38 Burst results for "Kent"

Fresh "Kent" from Weekend Edition Sunday

Weekend Edition Sunday

00:39 min | 7 min ago

Fresh "Kent" from Weekend Edition Sunday

"Listening to weekend edition from NPR News. Live from cakey reading News. I'm Julie Chang. Another heat wave with record breaking highs, maybe hitting the Bay Area about a week from now, the region will likely see temperature similar to those of the current heat wave from the mid nineties to about 105 degrees. Anna Schneider is a meteorologist with the National Weather Service, she says back to back heatwave aren't uncommon this time of year, but temperatures have been high. It was definitely high. There were daily records broken the past couple of days. And it's certainly well above normal for this time of year, Schneider said. Six Bay Area records were broken on Thursday in Santa Rosa, San Rafel, Kent Field, liver, more Redwood City and Gilroy. The weather agency is in daily communications with firefighters. California has rolled out a new online portal that will allow people to verify their covid 19 vaccination status, residents can sign up through the state Department of Public Health website there, they'll have to create a four digit pin number to get access to their vaccination record from the state data system. Amy Tong is California's chief information officer and director of the State Department of Technology. The digital format.

Amy Tong Anna Schneider Julie Chang Santa Rosa Bay Area San Rafel Thursday Gilroy National Weather Service Redwood City Kent Field Schneider State Department Of Technology Npr News SIX Department Of Public Health 19 Vaccination About 105 Degrees Mid Nineties Liver
Fresh update on "kent" discussed on Blowout Winner

Blowout Winner

00:56 min | 21 min ago

Fresh update on "kent" discussed on Blowout Winner

"Back, then going out to Cincinnati next next week. I'll be in Anaheim. I'm on the road to get co going down. Yeah. All right. Here's the land. Are you Are you Whenever are you traveling like everywhere Now is is this you're just back on the road. That's how it's going. So I'm skipping Dodger Stadium the following week because I hate Dodger Stadium And then I'm going to Arizona after that, And so I will be on the road for the foreseeable future. It looks like the budget back or back. Baseball's back. California's back The city is back, and now the road is back. You know it's going to be important, Kerry and this is this is actually something is going to be fantastic. We may be recording them together. Sometime in July, an episode of the cops and Crowley podcast from ST Louis, which is where Murph and Mac and expectations first series after the All Star break. So you and I could be painting the town in ST Louis together, trying. Believe me, that's that's not a town that's not a town that has a whole lot of painting to be done as someone who's ussa, who sat through a few series in ST Louis in my day. Uh, yeah, I mean, we'll be painting the arch, and that's that. That's it, Dude, we'll be heading up to the hill. Maybe hitting a few of those few of those casinos, man and eating some ravioli. And, uh, that's a Bruce Bochy coaching staff favorite. Those casinos outside of ST Louis. Yeah, and Charlie Giotto's. That's where we'll go to get some fried ravioli. Anyway. Here we go. Steven Vogt, though, comes up two outs bottom of the ninth. It's only this, I guess at the time. It was the first time since 98 that the Giants had hit a home run with one out remain was with two outs in the ninth to tie it and then hit a go ahead home run in extras to win it. First time since Bonds and Jeff Kent had done it in 1998, But tell me if you remember this moment, man Steven Vogt, the kid out of ice Alia huge moment for him. He steps up with a 10 11 deficit against Rice. L Iglesias and Here's what happens. Crazy.

Steven Vogt Jeff Kent 1998 Cincinnati Dodger Stadium Murph Anaheim Arizona Ninth Bruce Bochy MAC Giants California July Next Next Week Bonds TWO L Iglesias 10 First Time
Fresh "Kent" from Freakonomics Radio

Freakonomics Radio

00:39 min | 17 hrs ago

Fresh "Kent" from Freakonomics Radio

"Number of polling places in Tehran so far fewer voters than in past elections. Peter Kenyon. NPR NEWS Tehran In Alabama, Dozens of homes have been destroyed or badly damaged in a suspected tornado from Tropical Storm Claudette Sheriff's officials and Escambia County near the border with Florida say trees are down in the roof of a high school gym was ripped off. The National Hurricane Center says the storm is producing bands of heavy rains and tropical storm watches are up along the Carolinas. You're listening to NPR news. Live from KQED News. I'm Kate Wolf. Another heat wave with record breaking highs, maybe heading the Bay Area about a week from now, the region will likely see temperatures similar to those of the current heat wave from the mid nineties to about 105 degrees. Anna Schneider is a meteorologist with the National Weather Service, she says back to back heat waves aren't uncommon this time of year, but temperatures have been high. It was definitely high. There were daily records broken over the past couple of days. And it's certainly well above normal for this time of year. Schneider says. Six Bay Area records were broken on Thursday in Santa Rosa, Sandra Fell, Kent Field, Livermore, Redwood City and Gilroy. The weather agency is in daily communications with firefighters. Cannabis Testing Laboratory and Sonoma County is the first in the state to unionize Cinema Lab Works. Employees voted to join United Food and Commercial workers local five last year and the vote was ratified this week. Union officials say. Along with workplace protections, employees are hoping unionization will help them advocate for more standardized THC.

Anna Schneider Peter Kenyon Kate Wolf Tehran Thursday National Weather Service Santa Rosa Escambia County Gilroy Alabama Kent Field Carolinas Bay Area NPR Redwood City Livermore Florida Dozens Of Homes Schneider This Week
Louise DuArt On Getting Her Friends Out Of School

The Eric Metaxas Show

00:39 sec | 2 weeks ago

Louise DuArt On Getting Her Friends Out Of School

"At believe it or not. It was a very shy kid and my mother was very strict italian You kids children should be seen and not heard. My brother actually became a stutterer. And i used to stand in front of the marriages. Pretend i was someone else. And and it wasn't until i could get my friends out of school by calling up. Is the mothers thirty weinstein. Ernie kent county school. Today's got menopause van. They would they would became very popular. So i thought well then i made a career out of. It was just one of those things. God does

Ernie Kent County School Weinstein
Cases of Indian COVID-19 Variant Surge Across UK

FT Politics

01:58 min | Last month

Cases of Indian COVID-19 Variant Surge Across UK

"This week was meant to be one of celebrations. The biggest easing of the case komo navarre's restrictions in well over six months pubs. Restaurants will open indoor dining again with even hugging allowed outside but the positive mood was dampened by several out. Big of new vote of covid nineteen spreading in parts of england new variants of concern of always been on the government's radar estimate. The could challenge. It's lockdown easing plans but so much is unknown about this new strain particularly its transmissibility health sector matt. Hancock told the house of commons this week that the government was hopeful of getting it under control. We have used the extensive security surveillance system that we've built and new techniques to identify the areas. We're most concerned about where we will now surge testing. Vaccinations further. this episode shows. Just how important it is that every single person who is vulnerable to covert nineteen gets not just one but two doses ties. Let's begin with this new strain before we look at in the uk. Obviously india has had a very very difficult time with kota vice and we've seen those polling images of hospitals running out of oxygen running out of intensive cab bats and that obviously now with rhetoric is also do with this new strain of kuna virus that although it doesn't appear to be more lethal it is spreading much quickly than the dominant kent fair in this being within the uk for some time even the question of how much more transmissible it is is uncertain. Seb i mean you i. The public politicians would love some answers to these questions. But it's quite complicated to work out for example whether it's much more infectious which would destroy the remaining phases of the government's lockdown clan. Or whether it's just a little bit or infectious in which case we can probably go

Komo Navarre House Of Commons Hancock England Kota UK Government India SEB
Queen's Cousin Accused of Willingness to Sell Kremlin Access

AP News Radio

00:55 sec | Last month

Queen's Cousin Accused of Willingness to Sell Kremlin Access

"There's fresh controversy for Britain's royal family an investigative report by Britain's Sunday times and channel four television says prince Michael of Kent queen Elizabeth's cousin was willing to use his royal status for personal profit and to seek favours from Russia's president the undercover investigation saw reporters posed as investors of a nonexistent south Korean gold company the seventy eight year old prince Michael allegedly told them via zoom that he would give their company his royal endorsement for two hundred thousand dollar feet a business partner also reportedly told the fake investors Michael could be hired for about fourteen thousand dollars a day to make confidential representations on their behalf to Vladimir Putin describing him as her majesty's unofficial ambassador to Russia his office says Michael earns his own living to a consultancy company that is run for over forty years adding he has no special relationship with Britain I'm Ben Thomas

Prince Michael Kent Queen Britain Russia Elizabeth Michael Vladimir Putin Ben Thomas
"kent" Discussed on Right Now with Stephen Kent

Right Now with Stephen Kent

04:25 min | Last month

"kent" Discussed on Right Now with Stephen Kent

"And i get that people. We were all two people were all like. We have different sides of us. But we also all make choices. And you don't just randomly go from like making tiktok videos to wielding a knife and going out somebody. You're throwing that out the window and your chance for not due process but patients from police officer when you make that choice a lot of the progressives of the same people that wanna make the age vote sixteen. I mean we have to talk about the fact that i reject the notion that a sixteen year old is an infant. A sixteen year old is not. They're not a grown adult right. Their brain is still developing. But they know that you can't stab someone with a knife or try to do so and they know that please. You need to not escalate a situation when police arrived so i i think personal responsibility. It is absolutely a tragic situation but personal responsibility still matters. And i don't like this infantilism. Asian of victims of people who have agency levy. Did you see that new york times. Where the writer asserted writing about the experiences of young black girls in america Called it a burden right. The burden of being a young black girl and it described the entire. Bryant situation is sort of indicative of many people's experiences where black girls are treated as older as bigger as more physically threatening than white children are i. I can't relate to that. I was curious if you'd read it what you thought about it. I can definitely relate to that. I think it's an interesting intersection of being black. And a woman in this country As a young child into my early teens fourteen fifteen. I was constantly made out to be painted as like the stereotypical angry black woman when i wanted to voice my opinions or when i was playing sports. I'm a very competitive athlete. Since i was three years old and a multi the different sports in there several times where people would literally say to my face. I'm scared of you being aggressive. You're being bossy. You're being angry. And and this is not an exaggeration several those times specifically a member of my high school. Jv volleyball team mentioned that. She was scared me because i was black and i could be aggressive with her. We were teammates. It was not combat sports..

america Bryant sixteen year new york two people fourteen fifteen three years old sixteen sixteen year old Jv volleyball black Asian
Is The UK COVID-19 Variant Not So Bad After All?

Coronacast

01:50 min | Last month

Is The UK COVID-19 Variant Not So Bad After All?

"A lot on this. Podcast norman about variants of coronavirus in it solely. It's scary because maybe they're not covered by pre existing immunity if we've had covid before then covered by vaccinations. That's something that's evolving. But the other thing that's evolving is out understanding of them and there's some new research that shows that perhaps some of the mutations that we're seeing in the new variants commonly might make them more contagious but they also might not be as deadly as the original wuhan strain. Well that's particularly in relation that tried so particularly religion to the be one one seven variant. Which is if you're part of the cognoscenti and every listen cast is part of the cognoscenti remains. It just means we're not we're the people not not you and i but the people listen to us so the so the be one wants some variant one of the people. It's now called the kent variance so not the uk rain but the kent variant and an interesting study of samples collected from november last year through to the end of december from about five hundred people. So they were looking at people admitted to hospital between november twenty twenty minutes last year and december the end of december who had obviously severe disease feared enough to be admitted to hospital. It's about five hundred people and some had the be one one seven the kent variant of the covid virus and the Some had other various which were not be one one seven and interestingly they did not find an association between disease and death in other words you are no more likely to die which has been the allegation made of the one seven if you had that vs a variant. That wasn't be one one seven so that's really good news so if if this plays out i mean it's not a huge number of people but at least at some counters the prevailing belief coming out of the uk that it is a more virulent

UK
"kent" Discussed on Right Now with Stephen Kent

Right Now with Stephen Kent

05:10 min | 2 months ago

"kent" Discussed on Right Now with Stephen Kent

"I was a democrat. i was really not a voter. I voted for obama. I voted based on identity politics and back then. I didn't realize that that's what i was doing. So i said let me make a walkaway video because there's something very Interesting about being told that if you if you vote for biden. You're a good person if you don't vote for biden your terrible person but then the people telling me that i'm a terrible person based on how i vote are being there being bullied. They're being terrible. Wife say mostly white girls on twitter are the ones doing this. Yeah i mean it's crazy. Because you'd you'd make a good point i i've gotten so much vitriol From people that are white who are trying to fight racism. But then they'll being racist towards me. And i'm still having trouble figuring this out so yeah i think one of my first few i posted on youtube was about a walking away and didn't backlash against walked away anywhere else. Like no you like. Did you go to like the one of the politically homeless or did you or did you sign up republican and just changed hymns. Yeah i i'm politically homeless Because i again. I've i've never really paid attention to politics. Like i said i just vote based on identity politics so i i feel uncomfortable even committing to a specific side. So i'm just like i'm fine. Just being in the middle do my own thing and just assessing things on a case by case basis. Yeah i mean do you consider yourself conservative libertarian. I remember i remember. I can't remember which video was but you talked about. Not hearing about the libertarian party until you were an adult and it might be perfect for you. They take you. Yeah so yeah. It was shocking to me. I said what the heck is this. I've never heard of his party before. So i find a lot of my values to being libertarian. But again. I'm just like so cautious saying like i am this i am conservative. And whatever because i find when you put labels on things people expect you to adhere to some sort of a template in. I don't like that. I don't like being boxed in so. I prefer just like no labels if people call me conservative like whatever. It's whatever. I am conservative when i am amongst libertarians. And i'm libertarian. When i'm amongst conservatives..

twitter youtube republican one biden democrat obama first few
Devising a New Social Contract for Fashions Garment Workers

The Business of Fashion Podcast

02:08 min | 2 months ago

Devising a New Social Contract for Fashions Garment Workers

"This week marks the eighth anniversary of the collapse of rana plaza an eight story garment factory housing thousands of workers making clothes for some of the world's famous brands which led to the death of more than one thousand people. It seems like an appropriate moment to look back at our professional summit. Closing fashion sustainability. Got where we had an in-depth conversation with a group of leading experts to address issues around workers rights in fashion supply chain ananias bhattacharjee is international coordinator at the asia floor. Wage alliance of trade unions and labor rights activists focused on addressing poverty wages and gender discrimination. He joined us from bangalore. India based in los angeles aisha barren plot another sustainability council member and and chief executive of remake the advocacy group behind the pay up campaign which highlighted brands that refuse to pay for completed orders when the pandemic hit and to set is an expert on south asia traditional arts crafts and textiles based in new delhi. She's the founder trustee of the craft revival trust these three leaders in the space around workers rights spoke to our london editor. Sarah kent at the b. o. f. professional summit before we dive into what the industry needs to do to tackle so many of these labor issues. I wanted to talk a little bit about why we're still facing. Systemic problems of labor abused an annual. I wonder if i could start with you. You know you spend your career advocating to try fix these issues. Why is fashioned still failing to protect. Its welcome fashion fast. Fashion industry or one can say really fashion industry as a whole because even when they're not fast fashion. They're mimicking the fast fashion business model. The fashion industry business model is really at the heart of the problem. And so deal that business model. It's unlikely to unlikely to see fundamental

Rana Plaza Ananias Bhattacharjee Wage Alliance Of Trade Unions Aisha Barren Sarah Kent Bangalore Asia South Asia Los Angeles New Delhi India London
Google's Kent Walker on Ethical AI

Eye On A.I.

01:45 min | 2 months ago

Google's Kent Walker on Ethical AI

"Kill walker. I oversee a global affairs group and cool that includes policy legal. Our trust and safety work are philanthropy and are responsible innovation teams. I've been working in the technology sector for quite some time actually grew up palo alto at a time when silicon valley was just coming into being as a as a phrase and it's been fascinating to see the growth and development of technology and how intersecting all across our societies ever since and part of your work then at google is overseeing the ai principles document. I presume and then the implementation of those principles within google. That's right we've been working on the yeah principles for some time. It may actually be helpful to go a little bit of a a history starting in maybe twenty sixteen. It was clear that hey i was going to be bigger. And bigger part of our product portfolio. Google translate just to take one example went from having a translation of say a six year old which was helpful in that grade to having the translation ability of a teenager. Not perfect but pretty. Good through the application of ai. Over the course of a summer and that kind of remarkable improvement in performance really started down the path of saying not only yet what are other applications. We could be exploring but at the same time. What are the implications of doing that. How do we make sure we drive the technology for it but we drive the thinking around ethics and how and when these new tools should be used so that was a big part of our effort. I think starting in two thousand sixteen twenty seventeen. We were plenty other people. From across the company anti-people historians ethicists etcetera to start to creamer framework. As to how we think about this

Google Palo Alto Silicon Valley Walker
Honolulu resort evacuated as armed suspect barricaded inside room

Meet the Press

00:27 sec | 2 months ago

Honolulu resort evacuated as armed suspect barricaded inside room

"Resort after an armed man barricaded himself inside a hotel room. Police negotiators are on the scene at the Kahala Hotel in Honolulu. The incident started last night when the suspect fired several shots through his hotel room door. No one was hurt in the gunfire, according to Honolulu police captain Brian Lynch. The resort said in a statement that hotel security and law enforcement evacuated the area around the room. Police officials told reporters. They're just waiting for the suspect to give up. Kent S'more

Kahala Hotel Honolulu Brian Lynch Kent
Can Companies Force Employees To Return To The Office?

NBC Nightly News

02:02 min | 2 months ago

Can Companies Force Employees To Return To The Office?

"As vaccinations rise a growing number of employees or returning to the office. But what will your workplace look like. And can your company require you to get vaccinated. Here's joe lynn. Kent as companies planned to bring employees back to the office. The reality of returning is setting in. It is a little nerve wracking if my company like forces me to go back. I'm going to try to look for another job and the questions are piling up. How are you going to keep us safe. Have been vaccinated. Can an employer require you to come back to work. If you're getting the job done just fine at home. There's no reason that employer can't require employees to return back to work if they think that would be most effective even for employees who had been working productively efficiently while masks social distancing and reduced capacities will likely be required. What about vaccines three have been authorized by the fda for emergency use and full approvals are expected but can private companies mandate them. The law does permit an employer to require employees. Received even vaccine. That only has an easy way whether fully approved or not you have to make reasonable accommodations for people with disabilities or sincerely held religious beliefs and when the doors do reopened things will look very different. We installed uvc lights which basically as air comes into the building it kills all airborne pathogens and brings fresh air into the building at rio design firm in los angeles. They're also installing massive fans spacing out desks and opening garage door. What was their number one priority. Our primary priority was to really find a genuine way to do it for ourselves safety as a baseline but then we started to implement big ideas of really understanding what to do. And the office when you're coming in two days a week. What were we prioritizing in. Our work process one popular new strategy for employers new more personal desks instead reserve an empty desk ahead of time on an app.

Joe Lynn Kent Rio Design Firm FDA Los Angeles
Seattle suburb car crash into apartment building injures six in Kent

News, Traffic and Weather

00:19 sec | 2 months ago

Seattle suburb car crash into apartment building injures six in Kent

"Damage was tweeted out by Puget Sound Fire. It was bad. Now we hear that six people were taken to area hospitals. Two of them are critical condition have not heard the condition of the other four. Can't police are investigating what happened on that one. And a Seattle fire department says the fire that broke out early Saturday morning that we had here on come on. We told you

Puget Sound Fire Seattle Fire Department
A Crash Course on The Business of Fashion Sustainability Index

The Business of Fashion Podcast

02:11 min | 2 months ago

A Crash Course on The Business of Fashion Sustainability Index

"Last week b. o. f. was proud to release the bureau f. sustainability index the combination of more than one year of research and analysis led by sarah kent our resident expert on sustainability and big business for the past year. Sarah has been leading our efforts to structure our thinking around. How fashion can reduce its impact on the planet and improve working conditions for its millions of workers. This week on the podcast. Sarah breaks down the thinking behind the index and shares. The key findings are report. The sustainability gap. How fashion measures up. But if you have yet had a chance to download the more than fifty pages of analysis or if you want to understand how we put the index together. This is an episode. You won't want to miss i. I asked sarah why the industry needed an index like this in the first place. I wanted something like this. I write about sustainability for bela. And i get all of these emails from companies telling me about this new sustainable initiative. They were doing committing to some amazing new ambitious target. And i want to really understand one. How did this combat what other companies in the industry doing and two is it really making a difference and it was so hard to figure it out comparing one company to another was almost impossible because they're all doing slightly different things or you know moving towards a similar doggett but talking about in a slightly different way and then understanding whether that really moving the needle on these ambitions are setting was equally difficult to establish so i wanted a tool to help me understand this data and i think when we kicked off. I was quite naive about what it would take to get this done. But i'm really glad that we kind of set out on this. Johnny because this tool now exists which is great for me and hopefully really useful. Ask the industry But also you know in discovering how challenging it really was to do. I think we also really did some valuable research in work to create a benchmark that doesn't allow you to make these comparisons and does allow us to understand the industry going. And that's so

Sarah Kent Sarah Bela Johnny
A conversation on content and language

Brighter Thinking Pod

02:18 min | 2 months ago

A conversation on content and language

"We want to start this episode by getting to know our guests a little more. I have quite an interesting question here. That i've asked allie and d to think about so the question is how did you become interested in supporting subject teachers with english. Language needs of the students. How does this relate to your current work alley. Would you like to start. Yes so longtime gay back in two thousand and three. I became a substitute as lots of efl and temple teachers become and that was when i really became passionate about teaching teachers realize impact. You can have if you are training and developing teachers. And then if he is later. I was the head of a language school for the bell educational trust. That was down in kent in a place who bej bring a huge forest and in this forest. I was out of the language school on the same site. There was an international school. And so i also live manage the english teachers there and their role was quite different as it to. We didn't realize that to start with everyone was doing the same thing. And then through observations of subject teachers and the english teachers in the international school. I and the team realized that what was students at the international school needed was quite different. From what the students language score needed and so together we researching to kill some research into what those students who needed to help them. In their subject lessons the english language teachers really canes help to help skill the subject teachers however one thing that really fascinated me and something love encountered in most of the schools i worked actually was was a resistance to this change and whether it comes from people being concerned they don't know grammar enough confident enough in language themselves but it was something that really touched me and because i really feel so much to be learned from both sides and english language teachers and from subject teachers and yet there wasn't this cross pollination going on so after that i did my key ta i realized quite quickly seemed to be happening. Was that if you if you're not a qualified teacher. Actually teachers can be quite resistant to listen to a open. Maybe to hearing what you have to

Bell Educational Trust Allie Kent International School
Astrazeneca vaccine in US raises hopes

The Naked Scientists

02:04 min | 2 months ago

Astrazeneca vaccine in US raises hopes

"This week has covid. Nineteen cases continue to fall across the uk. They are at the same time surging in europe partly as a result of the spread of the kent. Variant that is now becoming the dominant circulating strain of the virus in many eu countries. The other factor is low levels of corona vars vaccination that have so far been achieved across the eu block. Some of that stems from skepticism. Any eu countries about the effectiveness of the astra zeneca vaccine. So maybe that will be about to change now. Thanks to the announcement of another successful trial of the vaccine. This time in the us astrazeneca have slightly revised their numbers since they made the trial results public. But they're still very encouraging. Chris spoke to university of kent virologists. Jeremy rothman to his reaction. I asked him whether a year on from the uk. I entering a lockdown. He expected us to be in this situation. We are today absolutely not. There's a lot that we had an idea of what was coming in terms of the severity and the need for strong action. But the fact that we are still experiencing lockdowns that. We've spent a large portion of the year in lockdown in dramatic restrictions. And we still do not have a solid plan of how we are going to get out of. This is really beyond belief to me. What did you think would happen this time last year when we watched boris johnson. Deliver that press conference when everyone was just glued to the tv and we'll fell down our spines. Where did you think it would end and win. I wasn't sure what i was hoping was that we would have lockdown and that that would drive cases down now that that absolutely did happen but what i had been waiting for. That didn't happen was that we would use that period of time to build and reinforce the infrastructure needed when we got out of the locked out

EU Jeremy Rothman UK Astra Astrazeneca University Of Kent Europe Chris Boris Johnson United States
Kent Taylor, Texas Roadhouse Founder and C.E.O., Dies at 65

WBZ Afternoon News

00:07 sec | 3 months ago

Kent Taylor, Texas Roadhouse Founder and C.E.O., Dies at 65

"The founder and CEO of the Texas Roadhouse restaurant chain has died at the age of

Texas Roadhouse Restaurant Cha
"kent" Discussed on Right Now with Stephen Kent

Right Now with Stephen Kent

05:16 min | 3 months ago

"kent" Discussed on Right Now with Stephen Kent

"Whoa do we all start on the same playing field like yes. We are different and we are equal but we born the same way like. That's the way beverage comes in the privilege aspect challenging the of equality is what is starting this new era fighting over identity politics out with equality and equity. I don't know do with that. The problem i think is that they If you take the color ryan approach completely than that just serves to enshrine whatever inequalities exist under the status quo problem i think with the left is they've abandoned the colorblind or identity as an afterthought approach even as an ideal they don't even strive towards that anymore but zuri i guess throwing to you. What's the right middle ground. What's how do you address both factors without falling into the trap. That far left and far right seemed to have found themselves in on this one. Yeah and definitely analyzing. I feel like a lot of times. A lot of people present policy solutions of but they don't do the work of looking back to see its effect and sale and that's kind of a larger government issue. How often do we go back and look at laws in c or even programs or departments. How often do you look and see what the actual impact of those were In how often can we say. Actually it's time to do something different or it's time to pass a law to kind of make a for the wrong and it is funny that you mentioned the reagan years because as we know like those were the years when the war on drugs really ramped up in. There were a lot of black americans who were being disproportionately sent to prison Four judd possession even though possession rates amongst black americans white in white americans are very similar. see you in. Obviously that has a generational effect. They're actually a lot of people still in prison because of the decisions mean as under that administration and of course other administrations following it so that's definitely. It is hard to say that the the colorblind approach is the best approach. Because you see all the ways as was just stated that it kind of encapsulates whatever inequality is happening at the time and it just perpetuates this bad system and but definitely if there were some sort of analysis or if people particularly politicians were humble enough to say okay. We've learned about these different inequalities that need never considered before now house our legislation going next that provide for better legislation. obviously some of the best legislation is legislation. because like. I said some of the things that we talk about our cultural issues in. It's up to us to have this conversation. You're on them with others. I i just wanted to reset the table here. Real quick In case you forgot you are watching right now with stephen. Can't you can subscribe to us on youtube. Follow us on facebook. Instagram twitter at rightly..

Instagram youtube twitter facebook both factors stephen black americans
"kent" Discussed on Right Now with Stephen Kent

Right Now with Stephen Kent

08:21 min | 3 months ago

"kent" Discussed on Right Now with Stephen Kent

"Going. Now i don't trust this. I don't trust spencer. Isn't everything that you were. Just talking about in terms of power corrupting. isn't that the kind of the basis. The philosophical basis of limited government conservatism. Small government conservatism. The reason there was a fusion the coalition between libertarians and conservatives. It was because we agreed that. Absolute power corrupts absolutely centralized planners can't manage the minute not a knowledge of planning everything in different parts of the country in different situations but it almost feels like some of the people who are tapping into the philosophical ideological trends. That you've aptly described right seemed to be getting away from that lesson here like the lord of the rings. So how do you grapple with all of that. Yeah i mean. I think that there's a. There's a valid caution in identifying. What happens if you will the one if you just try to wheel there one ring and like you know i. I definitely agree. That boroughmuir is there. Is this kind of lord. Acton this reminder of what absolute power does to people i mean that's sort of the premise of the ring is it represents the use of absolute power but the universe of the books is very complicated right and you mentioned galadriel. Who's a really good example of this right like because we live in a fallen world and because the ring is not actually getting thrown into more door until the end of day. It's right power exists in the whole premise of the story is that you have to find some way to engage with this corrupting terrifying tempting power while also maintaining your justice and and galadriel has a ring of her own right and she wields it in a way that is just like she is able to resist overreaching. My only premise year. And you know without kind of plunking for like full-on common good conservatism. Because there are many strands there to right and base. I think it consists of a very ballot observation which is like we reeled power like yes we do. Want to reduce the scope of government Insofar as as as possible to to reduce its intervention in our lives to use it for protecting a rights rather than infringing upon them But even like the most died in the wool. Libertarian right identifies a good which is which individual autonomy and personal liberty and presumably aspires to use the force of government to protect that. Good right i mean this is like how people interact together in a political way and so people get very like ants. You when folks are talking about the common good because there's big black box and in it like there may sit you know wanting wanting to reestablish like fertility rates or there may sit like full-on catholic integral ism. I think that yeah. I was just gonna ask right because the thing that kills me a little bit about common good conservatism is. I don't want other people's version of the good forced on me enforce on the entire country but is the middle ground here localism in the sense that if the good is being pursued but at the local level possible right not one federal government that is massive and powerful and enforces. Whoever wins every four years on the whole country. But if the good is being in your city in your town at your town council meeting then i feel like it's. It's averts that problem of forcing a one size fits good on a diverse in sweeping country. So i agree with you about the localism insofar as possible. I am generally of the indian that the answers to these kind of like thorny we always raise in public especially the left is fond of doing this. I think of raising these these tricky questions as a way of noting fairly that you know. There's there's no one size fits all solution to a lot of these questions. And i believe the smaller the community in which you would do to create these issues The better and your but on the other hand right there are some things which like the level at which for example those rights to life liberty in the pursuit of happiness need to be defended is is national precisely. Because they're non negotiable right. there are some goods. Like all governments impose or or employed by some good that is ultimate and not negotiable again. Even a purely libertarian. Government would presumably say at the national level. The individual liberty is good and we have to use the force of the state to enforce. I think like i. I just don't think there's any getting away from that. And and even though i agree that yeah i the further we can devolve this stuff at the local level. The better there are also some you know higher level national conversation that we're having and discourse about the common good in its purest form is is just that it's just saying there is a good rate and the government is set up to defend it minor rhetorical question. But do you make a distinction between common good and higher good. I sometimes see both thrown around in the discourse between libertarians and conservatives on this comedy is a broader term than hired good it can refer to like roadways right just as a matter of sort of pure political philosophy if you look up in like the stanford encyclopedia defaulted like. What's the common good simply goods that we all. We understand ourselves citizens related to one another an apology and there are certain things that we like come together to kind of i endorse because they'd benefit all of us hire good. Yeah is like a little bit more narrow think would would apply more specifically like elevated concepts that again part of our founding documents right liberty life. Hack on one concept here. And that's that i'm not sure. I agree with the framing as libertarian. Or or a limited government conservatives having their own vision of the common good versus the common good conservatives having a different vision of the common good because i actually think the libertarian or traditional conservative fusionists case is not about there being a common good. But it's about being every individual being left to pursue their own vision of the good and of like adam smith's invisible hand of the marketplace and then each individual pursuing their own vision of the good results in a collective outcome that nobody no one person planned right and so i almost don't think good but isn't that statement right that each individual should be able to do this thing like that in itself is a good. That's an assertion about the good. Which is that. It is good for individuals to have liberty right. Yeah i guess it is. But it's it's a more decentralized way of thinking about it in terms of the the power to decide what the common good is is made by one group of people or one decision making body or institution. It's decentralized across three hundred and thirty million people. I mean my my. My point is only that you haven't escaped the part of government where you posit a good right. You have said in this scenario that liberty is good and one question i have for. You actually is whether you think it's a good because it'll come up with the best outcome or whether you think it's a good per se like it's good for people to be free so we should let them you know and the outcome ruin. Yeah and this is where where you get kind of the tough edge cases. What right like the hard drug usage. And i think in most cases leaving people to their individual liberty particularly in the economic sphere market spear does result in the best outcome. I think though there are some outcomes where leaving people to their own devices might result in outcomes that we would judge us worse off but fundamentally and maybe this is just ideological question. If that's their choice with their life with what they wanna do. I think ultimately. Maybe you're right. Maybe this is the version of the common good but ends is and i think just to throw my hat niro quick where i am at and i'm a little bit undecided on this question because it's a good one spencer. I think at the end of the day going back to my faith. I sort of believe that we're we're all had the same place There is only one. There's only one ending to this story. So there's only so much point to try to exert are controlled through government over our friends and neighbors to try to foment the kind of world that.

adam smith both each individual three hundred and thirty milli one concept one question one ending four years one group of people spencer one one ring one decision one person one size one federal stanford body indian
"kent" Discussed on Right Now with Stephen Kent

Right Now with Stephen Kent

07:51 min | 3 months ago

"kent" Discussed on Right Now with Stephen Kent

"I think the fact that people are taking to the streets at all sort of speaks to that I also think by the way. There's this there's this moment in real near the end of the revolutionary war. It's the newburgh conspiracy it's called You guys probably know about this. That like at a certain point. The soldiers started to get antsy because they hadn't been paid and there was a conspiracy floating around in washington's camp that they should just defect the just like peace out and there is this moment new washington famous speech to kind of put this thing down and there was this moment at which he says. Look there's people are saying that if you step back and you deliberate about this then what you're really doing is you're just you're just copping out. You're just being weak. And i hear that a lot also on the conservative movement that things are so bad that if you take a moment and actually advised that we deliberate about this week. You're just you're just falling over to to the left In washington says you know down that road madness lights. And i really agree with it. I think that like the idea. All we like we just have to rush into action because everything is so bad does kind of conducive. I mean there are certain crisis moments at which that's true but in it right now for example when we're two years out in the next election thinking very deeply about what we're for is kind of the right thing. What would you do when you think about. Instances in the past where we rushed into extreme action in the face of a perceive crisis. I would say many of those haven't aged particularly well. Yeah and you point. Spencer you you know all about it like with the newburgh address. Part of what washington was chiding with a against us. Anonymous was the idea and i sort of liken it a little bit to the russian roulette analogy of of flight ninety three s. A is that like there is no time for thinking for prudence for reason Only action if you are one of those people who say like we need to take a breath and decide whether or not we're about anarchy or whether or not we are about deliberation a plan that you're squish that you're not really involved in the fight and that you don't have an end you save the republic and that's enough that drives me crazy so again not not to make this whole conversation about plenty three but again like there was a crisis there. There was a date on that one right to vote to make that decision and so i. I don't want to say that. There's no such thing as a time for choosing the as they call it. But i do sort of suspect you know. I was talking to charles kessler whose another clermont guy and we do a podcast on claremont review of books and we were comparing the this january six moment slash this react the whole reaction to all of the court cases that the left kind of in the lead up to the election right that the you know the rules were changed and now there are some calls to somehow centralize election integrity efforts to form a national bureau or whatever And we published an essay arguing against this and in favor of this kind of the gradual process whereby the electoral count was finally certified after this very contentious election and charles was comparing it to post nine eleven. Obviously a much bigger catastrophe. The loss of an election was another moment in which you know when you get when you get punched in the gut when you really something happens that it's just really devastating. There's impulse to do something about it right now. And a lot of the stuff that conservatives are now sort of reconsidering the forever war stuff. The patriot act like that. That's a hangover from that moment. When we sort of leapt kind of rashleigh into into action. And i think that there is an analogy there that we are now in this moment. Where lee suffered this great loss. We're we're very looked even to believe that it really happened right. There's very serious kind wrangling over the stolen election. I which i think you know. If that's true then our answer should be like you know gradually and slowly fight the court cases that return overturn these kind of in some cases on constitutional election rules as opposed to write suddenly. Like we just leap catastrophically into as you've noted in your podcast. Numerous times like the court battles were fought battles were lost. Gotta move on and you mentioned it's audits go ahead and put in a quick plug. You are watching right now. With steven kent. You can watch on youtube please. like and subscribe. And if you are listening via podcast leave us a rating and review. Five stars would be nice. Tell us what you think about the show And just to just to kind of go back into it here. Spencer in the in the thick of it. So we've got this fight. We've got this problem that we need to decide whether or not we're going to give in to despair or we're going to rally around a politics of hope i kinda of want to back up a little bit To something that you were mentioning about sort of the politics of optimism. Because brad and i both come from the libertarian world and even do a segment on this show where i like to share some good news. Good trend lines. We'll do to do it at the end of this episode but there is this part of me that goes oh man i don't i don't know if the world is really getting better. I feel something inside of me. That says it is really getting worse. And that's because i'm also a christian like it is a part of my faith that the world is going to fall apart and requires a savior like revelation doesn't come about because things are going super well like that's also baked into my very being so i'm always torn between the sort of conservative instinct about whether or not You know we really need to fight back and try to sort of save this moment or this libertarian aspect. That says you know things are actually getting better. Human progress is a foot. Well you definitely. Everybody needs to take the fall of man pill like this is some writing and that isn't laxed bill and like the. There's a lot i think. Of course out there that involves not having taken the fall of man pill i mean. This is madison's great insight right going back again to the founding is that actually like angels were to govern men than than no longer be necessary but in fact like we live among in this kind of embolic world in which things fall apart and i was noticing. You were on instagram. I saw kind of like thinking about some of these. Some of these issues and you were you. Were making a comparison with with the rings. Which like i really like. I think the idea of of the rings is kind of a power corrupts but it exists in the world like and so there is a sense in which you know are a reaction to corona virus for example. I sort of premised on this idea that you can sweep all death off of the playing field but somehow you can arrange things just right and then like nobody's ever going to die and there won't be any costs to that. I think that there is a level in which you have to take the piddling that is not the world and speaking to lord of the rings. Because i was watching it again over over the weekend i just showed you just showed my daughter the fellowship of the ring and so. Let's talk about the libertarian conservative. Divide because every time i watch movie i see something different this time. I saw bormio and argon both kind of wanting in their hearts the ring a power. Everybody wants during power. Galadriel wanted it. But she said no bore mir his his his kingdom is surrounded by the army of darkness. He is feeling desperate and eventually he goes for that rena power because he feels the only thing that can be done to wield it to turn back the forces of darkness. And i saw him right the common or higher good conservatives in that moment like they want to wheeled the ring and gore and. I saw the libertarian.

charles kessler steven kent Spencer Five stars madison charles youtube two years instagram russian both Galadriel clermont one this week brad bormio argon christian washington
"kent" Discussed on Right Now with Stephen Kent

Right Now with Stephen Kent

08:01 min | 3 months ago

"kent" Discussed on Right Now with Stephen Kent

"Evangelical worship at At trump rallies. Right or premised on the idea that god uses imperfect messengers that god uses people. Like you know. King david who is sort of you know adulterous ultimately murderous right. I mean this. This is a big theme and evangelical discourse. I don't want to disavow the whole like golden statue of trump part of this. And i think that that feature of things kind of got mash really toxic way with like the cunanan stuff from the moment that trump said on the night of the election that he had one that was the. That was the moment in which i thought we. Shaded over from this sort of pug nations suspension. If that's kind of the diagnosis right. What is the alternative. look like. what does a truly white. Hilt not nihilistic vision of conservatism. Or the american right. Actually what would that actually resemble a politics house right right. I mean so. I think actually that this is what this is why i'm saying they're. They're multiple dimensions to the whole trump phenomenon. The there was a strain a serious strain of of just exuberance enjoy in in the trump phenomenon. As well i had to do with loving america right with with actually having a vision of what it was. What kind of good and prosperous and and gracious land. We were trying to defend trying to get back to and the question on everybody's table right now is what does this. What does the conservative movement even look like now. That trump is is out of the picture. And i should say i am not a trump twenty twenty four guy at all. I think that he's kind of served his role if god was using him these like done using them and and i guess one question for me is like what is the america that we were trying to make great again right. Wh- what was the thing that we felt the deep sense of loss about because a lot of that loss was deeply felt but now needs to be articulated in a in a more precise way for me. It's it's you know to be not to be naive. Utilized is relatively simple. It's that we are endowed with our creator by certain with certain unalienable rights and those you know the government is set up to protect those rights life liberty pursuit of happiness. These kind of basic urgency's behind which lie a lot of real concern about like social crackup in america right. This is the sense that that america is premised on a certain form of moral and religious cohesion which now feels not just like it's slipping away but like it's under assault. A lot of this is is cultural and some of it is is like a you know. A reaction occur a reaction against these erosions of of of basic social contract. I think like one way forward to a kind of optimism. I've argued this law and the show is orienting your political attitudes in the most local way possible. And i mean there's both because we don't have national power like conserves national power in a big way but also because i noticed that my own emotional landscape was really key to what was going on in these big national movements and not what was actually going on around me like people one reason why it's kind of kooky to think that you need to overthrow the government if indeed. That's what the people thought is that you know we. We haven't even really tried to do with. The left is pretty good at doing. Which is you know getting on the school boards making arguments to our neighbors about who should vote who should run in. Local elections should win those and stuff like in california. Where they're you know. Ousting gavin newsom. Now like that to me seems more. you know. there's a sense that something is deeply wrong. there's also a deep love for this place that has been kind of just ravaged by progressive politics. And the more people i think invest in that local idea of like what is it might. It's just a question of taking action versus sort of looking to your neighbor to to fix things yourself and i really believe like at the core of the american mind and what you guys are doing. They're like it's a good thing. It's a call to action. It's a belief that like. You have to actually step forward and what you're saying about localism this. This is a little bit of a funny connection. But i was re watching a little bit of avatar the last bender this week and i know we're all fans here at this table. Your kids are watching this show on netflix. So if you don't know what. I'm talking about talk to your kids. They'll tell you but so in avatar spare air benders season two. There's this moment where is looking for oppa. His best friend who has been taken. He's kind of given up. He's kind of given up on this search and qatar asked him like why and hang says. Hope is a distraction which is not something you would expect from a little monk like this air bender air. No bad monk and go. Oh but that actually makes sense like there's this sort of moncus quality to the idea that hope could be used sitting around looking at the stars like luke skywalker looking at the twin sons waiting for someone else to do something for you and waiting to to have them fix the problem instead of taking action and so i guess in in an offhand way like do you think that that makes sense that sometimes hope can make us sit back and wait to long rather than just taking the action. We need to take boost kind of interesting. I mean i have noticed. And i you know because i make the rounds among like you go on the daily wire a discussion about this stuff or whatever Or go wherever you know At the american mind for example we have kind of helping engagement with with our readers. And i totally noticed a kind of suspicion about optimism. And i think it's not so much that people people were hope is distraction is that they worry it's it's like it's like copying out like if you if you really going to be a hard nosed realist about it. You have to realize that everything is just were just done for you. Know and to a certain extent. I wonder whether this is baked into the conservative mindset. Like sort of temptation to that attitude. Just because conservatism a big part of conservatism is to be aware of how precious and fragile our institutions are and how easily they can go astray. And how like humans are very fallen and everything every change can and so very very ready to describe how each thing is going to cause the crackup of the republic ten years down the line and people are very very defensive of that attitude. And when you when you say well actually like that could happen. But there's also a lot of potential the digital revolution this local. His new local investment offers a lot of potential for people. And i think that you're kind of just copying out on them deflection some. Well i part of the problem. Spencer that when conservatives talk about this kind of thing. It's often framed in terms of what they are against. They are against the left. They are against socialism there against whoa kness and cancel culture. But obviously you're identifying a lot of things and there are a lot of things whether it's the constitution whether it's limited government whether it's family or faith or social cohesion. That the right is traditionally for that. American conservatism is traditionally four. But i feel like what's at the forefront of the conversation must often is what they're against and it's hard to see how that lends itself to politics based in home. This is interesting. Yeah i mean. I think we are. Look one sort of move. Toward the blocked that i will take. I think we are in a serious moment of regime crisis. And.

california luke skywalker Spencer netflix this week both ten years trump one question season two King david four each thing one reason twin sons Ousting gavin newsom twenty one sort American twenty four
"kent" Discussed on Right Now with Stephen Kent

Right Now with Stephen Kent

07:53 min | 3 months ago

"kent" Discussed on Right Now with Stephen Kent

"Feels like a year ago. Already that's kind of how our world works now. Time isn't real. That horror show was just two months ago and it feels like ancient history now. We all saw different things that day. Some of you saw patriotism. Some of you saw hate what i saw. Most of all was despair. There was this essay in the claremont review of books in two thousand sixteen known as the flight ninety three esa which in short argued that trump and the clinton election was of such dire consequence that conservatives had no room for uncertainty about trump. It was a storm the cockpit or we all die kind of situation fast four to the twenty twenty election and conservative talk radio has shifted away from beating republicans over the head with the ghost of ronald reagan and instead went all in for trump because the threats they said are too great to worry about ideological purity. The left has gone full socialist. The election was rigged the vote was they said therefore all bets are off. That's when desperation sets in republicans barely tried in the georgia senate runoff. That would decide the majority in the senate purdue and laughlin told people to come out and vote a second time in one breath then turned around and said the election was fraudulent. Top to in the next. I mean if you have a job in a life why on earth would you go and take the time to vote again in a rigged election. It doesn't make sense one day later. The maga- crowd descends on washington thinking. They're red pilled or wake aware of a grand conspiracy but they're not they're on the black pill the same dead end. Everything is awful sixteen nineteen view of the country. Where we're all living a lie one where we're not the good people or the good country that we say we are successful. Movements aren't built on despair. But you sure as hell have to have a sense of urgency rate line from a great movie. Rebellions are built on people. And we're going to talk to a hopeful guy today and my co host for this one's my friend brad palumbo columnist for the washington examiner and hosted the breaking boundaries. Podcast brad. welcome to the table. Hey it's going to be with you absolutely and we are thrilled to welcome our guest today. Spencer clave to the show. Spencer is the host of the always excellent young heretics podcasts. He's the associate editor of the claremont review of books. And the american mind. Spencer welcomed right now days. Even thank you guys so much for having me great to be here absolutely so there's a lot of places we could start but in relation to what i was just riffing about a bit. I wanna ask you what is the black pill and who is on it. Yeah it's a topic of a lot of probably topic now of more conversation than the red pill which is how the whole pill discourse scott started rights away way back around twenty sixteen. The idea was that we're all in the matrix. And if you seen that movie you know that the way you get out of the matrix you take the red pill and you realize just how deeply you've been deceived. And it's been pointed out that this the rebel discourse are very right. Wing thing yeah. I've been deceived ugly allen to it. Well yeah there are. I mean there's like the all of these things. I was thinking of this as you were talking. Have multiple strands that that like. There's there's a. I think a really valid reform of red filling in which you kind of realized that a lot of the answers that the republican party has been giving our answers to questions that are a little bit outdated and the some of these conversations have to move on into the digital era and all this stuff but it's also the case that like woke is the sort of analog on the left which also implies waking up out of out of some kind of hayes. And i'm obviously much more critical of that view of the world but a lot of people on the left. And the right. We're having this sense that the framework they've been sold is just itself an illusion self wrong. There's something much more radical that needs to be done. Then out of this comes out of the repeal of course all of these other forms of pill discourse right. There's there's the blueprint that there's like the clear bill. There's you know. And then there's black on white and black marriage spare yes. This is what they mean when they talk about the crisis of addiction. No i i. Yeah i mean the the the black pill white pill sort of dichotomy is if you take the black pill as you say you have a form of despair you just think it's basically believe that it is hopeless and the image of the like mimi. Image of this right is the duma is the like kind of desiccated. Just sad millennial staring into avoid. I want to make a distinction. Actually between the forms of Let's say kind of urgency that you identified in your opener. yeah. I don't think it's quite right to lump flight. Ninety three in january six as like all one type of black pill and actually. I'm not sure that that. Like actually represents the black pill for the simple reason that anton who wrote that back in the day this is before i was at clermont but he. He was not arguing to like do something extraordinary inattentive outside of the scope of american government. He was arguing. That people should vote for a guy who was running for president and he was extraordinary guy and the reservations that conservatives and republicans had about him were serious and anton was arguing that it was simply time to disregard this reservations because of the urgency of the moment but the true black pedal which is like the jam sticks. Situation is the system itself is so rigged that there's no way by voting for anybody. Doing anything legal. We could work our way back to some kind of resolution and that to me. What i think is deeply wrong as you say which is sort of doomed to failure. I've argued this on the show a lot that we're we're really kidding ourselves. If we think we reached that point and if you read like federalists twenty eight in which hamilton describes what looks like to get to that point to get to the point of actually needing to stage a revolution within america against the american government because becomes oppressive. You know we haven't even begun to try. The actual wood and the american minds kind of salvo essay on the website is a is a really great call to action. It's a call against despair. It's a call against the idea of believing that. There is no way that we can fix this and i think that you are correct that there is a distinction between what flight ninety three in that essay was about it was about engaging in the election and believing that you know. The moment was urgent and we really had to do something and fall in line behind a certain guy but my guess my beef with that is that the whole donald trump magath thing is very much tied up in the i alone can fix it element to governance and winning the battle against the democrats and the left and so if you really believe that and buy into that entire bialokur that entire idea then if donald trump loses the election were back in crisis and we're back on flight ninety three again and so. That's that's how you get this moment. Where if the election is lost than we have no other choice but to do something radical i can. I can really see that. I think that there is definitely a sort of cult leader worship element of the trump coalition. I think it as being exaggerated into the whole of the trump phenomenon. And i think that like flight ninety three itself and a whole bunch of folks clermont and outside at have have really opened is about the serious moral deficiencies that trump presented right. And you know even the kind of kook elements of trumpism that have involved for example like.

donald trump Spencer trump brad palumbo anton two months ago washington republicans scott today a year ago hamilton one breath january six donald trump magath ronald reagan american government georgia one day later second time
Rush Limbaugh buried in private cemetery in St. Louis

WBZ Morning News

00:34 sec | 4 months ago

Rush Limbaugh buried in private cemetery in St. Louis

"The conservative radio icon Rush Limbaugh was laid to rest in his home state of Missouri this week. Kent Martin reports from ST Louis with only about 40, members of his family and friends that attendance limbo was buried in a private ceremony on Wednesday in a historic cemetery in ST Louis, where other famous Missourians are buried. Cemetery was closed to the public during the funeral. The conservative talk show host passed away last week from cancer at the age of 70 in a statement, Limbaugh's family says there will be additional celebrations of his life, both virtually and in his hometown of Cape Girardeau,

Kent Martin St Louis Rush Limbaugh Missouri Limbaugh Cancer Cape Girardeau
"kent" Discussed on Right Now with Stephen Kent

Right Now with Stephen Kent

01:36 min | 4 months ago

"kent" Discussed on Right Now with Stephen Kent

"This trend line is not just the past years past twenty years so we really need to move on from this advice about like. Be careful about it. Fifty percent in divorce. Things have been pretty good. I didn't know the rate was so low. I i thought. I didn't believe i had to cross check in multiple places to be like. Is this really happening. And it is. And that's encouraging. What's what's got you happy these days licensing or or we've had a lot of good luck with it's been one of my small silver linings in the past years that a lot of people have recognized like hey when you need doctors to work across state lines and they can't because of a license when you need nurses to act unilaterally because they can't because their scope of practice like what they're allowed to do without a doctor overseeing them is limited people have realized we need to change stuff stuff But a couple of states. Utah's governor. The governor recommend. The canadians all bring all the canadian There are so many opportunities to allow foreign medical school. Grads work but utah. Governor is is First executive order with licensing reform. I wasn't expecting it. I but i was expecting it and having it happened so fast and having them go through that review. Like it's gonna help a lot of people i know. It's a dorky thing. But like i want the help for people it makes me happy. Dorky stuff has the most direct impact on people's lives not arguing on twitter about colin kaepernick. Or whatever whatever they want us to be obsessed with at any given day it stuff like that that makes really big difference. So i hear you that gives us plenty of fodder for another time. We'll be back next week so please drop again. See you next time on right now..

colin kaepernick Fifty percent next week twitter First executive past years past twenty years canadian Utah one of my small silver linings canadians past years
"kent" Discussed on Right Now with Stephen Kent

Right Now with Stephen Kent

04:36 min | 4 months ago

"kent" Discussed on Right Now with Stephen Kent

"It might be living in a van on the road for the next ten years of their life doing the bohemian thing like so it all depended in their description of this idea if they had self determination to do it now. I also kind of disbelieve. This a little bit. I was like i don't know this feels to like rainbows and roses. But morning consul the same thing and their studies on gen z and optimism but it all came down to. They are less optimistic about the future particularly about covert but they believe they can change things in a way. That millennials didn't at the interstate by and large. They believe they have the power to change the world. And maybe that's just again youth. That's just youth screaming like that's always been there but i do take it seriously like and me to that. Autonomy is just so good for the soul to believe that you have control over your life and power in the world teams. Things millennial a structuralist. They don't believe that they can change some things that like the system is set. And you can't do certain things within the system. Yeah that's why. I think for the gen z. It's like it's nihilism but at the same time it is something along the lines of of a positive you know that they want to break certain things down and let me tell you the things that they want to break down. Some of them are bad but there are things that need to be to be smashed and rebuilt again. Yeah i mean you wonder once again whether it's you know we're free to exist here because none of this really matter so let's just enjoy ourselves or whether it's you know let's join together and improve the world for all. I'm not sure that they're flirting with that line. But you're right. That christian salt is anderson walton research. I did did show that..

anderson walton years christian gen z ten
"kent" Discussed on Right Now with Stephen Kent

Right Now with Stephen Kent

04:38 min | 4 months ago

"kent" Discussed on Right Now with Stephen Kent

"I think people are legitimately angry at what their kids are learning how they're being told to act and think and i think the republican party and the conservative movement needs to meet those people where they are and part of the healing process. That will bring. Let's say the trump ice and the right wing reaction or is back in is start. I was listening and understanding. Yeah and that's like what we were saying before that just a lot of the stuff isn't listening is dismissive and i know i can be rude on sweater. Sometimes can be dismissive and go to hell stuff. I i think it's a platform that prioritizes these things to survive on. That said like when when you want to win people over to your side. Like that's when i go back like brooks heart and stuff like i'm very big on like if we want to get people on our side issue is figure out if you have a solution if you have ideas it's like saying city is like with With a rural areas for For liberals whatever it is if you're not listening to people like you're not trying 'cause like then just people feel like they don't care about me and i understand that like i mean we've all had times when whether it's more personal or on a business level people dismiss you and you're like oh well so they don't give two craps what i think. I have a question for the tape. And people know why does gen. Z hate millennials. so much like millennials. It's always been us versus the boomers and gen x. Kind of gets a raced in that entire equation. Though i don't feel like there's anybody out there who's like oh gen-x ruin everything with grunge but there's like this really palpable sort of thing going on between gen. Z and millennials. What is that about in terms of temperamental. The values why they hate are luxurious. us side. parts that really show off my hair and they hater skinny jeans on they can go there middle parts and hopefully they all have symmetrical theory..

two craps trump republican party
"kent" Discussed on Right Now with Stephen Kent

Right Now with Stephen Kent

05:32 min | 4 months ago

"kent" Discussed on Right Now with Stephen Kent

"Suburbs will be our next generation of voters. Yeah i can't echo that enough. I love all of that one thing. I'll note to just a shoutout to oklahoma. City's mayor david holt. I think he's a really good model for a lot of this. I think there's a couple republican mayors throughout the country. Where you see that. They're they're like governing. They're doing their jobs. They're focusing on people's lives and making their communities better. They're not like out for the retweets. They're not to be like the next whatever channel contributor. They're there to do their jobs. And we need more of that on in both parties. I think and let me let me. Let me jump in if you don't mind You know we're not necessarily plugged into any republican candidate's. Here's a question about twenty twenty. Did kelly law floor and david perdue have significant black outreach on school choice in atlanta regardless of what happened with impeachment and the election being stolen did they do. What ron santa's did to win as governor's race in two thousand eighteen is ron johnson. Planning on spending time in milwaukee in two twenty two to win reelection these are questions. Gop strategists need to ask themselves if they're not asking these questions and they're relying on the the old base and trying to win back the. We're not gonna win and this is this all goes back to. The demographics is destiny. Sort of argument that again. We saw playing out in two thousand twelve mitt. Romney went down. there was the whole. Gop autopsy kind of some of the conversation. We're having today kind of again. Like another autopsy of what went right and what went wrong in two thousand sixteen republicans But at the same time like we wanna see a different party and it does seem to me that the old base the republican party is holding on for dear life to this party and that they are not going to let go..

ron johnson Romney milwaukee david holt atlanta david perdue both parties today oklahoma ron santa about twenty twenty two one two twenty two republican two thousand two thousand sixteen republica kelly law mitt thousand
"kent" Discussed on Right Now with Stephen Kent

Right Now with Stephen Kent

04:48 min | 4 months ago

"kent" Discussed on Right Now with Stephen Kent

"And where the opportunity is you see. Enormous just reported yesterday by nbc blue-collar shifts towards the republican party including among hispanics and black americans among blue-collar spandex and blacks and in philadelphia the words that flipped most to trump from sixteen to two thousand twenty where the hispanic sections of north philadelphia. There is an enormous opportunity for the american. Right it's not among woke progressive college graduates. It's not among hate has no home here. Thirty five year old moms in the suburbs. Among working people of color who comprise an enormous wag of the democratic constituency and yet have no voice in the party whatsoever because the democratic party is steered by an elite kadre of woke online mostly white progressive college graduates. They have forgotten their base. And i believe the republican party more than ever has an enormous opportunity there enormous gettable groups. Just look at people without college degrees and then juxtaposed that with biden's give away to college graduates who have student loan debt with the with the young people who are definitely. I think they'd just by default identify with the democratic coalition because of the identity politics stuff because of sort of the the more touchy feely aspects of the party. It does seem to me though like that barrier is what is always going to keep the zuma's and whatever generation comes after them from the republican coalition until the republican party learns to speak to more people at the national level. Because you mentioned cities. Like i think that there is always a chance for city policy particularly like with making the cities of the future zoning reform schools and this entire nightmare during covid and republicans being the party of opening the schools again. This is an opportunity but it will never happen as long as at the national level..

yesterday trump north philadelphia republican party sixteen philadelphia Thirty five year old republicans two thousand black hispanics nbc republican twenty biden american americans
"kent" Discussed on Right Now with Stephen Kent

Right Now with Stephen Kent

05:06 min | 4 months ago

"kent" Discussed on Right Now with Stephen Kent

"And there's been this rise of long form media. This show is kind of one of those things like. We're going to take our time and let things breathe but there's also this other side of it. Which is that. Kids are on tiktok getting. They're really quick bursts of information. And whoever's best at communicating on a rapid form is changing. The minds of young people supposedly. That's what they tell us. Yeah yeah. I think that's a good point but it's not all that new like buying a few years ago it was a big thing. It's kind of weird that that like yeah line and i was very good at it. I will very good but but tiktok has kind of. I mean it's different but it's kinda going that way. And i know there have been studies that show that like people are consuming faster media. Even older people like want like faster smaller. I guess that's also like the age old thing. Because i don't want to be like all concede of the president here. That or hurt moment is so different. But i feel like that's just shorter. Attention spans have been the thing. I think it's kind of something that like plays altogether Albert have you seen any of that in your work. do you think it's maybe due to something else. I think it's a really complicated political question that we face is how to be thoughtful while still being punchy how to break through the noise without sort of flattening all narratives into us versus them Your disgrace or you're fired or you know we're with you. We defend you scrub. It's really interesting but then again we see this desire. This sort of this is why podcasts. This is why joe. Rogan is so popular this sort of back to basics effort to really talk and think and discuss things a little bit more in depth..

Albert Rogan joe one few years ago tiktok
"kent" Discussed on Right Now with Stephen Kent

Right Now with Stephen Kent

04:36 min | 4 months ago

"kent" Discussed on Right Now with Stephen Kent

"Upper middle class kids. All of them have advanced college degrees and they are the more they wanna burn down the system and yet they are products of the stub. Yeah we we read about them all the time. Very privileged kids going to ivy league schools They're like third generation students at these schools and they come in there with a impressed attitude and thinking that they they can't succeed because of x. factor like you are at harvard. And your mommy and your grandma both also went to harvard. And it's just. It's a huge disconnect. And i think that's true. That is one reason why you're going to have like these activist sort of socialist among yo- young cohorts but they're never gonna be authentically socialist like as a cohort because they're too wrapped up in the fruits of capitalism and also like. I think it's one of the hard parts of her society to like. I was saying we're more recognition for things. It's also the fact that people can be all different points in in life in society economically to and still deal with things so. I think it's good that we're kind of understanding. Hey you can be here but still deal with this. And that's healthy but it's just when you latched too much onto the bad part. I think that can be really bad for someone and that can just be bad for their soul for the motivation. There's a lot to be said there. Also for all different kinds of groups on albert. How do you see that playing. And maybe the complexity of society maybe just people not matching their You know their lived experience with like i hate to say lived experience. I've just realized they said it. But social media will make fun of me but but but matching all that with your upholster so you know this kind of stuff. What does the data tell you about like. I guess our new complex issue society. So i would say both the data on the hidden tribes in american politics and my own anecdotal experience..

both one reason one albert ivy league american harvard third
"kent" Discussed on Right Now with Stephen Kent

Right Now with Stephen Kent

03:40 min | 4 months ago

"kent" Discussed on Right Now with Stephen Kent

"It's it's not knowing who your voters really are. We've we've both kind of all come up in in sort of the conservative and libertarian nonprofit world and we have this idea of who it was that we were speaking to. You know. I always remember doing outreach to the grass roots during the two thousand fourteen midterms and trying to push ideas like criminal justice reform licensing reform right. Something you're big on shana and and immigration reform but the only thing that people would ever leave in the comments was on criminal justice reform. You do the time. Do the crime All that kind of stuff and then also just like really anti immigration vitriol particularly about like cheating the system and rating The social safety net like they never were on board but we just kind of continued to plough ford. Hoping that maybe one day they would be. Yeah and i think that's true of a lot of organizations and albert. I'd be curious what you think here too. Because i think a lot of organizations have a disconnect between leadership and between like their base whether it's a campaign whether it's on any other organization that just have a lot of people in it You know pretty much everywhere. I've worked. There's always some level of disconnect there. But but i think it's just exacerbated a lot over the past few years and it's the rise of social media and other things that allowed people's voices to be heard that we're understanding that and we're seeing like. Oh we were until two totally different places. I think we've witnessed like you said a completely fragmented media system and the rise of some loud voices where the tone is more important than the ideology necessarily. That's being fronted. I i will say the american right either can figure out where people are and serve them or die dying albert like so there. Was this theory back in the day. The millennials we're going to be conservative and that they could be brought over I did work on on these issues..

both albert two totally different places past few years one day american two thousand fourteen midterms
"kent" Discussed on Right Now with Stephen Kent

Right Now with Stephen Kent

04:15 min | 4 months ago

"kent" Discussed on Right Now with Stephen Kent

"I know it's founders. Say it began as a real movement. Never bought that. I'm so sick of my dad. Being honest horse. So of course. He's doing that here like what. How many do you have between him and join goldberg. It's too many to count many like well. I don't think glenn greenwald is one of them. I don't know if he has any children. He's the intercept co founder. And recently the land tweeted that a major driver of its early protests was the ron paul adjacent anger over the bailout referring to mortgage bailouts during the two thousand eight financial crisis and he noted that the anger was shared by occupy wall street. Absolutely checks out. we're still seeing that brew today. And then lastly of the bulwarks charlie sykes and he asks wasn't a genuine grassroots movement a fringe movement composed of win nuts or scam packs over time. It was all of those things. The tea party was a miracle construct that changed its focus and agenda depending on its leadership and location miracle. That's a that's a good way to describe it. A hideous animal brought together for also different sorts and look the tea party comes to mind. It's a little bit of the origin story. Like this is where. I really began getting involved in politics. I was always interested just entering college at the time. And when this movement started up you know i thought very different about it and for everybody. Who's listening on the podcast. I'm holding up here. The gadsden flag. It's a little little memento. I hold up at the at the house. And i hold onto it because it means something to me like. It's it's where this all began for me. Don't tread on me. But i think today i am more of a don't tread on any one kind of person and i feel like the tea party and obviously lost its way. We have not seen the fruits of that born in dc. Yeah i think that's a good way to put it. I'm also i will say when i was younger. I never got into the gadsden flag itself. Although these days i love means of it and my favorite is of the king of the hill. One where bobby is on it and it says that's my purse. I don't know you so the me..

charlie sykes glenn greenwald today ron paul bobby one of them tea party one kind thousand eight financial dc One two crisis goldberg the gadsden flag
E-Eggs Track Turtle Traffickers

60-Second Science

03:51 min | 4 months ago

E-Eggs Track Turtle Traffickers

"Take note. If you're thinking about stealing eggs from the nests of sea turtles on the beaches of costa rica. well you may wind up getting more than you bargained for because researchers have combined. Gps technology with three d. printing produce. Decoy eggs that look and feel like real turtle eggs but can track where traffickers go when they swipe these endangered embryos the egg saving efforts are mapped out in the journal. Current biology some finds sea turtle eggs to be a delicious seasonal treat. Others think they're an aphrodisiac. Which has produced a thriving illegal market the mock turtle eggs were crafted in response to something called the wildlife crime tech challenge a program sponsored by the us agency for international development. Scientists led by kim williams kyanne of paso pacifico conservation organization device the decoys. They drew their inspiration in part from popular tv. Show says paso pacific executive director. Sarah ostrom kim's idea to put a tracking device into the league came from an episode of breaking bad where the police hit a. Gps transmitter in a shipment of raw materials for methamphetamine lab. The first challenge was getting the eggs substitute just right. We started with the size and dimensions of the turtle. Egg trying to figure out. How much do they weigh. What's their texture. How often squishy are they. What's their color then. The sorted out the electronics cell phones very widespread throughout the world. And we realized that if we could just use a sim card and a gps gsm technology. That's used in cell phones that even if a beach was remote from a cell tower if it was headed to a market somewhere would eventually pass by a cell tower. And the decoy aches could transmit to one of these cell towers. Finally it was time for a field test. I was actually the person who put the eggs in the nests. Helen physi- of the university of kent. And so it was really a case of deploying decoys into the nests and seeing if they Happens when they as you get. Taken fiji planted a decoy egg. In one hundred one. Sea turtle nests on four costa rican beaches about a quarter of the decoys got snatched some malfunctioned but others gave trackable signal. One wound up at a bar about a mile away but another traveled an impressive eighty five miles from its nest. Physique kept an eye on its progress from her cell phone and basically was moving further and further inland And eventually it. Stop so zoomed in on on the like google maps basically and it showed me very very clearly that it gone behind a supermarket like some sort of akali seep market loading by kind of area which was pretty suspicious is now really re not reason to really be there unless you unless you're up to up tonight good. The decoy hung around the loading dock for a time before making its way to a nearby residential property the fact that it spent two days in so waiting suggests that it may been handed over to a trafficker who sold it to someone else perhaps even the consumer that really fits we what we know about the illegal trade of xing. Costa rica reunited fanatic. Total information from interview information that exists old door to door and it seems likely that this is what's happened so yeah. We're very happy with that result. We've we've proved the concept that you can actually use these x. fee says. She hopes the decoys which they've dubbed. The investigators can help to really crack down on the illegal poaching of sea turtle eggs and reduce such operations to shell of their former selves.

Us Agency For International De Paso Pacifico Conservation Org Paso Pacific Sarah Ostrom Kim Costa Rica Kim Williams Helen Physi Costa University Of Kent Fiji Google
What to know about COVID-19 variants

Today in Focus

03:29 min | 4 months ago

What to know about COVID-19 variants

"Sara lee help editor at the guardian things almost felt positive towards the end of last year. We thought cave nineteen mutated. Pretty slowly and we have potential vaccines but it feels so grim again now because of these different variants. Can you explain this to me. Biologically what is actually happening to the covid. Nineteen virus. Well the virus is doing what viruses do they adapt they mutate in order to survive. Basically so we're finding in fact transmission is greater with these variants. On the whole the mutations were seeing are on these spike protein now. That's the bit of the virus that we've seen lots of pictures of is sort of sticks out and did attach itself as the mechanism by which detaches itself to the human cell. Of course i want to really worry us was what we call. The kent strain vote globally. I think they call it. The uk strain. Tell me how it was different and what we know about whether the vaccines work against it. This variant is just has. Lots of mutations is not just one. It's not just two. There are as many as twenty three mutations. The effect of those mutations has been to make it a lot more transmissible than previous ones new analysis confirmed that the new variant of corona virus. A much quicker transmission rate than the original strain. So this was where we noticed that the case numbers were going up massively during the lockdown in that area of the country in kent Which was a total surprise. And that's how they knew that there was a problem. There was immediately concerned that the vaccines might not work against these variants. The very good news though was that the kent variant still was very susceptible to the vaccine but just as we felt a little bit better about the scary prospect that we were suddenly talking about was the south african variant. I'm very worried about the new south african variant that we've seen and that's why we've taken the very robust action to stop flights from south africa. What do we know about that. We know that the south african variants got a whole load of mutations. Just as can't one did but some of these seem to be more problematic even one in particular called e. four eight four k sometimes nicknamed eric or each. They call f for eight four k and escape mutation because it's much better slipping partner. Antibodies changes the spike protein. So the immune system has been trained by the vaccine we've had based on the earlier variants is less likely to recognize. Kill the virus. And this escape mutation or eric eke that you're telling me about. It isn't just limited to the south africa variant is. We've had pretty troubling news hair this week. Yes this is something that really is worrying the experts so public health england has found that there is the mutation here in the uk and it's is attached to the kent variant. Which of course is very transmissible. So they've got really nasty combination so we've got quite a number of cases of this a couple of dozen probably around the i think it started in the bristol area and there are some cases with each in the original virus around the liverpool area

Sara Lee UK Kent South Africa Eric England Bristol Liverpool
Seattle-based Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos may step down without stepping away

South Florida's First News with Jimmy Cefalo

00:33 sec | 4 months ago

Seattle-based Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos may step down without stepping away

"Down and receives Jolin Kent has more After more than 25 years and billions and sales Jeff Bezos is leaving his post to CEO this summer, handing the reins of the massive disruptor he built to Andy Jassy, the current head of Amazon Web services. All our retail giant announced that CEO and founder Jeff Bases will transition into the role of executive chair he founded Amazon in 1994 and grew it into today's massive online Padma worth more than $1.6 trillion. In statement, The Miami

Jolin Kent Andy Jassy Jeff Bezos Jeff Bases Amazon Miami
Covid vaccination appointments available in Seattle's King County

Our Auto Expert

00:22 sec | 4 months ago

Covid vaccination appointments available in Seattle's King County

"Seattle King County says As of now, all appointments for the first two weeks of vaccinations at its new sighting Kent are filled. But if you're looking to be vaccinated at the upcoming drive through side in Auburn there still some spots available. Registration just opened up. Yesterday, King County decided to launch these sites, which opened Monday to help vulnerable older adults. Get vaccinated.

King County Seattle Auburn
"kent" Discussed on 10 Things That Scare Me

10 Things That Scare Me

05:46 min | 1 year ago

"kent" Discussed on 10 Things That Scare Me

"Number two? You have your bad logic to respond down expected crisis render unto God instead of playing God number three figure civilization running. Knock that values indulgence over everything. This big out can't continue We're spoiling ourselves to the point of no return Well I'm Ozark national forest. Which is about the most remote part in Arkansas and Made out in the woods By myself in a trailer it's about falling apart is donated to me so then that well oh my adult life really ever since out of out of the university. I'm gone I go a lot of days where I don't see anybody particularly. I've got a couple. It doesn't dogs and That doesn't cat so I got nuff animals here. They keep me distracted bouquet newer four. I fear fear itself. I don't mean instantaneous. Panic in response to sudden danger like stepping on rattlesnake or hitting your head Hornets Nest. I mean constant chronic fear number five losses Gavin. Tat's never sick. I fear climate change. I've been taking notes on The sequence of natural events since the seventy S and I can see definite changes in you know in Patterns of timing like on migration on nesting all kinds of things like that number seven since World War Two. We've said this Lost in space attitude of Trying to isolate ourselves from nature like in our own you know house becomes a spaceship in You know everything outside failing Number eight loss of basic information through current reliance on computers. I've never used a computer. Only electricity that I is is Solar chargers for batteries for my radio and for flashlight. That's not extend my technologies number nine. I should be afraid of time. My grandparents pretty much as me a lot of ways. My mom had other kids. She had to take care the time that got to be too much and she farm out to my grandparents. Ginka see the last of their whole era and they pretty much Had a whole different approach to life in the modern people they you know they fit into the world around them. They weren't you know aspiring towards bigger and better over the top. They were perfectly content to have survived in place. You know they'd relayed what they wanted to life. Which is just basically you know. Get third last week after the unexpected. That's pretty much. My name is Kim Boehner these are things that scare me. are of with his animals in the ozarks region of Arkansas longtime ago. He started drawing. The various plants encountered on his walks in the woods. Eventually had over thirty five hundred illustrations and they were collected in a book and published by the University of Arkansas and twenty seventeen. The ten things team includes Amy Pearl Daniel Game at Odell Reuben Sarah Samba..

Arkansas Kim Boehner Tat Ozark national forest University of Arkansas Odell Reuben Sarah Samba Gavin Hornets Amy Pearl