolen from their families and adopted two very wealthy families. So those are some of my recommendations but we're more recommendation for binge breeding. I do have an author. That when i discovered i read everything by a guy named frederick bachmann readers might be familiar with a man called ov- Every book that i've read by bachman just been a delight. His is such a compassionate human being with a wonderful sense of humor. It's great we mentioned that you quite a long time. I think probably a good many years. You were working full time as a researcher. And you develop to way of writing this sort of compartmentalization. Almost you might say of your right in life. Tell us a bit about how you structured your time so that you could work in that job but also get your books done. Sure i moved to minnesota. My wife could go to law school here. And when she entered law school. I became the sole supporter of our family. I was the guy to keep a roof over head food on the table. But i wanted to be a writer as vita figure out a way to meet my responsibility. Salsa developed as a storyteller. We were living two blocks from the psychotic cafes. All place called the saint clair broiler at opened stores at six. Am every morning seventies weeks. Oh i pitched this idea to my wife. Honey if you're going to get the kids up and dressed and fed off to school. I think so i can go right. I swear to you when i come home from my job. At the end of the day i will be the best husband best far possibly imagined she audit every morning at six o'clock with my pen and my notebook in hand and that became my regime. I still get up at six o'clock every morning. Seven days a week and spend the first two to three hours each day writing. But you don't use a pen and paper anymore. You know about my eighth novel. I was a little behind deadline. And you know if you're right longhand you have to transcribe to a computer or processing some kind and that takes time and i thought you know if i could write directly to the computer. Maybe i can meet deadline. And so i was scary proposition because writing with my pen. Notebook was part of the magic of the creation. And i didn't wanna monkey with the magic. But i I tried the deriding directly to the keyboard. What do you know it works. I think it's remarkable that you right wrote eight books it longhand. Actually you know. I still know Writers who have become selling authors. Who still hyper way on old manual typewriters. Because it's a part of the magic. Yeah i can imagine that. Actually the imperial sixty six wouldn't mind trying to use a of sixty six but you couldn't just quickly use the source. Oh google could use look Talking about your life and what's contributed to your writing. I was fascinated by the detail that you shared on your website about the way your own at least was interrupted. Rather buy some radical action that that occurred. You don't have any regrets about it at all. But tell us about the experience on how it's contributed to life on your is unsure matriculated stanford university one of the most prestigious institutions of higher learning here in the united states in one thousand nine hundred sixty nine that was at the height of the vietnam more conflict. The torah country. Apart in terrible ways it tore the nation apart tour communities apart or families. apart the spring of nineteen seventy. The there was a situation that tragic situation that took place on the kent state university in ohio in which the national guard there opened fire on a group of protesters killing a number of students about that same period. In time we became aware that the government had been lying to us about the extent of the war in vietnam that in fact we were carrying on.

kristin hannah depression tom sawyer huckleberry finn lisa wingate mississippi river frederick bachmann mark twain landon connor Stephen king bachman united states minnesota stanford university google vietnam kent state university national guard ohio
"kent state university" Discussed on America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

06:54 min | 1 year ago

"kent state university" Discussed on America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

"So what we were doing that. Paper is examining whether or not naming had some effect on risk perception using sort of large scale data web scraping technology and this is something called the social amplification of risk theory. So this is the idea. That sometimes public response can be amplified or attenuated compared to kind of an objective standard. What the risk is and we didn't really find much difference quite frankly in it was a really preliminary study but this is something that we don't I guess i can look to the reason you're asking me is because we're talking about something called hashtag name the way. Should we be naming heat waves. And i think that's a really interesting social science question. We don't know of naming heatwaves would caused folks to be more aware of the problem or to take protective action. But i think there's some interesting questions around messaging and there's a lot of good social science communications face about what kind of messages are more likely to be transferred and acted upon and i would love to see that and i think a lot of the controversy. Hasn't been around using cumin names because of this sort of legacy of naming hurricanes so for longtime hurricanes only had female names and the way that hurricanes talked about in the in the media. And i'm talking this the early nineteen hundreds mid nineteen hundreds they talked about these really sexist in gender ways so it was a non normative thing to name names now. There are rules and regulations. You can't name a hurricane. After sitting president for instance but the minute you anthropomorphized of biophysical phenomenon. You introduce a level of normativity there. That wasn't before. And i think the folks have proposed Stepped away from the idea of using the human names in our leaning end for it's more like ranking heatwaves in having some other kind of more systematic way of thinking about how severe a heatwave is but it's a really interesting proposition. I guess i didn't hear that. So they're they're stepping away from naming. Because i i guess. I still see a bit of chatter about naming but maybe it's not boy. I mean a man or woman's name but in dr lab keith was on we chatted a bit about this too. I wanna keep talking about with my my guess and such. Is it a good idea or not. He be beyond the naming in the cultural issues associated with that. Also two other reasons why it's potentially not a great idea because every region experiences heat a different way and so as the media gets their head around it. Like how useful is it really to tell this one area that you've got the wave coming and all that so it sounded like a bad idea for very complex nuanced reasons. Yeah i mean. How do you define heatwave. What's the beginning. What's the and it's not such a discreet. Thing like a hurricane that can be relatively well bounded Another thing you know. This is an interesting part of the conversation. You know my personal feeling is we. Don't know if it will be helpful. And i would never advocate that. For instance. a city do some sort of built environment intervention without having data support. That this is going to be effective in so it's really hard for me as a social scientists to say naming a heatwave is a good idea because i haven't seen data that it is to support that in so that's one issue but i think that on the other side folks are saying while hurricanes there is no data. This is something that emerged and was put forth in done for years and years without data. And it's something that we're still doing. Why can't we do it with tea. And you know. I would come back and say we're in a different time in era in when you're gonna ask noah in the national weather service to invest a lot of funds in creating the kind of social and political infrastructure to do this. There'd be responsive if they don't see evidence that it's beneficial got sort of a hard ass a over you know. I grew up in florida and so hurricanes were always there so it was front and center. And you've probably got a lot more discussion rounded than maybe better parts of the country and to be honest. I mean the name. You're like okay. Allowed you to keep track to a certain extent but the most useful bit of information when we were like they were communicating with the public was just the category. It's a category one is like well. We want to be on the lookout but when it got up to category five then you start thinking. I'm going to have to evacuate and all that. So that was the most useful bit of information when they were like targeting specific hurricane. The name was that it was such a sort of superfluous way of keeping track of it. Yeah absolutely i. I completely agree that that the categories are going to be super helpful but again that has to be carefully designed and there are some sort of pilot programs in terms of ranking heat waves. That are out there but you know different populations experienced those sort of levels of heat differently different regions. it depends on humidity. The devils gonna be in the details. But i agree that is way more useful than than a particular name. It's interesting i was in the mid west. I used to be at kent state university and they had these toxic algal blooms and the one of them ended up getting named in there. All these memes about the name of that particular algal glimpse so there is something to the name you know. People can connect with the name however as sort of the flagship policy. I think that we have ideas about things that really need to be done like if we wanted to save lives right now we would give those. Who have the fewest resources air conditioning in shade. That's gonna protect people's bodies in stop people from dying. What was interesting about hurricanes because you could see him like you have so much time. They develop out there in the atlantic and so that that name or whatever it is to develop personality just based on the media coverage so you have so much time as you're preparing for it. And when i was it was interesting about the pacific northwest heatwave. Is that when you think of heat waves. It's like you look like a week out. Maybe if you're lucky like in tucson and be like oh and five days it's to be one hundred five then whoever was doing it. I mean obviously the national weather service whatever but it felt like a week and a half two weeks that they were predicting this pacific north. Heat way i'd never like i guess seen that kind of coverage where they were so sure about. This heat wave so far in advance now. That was very interesting. Yeah yeah absolutely all right so we're at the anterior in if people wanna learn more about what you do and and i guess first off. Just what's next for you next. You know you're doing all sorts research the next six months you have new responsibilities now but Which research looking like. Yeah right now. I'm trying to bridge the gap between these land surface temperature maps that are currently guiding decision making and the kind of hyper local decisions. That cities are actually need information about so. Most projects are at the super micro level trying to understand how the microcosm of the built environment all the complexities. How we can help. Designed.

national weather service hurricane keith kent state university florida devils atlantic tucson
"kent state university" Discussed on It’s All About Health & Fitness

It’s All About Health & Fitness

06:56 min | 1 year ago

"kent state university" Discussed on It’s All About Health & Fitness

"From visiting the doctor. Visiting the doctor. So true. For visiting the doctor, here we go. And this was written in health day news and it says it's a cliche that me and don't like to visit the doctor, but unlike tropes about refusing to ask for directions yet because you know me and they refuse to ask for directions or putting away their laundry. This one has definitely serious health ramifications. It's a fact that men are less likely than women to get preventative screenings, seek timely medical care, or guess what, be vaccinated by COVID-19 or the flu. Man also have shorter lifespans than women. Although reasons for the life expectancy gap are complex biology explains only part of it. And this was said by wisdom power, director of Yukon, health disparities institute in Hartford, Connecticut. There's something social happening, says, Powell, who also is an associate Professor of psychiatry at UConn health. She and other researchers who have looked at why me and avoid the doctor often focus on stereotypical concept of masculinity. Mary, human Stein and a social professor in the department of psychology, science, at Kent State university, in Ohio, said men, often think acknowledging pain or seeking health means someone's going to take my man card away from me. That means that means not only are they reluctant to visit a doctor when they're sick or injured, they might not communicate honestly once they're there. Men believe, quote, I have to put on this front and I have to be consistently strong. I can't be seen as weak. I can't be seen as emotional because if I am, I'm going to lose social status. The problem is consistent among age groups. She said him and Stein said, although it's tends to taper off as men get older and their health problems mound. Not all men think in this super masculine way. But those who do are most at risk, power agree, the message is take it like a man, boys don't cry, walk it off. And soldier on are things that some men internalize with a particular level of rigidity. Broader factors also are in play power said. From the onset of puberty, the healthcare system encourages women to see doctors regularly. So they get a kind of early life health socialization that boys and men are often not privy to. Itself in instances that boys play organized sports and they have to get a physical. Men also tend to have higher levels of mistrust in the medical system and people who mistrust doctors are less likely to seek care. Now, this is important. Miss trust is a particular issue among black men. Historic racism and the infamous tuskegee, syphilis study are often cited as causes, but power said the problem is more about the here and now. Constant personal affronts, the kind of racism that creates deaths by a thousand cuts, chip away at men's trust in the healthcare system. In the face of such challenges, power said, stereotypical notions of masculinity might actually protect black men, according to a study she led publish in the journal of general internal medicine, black men who reported higher levels of self reliance the idea that a man takes his destiny into his own hands were less likely to put off blood pressure and cholesterol screenings to power this point the way toward a solution. We can flip that script in some ways, saying to men that the way to be a man about your life or to show up as someone strong and as a protector is to take care of your health. Powell said that black men in particular who have been subjected to systematic dehumanization need a moment where they feel connected seeing and validated. So I like this article because we do men do hook on a hold on to their masculinity and especially black men, but I like how she says that black men who have higher levels of self reliance, they take care. They know their numbers, you know. Maybe we can come from that angle. What do you think? You know, well, I can tell you that in thinking about this that I think one of the big, big problems where this is really been a problem is in prostate cancer. Okay, yeah. You know, men have not wanted to go to the doctor, you know, they mistrust. They don't want to have the rectal examination, you know, blah, blah, blah. And it has not both black men well, because by the time they come in, many of them have advanced disease. And, you know, that's why I was hoping one day that we could still get doctor modeling onto the Cleveland clinic. I know. You know, who's one of the world's experts and prostate disease and black man to come and talk about this issue about what a problem it is and trying to get, you know, this masculinity thing with men, especially and colon cancer too. You know, we have had a friend who had colon cancer, but it can be a problem. Black men and masculinity. I mean, 'cause it happens with it happens, it happens across the board, this whole masculinity thing with men, but even more so for black men, but there is historic reasons, you know, it's not like it's just whatever, but there are reasons for that because it's not like it just popped out of the sky, not like it doesn't have any basis for it. Right. Trust is what we're trying to say, right. Right. Exactly. The mistrust of the whole system and how black men have been treated in the past. Right. Right. As we would say, there's cause for concern. Cause for concern. That's exactly it. These were good articles. And so D this inside show, do.

Yukon, health disparities inst UConn health department of psychology, scie Stein Powell Kent State university Hartford flu Connecticut journal of general internal me syphilis Ohio Mary prostate disease colon cancer prostate cancer Cleveland clinic
"kent state university" Discussed on Here's The Thing

Here's The Thing

08:03 min | 1 year ago

"kent state university" Discussed on Here's The Thing

"Protesters at home. I'm host robin roberts. And in cova nineteen immunity in our community. A new podcast series from iheartradio and the us department of health and human services to hear from americans on the front lines many of whom were uncertain about the vaccine's and the facts that convinced him to roll up their sleeves. Get back sonate it. We spoke with trang to a vietnamese american who quarantined with her mother for over a year. And then there's just this huge emotional relief pre vaccination. There's such a high level of emotional stress and so having it just provides a huge measure of relief which in turn helps me be amar centered and focused and you know joyful caregiver. Listen to kobe. Nineteen immunity in our community on the iheartradio app apple podcasts. Or wherever you get your podcast we can do this. Mattress warehouse knows the buying. A mattress can be tough with so many choices. Where do you start introducing bed match a patented diagnostic system. That determines your pressure points and recommends the mattresses that are best for your individual sleep needs and it's found only at mattress warehouse. Come try that match at a mattress warehouse near you. Visit sleep happens dot com for locations and get free next day delivery on select purchases so peppers dot com. I'm alec baldwin and you're listening to here's the thing in the early morning of ninth nine thousand nine hundred seventy just days. After four students were killed at kent state university. Nixon went to the lincoln memorial to talk to protesters himself at five. Am he recorded the experience on a dictaphone which is memorialized in current anderson's podcast nixon. At war i walked over to walk up to them. They were not a matter of fact the somewhat over on of course. Quite surprise as one of the protesters said afterward. It was so freaky. I tried to explain by goals. In vietnam were the same as their stopped. Kelly and the war could bring peace. Our goal was not to get into cambodia. I we were going to get out of vietnam. I know that they did not respond. I hope their hatred of the war. Jiji well understand would not turn into a bitter hatred of our whole system our country and everything it stood for. I said. I know you probably most of you think i'm sob. To know that. I understand just how you feel kurt. Anderson says nixon's frustration. Was that his plan to draw down. S troops about training. The south vietnamese. Just wasn't working. Nixon did start vietnamese ising or pretty rapidly. Insignificantly which means for our listeners means walk which means saying hey. This is not our war to win the south vietnamese the non-communist southern half of this country that was divided after the french occupation failed in the nineteen fifties between the north who became communists in the south. Who in the bureau of the communist became the puppet of the united states so nixon is is elected in the war and he begins reducing the draft. First year withdrawing not very many troops but then more and more nineteen hundred million over there we had five hundred and fifty thousand when he was elected in as many as five hundred dying a week in six thousand boys. My brother's age and even my age almost being drafted every week. And he brought all that dan because he understood that was not politically tenable and it was for better or worse all about politics for him. If i can end the draft and reduce the number of americans killed. He knew it would not country doubts. It would not be a problem for him anymore and so his approval ratings for how he was handling vietnam stayed high for almost the whole time and they went up and down and he responded by giving speeches and announcing further reductions in the draft. And everything else so vietnamese asian was saying hey south vietnam it's on you. We're we're getting outta here. We're not getting down here immediately. But we're getting out of here and therefore you will be fighting your own war against your north vietnamese brothers during the time that you did this and you mentioned getting into the weeds quote unquote in the research. What was something that surprised you that you found out. Well i mean not so much facts. Although this initial story. I had heard of her may be but i knew nothing about that. And it was interesting because he had covered it up and then and then the nixon nights to this day the nixon library is still sort of. No no no. That's not. don't even pay attention to that. Dole looking those filo pay attention to that woman in the chanel dress in the cornwell exactly so that was a kind of surprised me but these moments on the tape. The listening to the tapes gave me a sense of their humanity our humanity. I just didn't have before that. I just reading you. Just don't i didn't get as much as hearing them talking. Admitting where screwed or low laughing about massacres all those things were just in the sense. That i now feel as though i was there with these guys as they were running their horror show so not so much facts. Although i had heard because it's well known about this visit of nixon's at five. Am to hang the protesters at the lincoln memorial which is an amazing scene. And i think we do pretty good justice to but i never knew the thing that he didn't did at dawn and went to the empty capital alone and sat in his old chair where representative nixon sat. And then as they're leaving going through the statuary hall in the middle of the capitol there's this black mopping the floor six. Am in the morning and he goes over to her and says you know my mother was a saint. You remind me and my mother. Ubs saint too. I mean this crazy scene so so the details throughout of of how they sound how they interact his his craziness. When daniel ellsberg appears and is arrested in is admits. Yeah i'm the pentagon papers leaker. Then he couldn't get alger hiss out of his mind what happened. He was a guide worked in the state department as a young man in the in the nineteen thirties and into the forties and then ran a nonprofit was a big liberal guy had been a communist as so many people had in the nineteen thirties and it was alleged and perhaps maybe probably true had given papers not atomic secrets or anything but had dealt with the the soviets and then that was put it in a pumpkin was part of the pumpkin thing. And that was that became thing in nineteen forty eight nineteen forty nine hundred fifty when richard. Nixon was fresh to the house. And richard nixon road that to prominence really the persecution prosecution. Call it what you will elder. His dream was along with jagger hoover's help was how nixon became famous mr anti-communist who wasn't a nut like joe mccarthy and that was his beginning was queer so twenty years later when there's leak of the pentagon papers wholly different thing it's not about a cold war it's about this actual war we're fighting and it's all so different but he sees it as just the same as another pinko guy and he's jewish to boot doing this bad thing. All the newspapers are not only supporting them. They're printing it so he to him. It was just odds. It's alger has all over again. It's communists against me all over again. It's the liberal elite all over again and.

nixon us department of health and hu Mattress warehouse vietnam Jiji Nixon robin roberts lincoln memorial cova kent state university alec baldwin nixon library cambodia kurt anderson apple Kelly south vietnam Anderson filo
"kent state university" Discussed on Farm To Table Talk

Farm To Table Talk

04:39 min | 1 year ago

"kent state university" Discussed on Farm To Table Talk

"Think. Ever <Speech_Male> say it again <Speech_Male> say begins people. <Speech_Male> Give a chance to pick <Speech_Male> up. Their pencils and <Speech_Male> pin <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> mother earth <Speech_Male> is a stayed <Speech_Male> and <SpeakerChange> dignified <Speech_Male> old lady. <Speech_Male> No nudist <Silence> by choice <Speech_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> think bromfield <Speech_Male> with would have <Speech_Male> raised the glass of whisky <Speech_Male> and said here <Speech_Music_Male> here <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> as he took <Speech_Male> a big bite of lobsters <Speech_Male> hill <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> So those <SpeakerChange> are the <Speech_Male> those are the books that <Speech_Male> have an <Speech_Male> wh and what those <Speech_Male> books tell <Speech_Male> me. Is that <Speech_Male> what <Speech_Male> we're talking about <Speech_Male> today. Although <Speech_Male> we know more we have <Speech_Male> better science. <Speech_Male> We have better analytics. <Speech_Male> We have <Speech_Male> more information <Speech_Music_Male> but <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> the basis <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> for what <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> we're talking about <Speech_Male> is really old knowledge. <Speech_Male> You know with as <Speech_Male> far as soil <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> the foods that are produced <Speech_Male> on good soils <Speech_Male> the importance of <Speech_Male> all of those things that bromfield <Speech_Male> spouse with <Speech_Male> the importance <Speech_Male> to society. All <Speech_Male> that stuff is <Speech_Male> is <SpeakerChange> fairly <Speech_Male> fundamental <Speech_Male> and foundational. It's <Speech_Male> not like we're discovering <Speech_Male> today. we're <Speech_Male> rediscovering it <Speech_Male> in <Speech_Male> by <Speech_Male> looking at these old books <Speech_Male> get an appreciation <Speech_Male> for it. <Speech_Male> But then i think some of these <Speech_Male> newer books <Speech_Male> like lisa's <Speech_Male> gonna help even <Speech_Male> more to to <Speech_Male> reaffirm those <Speech_Male> positions <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> which are one to <Speech_Male> if <Speech_Male> you wouldn't mind emailing <Speech_Male> me those names <Speech_Male> and titles again <Speech_Male> and i'll place him <Speech_Male> in the description <Speech_Male> here for the pumpkin <Speech_Male> so people sure <Speech_Male> look them up and turn <Speech_Male> and and <Speech_Male> chase. They're <Speech_Male> they're all my bedside <Speech_Male> so okay. <Speech_Male> And then <Speech_Male> i think <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> You see <Silence> on your website <Speech_Male> bedside. <Speech_Male> There are no <SpeakerChange> there at my bedside <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> lied. I'm so <Speech_Male> used to people. Same website <Speech_Male> the bedside <Speech_Male> sounds a lot like <Speech_Male> website. Actually <Speech_Male> should be the <SpeakerChange> same thing. <Speech_Male> Rich <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> you <Speech_Male> know <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> And i mentioned. I kinda <Speech_Male> got motivated on. <Speech_Male> That's why mentioned to you. I just <Speech_Male> finished reading. The <Speech_Male> book called the planner of <Speech_Male> modern life. Louis bromfield <Speech_Male> and seeds <Speech_Male> of food revolution <Speech_Male> by stephen <Speech_Male> heymann <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> I enjoyed that. <Speech_Male> But <Speech_Male> i am really <Speech_Male> looking to unleash. <Speech_Male> You're gonna get a book out <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> And the title <Speech_Male> of your book <Silence> will be <SpeakerChange> one. <Speech_Female> Italy <Speech_Female> now of <Speech_Female> our farm is <Speech_Female> the main title and <Speech_Female> subtitle will be <Speech_Female> louis bromfield <Speech_Female> friends of <Speech_Female> the land and <Speech_Female> the rise of sustainable <Speech_Female> agriculture. <Speech_Female> And <Speech_Female> that will be coming out <Speech_Female> at kent state university. <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> Press <Speech_Male> this november. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> What and <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> these podcasts. Tend <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> to be evergreen. <Silence> <Advertisement> So <Speech_Male> there'll <Speech_Male> be people listening <Speech_Male> to this a year <Speech_Male> from now <Speech_Male> and they'll <Speech_Male> have to go <Speech_Male> back and say well she <Speech_Male> was talking about <Speech_Male> november of two thousand <Speech_Male> twenty one. Because <Speech_Male> they'll they'll be <Speech_Male> listening to <Speech_Male> this podcast in <Speech_Male> two thousand twenty <Speech_Male> two <Speech_Male> But they'll still be able <Speech_Male> to find it. So i assume <Speech_Male> that Just <Speech_Male> going online and finding <Speech_Male> wherever those those <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> were books are sold. <Speech_Male> You'll be there. <Speech_Male> And i'm i'm <Speech_Male> looking forward to <Speech_Male> reading it.

Louis bromfield lisa kent state university Italy
"kent state university" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

03:34 min | 1 year ago

"kent state university" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Com savings off regular sailing clearance prices exclusions apply not know this week, 1970. Members of the Ohio National Guard. Fired into a crowd of students protesting the war in Vietnam. Dozens injured, four killed in what is known as the Kent State massacre. The incident triggered a national outcry, including one of the biggest anti war anthems of all time. Crosby, Stills, Nash and Young Song, Ohio, which refrained Tin soldiers and Nixon's coming. We're finally on our own this summer. I hear the drumming. Four dead in Ohio. Here's the story. In late April, 1970 President Nixon announced the U. S military was expanding its operations into Cambodia. To defeat Vietnamese communists that were using the country to resupply. Protests erupted on campuses across the Yusa over the Cambodian incursion. On May 4th students at Kent State University in Ohio 40 miles south of Cleveland, gathered to protest the Vietnam War. Officials attempted to ban the demonstration, handing out 12,000 leaflets claiming the event was canceled, which was not More than 2000. People showed up. The Ohio National Guard was deployed to stop the protest when most of the crowd refused to disperse. The guard used tear gas. Because of wind. The gas had little effect and some students through a volley of rocks at the National Guard, chanting Pigs off campus. Chaos unfolded. 29 Guardsmen fire their weapons at the students using 67 rounds of ammunition. The shooting lasted 13 seconds. The incident left four people dead, nine seriously wounded nearly all under the age of 20. And here's something else you might not know. The event sparked a massive rally in Washington, D C. 150,000. Antiwar protesters descended near the White House. The scene was so dangerous Richard Nixon was rushed to Camp David. Years later, President Nixon would cite the national outrage over the Kent State massacre as one of his biggest motivators for getting out. Vietnam. Back after this. How bad is your back? Knee or neck? Pain? Mine was pretty bad. I played four sports when I was younger, and it's catching up with me now. Tried a lot of stuff to manage the pain ointments, pain relievers. Fish oil, Nothing worked. So a doctor friend of mine recommended Omega XL. And here's why the underlying cause of painful achey joints and muscles is in inflammation. The key to knock down inflammation before it causes damage is backed by 35 years of research, and that's what Omega X. L does. The doctor also says quote I can't write any prescription that comes close to what Omega XL accomplishes She was right. So if you're suffering with painful achey joints and muscles, stop wasting money and switch Tau Omega XL Order Omega XL now and get a second bottle free. Visit omega XL dot com.

Richard Nixon 67 rounds Nixon Camp David Ohio National Guard 35 years Vietnam War late April, 1970 White House 12,000 leaflets 13 seconds Yusa Cambodia President Dozens this week, 1970 29 Guardsmen four people 40 miles May 4th
"kent state university" Discussed on The COMEBACK Coach

The COMEBACK Coach

04:26 min | 1 year ago

"kent state university" Discussed on The COMEBACK Coach

"And you've got donna of They're actually leads to something because there is they the i am faked. And you'll rich site is. I am harrison klein on as opposed to harrison klein. I m watch that about the words i am are the two most powerful words the entire universe fight. I mean if you remember the biblical story about this where he asks god his name he says i am that i am well. What was put into the physical plane is the words i am which are the management of all energy. So i i. I is the ability to see 'em the ability to exist. So i see i observe i am i am an existence that observes okay so i am and those two words are the most powerful words because they manage energy so what they do is whenever you attached to. Those words are a signal to the universe to take. Those attachments are to completion. So when you say. I am happy wednesday happy. You feel light where you say i am depressed. You feel heavy so when you say i am successful you feel buoyant while you say i am struggling you feel you feel friction riphil difficulty so words i am control. The wherever follows the words. I am controls. State of mind is the identity principle so we get in this world what we are. Not what we walked. This is really important. Understand so we get in this world where we are not what we want what we are who we say we are through our. Im's so we experience our lives through the ability. To say i am this that or whatever the case may be the closest thing to your god connection that you can do as a human being so in this in the physical realm of humanness basically. I am are the two most important words because they manage every single kind of energy at any experience. You have comes from some free. I am that you thought to yourself at some point in life. Well that's interesting. What comes to mind they come back to this I'd like to ask you a question and comeback to your answer. Which is you mentioned. We did what we what we want. And so much of the law of attraction. But i've studied unrated loons now about is very much about sitting wants and intentions so when it come back to that in a moment so you can clarify that because i find that very interesting now. You have the appearance of a university professor. You've got a unique professional vicious. Even you actually. Ira university professor on you taught in universities. You just give us the background their way. Where did you grow. What was your upbringing. Lie way did you grow up with you. Go to school family. All that stuff well at this point is somewhat irrelevant. But i grew up If if people are old enough to remember in the united states that there was a shooting of four a of kids at a school called kent state university which was a world renowned experience. I grew i went to kent state university. I grew up in cleveland. Ohio which is a bit west Pity that was famous for steel mills in In ohio and House some world class universities are workouts hospitals and basically steal note so it was really a working class town with a lot of rich people who govern the working class so i come from a holocaust parent. Rental background by parents. Were holocaust survivors..

harrison klein donna Ira university kent state university united states cleveland Ohio ohio
"kent state university" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"kent state university" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"While the FBI continues to investigate those involved in the capital riot, the head of the bureau says it's also working, non stop probing the massive cyber breach that had several government agencies and private companies a hack blamed on Russia. And he says collaboration with the private sector is key to preventing future cyber attacks. Securing America join to Christopher Wray told a Fordham University conference the FBI was to keep building partnerships with the private sector and academia. There's a saying that the best time to patch the roof When the sun is shining Same concept here. We want people to start to build those relationships with the local FBI field office before they have a major intrusion, Ray said. The most important thing to do is move with speed. If there's an intrusion and reported to the FBI before bad actors start erasing footprints. Rachel Sutherland. Fox is in case you didn't notice January's over its February 1st the start of Black History Month. It's during February, when schools museums, the media and other institutions spent time studying these story of African Americans highlighting the community's history. And studying its current place is part of American society. There were precursor observances as early as the 19 twenties, but the modern concept of black history month was formalized. 1970 by students at Kent State University. Six years later, it would be recognized by President Gerald Ford during the U. S. Bicentennial. Evan Brown Fox News Wall Street stock futures are hires markets also rise overseas, coming off last week's sell off the worst one since October, The Dow and the NASDAQ fell more than 3%. As for games stop its stock. He's up in after hours trading at the last week's wild swings up and down and back up, closing around 325 bucks a share fraud in a battle.

FBI Gerald Ford Rachel Sutherland Christopher Wray Evan Brown Russia Fordham University Fox Kent State University America fraud U. S. Bicentennial Ray President American society
"kent state university" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"kent state university" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"Those involved in that capital riot, the head of the bureau says it's also working, non stop probing the massive cyber breach that it's several government agencies and private companies, a hack blamed on Russia. And he says collaboration with the private sector is key to preventing future cyber attacks. Securing America join to Christopher Wray told a Fordham University conference the FBI was to keep building partnerships with the private sector and academia. There's a saying that the best time to patch the roof Still in the sun is shining. Same concept here. We want people to start to build those relationships with the local FBI field office before they have a major intrusion, he said. The most important thing to do is move with speed. If there's an intrusion and reported to the FBI before bad actors start erasing footprints. Rachel Sutherland. Fox is in case you didn't notice January's over its February 1st the start of Black History Month. It's during February, when schools museums, the media and other institutions spent time studying these story of African Americans highlighting the community's history. And studying its current place is part of American society. There were precursor observances as early as the 19 twenties. But the modern concept of black history month was formalized in 1970 by students at Kent State University. Six years later, it would be recognized by President Gerald Ford during the U. S bicentennial. Evan Brown, Fox News Wall Street stock futures are hires markets also rise overseas, coming off last week's sell off the worst one since October, the Dow and the NASDAQ fell more than 3%. As for games stop its stock is up in after hours trading at the last week's wild swings up and down and back up, closing around 325.

FBI Christopher Wray Rachel Sutherland Evan Brown Russia Gerald Ford Fordham University Fox President Kent State University America American society
SolarWinds hackers breached US Treasury officials’ email accounts

Cyber Security Headlines

02:52 min | 2 years ago

SolarWinds hackers breached US Treasury officials’ email accounts

"Attackers stage. A dry run get solar winds in october. Two thousand nineteen. Yahoo news is sources. Say the operators of the attack conducted a test of the campaign five months before the supply chain attack began in earnest. This test sent files without back. Doors through signed updates to orion seemingly detest they would actually be delivered and detected and updated. Faq by solar winds indicates that this was the first modification to its updates. It was aware of in related. News and analysis by the wall street journal farsight security and risk iq identified twenty four organizations that installed solar ones orion platform with militias backdoors installed including cisco intel invidia. Vm-ware belkin kent state university the california department of state hospitals and deloitte nso group spyware reportedly used against journalists a new report from security researchers at citizen lab at the university of toronto details. How government operatives used the pegasus spyware from nso group to attack the phones of thirty-six journalists producers and executives at al jazeera as well as journalist at el arab tv in london the attack was carried out using the click kismet exploit chain and i message that worked against phones running. Iowa's thirteen dot five dot one or earlier. Apple said at pets vulnerabilities seemingly with iowa's fourteen. Cia agents exposed with stolen data. A new report in foreign policy looks at the impact of data stolen by state-backed groups and other ap tease round twenty thirteen. The cia began to notice that undercover operatives in africa and europe began to be rapidly identified by chinese operatives. This marked a period where the us intelligence community noted a general professionalization of china's intelligence operations building infrastructure to process that data. They were already collecting both officially and illicitly as well as general rooting out of corruption that previously led to deep penetration into the chinese government. In the early two thousands china began tracking flights and passenger lists it also when after biometric data at airports like at bangkok this information was correlated with data gathered on an attack at the office of personnel management in two thousand twelve which leaked personal data from twenty one point five million people that data could be analyzed to figure out who was a us agent pair that information with travel data and you could figure out who from china those agents met with and with the background data indicating who might be approached at becoming sa asset europol. The european commission launch a new decryption platform. This platform was lodged in collaboration with the european commission's joint research center designed to aid authorities in decrypt information that is obtained lawfully in criminal investigations and managed by your oppose european cybercrime centre functionally. This platform will use in-house expertise with both software and hardware tools to provide effective assistance to national member. state investigations. National police forces from member states can now send lawfully obtained evidence to europol for decryption.

Belkin Kent State University California Department Of State Citizen Lab Nso Group El Arab Tv NSO CIA The Wall Street Journal University Of Toronto Al Jazeera Yahoo Intel China Cisco Iowa London Office Of Personnel Management Apple Africa
Let's Not Talk About Politics

Everyday Buddhism: Making Everyday Better

07:56 min | 3 years ago

Let's Not Talk About Politics

"And now on to the episode about yeah. Let's not speak about politics and I hope this gave those of you who don't want me to speak about politics enough time to stop listing if what. I'm about to say offend you because I am going to talk about the P. Word Politics and so here we are again. Elections politics divisiveness separation tribal rage. Yet it feels. We have never had even a moment out of this boiling pot. Since two thousand fifteen it's been a tumultuous time for the US The UK we've had tumultuous times before in this country in the world but for most of us alive today and for what. I imagined to be the bulk of my podcast listeners. We haven't witnessed this level of unrest distrust and anger before I have though and those older than me certainly have. It was a time of major unrest in the nineteen sixties when I was growing up with protests and violence all around US stemming from reactions to racial injustice and the Vietnam War. This is the time I was growing up. I lived in a small town in Ohio man away. Ohio located about twenty minutes or so from Kent State University where protests and riots over the Vietnam War ended in the unspeakable the May fourth nineteen seventy massacre of four unarmed college students by the Ohio National Guard and that was fifty years ago. It's hard to believe because it's very real time in my memory. All the color sows emotions are right at the surface and looking the other way and politely. Not Speaking of the things of the world was not an option for me at that time and it isn't now either and long before these times of distrust and questioning and long before Kent State University. The massacre we can recount multiple times. Were OUR COUNTRY. Our government and the world was a real scary place to be. It's as old as human history. It is a part of who we are as humans we cling to ideas of self and the world and these ideas that we cling to are largely formed in a cloud of ignorance in views. Not based on things as they are and it is from that ignorance mistrust fear anger tribal rage and wars begin yesterday. I decided to talk about the sticky subject of addressing the world in its politics head on although I've touched on it a bit up in episode twenty to release your cows which initiated a few negative podcast reviews in emails and also an episode. Fourteen prost protesting. What's in your mind and experience with a follower? This week led to the seed thought of this episode. I wrote a bit about it on the Public Facebook Group for Everyday Buddhism. I said sometimes. People request friendship with me on my personal facebook page in addition to joining the public facebook group for. Everyday Buddhism and as an. Fyi I have to say I'm in a very. I'm a very imperfect human being just like all of us in Pure Land Buddhism that is referred to as bamboo nature meaning were foolish beings and we always do things right. It is actually wonderful to understand except that about ourselves because it helps us have compassion for others and actually it helps us have compassion for ourselves. All of this. I'm talking about now. Is to introduce something that happened this week. Someone who follows this group? The everyday Buddhism facebook page was also a friend on my personal facebook page. The person message me through a private message messenger and then quit the private group saying this. I was hoping this would be a place of peace and kindness and not political posts now. My first thought was political. Posts are not necessarily unkind. It's all in how you do things. It's about skillful means. But I replied saying that. His her reaction was to my personal page and not to the public group. Typically even on my personal facebook page I avoid politics yet. Sometimes I will post something funny or something. I have a excuse. Me Deep Personal. Concern about that intersects with political life. Which which it's hard not to in this current world. We live in but I do not post these things on the group page the everyday Buddhism group page. Nor do I approve or my other moderators approve such posts? And when I do post on my personal page I always make sure. It's not devicive or mean-spirited or filled with anger so even if this person considered my own personal facebook page A. Place a public place which it's not. It's my personal page. I try hard to make it a place of kindness. All this is to say that. What makes us react in the way? This person did is our expectations. The world is political and its financial and it's warring and it's all sorts of things we may not want to talk about or even look at but the beauty of Buddhism is that as a part of our practice. We try to see things as they are and not as we hope or would expect them to be and that includes seeing people are Dharma friends and all people the way they are but with kindness you will. There's two truths but the two truths are one truth in Buddhism. Some Sarah is Nirvana Nirvana. Is Sam Sahra? Form is emptiness and emptiness is form this is from the heart sutra if you are a friend on my page remember. It's my page a foolish being and not a Buddha. So that's what I wrote on the Public. Everyday Buddhism facebook group to to sort of talk about what just happened in a way to reflect on those things how I see them from a Buddhist perspective but I need to say more one of the things that distinguishes Buddhism from other spiritual practices and religions is that it is very much about being in the world and not about a scaping it

Facebook Ohio United States Kent State University Ohio National Guard Sam Sahra UK Sarah