18 Burst results for "Kenny Washington"

"kenny washington" Discussed on Broken Record

Broken Record

15:40 min | 5 months ago

"kenny washington" Discussed on Broken Record

"Minutes before I just had to leave. I just had to go home and play. And I started taking the banter to school, playing between classes, cutting classes and hanging out in city college. I went to music and art, high school when it was up in Harlem. So there's a lot of music surrounded by music. And the folks that I went to high school with, you know, like, Omar hakim was there with me and Kenny Washington and Marcus Miller. We were all there together. And Don Byron, all these guys have had these great careers playing jazz and rock and so forth and starting to play jazz then on the banjo. Yeah, I was trying, I had my teacher, my last teacher, Tony trishka, was doing a lot of exploring with the banjo. He was really the guy who said, hey, you can do anything. You don't have to do that. I noticed when I went to high school, if I could play Led Zeppelin lick, everybody thought that was cool. Much cooler than if I'd play them a flat and scruggs tune. Right. So I noticed that that got me more attention. And so that was interesting. We're Grateful Dead riff or something. That was more cool. But I was just interested in the musical ideas that were in all these different musics and trying to figure out how to learn them on the banjo was fun. And then you started doing your own albums pretty early. Yeah, I moved to Boston right out of high school, 76, and I think 79, I made my first album. So I think I was still 20 when I made the first record, maybe 21. Wow. I mean, you must have had great chops at that point. It was kind of weird, like, okay, so Tony, who was arguably the greatest banjo player of the period. I only say arguably because he was such a progressive. And so some people might debate me, but I don't really think you can debate me on the talent and the quality of his music, but he was my teacher. And after a couple of years of playing, people said they couldn't tell the difference between him and me. Like if we were somewhere and we were both playing, that was their compliment. They said, hey, I was listening to you guys play I close my eyes, I couldn't tell who was who. I was such a, I copied him so intently that I could do most. The years of life and humanity and practice and creativity that he had, but I learned quite a lot of what he could do. And so that made me an unusual banjo player because nobody could really do that back then, but him. So now I had all of his toolkit to draw from. I'm not saying I was Tony, but I was darn, I really learned a lot of it, you know? So then the thing was I suddenly realized, oh, there already is a Tony trishka. I gotta find my thing. And then I started very consciously exploring things that he didn't do and looking for the things that I could do that would be my unique stamp on it. And then I immediately went into bands and started touring and I've been doing it ever since. What was it you found in your playing? What distinguishes your playing from other banjo players? Well, Tony, and I'm jealous of these qualities in his playing, he's a primitive, like he can draw on some theoretical knowledge, but he figures out things in a very primitive kind of way. And it's like a high-tech primitive thing that he does. I am more of the kind of guy who wants to know every scale. Like if I learned a scale, I have to learn it in every key major and minor all the way up and down the banjo from the bottom open string to the last threat of the high string. I wanted to do all that. He hadn't done that. So when I started to do that and started learning like legit jazz repertoire and language and classical things, suddenly I had some knowledge on the banjo that was different. That was new to the instrument some wagon. I don't know how to say what's new because in the 20s, there are people playing jazz stuff on the banjo that still hasn't been equaled, but it was a different banjo. It was a different tuning as we were talking about before. Who were the jazz players you were listening to at that point that informed your playing? When I started playing, I mean, I certainly listened to Joe pass and Oscar Peterson and people like that. I was real big fan of Charlie Parker. I love Charlie Parker's playing. And for me, Charlie Parker had the same rhythmic intensity of Earl scruggs. And then one day, at jazz appreciation class in high school, the teacher his name is Justin de chocho. He's a great jazz teacher. He played chicory as recording of Spain. And that blew my mind because like the sound of that electric piano, there was something about it, all the short, stabby notes. I was like, I don't think I could play like Stan getz, but I might be able to play like that on the banjo. You know, I don't think I can do it. So staccato. Yeah. And he was all about time and also there are pianists who run up and down the piano constantly, and you know, you can't do that on the banjo. I don't have the range. But if you go, you know, like he would do these back and forth things with his two hands. That I could do, short phrases that were very rhythmic, like a lot of monk influence and that he was very rhythmically focused on playing these unique rhythmic ideas with a lot of intensity. I could see how that might work. And then you did it on your first album. I did record that song, but I went to see him when I was in high school. At the Beacon theater with return to forever. And that blew my mind. Hearing him play with Stanley Clark and Lenny white and Al deola, it was like, imagine, you know, like some people say, oh, that's not the greatest music or whatever, but like imagine being a 17 year old. Never hearing anything like that and walking and sitting down at the Beacon theater and hearing that. I mean, it was unbelievable. And I never was the same. It had that impact that Earl scruggs had. Like the three people for me, or else scruggs, Charlie Parker, and chick Korea. And then there were guys like pat martino playing around the city, two around that time, and I got to see him in person a few times. And he also played these long lines long, very rhythmic rhythmically solid lines also reminded me of banjo playing. I was like, I think I could play like that too. Not that I had the ability, but that that would be possible on the banjo long. That long lines that jazz players play. Let's ask guitar players play in particular, because they don't have to take a breath. And you don't have to take a breath on the banjo. So again, you're going back to the perpetual motion idea that you were bringing up before. That's what the banjo does really well. And you do hear that a lot in jazz and classical music. Music with a lot of space because you're not used to hearing the banjo, have that kind of space, and it can be very plaintive and beautiful when you figure out how to leave that space. So when you did your classical record, that was an example you did the Chopin you did to famous cello suite. I did, yeah. That's right, yeah. But you don't have sustain. And you don't have that great a dynamic range. Is that fair to say? That's very true, a very disappointing but very true. So the thing about that record is down in Nashville. You have these thing called songwriter demos, like if you're making a vocal record, you get a pile of tapes from different songwriters and you pop them in your cassette till you hear it when you like and then you write down, oh, I like that one. And so I kind of did that when I was doing perpetual motion. I got all of these recordings of classical music and I would pop them on in my car CDs and flip through until I heard something. And every time I heard something I liked, I'd write it down, I had a little pad in my car. And it almost inevitably I was drawn to these modal perpetuals, long lines, long cascading things that went on and on and on. And it kept unfolding and unfolding and unfolding like Bach, you know? Or paganini or a Chopin things. And so that's part of why we named the album, a modal perpetual, because to me, most of the pieces on there are moto perpetuals of one kind or another, whether it's children's corner by debussy or Bach things. They just keep on unfolding. The story's not over. And then it stops. Kind of like life. Yeah, yeah. Well, I can't get a banjo player to stop. Maybe that's maybe it's your ticket to immortality. Till the end. That's when they stop when they die. So tell me going back again, you played with Tony rice on hold on the show. Cold on the shoulder, which is this album people in all kinds of worlds love. But it's this great. I guess would you call it bluegrass? Well, I think it's definitely extended bluegrass. And so he was a hero to me because he also had that incredible rhythm, a rhythmic ability on the guitar, and he had an interest in jazz and all these different things. And he would bring them into his bluegrass, but he also had a very musical vocal kind of quality. Like he was a great singer, but he chose songs that were kind of deep sometimes and had harmony to them. Which was very unusual for bluegrass, which is tends to be very simple harmonically. He liked things that were more explorative. And so when I got to play on that record, it was a dream come true. It was like I was finally playing with the a team. Sam Bush was playing Vassar Clemens was there, Jerry Douglas was there, Tony rice was there, and we all just cut it in a circle and he sang and played everything live. We all played live, and it was unbelievable how good that music felt. I played I played on four tracks that day, either three or four, and every one of them had this dance. It was so easy to play banjo with him because of the way he played rhythm, his rhythm guitar playing was like a magic carpet ride that you get on and all of a sudden you could do things that you couldn't do anywhere else. So after that session, I was like, if I could do a record with this guy and Sam Bush, because he Sam has this way of chopping the rhythm on the mandolin. And Tony is so free floating with his rhythm playing. The combination of those two guys playing together, you have all of the freedom and the imagination of Tony rice, but it's put into a rhythmic context by San bush's chop. So when those guys start playing together, it's magic. And feathering the banjo into that is like the easiest thing in the world. So when I made that first record, we're talking about drive. That's the band that I wanted and was lucky enough to get. And I had those two guys playing together and Jerry Douglas, the greatest over player and these great fiddle players. You described it a little bit, but you know one of my favorite albums of yours is the album you did with Czech Korea. The enchantment? Yeah, how did you make that work? It's very unusual sounding album. It's a puzzle. What happened there? Because, you know, as you know, he is a formative influence, like even more so than scruggs or Tony trishka or Charlie Parker who weren't part of my life. He was a guy that I revered as so good, I would never could never imagine playing with him, but an inspiration for life. I was 5, followed everything he did, and always wished I could play like him and learn from him and stuff. So at a certain point, the fleck tones got going, you know, some decades later after falling in love with his music. And got a Grammy nomination, right? And got to go to the Grammys where chick Korea, one of the reigning Grammy count kings, it was and got to meet him and talk to him and say, oh yeah, I saw you guys saw your video sinister minister. I like it. I like that, you know? So I got the nerve to ask him if he would play on a track for me and he did. To my surprise, agree. And I got to do something with him and I thought, well, okay, now my life is made, you know? I'll never bother you again was what I thought. You know, it was an album called tales from the acoustic planet. The first one I made and Branford Marsalis also played on that. And I got them together. They never played together on the tracks. As a neat thing. Yeah, they just sat around and did old jazz in the corner until it was time to close the studio down. They were having so much fun. So some years later I was playing at Newport jazz festival with Stanley Clark and John Luke pawnee. We had this trio for a little while. And Ted kerlin came over to me. He's the agent that booked all these guys, you know? And he came over to me and he said, um, bayla, chick Korea is thinking about doing some duet projects next year and you're on the list of people. Would you have any interest in something like that? Would you have any interest? I was like, yes, sign me up enough. So I was the first person who said yes. And so we said, okay, well, let's do something. So we booked this session. I'm going to come out there and he sent me this music, which I'm trying to decipher from midi files and trying to figure out how to play. And we have a week to do it. We're going to do it. I think 5 days. I was used to making records with the flecktones where we had months. You know, we could just take our time and just when we were done, we're done. And then I get there and what about rehearsing? Well, we'll meet up the night before, so we meet up in a hotel room and we play for an hour. And he says, I think that's good. I'm like, oh my God, how are we going to do this? And then as he's leaving, he says, oh, by the way, I think we can record and mix this record in those four or 5 days. So now it's getting down to four, you know, four or 5 days. I'm like, but somehow we did it, you know? We just went in and just tune after tune, got the arrangements together, just did them, and one after another, they turned out really good, and we did the whole thing. I mean, drive was made in three days, but that was with a bunch of guys, a bunch of music I knew how to do, you know? So I'm always surprised when I hear it back because I have that feeling of fear every time it comes up that I'm going to listen and be really disappointed, but it's the moment. You know, that's what happens when you do something fast. You get some different benefit out of it. And if you do something slower, you can get another benefit out of them. You know, there's different things. He was a guy who was always trying new things. Yeah. And you were a guy that's always trying new things. I think I've seen interviews where he has said, I just want to get on to the next thing and my record label is always saying, how about a bluegrass album? Where does that drive come from with me? Yes. Well, I have to say one of the things that was very inspiring on that chick session is the minute we finished the last song of the last track, which was a tune called mountain, it was the last thing we cut, I put the banjo in the case, chick went into the other room, pulled out the music for his next project and started practicing. Wow. That's a little scary. And I went, wow. I want to be like that, you know? This is, I guess, early 30s. And you're like, I had a bottle of wine, I thought. Yeah, this was before the wine. This is the wine was a few decades later. But no, I was always thought we were supposed to do that. And you know, talking about The Beatles, you know, they just kept changing every record was like, almost like a new band. I thought that's what you're supposed to do. You're not supposed to like create something and then keep doing it. Like that's what Bill Monroe did. He created bluegrass. You know, and on the 7th day, he rested, but then he kept playing it the same way. He would always try to find guys who would play it like the original band, more or less. Although there was some variation, of course, but his idea was I've created it, and now we will do it. And then there's other people, other artists that continue to change their whole lives. And I like that idea because that's what the cool cats were doing. That's what Chicago is doing. That's what The Beatles were doing. That's what Led Zeppelin was doing. The people that were around that I saw were growing and changing. From the Carnegie hills of Manhattan. Thank you so much. My pleasure. That was wonderful. Great talking to you. It was fun. Great. It was great. Just great. Thanks to Bela fleck for explaining his lifelong love for the banjo and sharing a song off his new album, my bluegrass star. To hear the album along with our favorite bayla fleck songs, check out the playlist at broken record podcast dot com. Be sure to subscribe to our YouTube channel at YouTube dot com slash broken record podcast where you can find all of our new episodes. You can follow us on Twitter at broken record. Broken record is produced at help from Leah rose, Jason gambel, mentality, Eric Sandler, and Jennifer Sanchez, with engineering help from Nick chafee. Our executive producer is Mia Lebel. Broken record is a production of pushkin industries. If you like this show and others from pushkin, consider subscribing to pushkin plus. Push can plus is a podcast subscription that offers bonus content and uninterrupted ad free listening for 4.99 a month. Look for pushkin plus on Apple podcast subscriptions. And if you like the show, please remember to share rate and review us on your podcast app. But themes by Kenny beats, I'm Justin Richmond. Make

Tony trishka Charlie Parker Tony Stanley Clark Omar hakim Kenny Washington Don Byron Tony rice Beacon theater Earl scruggs jazz appreciation class in hig Justin de chocho Lenny white Al deola Marcus Miller Sam Bush scruggs Jerry Douglas Joe pass Bach
"kenny washington" Discussed on ESPN Daily

ESPN Daily

08:21 min | 5 months ago

"kenny washington" Discussed on ESPN Daily

"In. So they agreed to have black players on the team. Now, what they did was they, there was this incredible player who played at UCLA, got him Kenny Washington. He was actually in the same backfield with Jackie Robinson who broke the Major League Baseball color barrier in 1947, Jackie Robinson was a great football player as well. And the rams thinking, okay, well, Kenny Washington played at UCLA. It's Los Angeles. He could be a draw, all right, we're going to do it. And I just think, at that time, again, we don't have any official documentation about this where their owners who are upset about this probably, but you see they wanted to open up that market. So money, money again, Jason is the thing driving all of the progress and also the lack thereof. Absolutely, absolutely. And so the rams agree to have Kenny Washington team. But back in those days, like NFL players now, you know, you get your room on the road. But in those days, all those guys had to room together to save money. So the rams were presented with this problem. We'll have this black guy a team, but we don't want them having a room with a white player. So they also signed woody strode, Kenny Washington teammate UCLA. Essentially, so Kenny would have a roommate. And you think about it, it really is sad. But also in Cleveland Browns, they also signed Marion Motley and Bill Willis. So these are the four guys who integrated professional football, the NFL in 1946. Yeah, so the NFL is reintegrated. I mean, this is, again, the strange, the lost history of all of this, Jason. Once those four players reintegrate the NFL, bringing black players back formally into the league, how would you describe how the perspective towards black players at the highest levels of ownership and front offices changed? Well, it changed very slowly. There was a belief that black players lacked the intellect to play the quote unquote cerebral positions. And in terms of the jobs available now to black players, how would you describe that marketplace? Well, really, you're talking about the running back position. You could be talking about wide receiver. You could be talking about the tackle positions, but the up the middle position center, which is the quarterback of the offensive line, you have to make line adjustments. No, black people are excluded from that. Black players were because they weren't believed to be smart enough to make the line adjustments. Middle linebacker, the quarterback of the defense, you have to make the defensive calls. Well, black players weren't considered smart enough to make the defensive calls. They were excluded from middle linebacker. And quarterback, obviously, the most important position in professional sports, black players were completely excluded from that. Obviously now we are familiar with the echoes of that in the coded language that we talked about at the top of the show. But how explicit was this? Jason at the time. Well, it wasn't coded. It was just, this is the way it is. I mean, no one had a problem with talking about this. I mean, it's coded now because you're not supposed to say these things. But at the time, in the 40s, the 50s even into the 60s, and I would say really even it's the 70s and the 80s. It was just understood that black men can't play certain positions because they're not smart enough. Which, I mean, clearly is all a racist myth. I mean, yes. We've had black capitals of industry. We've had black generals, there was a black president of the United States. It's absurd to even have to lay it out like this, but of course you're right, yes. Yeah, so that's just the way it was and, you know, the country was so overtly racist. It was not even a situation where white people acknowledge it because it was just, this is the way in their minds, things are supposed to be. And there is, as we move into now, the 60s into the 70s, Jason, there is one quarterback that you spent a bunch of time writing about in your book. Who seems to embody all of this complexity, all of these factors that have to be navigated. And that's Warren Moon. The future Hall of Famer who happened to be a senior at the University of Washington in 1977. Tell us about what his path into professional football was like. I didn't really gain a full understanding of how bad it was for these guys. Until sitting down with Warren and he was telling me that in 77, he's a senior at the University of Washington. And he's getting booed during home games. Washington had a very good team that year. They actually went on to win the rose bowl and Warren actually wound up being the pack a co player of the year, but he's getting booed at home games. And you know, he told me that, you know, there was a time he was thinking, he just wanted to flip all these people off. Like, I'm out here performing for you and succeeding for you. And you just hate me because I'm black. And he winds up not even getting drafted, which you think about it now. That would never happen from a co player of the year from a major conference. It just wouldn't happen. Right, exactly. Like at a certain point, teams are just self interested enough in the modern day where they would obviously take him, even if there was any sort of hesitancy racially, right? Like, what was the explanation though at the time? Well, he wanted to play quarterback, you know, Warren did something very interesting to Pablo. When it came time for scouts to come to the University of Washington to look at players, Warren would not run the 40 yard dash because the 40 yard dash is a NFL teams use of determined players speed and once you can gauge your player's speed, you can project them at certain positions. Well, warns thing was, I'm not going to run the 40 yard dash for these coaches to want to move me to play wide receiver or a tight end or safety or something. And when he did run the 40 yard dash because he eventually did, he would make sure that he did not perform well. And he basically tanked it. It was all very calculated because black men are not drafted even in the late 70s into the NFL to play quarterback. And so Warren Moon does not get drafted as a quarterback. Does not get drafted at all in the NFL. Where does he wind up? Well, for many black quarterbacks in the 60s and 70s, what you would do is you go to Canada. Now, the Canadian football league was a viable option for black men who aspired to play quarterback professionally. But the Canadian football league is not the same thing as the National Football League or in the late 60s, the AFL, the American football league, which merged. It just wasn't the same thing in terms of the money in terms of the prestige, in terms of the exposure, but Warren wanted to play quarterback. He wanted to prove he could do that. And Pablo, he goes up there and just likes it up. Since all kind of records, wins the equivalent of their Super Bowl is the best player in the league and he made his point because after doing this for several years, the NFL eventually took notice. Yeah, and the other parallel story and there are so many of these stories that again are not like truly formally documented in the depth that you hope for today, but you tell the story too of your dinner partner, right? Doug Williams, who was at grambling state. And what does Doug's introduction to the NFL look like? So he's at grambling in 1978, he's Whiting it up. He actually finished in the top 5 of the Heisman Trophy voting that year while playing in a historically black college university, which just shows you how good he had to have been. And Joe Gibbs is dispatched from the Tampa Bay Buccaneers to go evaluate this statuesque strong arm black quarterback who's playing a grambling. Joe Gibbs legendary Hall of Fame coach at the time you believe he was the running backs coach of the Tampa Bay Buccaneers. And they have the number one overall pick and he was thinking we need a quarterback in an expansion franchise. We need a guy we can build around and it was a radical thought for them to even consider drafting Doug Williams in the first round, let alone at the top of the drive. So Joe Gibbs goes to Grammy. He spends, I believe, it was like a week with Doug. And he files

Kenny Washington NFL UCLA rams Jackie Robinson Jason woody strode Marion Motley Bill Willis middle position center football Warren University of Washington Warren Moon future Hall of Famer Cleveland Browns Major League Kenny Baseball
"kenny washington" Discussed on NFL Live

NFL Live

08:10 min | 8 months ago

"kenny washington" Discussed on NFL Live

"Another layer of complexities. And if I was Baltimore, I would just slide down, see him in Florida with his mom and whomever else is in that inner circle and get the deal done because again, it destabilizes everything. And Laura from a football context, here's a great example. Tired of Linda bomb is going to be their center for a long time. Not getting reps with him. You know, all those things matter and look, he's been a system now for four years. He's fine. He knows what to do, but as the CEO of the team has the quarterback, if you're there, everybody else needs to be there. So it just adds as Jeff and RC allude to more intrigue, more questions than answers. And the fact that there's no news coming out of it makes it somewhat more ominous, especially when he doesn't show up. Yeah, it did feel like his tweet today made it seem like he would be there soon, but another reminder over the last three seasons, Lamar Jackson leads the entire NFL in yards per rush over that same span. He also ranks second in touchdown passes per attempt trailing only Aaron Rodgers. He's been so efficient. The NFL announced this week that they will be honoring a special group of players during the Hall of Fame enshrinement week with the Ralph hay pioneer award. And when we think a trailblazers and breaking the color barrier, Jackie Robinson comes to mind, as he should, but in 1946, one year before Robinson signed with the Brooklyn Dodgers, four players now known as the forgotten four, shattered the race barrier that had existed for African Americans in pro football since the early 1930s. The forgotten four no longer forgotten are Kenny Washington. Woody strode, Bill Willis, and Marion Motley. They've all been selected to share the pro football Hall of Fame's Ralph hay pioneer award. And here's more on these incredible men. Kenny Washington, a halfback with the Los Angeles Rams from 1946 to 1948. He played only two seasons before his badly injured knees forced him to retire, but he was the rams leading rusher in 1947. Woody strode also played for the Los Angeles Rams and when World War II broke out, he enlisted in the army air corps. Then in 1946, as a 31 year old rookie, strode played only one season with the rams. Then there's Bill Willis. He played for the Cleveland Browns from 1946 to 1953 and he was elected to the pro football Hall of Fame in 1977, he became a superstar as a defensive middle guard. And then finally, Marion Motley, a fullback from 1946 to 1953 for the Cleveland Browns and in 1955 for the Pittsburgh Steelers, with his powerful running on Cleveland's famed trap and draw series Motley made the browns ground game a dominant force. He was elected to the pro football Hall of Fame in 1968. The forgotten four will be honored during the 2022 pro football Hall of Fame enshrinement in downtown canton on Friday, August 5th. Still coming on NFL live, the saints are sticking with Jameis Winston and now that the quarterback has shown up, can he get back to what he was before. Here's more. You know, Jameis has always been highly competitive. He's always worked extremely hard. I like where he's progressed physically and I like where he's at mentally right now. The quarterback position is about process information quickly and within those drills, I'm layering my brain the entire time. But the more that I can layer my brain, the easier it will be to process information to move faster on the field. I think I like living on the edge, man. I like being different. That's, I think that's one of the greatest parts about being a quarterback in the NFL. You're different. You are. It's a blessing to be one of the 32. Even a little baseball in there back to his old days. We've seen those wild workouts as Jameis looks to make his way back after tearing his ACL. And he did just that yesterday, see him out there on the practice field with new rookie receiver Chris olave. Here's what James had to say about where he's at with his rehab process. Just the biggest thing is with me getting hurt early in the season. As a team, we just decided even though the electrons, he decided, like, hey, man, let's do this the right way. There's no reason to rush, right? Because we have time on this. And I'm healed up. I'm feeling great. And like I said, I'm embracing this process, and I'm staying faithful to the protocol. I think he's doing well in his rehab. He's not ready yet. But he's here. He's rehabbing. He's getting himself better and we're certainly anxious to get him out here. But yeah, I mean, our hope is that he's going to be ready to go for training camp. So that's what we're pushing for. All right, so no doubt, if you look at some of the saints recent moves, they think they're going to be really good. They think they are positioned to win. And Ryan with Michael Thomas coming back. The addition of Chris olave, you think the saints could be flying under the radar, competing with the bucks in the south, a bucks team that they're certainly not scared of based on the record in recent years. Yeah. I don't even think the saints are flying under the radar to tell you the truth, Laura. When you look at this team and the pieces they've added, if you get Michael Thomas close to being what he was as a record breaking wide receiver a few years ago, you've now added Jarvis Landry, who you know is an experienced veteran in the slot. And Chris the lava, who many think is the best route runner that came out in the 2022 draft. You have skilled players all over the field. And we haven't even gotten to Alvin Kamara and the Swiss Army knife and Taysom Hill. And we watch Jameis understand. He doesn't have to get it all in one place. And this defense has been excellent under Dennis Allen for years and now you add Marcus may entire Matthew to replace the two safeties that have left one in retirement to other Marcus Williams to the Baltimore Ravens. I think that this team could be at the top of the NFC south and offensively, offensively and I know this is going to be sacrilegious 'cause you can't say stuff about Tom. The New Orleans Saints can be better offensively than the Tampa Bay Buccaneers are. Wow. Okay, Jeff? What do you think about that? The Brady guy. I mean, I mean, Ryan's. There he goes. Brian's a really good leader, so I'm not going to do that. Ryan, because it's just so hard. He always wins. He's scared. He's the winner. But look, so it was Tom Brady. But hey, I do have one thing about these things. And I feel like this is something that's a little bit taboo to talk about. But I like Pete Carmichael. I think he's a really solid coach and offensive coordinator, but Sean Payton is no longer the head coach of the saints. And he's one of the best play callers that we've seen in the past two decades in the NFL. So I don't want to necessarily dismiss his absence. And I'm curious to see what this saints team will be without Sean Payton. I agree with everything that Ryan said other than the Tom Brady part. But I do agree that there are really good team not quite under the radar. I'm just curious to see what this team is without Sean Payton. Yeah, it's interesting. You're right, Jeff, I think in a lot of ways, we are kind of overlooking that Sean Payton's no longer there. Okay, well, the strength of the saints last season was their defense. The same could not be said for the Chargers who ranked near the bottom of the league in both points allowed in red zone efficiency and dead last in third down conversion percentage. They clearly look to fix that this off season, adding multiple notable players to the defensive side of the ball, including Khalil Mack and JC Jackson. Here's chargers head coach Brandon staley miked up this week at OTAs. Look at you. You made an entrance. You'll be here the whole summer. Yeah, see, that's the thing, bro yeah. You look good in that powder blue. Uh oh, we got some new engineering here, man. Here we go, technique. Let's go. Where's that energy at, Darwin? Where's that energy out here, baby? Let's go, come on, come on, baby. Yeah, I want to see that clamp. Good. There it is. Good, good, Mike. Oh, good. Oh man, that just made me smile, man. Oh, I love that. Don't back up. Good, good jam. Gotta squeeze it, snug, get in here tight. Balls on the ground, we're scooping them. Keep it PG. Good, Nick. No. What are we doing, guys? Here we go, baby, bring it in. Let's go. After we finish the practice, we'll make sure we always shake a hand. All right, well, I don't want this team to turn into his blue shirts and white shirts..

Ralph hay pioneer award Kenny Washington Woody strode Jameis Bill Willis Marion Motley football NFL Cleveland Browns Los Angeles Rams Chris olave saints Lamar Jackson rams Jameis Winston Michael Thomas Laura Brooklyn Dodgers Aaron Rodgers Jackie Robinson
"kenny washington" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

02:12 min | 8 months ago

"kenny washington" Discussed on KOMO

"The home stand off the right way The Mariners won't lose a game tonight nor will they win It's breaking the baseball home stand which did not start well losing two or three to struggling Oakland so Seattle is now last in the division and they have first place Houston coming to town Friday night The Cincinnati reds today racked up their highest run total in 23 years They had 20 hits in a 20 to 5 thrashing of the cubbies And the four men who smashed the race barrier in professional football in 1946 have been selected to share the pro football Hall of Fame's Ralph hay pioneer award They can't in Ohio based organization announced that Kenny Washington woody strode and Hall of Famers Bill Willis and Marion Motley will be celebrated in August Sports with swords at ten of 40 after the hour northwest news radio An actor who had a major role in one of the greatest baseball movies has died He'll Schwartz remembers the man who played shoeless Joe Born in Newark New Jersey in 1954 Raymond Alan leota abandoned an orphanage and adopted by a local couple Fittingly leota would become a central figure in a sports movie with a powerful message about family It's definitely about a father and son relationship And they don't make many movies like that for guys and it's really emotional It really is A lot of guys would cry when they saw that And I've had a lot of people come up to me and say you know because of that movie they play with their kids more You know that time goes and you're busy working and before you know it you know time's up and the cradle That's Ray Liotta during a 2009 interview with American Film Institute Talking about his portrayal of a talented but infamous baseball player from the early 1900s What a story it'll make Shoeless chill Jackson comes to Iowa Joe Jackson was part of the 1919 black Sox scandal several ball players from the Chicago White Sox conspired to fix the World Series Build it and he will come as the famous line based on WP kinsella's novel shoeless Joe The 1989 film field of dreams start Kevin Costner as an Iowa farmer who builds a baseball park in the middle of a cornfield attracting the ghosts of baseball legends Break.

Ralph hay pioneer award Kenny Washington woody strode Bill Willis Marion Motley baseball Joe Born Raymond Alan leota leota football Cincinnati reds Mariners Oakland Seattle Houston Schwartz Newark Ohio New Jersey Shoeless chill Jackson
"kenny washington" Discussed on The Showtime Podcast with Lakers Legend Coop

The Showtime Podcast with Lakers Legend Coop

05:39 min | 9 months ago

"kenny washington" Discussed on The Showtime Podcast with Lakers Legend Coop

"Teacher. Came out of the classroom and he had been like I said. And I only knew him as a teacher and the guy who kept our stats. And he stopped me in the hall and said, you know, have you decided where you're going to go to school? I said, no, not yet. You know, Michigan is supposed to be sending a jet for me to fly there and I've got these offers other places been to Kansas and he said, well, Johnny wouldn't is a friend of mine. But little did I know that he was coach wooden's first assists assistant at my high school back in the 40s. And he knew more basketball wouldn't later told me that wooden knew at that particular time. In fact, he's in our Indiana Hall of Fame as a basketball coach. He never talked about any of that. He was such an unassuming man. Very much like coach wouldn't. And so he was the one, the first first told me about UCLA. And you can appreciate this, man. And Ari. Area code is three one two. That's Chicago. That's right. You know what I'm getting ready to talk about. I came out to UCLA in March. Mid March snow still on the ground, right? And so I got a stocking hat on. Overcoat. And I get off of that plane coupe and that heat hit me. And I said, this is where I'm going. There was no nothing on campus. It was spring break, no parties, no girls, no under the table money. Nothing, man. And so would laid out the plans for Pauly. And he was very impressed because he didn't, he didn't say when you come here, you know, your sophomore year, you'll be starting. He didn't make any promises just that you're good at a great education. And it's a great institution. And so he laid out the plans to Pauly. But when I went back home and I saw my high school coach and he said, how did it go? I said, yeah, it was pretty good. It was pretty good. You know, I met a guy who played on the national championship team, his name was Kenny Washington. He took me around and I met coach, he was very impressive in the laid out the plans. But for some reason, if coach wouldn't and UCLA, if they don't want me, there's USC, there's Cal state. There's no, you stay on the west side. I wanted to get it where that heat will expand. And he said, you know, if you don't play with Johnny wooden, you're not going to go to UCLA. And it worked out. Wow, you know what? That was one of the fantastic things about it because you know what? I get jealous of UCLA players back then because I remember watching you guys on TV all the time, but obviously being in Westwood, playing for one of the greatest, greatest basketball minds. The one thing that I always was impressed by coach wooden, I never, ever saw him yell at you guys. I mean, am I wrong or right or did he yell at you in practice? But you know, he got on us, he got honest, you know, his way was his favorite saying if he got upset, was gracious sakes alive, right? Matt, now we know in the heat of battle, you may say, good gracious. Yeah. Whatever, but you know what that really means..

UCLA Indiana Hall of Fame basketball Pauly Kenny Washington Ari Johnny Kansas Michigan Johnny wooden Chicago USC Matt
"kenny washington" Discussed on WGBB Sports Talk New York

WGBB Sports Talk New York

04:06 min | 1 year ago

"kenny washington" Discussed on WGBB Sports Talk New York

"But strode strode acted with. John wayne He he was a favorite of director. John ford now. John ford When he passed away woody strode like took care of him and was a companion for him for for many many months when when ford was was was dying interesting. Yeah another piece information from bob. Claver and shawn johnson's book. The forgotten i As i said folks the book it parallels jackie robinson's story As an iconic piece of sports history but it really brings out the facts that are not known. And i guarantee you you guys out there and do not know the these players who broke the color barrier in the nfl. And i believe it's time definitely to to learn about these people and to to study it and to know it as as we know all the other records in sports This book there's a tremendous job of that. Thank you yeah great. Great job bob and Keyshawn how is it working with him. He's a media guy now. Yeah yeah. He's like keyshawn knows You could very savvy guy and he saw this as a meaningful project and extremely involved in it and with the concept with the layout with the you know the the execution of it and it was. It was great. He you know if you need to run stuff passed him and you know in any form he he was always there and we. I found it to be a really great partnership. And hopefully you know he. He's he's passionate about it because you know he is a little that he didn't know about these players when he was growing up two of them were were from his town and he you know and we're talking that first conversation. I said keyshawn played. a zero. zero tie can washington walks off field to a hero's exit sustain field. You walked off and ninety five and a year later. You're the number one overall pick and that's exactly fifty years after the color barrier was broken in pro football and that was really impactful for him and you know it got him fired up and then once we kind of learned about you know just how how owners just did not want black players in the nfl. For for many years until it was basically forced upon them and they ultimately relented and then the beginning of you know important. Reintegration occurs in overtime black players. Get a fair chance to the point. Now where you know. Football is looked at. Like if you can play the if you're the best player regardless of your race you're gonna play and you're gonna get the job and that's the way it should be. It should be it's not this month of democracy but it's a meritocracy. That's that's what it should be. You know you right. You earn the job based on the merits of your play. And that's generally what it is in all sports but especially in football. He should probably just said. Give me the damn book. Right bob. And then man. Yeah i missed him when he left the jets but he went to my second favorite team. He won the super bowl down there. So keyshawn holds a special place for me. Well bob it's been a pleasure. Thanks for taking time out of your sunday night to graciously be with us in short notice the book again folks the forgotten. I kenny washington. Woody strode marion. Motley bill willis and the breaking of the nfl color barrier. Where can folks pick it up. Bob get an at your.

keyshawn John ford woody strode Claver Keyshawn bob shawn johnson John wayne jackie robinson nfl ford football washington Football jets super bowl kenny washington Woody strode marion Motley bill willis
"kenny washington" Discussed on WGBB Sports Talk New York

WGBB Sports Talk New York

03:48 min | 1 year ago

"kenny washington" Discussed on WGBB Sports Talk New York

"It you realize it's going to end in zero zero tight. Takes washing off feel with less than a minute to go. And all of a sudden the crowd just stands and hollers and screams and gives. Kenny washington this phenomenal ovation which woody strode described as like the the. The pope came out of the vatican. It was just so emotional and powerful and it just kind of points to the fact that this guy was the most dominant player in college football that year and He had this phenomenal career that that ended with this game And any any walked off to cheers from both usc and ucla fans and it was incredible. And then we contrast that with that same day in milwaukee is the nfl draft and under different circumstances. Can you washington is like almost a no brainer. As the number one overall pick if black people were allowed in the nfl he'd have been a number one overall pick in that draft but they had a twenty two round over two hundred players drafted. And His name was not called Nor was the name of any other black player in the country and it was a fitting contrast to kind of really point out. Just how How unwanted black players were in the national football league eating today most of the stars in in in the modern. Nfl or at least half most are are black players but back then they were not allowed and not wanted and it took until nineteen forty six That first year. When kenny wash didn't sign with the rams to to reintegrate football and that was for good and then a year later. Jackie robinson integrates major league baseball. And even that story is connected to kenny. Washington because Branch rickey who signed jackie robinson to the dodgers a year after kenny washington. I played Wanted to integrate pro baseball and he saw how this is. Where marion motley in duluth come in. He saw how molly willis played and played tough And there were no problems in the games that they played and brush. Ricky was from ohio and he saw that and he realized you know what. I think we can do this baseball. And it really gave him a lot of motivation to go ahead and signed. Jackie robinson So so so these stories are all interconnected and it's a fascinating time and by the time that was largely forgotten As far as the football players are concerned. Very true. Bob and speaking to bob lauber tonight. from newsday about his new project with keyshawn johnson. You can you can find it on amazon. It's it's called the forgotten. I about breaking the color barrier in the nfl. And nobody knows. Bob that Branch rickey was influenced at all by by the play of those guys by the appearance of them in the nfl. that's not included in any story. And that's what the book depicts. Yeah there was We came across A tidbit that. I found fascinating. Certainly keyshawn did is that mary. Motley carried a letter with him Basically till the day he died in his wallet and it was from branch. Rickey and ricky wrote to him and basically spelled out how Impressed he was by the by watching mary. And molly and how much it influenced him..

Kenny washington woody strode nfl Jackie robinson football kenny wash baseball Branch rickey marion motley molly willis vatican ucla usc milwaukee bob lauber rams washington dodgers kenny duluth
"kenny washington" Discussed on WGBB Sports Talk New York

WGBB Sports Talk New York

04:08 min | 1 year ago

"kenny washington" Discussed on WGBB Sports Talk New York

"And that was also the same year that woody strode played with him with the rams and then marry motley and bill willis signed with the cleveland browns. It was a different league but the browns ended up in the nfl. A couple years later. So i'm like you know my professional job is to cover football and i don't know this stuff so i've got to believe that a lot of people don't and kishan i talk for literally two minutes about this He asked for some information about it. He grew up in los angeles played high school ball. No more than ten miles from kenny washington and what he strove where they played in high school and realized that he he wanted to know about this and so we we said hey. Let's let's let's do this. What are you saying he said. Let's let's do it and we dove right in interesting now. How did you come upon. The four guys. Just mentioned their names to the folks and how you decided to use all for those. Because you know kenny. Washington was the first african american to britain to break the color barrier. If you will in pro football and then woody strode played that season in los angeles. So those were the only two black players in that first year of You know in nineteen forty six and then. It was the same year that mary motley. And bill will assign with the cleveland browns of the all american football conference so it was basically revolving around those four and that first season but also looking at their lives in in their entirety and also Kind of including more modern stuff about how their struggles. are sort of mirrored in in today's nfl at a different level And it just going into things that are related to today's game to kind of bring it forward because there are many many threads from their time back in nineteen forty six that that literally carry through to today and we think that you know we kinda found a way to Point that out and bring to light. You know how those things carry forward to literally. Today's game right The book folks it really depicts the challenges that these guys had to overcome like. Jackie robinson did to help impact The future generations of nfl ball players and they really changed the league forever and it just so happens that this year marks the seventy fifth anniversary of that first season that the guys were run the league and it's just a fitting reminder of how far as bob mentioned the nfl has come in creating Diverse world and one of the most diverse landscapes in. Sports is is in the nfl. And what i'd like you to do now bob. Is this a story in the book about the nothing. nothing game. People may not have heard of this is. It's it's interesting. It was ucla versus southern cal. And i believe it was at the I can't think of it now. L. got sick. Yeah he's looking for that. Now fill the folks in a little bit on that game and and how it featured tenny washington. Well believe it or not. We started out the book with a snippet from that game and really the the sort of like a game story from that game. Nineteen thirty nine and usc is already established as college. Football powerhouse dominates the southern california landscape and ucla is always the you know the week second Sibling and they always play. Second fiddle to usc but this particular year Jackie robinson joined the us the ucla team along with kenny washington and woody strode and so we started out with that. Nineteen thirty nine matchup. It's the final game of the season and a rose bowl. Berth is on the line so essentially a chance to win the national championship. And a hundred..

woody strode browns bill willis nfl kenny washington kishan football mary motley los angeles motley rams kenny Jackie robinson britain Washington bob ucla tenny washington bill
"kenny washington" Discussed on WGBB Sports Talk New York

WGBB Sports Talk New York

03:40 min | 1 year ago

"kenny washington" Discussed on WGBB Sports Talk New York

"You'll find so much information that you'll you'll really enjoy. Give it a look then give us give us a like Also twitter we use twitter a lot where out there. It's wgn sports talk and you can also follow me on twitter at b. donahue wg bb. And if you miss a show don't worry because they're all archived out on the website and you can listen to them at your leisure. Well i guess. Is the nfl columnist for newsday covering the nfl. Since one thousand nine hundred five. He was selected for the two thousand twenty one career achievement award by the professional football writers of america for long distinguished service to pro football through coverage. He has a new book out written with the great keyshawn johnson. It's called the forgotten. I kenny washington what he strode. Mar marion motley. Bill willis and the breaking of the nfl color barrier. It's great to welcome to the show. Tonight bob glauber. Bob good evening. Hey good evening. Thank you for having me no worries. Glad to have you aboard. Bob now i just want to ask you. What was the road you traveled. That leads the newsday. Give us a little story on on how you got there. Well i started My newspaper career at beginning at westchester papers back believe it or not in the late nineteen seventies out rating in part time and then covering high school sports and then i got a chance to start covering football in. Nineteen eighty-five covered the giants and the great bill. Parcells and lt and phil simms teams and then in eighty nine went to newsday. Nice okay. great little path that you follow their. Yeah you're you're certainly got there and you're doing what you love and that's important now. How did you in keyshawn get together for this project. Who developed the concept really. Well i i was thinking about the concept and i went to keyshawn about a little less than a year and a half ago. Now i've known keyshawn his entire career With you know starting with the jets Met him even before he was drafted. You know he's got along with him and always found to be very compelling Figure to write about but in the last couple of years. I'd been thinking about this and you know i'm a journalist so i'm naturally curious about a lot of stuff and I just felt that you know the. Nfl is a very diverse Sport as far as its players and even in my time covering the league since eighty five. It's gotten more diverse. And i'm like like like how do you what if i go further back you know. What about the time. You know the thinking about baseball kojak. Everyone knows. Jackie robinson's first african americans spray color ray baseball and i'm thinking well who who is it in football and why don't i know it right so i'm literally in the giants locker room. One day googling First african american football player a nfl player and it goes back to. It's his kenny washington. Now he wasn't he he wasn't the first black player to play in the nfl. It was You know there. There were a few black players back in the twenties. When leaks started in including paul robeson right the opera singer and And i of course who's now in the hall of fame but found out that there was a ban on black players twelve years from eighteen. Thirty four to forty five and then kenny. Washington was the first to sign basically to reintegrate the nfl in forty six..

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"kenny washington" Discussed on The Stephen A. Smith Show

The Stephen A. Smith Show

06:21 min | 1 year ago

"kenny washington" Discussed on The Stephen A. Smith Show

"More keyshawn will in max next. We gotta get into the football but jay. I wanted to ask during the sportscenter anchorman. And it's not in the script. I'm like san diego what i said. What j. what do you think about rex retirement. Well i'm happy for my brother. First and foremost to his two sons being a father as a priority to them. I know us potentially way and to try to see that situation. I could work out with the nets brooklyn to come back home to new york. But look man god known for dwight. Howard era in orlando lob. City in the clippers may be one of the best seventy sixers team. They've had a long time. And he finishes his career and top twenty in three pointers made in three point shooting percentage. I think the by in the body of work speak for itself. I'm glad to see him go out on his terms. Major hit rock bottom of the know at some point in time you stop chasing it. And he's made the decision to stop chasing. I don't know if i believe a. Jj seems like a nice guy. I've run into once or twice. Seems like a nice guy. He'll stay ready. He'll say he's in this area. And you gotta team in brooklyn. That could be making a finals run. Someone gets hurt. They need some shooting he he ought to retire until you retire. Yeah especially if you have a skill that travels well they ages. Well yeah keyshawn. J. amax is presented by progressive insurance Key today's a big day for you. Thank you your new book has launched today with. Tell us about it. The forgotten i man. It's a A book talking about kenny washington. Woody stroll mir marlee bill willis. It's breaking the color barrier right so There was once upon a time. Here's the book it's on sale. You can grab it many copies. So wonderful read makes a nice gift for the holidays coming all those things but it it talks about the reintegration of four black men into the national football league and for a period time twelve year period of time from nineteen thirty six to wanna say four thirty four to forty six. The we were not allowed to play in the national football league. Right wasn't happening. The rams came from cleveland remember. Were cleveland have before they became the la rams anaheim ram saint. Louis roused back to la is so kenny. Washington was a backfield mate of jackie. Robinson the baseball player at ucla. They were like the greatest thing going. King washington was the first african american all american at ucla and think about this. He was all everything j. He never got drafted eating drafting. He signed as a free agent to the los angeles. Rams that moved from cleveland and the reason may signing is because of the politics so you know how stadiums subsidized by the government of state local officials. Iraq's money money to hold deal a lot of them do so in los angeles politicians alone with a a writer from black newspaper. Went to the rams and said hey in order for you to be able to use the stadium. You've got to get a black person on the team. And so the rams made the decision to do it and they signed him and then eventually the cleveland. Eventually cleveland browns. They signed two black players but it was a long period of time. It's crazy because there's things that preston marsha who own the washington redskins at the time now in the washington football team he would take his team away from and go down south to play games just so he didn't have to deal with black players. It was it was wasn't a lot is known like our national pastime. Used to be baseball so a lot is known about the history of race relations in baseball. Jackie robinson nine hundred forty seven very celebrated but our national pastime now football yes and that history in football is much less well-known key. Hold it up. It's called the forgotten. I and this is the kind of stuff that as football increasingly the people get it in their heads. This is our national pastime. Its history and that includes the history of the most important issue in the history of this country which is race. Because it's this country's original sin is very important. I think that's important book. Just hold it up again. Let's just show it extremely important. I i hope to be able to educate people in history about what's going on in this book because growing up in our communities in our schools we were only taught about jesse owens rosa parks martin luther. Jackie robinson robinson. That was pretty much. It lee these four. If it wasn't for these four then. I probably would never had an opportunity to play in the national football league. That's just the reality of it and it's just one of those deals where you i get like when we're doing the research i was kid mad. 'cause you know i wear my emotions on my sleeve to get teed off man because when you learn stuff it's like what ki- asked me why i never saw schindler's list. I can't sit there. And i too angry. Shocking thing that you found out throughout your research the the most shocking thing was was it shocking because four players Two players Mary molly bill willis were on the browns team and they travelled. They had traveled to like miami now. I didn't realize miami was obviously back. Then that was considered like the deep deep deep. So so it's not anymore right. It's just miami in the players didn't travel because they were getting death threats. If you come here. We're going in so the owner hit letters and didn't travel. He didn't tell them into the end of the year why he didn't traveled him into me and i was just crazy. Just think back then. People really wanted to take somebody's life because he was black and played on the damn football team. This is wow this the ever..

keyshawn rams nets brooklyn Howard era cleveland national football league football J. amax kenny washington Woody stroll bill willis King washington government of state local ucla sixers baseball clippers preston marsha rex dwight
"kenny washington" Discussed on Mornings with Keyshawn, Jorge & LZ

Mornings with Keyshawn, Jorge & LZ

06:21 min | 1 year ago

"kenny washington" Discussed on Mornings with Keyshawn, Jorge & LZ

"More keyshawn j. Will max next. We gotta get into the football but jay. I wanted to ask during the sportscenter anchorman. And it's not in the script. I'm like san diego what i said. What j. what do you think about rex retirement. Well i'm happy for my brother. First and foremost to his two sons being a father as a priority to them. I know us potentially way and to try to see that situation. I could work out with the nets brooklyn to come back home to new york. But look man god known for dwight. Howard era in orlando lob. City in the clippers may be one of the best seventy sixers team. They've had a long time. And he finishes his career and top twenty in three pointers made in three point shooting percentage. I think the by in the body of work speak for itself. I'm glad to see him go out on his terms. Major hit rock bottom of the know at some point in time you stop chasing it. And he's made the decision to stop chasing it. I don't know if i believe a. Jj seems like a nice guy. I've run into once or twice. Seems like a nice guy. He'll stay ready. He'll say he's in this area. And you gotta team in brooklyn. That could be making a finals run. Someone gets hurt. They need some shooting. He i you ought retire until you retire. Yeah especially if you have a skill that travels well. They age as well. Yeah keyshawn j. Amax is presented by progressive insurance Key today's a big day for you. Thank you your new book has launched today with. Tell us about it. The forgotten i man. It's a A book talking about kenny washington. Woody stroll mir marlee bill willis. It's breaking the color barrier right so There was once upon a time. Here's the book it's on sale. You can grab it many copies. So wonderful read makes a nice gift for the holidays coming out all those things but it it talks about the reintegration of four black men into the national football league and for a period time twelve year period of time from nineteen. Thirty six to wanna say four thirty four to forty six. The we were not allowed to play in the national football league right. It just wasn't happening. The rams came from cleveland remember. Were cleveland have before they became the la rams anaheim ram saint. Louis roused back to la is so kenny. Washington was a backfield mate of jackie. Robinson the baseball player at ucla. They were like the greatest thing going. King washington was the first african american all american at ucla and think about this. He was all everything j. He never got drafted eating drafting. He signed as a free agent to the los angeles. Rams that moved from cleveland and the reason may signing is because of the politics so you know how stadiums subsidized by the government of state. Local officials hacks. Money money to hold deal. A lot of them do so in los angeles politicians alone with a writer from black newspaper. Went to the rams and said hey in order for you to be able to use the stadium. You've got to get a black person on the team. And so the rams made the decision to do it and they sign him and then eventually the cleveland. Eventually cleveland browns. They signed two black players but it was a long period of time. It's crazy because there's things that preston marsha who owned the washington redskins at the time now in the washington football team he would take his team away from and go down south to play games just so he didn't have to deal with black players. It was it was wasn't a lot is known like our national pastime. Used to be baseball so a lot is known about the history of race relations in baseball. Jackie robinson nine hundred forty seven very celebrated but our national pastime now football yes and that history in football is much less well-known key. Hold it up. It's called the forgotten. I and this is the kind of stuff that as football increasingly the people get it in their heads. This is our national pastime. Its history and that includes the history of the most important issue in the history of this country which is race. Because it's this country's original sin is very important. I think that's important book. Just hold it up again. Let's just show it extremely important. I i hope to be able to educate people in history about what's going on in this book because growing up in our communities in our schools we were only taught about jesse owens rosa parks martin luther. Jackie robinson robinson. That was pretty much. It lee these four. If it wasn't for these four then. I probably would never had an opportunity to play in the national football league. That's just the reality of it and it's just one of those deals where you get like when we're doing the research. I was kid mad. Because you know i wear my emotions on my sleeve to get teed off man because when you learn stuff it's like what ki- asked me why i never saw schindler's list. I can't sit there. And i too angry. Shocking thing that you found out throughout your research the the most shocking thing was was it shocking because four players Two players Mary molly bill willis were on the browns team and they travelled. They had traveled to like miami now. I didn't realize miami was obviously back. Then that was considered like the deep deep deep. So so it's not anymore right. It's just miami in the players didn't travel because they were getting death threats. If you come here we're gonna you know in so the owner hit letters and didn't travel. He didn't tell them into the end of the year. Why he didn't travel him in to me. And i was just crazy to just think back then. People really wanted to take somebody's life because he was black and played on the damn football team. This is wow this the ever..

keyshawn j rams nets brooklyn Howard era cleveland national football league football Amax kenny washington Woody stroll bill willis King washington government of state ucla sixers baseball clippers preston marsha rex dwight
"kenny washington" Discussed on Mornings with Keyshawn, Jorge & LZ

Mornings with Keyshawn, Jorge & LZ

03:59 min | 1 year ago

"kenny washington" Discussed on Mornings with Keyshawn, Jorge & LZ

"Hard stories that are uncomfortable to discuss but need to be. But there's also gotta be also some good stories there as well. It is their favourite for you. Well you know not really a favorite. But i just found that You know. I think you'll you'll kind of fall in love with these guys when you read about him And by that. I mean you know. You'll fall in love with their stories. And you know washington. Very shy guy self Self deprecating guy. You know what he strode turn. He had an amazing life. He was can you washington's best friend at ucla and he ended up becoming cfl champion for undefeated season a pro wrestler and then an actor who worked for fifty years. And what he what. He strode the woody from toy story. Right the series. That tom hanks stars. And that's he's named after what he strode. As as you know kind of an ode to woody strode you know the we learn about paul brown in his role. Poprad was the branch rickey of football and nobody knows and nobody kind of gives him credit for it because he did it quietly with mary. Motley and bill wilson cleveland. But he did it. And you know the thing that also we we kind of try to do here. And we do is tigers to the present and quiche mentioned george preston marshall while it was only a year ago when the statue of george preston marshall outside. Rfk stadium was removed on june eighteenth and it was very purposeful. There is no mention of george preston marshall anymore with the washington football team so things that happened currently kind of trace back to the way it was back. In the day you know for twelve seasons. Nfl the nfl did not have a black player in the league from nineteen thirty four to nineteen forty five and it was. It was a a damaging thing on the nfl's history so the present tense. Another example of that we talked to the owners from the four teams that who's grandfather's own the teams and still owned teams in the nfl. Ano- participated in that exclusion of black players in the in the thirties and forties George mccaskey of the chicago bears. You know he has. He has gone through this very very carefully and look back and his grandfather. George challenges has role in. Potentially the you know the the ban on black players john mara michael bidwill of the cardinals and the rooney family of the steelers. And it's interesting that all four of those families are among the most progressive owners in the nfl as far as pro promoting diversity so there's a lot of layers to it a lot of levels to it and it connects with today and that's the the cool part of this and the interesting part of it. You know history is very real key. You're history major at usc. Though this is this is this is in your wheelhouse. And i'll never forget talking to keyshawn. Keith you play five miles from from you know where we're kenny washington in stroke play in high school and he's like man and i could feel it in the that. Okay this is this. This is right and and this is gonna work and you can hear you can certainly hear the passion from both of you on this. It's a very important story and certainly a book. I'm looking forward to reading the forgotten. I out in september bob. Glover keyshawn johnson bob. You know it's always great to catch up with you all the best. And congratulations again on the bill. Nunn award as well congrats. Thank you very thanks man. Thanks guys appreciate vago. Newsagent on the goodyear hotlines.

george preston marshall nfl Poprad washington Rfk stadium paul brown cfl tom hanks bill wilson George mccaskey football ucla Motley john mara michael bidwill woody cleveland mary chicago bears keyshawn kenny washington
"kenny washington" Discussed on Mornings with Keyshawn, Jorge & LZ

Mornings with Keyshawn, Jorge & LZ

08:53 min | 1 year ago

"kenny washington" Discussed on Mornings with Keyshawn, Jorge & LZ

"All guests. Join us on the goodyear hotline. So key i'm gonna let you. I know i'm supposed to be doing this. They running this stuff but you have you have a project that is on. Its way out right now. You and somebody that i consider a mentor of mine. And bob glauber who is longtime. Nfl columnist at newsday in new york. Who just was named by the way the bill nunn junior award winner for this year which is a reporter who has made a long and distinguished contributions to football and that is a perfect way to describe off glauber who joins us right now in the goodyear hotline or germs spreading either. Good morning baath. Good to see it. Maureen costello keyshawn morning violent doing good. So let's. Let's discuss a collaboration between you bob and key in what is called the forgotten. I and it's it's some. it's going to be a fascinating book. I have have it bob. I admit i did not get a chance. You have to start at you. Know why because the minute i saw this is this is a lot of reading. Education is a lottery eating. But it's definitely going to be a fascinating story so key again. Why don't you begin by talking about what's what is this book about. And why are you so passionate about well one. It's about four. African american football players that were brought to the national football league in nineteen forty. Six two of them went to ucla and kinney washington in so kinney in in motley. Were roommate not roommates. But teammates of jackie robinson at ucla. And so when you look at it project was first brought to me. I said back and it took me all of about. I don't know twenty minutes of understanding and thinking about it and said to myself. Oh man we can ready to do this. I'm i'm all in on this one for sure. No question about it and especially given the fact that things that we've gone through over the last several years as a country in a society that has to do with largely minorities. This was something that was right up my my wheelhouse. I mean i was like all in and it had also do football in in. Bob was attached to the project. And so when i thought about it having known bob from my new york jet days in knowing that he was a terrific writer and things of that nature i said. What other person would i want to collaborate with on such a project in so not. Only that is is close to home. It's an understanding in an educational vehicle for those that have a lack of education of high minorities were somewhat integrated into the national football league or even even pushed out of the national football league way long time ago when you were first born alan package so i'm a year older than you by the way about you've written you've written many books now. They're all behind you in the shot. Please read but what. What is it about this story though. Compelled you so much to want to be part of it. Well you know. I've been thinking about this for quite a while. And i just find that i was actually staying in the giants locker room. One day. we stand around as you know on you know. Kill a lot of time. And i'm taking you know who is the first african american football player in nfl history. And everyone knows jackie. Robinson is the first african-american baseball player. And i didn't know the answer to that googled it. It's this kenny. Washington who played a year before jackie robinson played for the brooklyn dodgers. And then i just kind kinda got into it and got into it and keyshawn tonight. He sean says he took twenty minutes to decide on. It was more like ninety seconds. We had a conversation and we just kind of connected on that immediately and it was Nobody really knows about these. Four players and I thought it was important and keyshawn thought it was important to kind of brain to light the history of what that's all about. Everyone knows the story of jackie robinson and nobody knows the story of integration in the nfl. It's not perhaps because it's not really a pretty story the whole way. There were a lot lot of things. Went into a lot of Controversy at the time a lot of difficulty for these four men. So it's you know kenny. Washington what he strode. Bill willis and mary molly. Now motley and willis played for the cleveland browns of then the all america football conference but you know they became. Nfl players with paul brown. It's a fascinating story and keyshawn. You know we we just connected on it immediately and let me just throw this little trivia out so keyshawn was drafted first overall in nineteen ninety-six twenty five years ago. That was fifty years to the season after Motley and willis and strode and washington played pro football fifty years now. Washington was probably the best college player in football in one thousand nine hundred thirty nine. The best he was the first all america. Ucla and he did not get drafted. No black layers got drafted in night for the nineteen forty draft so when kishan discussed that it was like you know he didn't realize it. He didn't know that he had played. You know five miles from where. Kenny washington he start at. Ucla and i think it went from there and it was. It was immediate keeshonden. I have known each other. What is it now twenty five years. K nineteen ninety four six. I would say yeah ninety six. Yeah on the serpine. The certain line boat ride before the draft in nineteen ninety-six. And this brash get from. La's regaling the media. I'm like wow. This is going to be fun. And so when you you know when you think about it though allen i want you know when you when someone asks me the in goal of of why i wanna put my self in this position with. This book is to be able to educate so many people across the world not just sports fans but in general. Because like bob said is you go back to nineteen thirty nine and the best player in college football here. We are right now at twenty twenty two basically in the draft of being twenty twenty two. Can you imagine the best player in college football today. Not being drafted we. Yeah and that's how. I looked at it way back when it's like that doesn't make a whole lot of sense but also where the world was at in general mailing mates now to us now but back then i'm like okay. Well it makes sense and then you you look at what has transpired over the years how the nfl has somewhat figure certain things out still a long ways to go but they have figured some things out in terms of diversity in minorities and different people in different genders and sports and being accepted and all those sorts of things so it was like this. This makes all the sense in the world. I want be able to have this. This book become an educational tool in universities. High schools elementary. So it's history. It's history that's never been told before and when you think about it. That's important when you go back to george preston marshall who was the owner of the washington football team formerly wash the risk is it was an races but people don't really unless you really know you don't know And we shared a lot of light on that in. Give a whole backstory. How he came took the team from boston to washington and then carried his expedition. I think it was nine. It was probably about eight or nine. Preseason games that he played in the south because that's where he wanted to do things the keep the blacks from playing so he would go down to the south and play these games knowing that it would be hostile for blacks even be able to join his team. All of those sort of little interest parts of history that we don't even know about. Yeah and it's a history of of course some times where you just have to talk about us. No doubt about it. The book again the forgotten i bob up newsday. In a collaboration with keyshawn johnson book will be out in september bob. What's your story like. This is obviously going to have a lot of hard history..

keyshawn football nfl jackie robinson Ucla bob glauber bob glauber Maureen costello keyshawn kinney washington goodyear Bill willis mary molly new york kenny kinney Washington motley willis kishan
"kenny washington" Discussed on Consider This from NPR

Consider This from NPR

08:15 min | 1 year ago

"kenny washington" Discussed on Consider This from NPR

"And president of the international olympic committee. He had carlos and smith removed from the olympic village and then suspended from the. Us olympic team smith and carlos were told to leave the olympic village and mexico within forty eight hours. Were both stunned that the decision but retain their composure. The sociologist harry edwards. I wrote about these issues. More than fifty years ago in his nineteen sixty eight book. The revolt of the black athlete. There was never any intention of blacks being involved in the games. One thousand nine hundred four a racial olympics and saint louis where they brought in african tribesmen and put them on a track alongside trained white athletes to demonstrate black inferiority and why they should not be allowed to participate in the olympic games. He says when you combine the pressure to perform with the expectation that black people will just be silent and grateful to be included. It creates layers of pressure on black olympians that can be almost impossible to bear. They became the focus of not just athletic performance and excellence but also of all of the aspirations of black people in this country and as well as many of the fears of mainstream white society about black excellence That's a lot of weight On the shoulders of people who in many instances are just barely young adults and somehow they have to navigate that quite fear of lack performance black expectations of high black performance while at the same time focusing on their principal goal which is athletic achievement. I spoke to edwards about how the struggles of black athletes at the olympics. Tie into the larger arc of the black experience in america. Well the reality. Is that all of these efforts. At protests and so forth involving athletes have always been framed up by the broader struggles in the society the double the effort victory over racism abroad and victory over racism at home which was carried into world. War two was framed up by abject segregation segregation framed. Up the struggles. Of jesse owens joe louis and jack johnson and paul robeson in that whole first wave of athlete activists the civil rights movement framed up the second wave of athlete activism with jackie robinson. And larry doby in baseball. And kenny washington and woody strode in football and of course the black power movement at the end of the civil rights movement framed up the actions of smith and carlos and author ash Who took it into national in terms of his concerns over south african apartheid and its role in perpetuating racism at international level. So there's a direct connection between perceived legitimacy of athlete activism and the extent to which they are interpreted through and embedded in the broader struggles for freedom and justice and equality in american society. That has always been the case you've written about how essential it is for black athletes specifically to have the right to protest at the olympics roof fifty. The olympic charter has been relaxed a bit this year but the ioc still says no kind of demonstration or political religious or racial propaganda is permitted in any olympic sites venues or other areas. Explain why you think it is so important for black athletes especially to be able to protest. Well first of all. Let me say that the i. o. C. is hypocritical in that the ioc allowed nazi salutes. On the podium. Behind jesse owens in nineteen thirty six. They most certainly tolerated south africa and southern rhodesia and the olympic movement up until we threaten the barkat with africa naser black african nations over their participation They have gone for a generations without a black person in their organization. All of that is political. I think that if you are going to how politics and the games then it has to be universal. And so i think they have a right to express themselves given the fact that the games have always been political says never say anything about the united states and the soviet union in the nineteen fifties and sixties counting metals and turning athletes into frontline troops in global titanic. Ideological struggle over. Who system is greatest. Ioc never said anything about that. They love curated in it because it brought money in it captured sponsors and attention so i think athletes have a right to speak out and to speak up especially if it's in a dignified fashion such as carlos and smith such as when perry And some of these other athletes who have spoken up so valiantly and so do you think the inconsistent way that israel has been implemented over the decades underscores. The idea perpetuates the idea that black athletes should be grateful just to be included. Oh absolutely the black athletes were never intended to be included in the olympic games. They cooper time porn. Afaq was a pro colonist. He instituted the modern olympics. In order to reinvigorate french youth to recapture empire of for france. and of course he was adamant and vociferous supporter of nazi germany. So much so that. He negotiated with hitler to make germany. The permanent home of the olympic games. And hitler was intended to do that by creating a four hundred thousand seat stadium and a massive educational museum complex which cooper. Tom was going to deposit all the historical papers and documents associated with the reestablishment of the modern olympics. There's a long history of the. I'll see not only tolerating but promoting a discrimination and disrespect for black athletes and we have not moved beyond that face. The i o. C. is a nineteenth century organization that manage to survive the twentieth century and has come into the twenty first century with many of those same perspectives biases and lack of understanding of the circumstances of diverse populations around the world. So we've seen this pattern for decades where countries like the us put black athletes on a pedestal in venues like the olympics and then those athletes are treated as second class citizens. When they come home. What do you think needs to happen for that to change. It really comes down to the same old issue. The notion that athletic performance somehow generates legitimacy even for black athletes. And sports is a myth. While jesse owens was was running being cheered in berlin behind his four gold medals. The german government were sterilizing. Afro german children who was born as a consequence of the french troops from colonial nations who were placed in germany in the wake of world war one and many of those troops stayed in germany. Married had children. Those shows were being sterilized in nazi germany during the olympic games. When a jesse owens was getting all this applause so it's not an issue of performing your way into legitimacy. It's not an issue of showing that you're a great athlete. Tennis player basketball player track and field athlete football player and so forth. Because that doesn't deal with the problem. All of these massive demonstrations over the years are cycled back again with the new and latest atrocity. Committed against black people are against brown people because those demonstrations are in support of those communities. They are demonstrations of empathy in terms of the pain. And the problem. I will be impressed when there are just as massive demonstrations just as an jetty just as determined and outspoken about the problems in the white community that create that pain that create those issues in communities of color so as long as we continue to organize massive demonstrations and protests and proposed legislation to deal with the pain rather than focusing on the source of that pain in terms of the problems.

Ioc olympics carlos olympic jesse owens smith harry edwards olympic games larry doby kenny washington woody strode naser black african nations us saint louis paul robeson joe louis jackie robinson jack johnson germany Afaq
"kenny washington" Discussed on Band It About - Podcast Series

Band It About - Podcast Series

07:49 min | 1 year ago

"kenny washington" Discussed on Band It About - Podcast Series

"Is the most recent recordings of a made with with the That's available online or the gig. Come see us yes. Every tuesday not been played. So if you're a fan of jazz getting there and have listened and spa the album. Do you have a memorable story. Good or bad that you'd like to share ben memorable gig. My favorite gigs lasting plights last not banned. Smoking will applying sem. Hugh study. did last night with us. He's at wonderful adelaide guitarist and from allied to move to the. Us spending your your for the last several years way in. Nobody's giving back as so many quite musicians foot a big town for a little while a good place to bake you can play it. It is really good players around at the mine and so he's doing the next couple of weeks us insight legitimate member. We gigs zoe's last time. Because it's suicide great to be playing that probably one. That does come to mom it. Just because i had such an it was made such an impression on me. The fish thomas sold on right browns Light brown wonderful bison it was mine and the trio was my. It was my hero as five. Trae is concerned when i started getting into jazz seriously because it just might be great. That illegal alien sort of is to listen to the going to jazz was the oscar. Peterson trio right ram. That's the music that spiked me early. On just because it might be fewer side legisla plying along with it. Love rise by salons in fact. When i first album ahead of compata- some was was the With who benefits from brown of course his drums and aric About halfway through the album before reload says no drumming at the justice. Got such a strong feel it's And so that is that was. My odi. Had a swing music playing along with. Is liz albums and then got into the white bram tray with various combinations of that that great but so when i came to adelaide on his own Janis with them. Benny green on the piano. And kenny washington on drums and i played at the show. The outline how talent and kim's trae. I was asked to do the support it so we wound up those basically court. We will decide for them and it was such a thing. I should have been terrified of his olympic. Taros more excited Could have spent so much fun and then go to make the gods hang with the gods in washington flying on the saw just and it was fantastic By lowering town to the hang out with them draw miranda and look at look at the adelaide sought so that was memorable experienced it for show excellent. What about while year. I've new york. Can you think of anything that happened over head. Stay with you forever. Single the gun. See my favorite is probably the band. That sort of a bunch of towns and one of the most memorable Advance australia stunts. Hot billy higgins my my five at trump sai guessing him like a number of tones was just always watching belly. Just the same scene in here had been play live that the joy that he had the penny ice three his not. Just the museum and you can hear it on the albums but when you eat to see him in san live it just this is whole face. His whole vibe is just joy and passionate love of jazz music in swing it's just it's infectious Yes i watching it and getting the breaks arrive about music. And that's probably that would be updated with some of the base. Gigs off saying doll. Bunch of them and you did workshops while you're out of it took a bunch. Listen so flood. One one lessons thank people. And for companies did the stanford jesuit shops had school pat so helping out a appliance with the on. Somboon a this deal for a couple years time for plywood playoff pal sort of backing some of the the grapes. I get get to do it for nothing in combination. Saw did that fantastic's getting that was put on i Tom lewis was nash. Was with them co wonderful peanuts moga miller lite motorola one of the most awesome Pies and george was out the pin associated that you changed moody. A bunch of is to to that a couple years ago funston. Is there a band that you wish you had had an opportunity to play with them. God like a guy that can taunt and be a fly on the wall or or just hang in there in radio van goghs. Gdi can watch some of the greatest jazz albums of all time. just watch them unfold. The bank would have been awesome. To think of anyone that i would have loved to play with hamas. That's not a sign. Many people and call guy back to cut in tom in sitting on any other. Watch the jazz in the early jazz. Sort of emerging emergence of what bain fanta or actually in. I'm fascinated by old. Any sort of the transitions of one form of music to an either several years Underground minute The records but certainly in that period way. It's an swing music in all sort of emerging the underground then sort of becoming more popular. The sinus beckenham early rock and roll pre pre rock umbrella much as early artists. I'm the rich nail. Elvis coming out of who of course in the country Thing into the blues and rock watching all of the the transitions of music and go back in the heart of an what's happening now. I mean saipa. Striving toward the scientific branches was sort of moving off of now. But it's a it's never stand still. It's always evolving music.

kenny washington new york Janis Elvis Tom lewis adelaide Hugh last night Peterson stanford one first album kim five tom zoe Single olympic miranda trump
"kenny washington" Discussed on Band It About - Podcast Series

Band It About - Podcast Series

07:50 min | 1 year ago

"kenny washington" Discussed on Band It About - Podcast Series

"The time because it's such a a healthy environment to to cultivate could musicians into Hashing around physicians like minded people died. I'm looking for a change to play him jam when about music living in fear. Essentially you're immersed in music for those years doing that at the degray supplied with a lot of on samba. A in the during the the music costs at the com. And then i p- Are member of the fund quote episode. I think it was still in hospital. Just finished hoskin on suck been taking lessons of lowery for a couple of years than in. Who was playing with a band a big band code. Hush brass farming with nine correctly. That i had Because bold anacle note the note down mice go remember. Remember clearly Right code and said was ryo laureate. Modern was playing with could make an audience on well and could not do excited and it was sought rated foaming and but on you had to rate a few dot spotting and new new bit about big band music Ballistic to prolong tom. And so that. That was my first hiking Talk me down there and hoping me like the thompson never done that. Before in yeah types. That was the first time and then through through the uni three during the course you little things come up here and there high with a bunch of gaza at time. The finace tim bone on the base start planning team and ken computing and pianist and three unique. We would be played each other's some exams so we to let applying together and then we finished the con- the outfit together and did a lot of flying over the next sort of five to seven days a week for the for the noughties muster. That will the first first half of the noughties. We were playing a lot of us with various outputs around town. And you say plight assays with that long to you at some stunts. Not we come up done of might a few trips. Overseas went spent almost a year away about ten months away when i finished the condo. Time spent some tom the sky in the states to new york down. Some of my five applies tongue and which we had to do by rotting lettuce and finding them that we didn't have the topic. Be heading to nip. He didn't tom sorta jump on people up. Email to email or anything that was cody noughties and the first top pipe with auburn took some lessons kenny. Kenny washington which one of steelers one of my great One of my favorite pies most was lewis. Nash wonderful drama allen's another one up and smith house listening to allow him back in a time with him and what a training. What a training ground in cops watch from the gospel ply Which was the greatest training. And you can have a jazz musician other than being on the bandstand of course implying. Yeah definitely so. What was your first major gig. Then ben koos might well them with a first fist. Pike gig was that technical know to bet. I'm yeah four. But magical i early. Early residents say that we that we had the bank with kim in team or giants. Cry and i was tempest by some people. Mock remember that if they're a vintage And that was a barring the eastern developing rondo straight. We had a residency. They met seven years. It was a great run. Actually it's only being passed on by l. residency at the gilbert. Straight high to apply with them The advantage mellon poll watt. So we implying the fool. I don us choose. Not so tempus was at sydney's eleven pm to two. I m every fraud and so we used to do the honey pot grow on. What is now that. Tell straight up. Notice code now swings kopech than so we did and we did that at the same amount of tom. We did that from six to ten sixteen to eighteen being with a with a singer john. Laurie did that for some us. And six seventy six to ten Cure up and the rice down to the east end We from eleven to two. That was every fraud and opera saving news. Hey christianity was fantastic. We had a lot of gaza done gaza angles would come in from the and three town. That wanted somebody meeting spot. Mom to for musicians in our fund fund is excellent. Write music tea banh now. You've done coding. various paperless. Well did you talk about that. Been sure little bit of stuff with kim was the beauty stuff. We did a few albums with him and one who triage that was an independent biosafety. Their independent was let swing another one. We did with the with dive. Mcevoy tim bone in the great bulb. Jeffries on on tennessee. Sex and the boston area Katherine lambert Great vocalist catherine abbots. Signed on either was spun. The change clark on bice in kim on piano muscle from catherine. That was those standards I'm pretty sure. And then there was another one did when she shed a small pine a bill. Murray movie called lost in translation. She craton album with the title. Track lesson translation and some other stuff.

Katherine lambert Kenny washington seven years new york catherine abbots eleven pm Jeffries Laurie five eleven two john Murray One kenny first time first boston sixteen tennessee
"kenny washington" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

04:08 min | 2 years ago

"kenny washington" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"Okay, so you enjoyed the Super Bowl because you know it was display of sport and it was More patriotic than football has been all season long. Well, The New York Times unlike any of that stuff, so every every time there's a Super Bowl, and the Super Bowl is not sufficiently woke, people get super ticked off. Ken Belson has a long piece of The New York Times about the evils of the Super Bowl is the NFL likes to project power and precision sideline catches are scrutinized with zoom lenses. First downs are measured in inches. Air Force jets fly over stadiums just as the Star Spangled Banner reaches its peak. When it comes to topics like race, health and safety, the league's certainty dissolves into a series of mixed messages. That was the case on Sunday at the Super Bowl. The NFL's crowning game typically watched by about 100 million viewers in the United States. Championship game provides the legal massive platform each year to promote itself is America's corporate do gooder with the best interests of its enormous fan base at heart that was harder to do this year. On Sunday, the NFL trumpeted its support for the fight against social injustice. The national anthem was performed by two musicians, one black and one white. The poet Amanda Gorman, wowed the country with her recitation of President Biden's inauguration reading Ode to three honorary captains. It was fine. I was like, Okay. The TV announcer spoke often of the work that the league and players have done to battle racial inequities. Yet moments later, says The New York Times When the Kansas City Chiefs took the field, the NFL played a recording in the reduced capacity Stadium of the Made up War cry that is a team custom. Promise got fans to swing their arms in a Tomahawk chop and act many fine, disrespectful and perpetuation of racist stereotypes of the nation's first people. Wow. I mean, just the brutality of the NFL. Brutal. Plus no one mentioned Colin. Captain. It was I mean, frankly, I have to admit Like Matt Walsh. I was appalled that no one mentioned Colin Cabinet because yes, Tom Brady. Cemented his status as the greatest quarterback ever play football, but He was the second greatest quarterback to ever play football because we all know that the true greatest is the person who has been denied a slot in the NFL for years after backing up the immoral Blaine Gabbert in San Francisco, Colin Kaepernick, we needed more. Colin Kaepernick talk. We needed more of that. I mean, after all, Mariah Carey did Tweet out Happy Colin Kaepernick Appreciation Day. There is no talks is The New York Times of the league's abysmal record hiring people of color as head coaches and general managers or even his television cameras showed that she's successful offensive coordinator Eric Benet Me who is black and been unable to land a head coaching position, multiple hiring cycles. Before the game is CBS Sports showed a segment that featured Viola Davis saluting Kenny Washington, a black player who in 1946 re integrated the NFL, which had known official color barrier for 13 years, But there was no discussion of a lawsuit brought by two former NFL players who accused the league of rigging the concussion settlement. I mean, probably that's what they should have led with that The Super Bowl. You know, as a piece of marketing probably should have led with also were secret racist. I will say the NFL did its best to buy into woke nonsense to the NFL ran a commercial. After the end of the after the end of the Super Bowl, in which it just basically poured out. A bunch of woke slogans said showed one of the referees, one of the female referees wearing a hat that said end racism. That hat, by the way, did end racism. In the history books will go down that in 2021 racism was ended by the hat of an NFL referee. So lots of racism being ended right here. Here's the NFL ad promising to end they promised they're going to spend $250 million to and systemic racism. $150 million and systemic racism. It was an amazing contribution by the NFL. In fact, I think the NFL has contributed Hundreds of millions of dollars to quote unquote ending systemic racism, Considering a huge percentage of the league's players are black, and people in the league are being paid exorbitant amount of money far above the average American that seems like that's a good way to end systemic racism. Nonetheless, here is the NFL pledging to do more because corporate woken this is now a thing, gang. To feel the promise of one nation to be part of the solution. Be part of the change. Try harder. Show up, dive in and say it. Okay, wait. Wow. Amazing. Maybe maybe I'll tell you what is true in this and they've got people kneeling. And while the season is over.

Matt Walsh Ken Belson Amanda Gorman Viola Davis Kenny Washington Colin Kaepernick Blaine Gabbert Tom Brady Colin Mariah Carey United States Eric Benet Me $250 million San Francisco $150 million Super Bowl 2021 13 years Sunday 1946
Historically Black Colleges' Contributions to the NFL with Dr. Derrick E. White

In Black America

06:27 min | 3 years ago

Historically Black Colleges' Contributions to the NFL with Dr. Derrick E. White

"On this week's program historically black colleges and universities and the NFL with Doctor Derrick white in black America in their celebration of the hundred year. It was not as historical as we would like right. I think the for better for worse college football who celebrate the One hundred fiftieth year and in conjunction with ESPN primarily. Done these series of documentaries. That kind of documenting the game so they did a great set of talking about the early game when the Ivy Leagues Dominated College Football. Right you get that kind of Astaldi. Nfl is not so much right. In their part of Wigan's law says that the integration the reintegration of the. Nfl in part is done. Because you know teams WanNa move to the West Coast Right. They WanNa play in Los Angeles And that the black community the La said no in particular forced the L. A. Don's to say if you WANNA come in you. GotTa you gotTa desegregate Your Team. So woody strode gets an opportunity to play and Kenny Washington gets a chance to try out for these teams and they make these teams in the NFL so we were talking about the kind of reintegration of of professional football as the National Football League celebrated. Its first one hundred seasons unbeknownst to many sports fans the NFL didn't have any African American players for decade from Nineteen thirty four to nineteen forty-six. There was an unspoken agreement between owners to ban African American players today. They are two African American general managers for minority head coaches and one chief operating officer for the first time the crew for sue both fifty four had a record number of minority officials of the seven on the field five for African Americans the contribution of historical black colleges and universities. Acc use to the NFL has changed the game forever undrafted by an NFL team. Paul tank younger was the first African American player from grambling State University to play in the NFL when he signed with the Los Angeles Rams in nineteen forty nine the first African American drafted in the NFL draft was jaws rooks. I running back out of Morgan state in the Eleventh Round. One hundred and twenty fifth overall by the Green Bay packers in nineteen fifty one doing super bowl fifty four week in south Florida Group of area high school athletes had an opportunity to learn about the rich history of black college football and his contributions to the NFL and Black America spoke with doctor. Derrick wide associate professor at the University of Kentucky. When I was teaching a class on sports history I found that the students knew nothing about historically black college role. They were as part of their assignment. They had researched The histories of sports history at various institutions and students had cookman in Florida. And I knew that those are really successful. Athletic programs and students came back with nothing. And so I've you know I just thought chalked up. Initially students being students that they just didn't do enough but when we both begin system. I realized there was a huge gap in the scholarship. And there's a Lotta work on sports. History is a lot of work on college sports especially college football but there was very little nearly nothing on historically black colleges And so at the time I was at Florida Atlantic in so I was like Bam. You is like right up the road. Well you know eight hours away from my house but I and I knew Jay. Gator was dominant. I'd heard these stories from my uncles and I knew he was a fantastic program so I did a research trip and I went up there and they have the archivists there. And the the library's at up in Florida were amazing and they gave me these materials in there. All these letters documents and so I had budgets and letters of professional teams and I begin to understand how he organized his football program because the issue is discussed our Pamela Day. That there wasn't a lot of research money. A lot of research recruiting money not money budgets. Within Coach Gate. There was the ad coach basketball at one point. And those things. I thought those kinds of stories and that the greatness that the success that he was able to produce was Willie Gallimore Kim. Rowley Bob Hayes. I wanted to understand how that was done. I didn't WANNA chalk it up to that. These were just natural athletes that there was something being done happening on these institutions in some coaches Were better than others and so I wanted to tell that story talk about. Integration Immigration had a positive effect but it also had a devastating effect on also African Americans going to the NFL right so an integration was boom for professional football. Right then you know one of the reasons that Jake was so able to be so successful especially early on in the forties and early fifties that many of his former players gather degrees and became teachers in the high schools. All across the State of Florida and North Georgia. And so he would. They would just send him letters. Like hey coach gay. Got This really. Good kid this Willie Gallimore guys pretty good right. Like this is how he got recruiting information was from his former players but those players were talented but there was no professional football opportunities and so when those opportunities really begin to open up a specially after nineteen sixty when the AFL comes in then professional football now creates a new opportunity for black colleges in small colleges in general and so that becomes this boom and on the backside that the course the civil rights movement is happening at this exact same time right so brown. V Board of Education. This is entire push to desegregate schools Whether the high school level colleges etc and so so many ways why colleges Kinda caught between their own. Their success right. They're producing these great players in the NFL. Minium all pros as we talked about earlier. Thirty two or in the NFL Hall of fame at the same time. There are new opportunities at Florida. Miami or Georgia and that these schools especially in the deep south are slowly trying to recruit them when you look back at the history of ACC using his contribution to to the NFL. I found it amazing and the one hundred year the League. There's very little that has been articulated about a SPEC- US or the early African American players and they and their celebration of the hundredth year. It was not as historical as we would like right. I think the you know for better for Worse College Football who celebrated his Hundred Fiftieth Year and in conjunction with ESPN primarily. Done these series of documentaries that kind of documenting the game so they did a great set of documentaries talking about the early game when the Ivy League dominated college football. Right you get that kind of Nfl is not so much

National Football League Football Florida Ivy Leagues Dominated College Derrick White Espn Astaldi Los Angeles Willie Gallimore Kim Ivy League Woody Strode America United States Rowley Bob Hayes League Willie Gallimore ACC Green Bay Packers