15 Burst results for "Kenneth Shropshire"

"kenneth shropshire" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

05:41 min | 6 months ago

"kenneth shropshire" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

"In addition to that new collective bargaining agreement, there's something else of note in the baseball world today. For the first time, the team from Cleveland is playing under the name guardians. In the wake of the murder of George Floyd, Cleveland decided to change its name. It retired the team's Native American name and mascot, which were pretty racist. Last year, the year prior in 2020, Washington D.C.'s NFL team did the same with its name, which was a racial slur against Native Americans. Now that team is called the commanders. As marketplaces Savannah Maher reports, economic pressures played a role in turning the corner in a long campaign. We've had strong evidence since the early 2000s that Indian mascots are harmful, says Ariane Eason, a Professor of psychology at UC Berkeley. More than two decades of research shows that the use of native mascots decreases indigenous youth self esteem, community worth, and what they hope they can accomplish in the future. Easton's work finds that these mascots also promote racist stereotypes of native people. As aggressive or savage or primitive, which makes sports fans feel comfortable dressing up in red face or hurling racist slurs at opposing teams. The American psychological association called for the retirement of these mascots in 2005, but it took 15 years and a different incentive for some proteins to make the change. Well, you know what, I think we can say conclusively in the end, it's money. Kenneth shropshire is CEO of the global sports institute at Arizona state university. In the wake of George Floyd's murder, he says there was a national push to retire racist branding, and that put a spotlight on the Washington football team. And that motivated a couple of key sponsors FedEx and Nike to say, you got to change the name. And they did, rather than lose sponsorship deals, crystal echo hawk is a citizen of the pawnee nation of Oklahoma and director of illuminative, which focuses on media portrayals of native people. She says Black Lives Matter helped advance this issue. The ground had already been made fertile, right? And had been sort of sewed until the over decades and decades of native blood organizing. She hopes the same combination of social and economic pressure can topple mascots that remain. Well, it's opening day for the Atlanta Braves. And we have teams like the braves. We have teams like the Chicago Blackhawks and nearly 2000 K through 12 schools across the country, still use Indian mascots, according to the National Congress of American Indians..

George Floyd Washington D.C. Savannah Maher Cleveland Ariane Eason UC Berkeley Kenneth shropshire global sports institute baseball NFL Easton American psychological associa Arizona state university FedEx Nike football Washington Oklahoma Atlanta Braves Chicago Blackhawks
"kenneth shropshire" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

04:31 min | 8 months ago

"kenneth shropshire" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

"When all the counting is done more than a 100 million people likely tuned into the Super Bowl last night, and there was plenty to take in, the hip hop nostalgia fest that was the halftime show. Eminem taking a knee that weird Uber eats ad. Oh, in the football, sorry, Cincinnati. Now that the season is over, the biggest story in professional football is a federal lawsuit against the NFL, alleging a pattern of discrimination against black coaches. Marketplaces Andy Euler reports. 70% of NFL players are black. But only 16% of the league's general managers are, and just 6% of its head coaches. What we're seeing in NFL is the equivalent of if we had 80% to 90% of the coaches in the National Hockey League being African American. That's kind of shropshire. He runs the global sport institute at Arizona state university, and he wrote the book in black and white, race and sports in America. People have known for a long time that minorities have a steep hill to climb to get ahead in NFL management. It's according to Jason belser. He's an attorney in coach's agent. We have always known that until somebody stepped up with a smoking gun. And he said, hey, I have actual proof that the system is rigged against me. Nothing was going to change. Former Miami Dolphins head coach Brian Flores thinks he has that proof. Flores got a text from his former boss, Bill Belichick. Congratulating him on getting the job as the New York Giants new head coach. But Flores interview wasn't for another three days. Turns out Belichick thought he was texting Brian dabel, who is white and ended up getting the job. Flores told CNN that he went ahead with the interview anyway, but wondered whether there was any point. You know, is this real? Am I wasting my time? The NFL has known for a while that it's teams don't hire enough minority coaches. The league tried to fix the problem in 2003 with the Rooney rule. That's named after the late Dan Rooney, who owned the Pittsburgh Steelers and was the chairman of the NFL's diversity committee. The rule says any team seeking a head coach has to interview at least one non white candidate. Nelly drew is a Professor of sports law at the university of buffalo. She says, the league's numbers speak for themselves. The Rooney rule is well intentioned as it might have been, apparently, is not working. And that's a problem. In the lawsuit, Flores claims that Rooney rule interviews are a sham, just teams checking boxes. Kenneth shropshire and Arizona state says by filing suit, Flores is taking a huge risk. You have somebody who's in the prime of his career that steps up and says, this is what's going on. I am going to probably sacrifice my career to try to move the needle forward on this issue of not hiring black men in the National Football League as head coaches. Shropshire says the problem starts at the top. There is one black team president in the league. Only two of the 32 franchises are owned by people of color. Zero of them are black. In the lawsuit Flores suggests the NFL seek black investors to become potential NFL team owners. Maureen Weston, a sports law professor at pepperdine says every organization can benefit from more diverse ownership. The ability to invest in an inclusive community reflective of fans of reflective of the players. It's just way too long that we've just accepted that this is the way things are. The NFL says, Florida's lawsuit is without merit. Over the next few months, the league will likely file a motion to dismiss the suit or go to arbitration, says Mike McCann. He's a law professor at the university of New Hampshire. But if the judge doesn't grant either request at that point it really becomes a threat to the NFL, because then we go into pretrial discovery, where records have to be turned over emails, texts, owners, general managers might have to testify under oath, at least in sworn, testimony, McCann says, at that point, the NFL might decide to settle out of court. In.

NFL Flores Andy Euler global sport institute Jason belser Brian Flores Rooney Brian dabel football National Hockey League Nelly drew Eminem university of buffalo Arizona state university Super Bowl
"kenneth shropshire" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

TIME's Top Stories

06:15 min | 1 year ago

"kenneth shropshire" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

"Yours, you need a card built for business. The NFL will survive John Gruden's bigotry, but it must force change by Sean Gregory. The NFL has a nightmare on its hands, thanks to bigoted missives from one of its most prominent former coaches. It started on Friday when The Wall Street Journal reported that then Las Vegas Raiders coach Gruden sent an email to former Washington football team president Bruce Allen that included a racist trope about NFL Players Association executive director, demari Smith. Gruden apologized, insisted he wasn't racist, and coached the Las Vegas Raiders to a 29 loss against the Chicago Bears on Sunday. He may have even held on to his job until Monday's revelation from The New York Times that an emails to Alan and in some cases other business executives between 2011 and early 2018, Gruden wasn't ESPN commentator during this time before he took over the Raiders prior to the 2018 season, Gruden also used homophobic and misogynistic language. The times reported that he called NFL commissioner Roger Goodell, a homophobic slur and announced female referees a gay player 2014 St. Louis rams draft pick Michael Sam, and players who called attention to social inequalities during the national anthem. Gruden resigned Monday night. It's bad for the image of the game, says Harry Edwards, and there it is Professor of sociology of the University of California Berkeley, and a former consultant for the San Francisco forty-niners. But will the Gruden scandal threaten the core business of the NFL, which is still the richest major sports league in the U.S.? That outcome seems unlikely. Throughout history, sports have suffered through embarrassing incidents of public bigotry, but continued to expand their reach and revenues. Las Vegas Dodgers, general manager Al campus, and an infamous 1987 nightline interview questioned the qualifications of black people to hold jobs as managers and front office executives. He was fired two days later. In 1988, CBS football analyst Jimmy the Greek Snyder lost his job after making cringe worthy racist remarks about black athletes. In 2011, Kobe Bryant was fined $100,000 for directing an anti gay slur at a referee. In 2014, Los Angeles Clippers owner Donald Sterling was called on tape going off on a racist diatribe. NBA commissioner Adam silver banned him from the league for life. Former Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer bought the clippers for $2 billion. Over the past decade, the NFL has confronted various crises, like revelations about the effects of head trauma, that mishandling of the ray rice domestic violence investigation and the Rao over Colin Kaepernick's activism. In 2010, the NFL generated some 8 and a half $1 billion in revenue, by 2019, revenue nearly doubled to $16 billion before a pandemic related drop to $12 billion in 2020. After Kaepernick's demonstrations during the anthem, all sides dug in. There was a fraction of fans who swore off football because they felt Kaepernick was being unfairly blackballed. Another fraction offended by the protests from Kaepernick and other players also claimed to be done watching the NFL. But in March this year, the NFL signed a $113 billion rights deal with media partners through 2033. People loved the game so much, says Kenneth shropshire, CEO of the global sports institute at Arizona state university. It continues to flourish. Gruden's emails, however, do pose some business risk for the NFL, especially with a third subsection of NFL fans whom Edwards calls that massive group in the middle. These fans says Edwards are simply wondering what the hell is going on. They are saying, wow, how widespread is this? Some of them go to games, some of them don't. Most of them watch games. How should I respond to it as a responsible, humane considerate individual? Edwards who played a pivotal role organizing the iconic black power salute at the 1968 Olympics, does not believe Gruden's bigotry alone will turn off these fans and significant numbers, further revelations, however might. If you have a succession of these exposes, then you're going to begin to lose some of that big middle group, says Edwards. It could be catastrophic for the league. We're still pretty far from that point, and Lieberman director of policy and programs at LGBTQI plus advocacy organization athlete ally doesn't see boycotts as productive. We have to understand what is realistic, says Lieberman. What can we do to get the outcome that we want? Which is true systemic change within an organization. Lieberman hopes to see more inclusivity training and education for coaches. Maybe some good can rise from this mass around 60% of NFL players are black, but there are only three black NFL coaches. Gruden has crudely reminded America about the NFL's race problems. According to the NFL's 2020 racial and gender report card from the institute of diversity and ethics in sport at the university of Central Florida, teams receive failing grades for their hiring of women as team presidents and senior administrators. Perhaps owners and executives will be more cognizant of these issues when they make hiring decisions. This could be a tipping point in this whole equation because of this moment, says shropshire. Let me do the things that illustrate that I am thinking about this new society that we're in. One where John Gruden no longer has a place in the NFL. Meet Lucy Bella, owner of fancy flowers, business was slow until Lucy received an email. Wedding date, February 14th, flowers, only red roses. Valentine's Day, the most expensive day for red roses, so she used her American Express business card, which gives her the ability to pay over time with interest, so she could buy those red roses now. Talk about love and bloom, built for business by American Express..

Gruden NFL Las Vegas Raiders Kaepernick John Gruden Sean Gregory Players Association demari Smith Michael Sam Harry Edwards University of California Berke San Francisco forty Las Vegas Dodgers Al campus football Jimmy the Greek Snyder Bruce Allen clippers Adam silver
"kenneth shropshire" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

TIME's Top Stories

05:57 min | 1 year ago

"kenneth shropshire" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

"In july when he called the company's design of the latest kyri eight signature shoes trash on social media irving subsequently walked those comments back irving one of the most dazzling players on the globe who every game seems to pull off some basketball magic trick. Heretofore never seen as to this point hesitated to receive a covert nineteen vaccination a position that has caused everyone from kareem abdul-jabbar new york city mayor. Bill de blasio and spain's prime minister to oppose his stance under new york. City law irving cannot compete in brooklyn home games or practice at the teams facility without at least one dose of a cove in nineteen vaccine while irving has not publicly confirmed he's unvaccinated. He participated in nets media day. Remotely on september twenty seventh and did not practice with the team in brooklyn on tuesday. Due to the city's vaccination protocols nike irving's biggest sponsor plans to release the kyri eights in november sales would benefit if he were actually playing full-time the company not to mention. The nba has nets teammates and fans won't serving to receive a vaccine. Some ninety five percent of nba players are already vaccinated. Time reached out to nike for comment on the irving situation. Nike chose to stay mum on the matter. We're living in an age. When consumers demand that companies take stands on important issues nike itself for example through its full support behind colin kaepernick after his social justice protests effectively got him fired from the nfl. Supporting vaccines and public. Health would seem like a worthy cause for the company not to mention in its own self interest. If irving gets sick his performance could suffer if he spreads the disease is reputation could take a serious hit so by staying. Silent on irving is nike being hypocritical or just carrying out a smart business strategy that protects company that generated forty four and a half billion dollars in revenues in its most recent fiscal year. It's probably some combination of both just this week. Nike announced that all. Us office based employees will need to be vaccinated. The company plans on calling. Its workers back to offices on january tenth. So while irving may not technically be a nike employees. The company's position could be interpreted as a double standard if nike and other sponsors believed that vaccines are important and everyone should get them. They should say the same about their athletes says ricardo fort former vp of global sports and entertainment partnerships at coca cola. Who now has his own consulting firm. I don't see a reason for having two different approaches from a strategic perspective however nike has good reason to stay on the sidelines. First off irving may soon receive his shot. The nets first game in brooklyn as on october twenty fourth and only needs a first vaccination shot to be eligible to play so irving has some time to decide whether he's willing to miss games and while some consumers may be upset about kyri stance. They're not taking it out on nike. At least not yet. So the company has little incentive to inject itself into the vaccine wars. Look their business is built on selling sneakers and apparel says scott rosner a sports consultant and academic director at columbia university's sports management program. There's a social justice component of what they do but that's not what drives their business and their growth while the numbers would indicate that most consumers disagree with irving stance sixty two percent of americans have received at least one vaccine dose and fifty. Six percent are fully vaccinated. That might not really matter. From nike's perspective athletes do have freedom of choice says rosner and at the end of the day. The bottom line is still the bottom line. Kyrie irving sells a significant number of sneakers for nike. That kind of thing at least for the time being allows them to take more of a hands off approach if irving ultimately decides to sit out his home games nike may have to craft some sort of response but the timing of his decision on the heels of the release of his latest nike shoe would likely prove more harmful to business than any kind of mass backlash brand shaming and virtue signaling by advocacy groups of all types have become so commonplace as to have lost part of their power and influence says david carter founder of the sports business group and adjunct professor at the university of southern california's marshall school of business. Remember when nike threw its weight behind nick. Loud calls for nike boycotts followed instead sales. Rose we can disagree with irving's misunderstanding of science says rosner but does that make it rise to the level of boycott where there's going to be a mass boycott against kyrie's i don't think so irving is a complicated character. He's done plenty of good like committing one and a half million dollars to supplement the income of wnba players who chose to sit out there twenty twenty season due to cove in nineteen concerns or to work on social justice issues but he has also shared flat earth. Theories and last season broke nba safety protocols by attending a family. Birthday party mask less now. On the eve of the nba's seventy fifth season. He's created a vaccine controversy. It's a bad spot. Says longtime sports business. Professor kenneth shropshire who leads arizona state's global sports institute. It's hard for nike to lay low. But i think that's the best thing they can do while hoping he just gets that jab. Meet walter wellman. The owner woman's autoparts. Everything was fine until his calibration system took a turn for the worse critical failure failure.

nike irving kareem abdul brooklyn nba Bill de blasio ricardo fort colin kaepernick scott rosner basketball new york city spain rosner coca cola nfl new york
"kenneth shropshire" Discussed on The Indicator from Planet Money

The Indicator from Planet Money

08:13 min | 1 year ago

"kenneth shropshire" Discussed on The Indicator from Planet Money

"N. p. r. this the indicator from planet money. I'm stacey vanik smith. The olympics is wrapping up this weekend and this has been a strange olympics. Nobody in the stands kovin spreading through the olympic village protests in tokyo while. I'm in my tiny tiny hotel room which I can't even stretch my arms out to yoga in the hallway. It's only a few steps away. it's It's very very tiny. Our own mandalay. Del barco has been reporting on the olympics for npr from tokyo. It's been very interesting and strange and kind of humbling to be here as a journalist as well. There's not a lot of us here kind of a lonely olympics. I should say mandalit says these olympics have also been marked by all these protests a lot of them over the cost of this olympic games which is one of the most expensive olympics on record. I know cost a lot to put these Olympic games on and the some of the venues were or the venues were paid for by tax dollars here in japan largely so i think there was a lot of feelings about that but here tokyo is in the majority cities that host the olympics. Almost always lose money on it. So why did they do it today. On the show we take a look at the costs and benefits of hosting the olympics. Right after the break this message comes from. Npr sponsor fund rise making investing in private real estate as easy as investing in stocks bonds or mutual funds build a more diversified portfolio today at fundraise f. u. n. d. r. i s. e. dot com slash indicator. This message comes from npr sponsor capital one capital one auto navigator can help you find a car get prequalified instantly and see your real monthly payment without impacting your credit score capital one. What's in your wallet. Terms and conditions apply more at capital. One dot com slash auto navigator. We're joined by kenneth shropshire. Ceo of global sport institute at arizona state university and victor matheson professor of economics at college holy cross in massachusetts. So victor let's start with you. How much did the summer games cost. The olympics in tokyo were hugely problematic from an economic standpoint way before kovin hit so they originally had a price tag of seven point. Three billion dollars. That's a lot of money just to start with. But those numbers had risen to fifteen and a half billion dollars officially and over twenty five billion dollars. Unofficially by december twenty nineteen so before a single person in japan ever got sick from cova. Did we already had an olympic games that we were looking at a twenty five billion dollar price tag and there's just simply no way that the money amount of money generate from the olympics can possibly cover those sort of classes. Okay kenneth. i'm gonna throw this question to you. Which is i think the question that always comes into my head about the olympics. Why does anyone want to host the olympics. This is extenuating circumstances but it seems like almost every single city that's ever the olympics has lost money sometimes. There are like political issues that happen. I mean why does anyone want to host the olympics. Chroma sofas devil's advocate. I love it. Devil's advocate but it is the or of that brings to your community. It's what it brings to your city. You are mexico city in nineteen sixty eight. And you want the world to know that. Latin america's a place to go to your tokyo and sixty four where maybe it made more cincinnati does today and you wanna know twenty years after world war two. This is a city. This is a country that part of the global community. If you're los angeles in eighty four. We're not just hollywood. Were part of the pacific rim. So it's so it's big issues like that and it's infra cities who are the ones had been on this. It is like building infrastructure. It's like building roads and highways and parks. And the like but this is this is not a mutual fund where there's a return on investment and victor. What is your take on this issue. I mean from what i understand. It's very rare for cities to be able to make money on the olympics. I think one of the few was los angeles in nineteen eighty-four right so first of all los angeles was just a very remarkable and unique situation. And what had happened. There is that los angeles was left as the only bidder. Back in one thousand nine hundred four for the games and when you're the only bidder of course you can dictate the terms of the bid to the i o c. Rather than the other way around and so they said. Hey we'd we'd love to host the games but we're not building new facilities you can use the rose bowl you can use the coliseum. These facilities that even then we're already over fifty years old and when you do that you can really keep those costs down. A worth of the info four olympics in my youth. I ran the sport of boxing initially sponsorship in licey. yes. I did sponsors licensing. I am forced gulf so. La was that unique situation. Ironically there was one city that was still bidding theron and that was during the hostage crisis so wisely there was the decision. Well we will include them in this conversation and so la have this tremendous leverage. Is there a kind of kenneth mentioned. Is they're kind of like a softer sort of pay off. I mean is there like a payoff in like maybe not right away but in like visibility for your city long-term tourism on the answer for that is yes and that's of course what we call the legacy effect right and you can have a couple of kinds of legacy here number. One part of this is actually real infrastructure. You you make your roads better and you build your airport. Expansions and and both greece in rio have expanded subway systems. Thanks to the olympics. And then there's that lasting there's that intangible thing about becoming a major league city right or putting you're sitting on the map but even there requires a very unique situation. I think the best two examples of this. We have our barcelona which was kind of in the shadow of madrid and lesser known as a tourist destination it was about tenth or twelfth in in europe in tourist destination before the early nineteen ninety s After the olympics it's jumped into the top five and tourism in europe and so there's a good example Salt lake city also following the olympics. Ski visits to utah. Significantly outpace ski visits to colorado. So there's some legacy effect that you're getting out of these things. Are you guys going to be watching the olympics. I'm a big fan. I have devolved away a little bit. I was caught up old enough. Where the medal. Count things a big deal and we get more this. This media presentation the athlete back story than we had in the past. And you got so many options of ways to watch the good or bad thing now is you can almost watch every event if you want to as opposed to just wait and see what. Abc would share with you on a given day again. Some of these great powerful moments that you get from sport. That again is worth something. But the question is whether it's worth twenty five billion dollars. This episode of the indicator was by julia. Richie engineer huxtable. It was fact checked by michael Our editor is kate coyne cannon and the indicator is a production of npr and the results are in so on friday. We had a little contest. Family feud style on indicators of the week and had alone jacob goldstein. Mary childs and robert smith and me. We all competed to see who would win. the prize. for indicator of the results are in. Check him out on our twitter feed at the indicator or on instagram at planet money..

olympics tokyo Npr stacey vanik smith Del barco mandalit kenneth shropshire global sport institute victor matheson college holy cross olympic games los angeles japan Olympic games kenneth arizona state university
"kenneth shropshire" Discussed on Now For Tomorrow with Deepak Chopra

Now For Tomorrow with Deepak Chopra

01:32 min | 1 year ago

"kenneth shropshire" Discussed on Now For Tomorrow with Deepak Chopra

"Reported by me. Then baskin our senior producer. Is kate mcauliffe. Iggy monda is production assistant with production support from meghan. Coil endeavour manzi tommy zarian from pr x productions. Is our engineer. Editorial support from michael. Garoppolo and jessica pup avec are executive producers. Are gotham chopra. A meath soccer in an atom schloss men special. Thanks to alex. Bernard alexander wolf. Chris evans dennis page jeff. Roth jeff smith justin cups keith. Kreider kenneth shropshire mandy murphy. Michelle young finn barnes. Rick calendar stephen stillie. Tom austin and tony. Giovinazzo lost in sports production of religion of sports. Npr if you like the show please leave us a review in click follow. And if you have your own sports mysteries you want me to solve. Leave me a voicemail at nine one. Four eight nine three two eight seven. Oh or e. Mail me at lost in sports at religion of sports dot com. This is yours truly. You're just listening. To the details of absolute infancy throws will tell you the next gen shot. Make sure it's over and that actual opponent and there's nothing but the bottom of the net. See you don't wanna be tonight..

Iggy monda Tom austin michael meghan tony Giovinazzo alex tonight Garoppolo Chris evans dennis Rick calendar justin Roth jeff smith manzi tommy zarian nine three Kreider kenneth shropshire jessica pup avec Four seven
"kenneth shropshire" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:59 min | 2 years ago

"kenneth shropshire" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I'm sorry, Ben. Ashore in for David Brancaccio. A wave of athlete protests against the police shooting of Jacob Blake in Kenosha, Wisconsin, has gained momentum. Blake, a black man was shot in the back by police seven times as he tried to enter his car. In protest. The Milwaukee Bucks decided not to attend their playoff game. Other teams have joined in Solidarity. Three WN BA Games. Three Major league Baseball games, five Major league soccer games have been called off. Tennis star Naomi Osaka, said she would not play in the Western and Southern Open semifinals today. In games there have been put on pause until tomorrow. Kenneth Trump Shire is professor of global sport at Arizona State University and C E o of a Global Sport institute. Good morning. Good morning. Professional sports have been a venue for protests at times, But have we ever seen something on quite this scale? You know what is? I woke up this morning. I thought about this not within or against the United States, but within it and against South Africa. I mean, it's really Ironic to think about the last time sport was used so dramatically against A country. It was longer term then, but this is certainly much the same principle, especially with International tennis players looking to be joining in, but by my wheel, Sokka Sports College and professional. They've been hit pretty hard by Corona virus. Some estimates put the losses upward of $12 billion. Do these protests pose an additional hit to the bottom line or basically were losses already huge. No, For sure, there's there's potential additional hit. I mean, it's certainly the meteorites. Deals of the Games are played the sponsorship advertising deals if the games aren't played. Sure there's mohr harm that can come in. And that is again with the biggest sports protest. That is, that is the goal that is a goal to strike. The party's economically so that they begin to examine the underlying Social issues. So this is you know, it is both of principle. Watch we play games. When these horrible things are going on, especially in our home states, and there's an impact on people that have power that can converse with people with power. So I said, Ah, very impactful. Move. It's It's something that someone who's watched sports like this for 40 50 years. It really is ah, unique moment in time in the United States. Kenneth Shropshire is professor of global sport at Arizona State University. Thanks so much was going to talk to you. Thank you. In a speech today, Fed chair Jerome Powell announced a change in the Fed's approach to inflation to summarize the Fed will occasionally tolerate more of it. The feds goal. Is normally 2% inflation, but it's been persistently lower than that. In recent years. Pal said the Fed would be okay with temporarily higher levels just did she achieved an average of two per cent. Following periods when inflation has running below 2% appropriate monetary policy will likely aimed to achieve inflation moderately above 2% for some time. L said, too little inflation can lead to unemployment in price instability. This announcement means in English. The Fed will keep interest rates very low for years to come with that. Let's take a look at how numbers were doing this morning. The Dow Jones industrial average is up 229 points that is 8/10 of a percent. Yes and P. 500 is up 4/10 of a percent. The NASDAQ Up 1/10 of a percent in the 10 Year Treasury yield, is it 100.720% Marketplace Morning report is.

Fed United States Tennis Jacob Blake Arizona State University David Brancaccio professor Milwaukee Bucks Kenosha Wisconsin Kenneth Trump Shire Kenneth Shropshire Naomi Osaka soccer Sokka Sports College Ah Global Sport institute South Africa
"kenneth shropshire" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:35 min | 2 years ago

"kenneth shropshire" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I'm sorry, Ben, ashore in for David Brancaccio. A wave of athlete protests against the police shooting of Jacob Blake in Kenosha, Wisconsin, has gained momentum. Blake, a black man was shot in the back by police seven times as he tried to enter his car. In protest. The Milwaukee Bucks decided to not attend their playoff game. Other teams have joined in Solidarity. Three WN BA Games. Three Major League Baseball games. Five Major league soccer games have been called off. Tennis star Naomi Osaka, said she would not play in the Western and Southern Open semifinals today. And games have been put on pause until tomorrow. Kenneth Shropshire is professor of global sport at Arizona State University and CEO of Global of the Global Sport Institute and joins us Good morning. Good morning. Do sports protests move the needle culturally. Certainly brings attention to the issues. It certainly think back to Mohammad Ali and his protest against the Vietnam War. He certainly shifted many people in the direction to better understand the issues. The magnitude of the presence of John Carlos and Tommie Smith on the Victory stand in 1968. And certainly the events leading up to today, Starting with the The earlier murders of people like Trayvon Martin, Eric Garner. As the athletes began to speak. There was certainly more attention brought to through the the's issues so So, yes, I have to say, especially in this moment of Pandemic. Nothing else to toe Watch. That's new on different forms of media that this is ah, really, universally, Ah, unique day. In history and in sport. Sports college and professional that they've been hit pretty hard by Corona virus. Some estimates put the losses upward of $12 billion. Do these protests pose an additional hit to the bottom line or basically were losses already? 40 huge. No, For sure, there's there's potential additional hit. I mean, it's certainly the meteorites. Deals of the Games are played the sponsorship advertising deals if the games aren't played. Sure there's mohr harm that can come in and that and that is again with the biggest sports protest. That is, that is the goal that is a goal to to strike. The party's economically so that they begin to exact examine the underlying social issues. So this is you know, it is both a principal watch. We play games. When these horrible things are going on, especially in our home states and There's an impact on people that have power that can converse with people with power. So it sort of Ah, very impactful. Move. It's it's something that someone has watch sport like this for 40 50 years, it truly is, ah, unique moment and find the United States. Kenneth Shropshire is professor of global sport at Arizona State University. Thanks so much was good to talk to you. Thank you. Let's do the numbers this morning. The footsie in London is up a little less than 1/10 of a percent. Dow and S and P and NASDAQ futures are down in the 1 to 2/10 percent range, and the number of Americans filing for unemployment benefits came in at a million people last week, 98,000 less than.

Kenneth Shropshire Jacob Blake Mohammad Ali Arizona State University professor Naomi Osaka Global Sport Institute Milwaukee Bucks David Brancaccio toe Watch Kenosha Wisconsin Ben CEO of Global soccer Tennis John Carlos United States Tommie Smith
"kenneth shropshire" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

03:40 min | 2 years ago

"kenneth shropshire" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"It's not just Nike there's a rush to anti racist messaging by consumer brands Kenneth Shropshire fire at the global sport institute at Arizona State University attributes this partly to the clarity of the incident George Floyd's death under a policeman's ni captured on video in a moment of pandemic the severity of the incident near universal reaction in the time that people have the focus attending to media these messages can be smart marketing appealing to young consumers but Michigan state advertising and PR professor Salim al how Bosch says more is at stake for corporate America communities are now suffering companies and brands should be asking what side of history do I want to be on there can be risk for brand standing with civil rights protesters while looting and arson fill TV screens Wharton professor of marketing Americus reed says it could alienate law and order consumers you are willingly saying I'm going to be okay with some customers walking away from my product but they're going to be enough or deeply loyal because you are taking that stance there's another risk for outspoken brands seeming to jump on the bandwagon just to score good PR and sell more Kenneth Shropshire fire at A. S. U. so this companies will need to follow up on the racial justice agendas with concrete action he's analyzed major apparel companies including Nike in terms of the boardrooms not our leaders in corporate America in terms of diversity at the highest levels he says consumers who agree with companies talk will be waiting to see if they walk the walk after this crisis this past hi Mitchell Hartman for market place back in March president trump declared a state of emergency over the corona virus pandemic could give city and county and state authorities access to federal resources and it's turns out they can use that declaration to ask for help after protests too but as market place's annual reports there's a whole lot of bureaucracy you gotta get through first when you think of disaster relief you probably think of things like hurricanes wildfires and floods their emergency operations there are disaster declaration is there a major disaster declarations and then there are public health emergencies Carlos Martinez a senior fellow at the urban institute he says the official federal definition of an emergency is even broader any occasion or instance for which federal assistance is needed to supplement state and local efforts and capabilities to save lives and protect property and public health and safety so there are a whole bunch of different pots of money you can open up depending on who is doing the declaration and and what the actual cause of declaration but Samuel rose in a finance professor at Temple University says that necessarily like there's just you know a big government chest of money that anyone can ask for money from an eight times this kind of these designated programs paid for by federal tax dollars or higher government debt Texas governor Greg Abbott issued his own disaster declaration after protest over the death of George Floyd the declaration allows federal law enforcement officers jurisdiction in the state governor Abbott and president trump are political allies and that matters says Eric Tate at the university of Iowa national political influences could improve the governor's request you know what if there's some differences in party affiliation election year or not he says it's tough to tease out exactly how much political influence plays out in disaster relief allocation but it's certainly not.

Nike Kenneth Shropshire
"kenneth shropshire" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:24 min | 2 years ago

"kenneth shropshire" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Of notable exceptions exceptions that fed directly to their bottom lines big brand names those corporations at the brit was talking about they have mostly stayed away from explicitly embracing political and economic protest until pretty recently actually Nike in Colin Kaepernick is the Big Apple now those scores of other brands Netflix Citigroup Starbucks also Nordstrom they are calling for justice as market place's Mitchell Hartman reports Nike released a new ad last week no images just words on a screen the company that's been telling us for decades to just do it says just don't do it don't turn your back on racism and it's not just Nike there's a rush to anti racist messaging by consumer brands Kenneth Shropshire fire at the global sport institute at Arizona State University attributes this partly to the clarity of the incident George Floyd's death under a policeman's ni captured on video in a moment of pandemic the severity of the incident near universal reaction in the time that people have the focus appearing to media these messages can be smart marketing appealing to young consumers but Michigan state advertising and PR professor Salim I'll have Bosch says more is at stake for corporate America communities are now suffering companies and brands should be asking what side of history do I want to be on there can be risk for brand standing with civil rights protesters while looting and arson fill TV screens Wharton professor of marketing Americus reed says it could alienate law and order consumers you are willingly saying I'm going to be okay with some customers walking away from my product but they're going to be enough for deeply loyal because you are taking that stance there's another risk for outspoken brands seeming to jump on the bandwagon just to score good PR and sell more construction here at A. S. U. says companies will need to follow up on the racial justice agendas with concrete action he's analyzed major apparel companies including Nike in terms of the boardrooms not our leaders in corporate America in terms of diversity at the highest levels he says consumers who agree with companies talk will be waiting to see if they walk the walk after this crisis this past hi Michelle how are market place back in March president trump declared a state of emergency over the corona virus pandemic could give city and county and state authorities access to federal resources editor turns out they can use that declaration to ask for help after protests too but as market place's annual reports there's a whole lot of bureaucracy you gotta get through first when you think of disaster relief you probably think of things like hurricanes wildfires and floods their emergency operations there are disaster declaration is there a major disaster declaration and then there are public health emergencies Carlos Martinez a senior fellow at the urban institute he says the official federal definition of an emergency is even broader any occasion or instance for which federal assistance is needed to supplement state and local efforts and capabilities to save lives and protect property and public health and safety so there are a whole bunch of different pots of money you can open up depending on who is doing the declaration and and what the actual cause of declaration but Samuel rose in a finance professor at Temple University says it's not necessarily like there's just you know a big government chest of money that anyone can ask for money from an eight times this kind of he's designated programs paid for by federal tax dollars or higher government debt Texas governor Greg Abbott issued his own disaster declaration after protest over the death of George Floyd the declaration allows federal law enforcement officers jurisdiction in the state governor Abbott and president trump are political allies and that matters says Eric Tate at the university of Iowa national political influence it could influence the governor's request you know what if there's some differences in party affiliation Alexion you're not he says it's tough to tease out exactly how much political influence plays out in disaster relief allocation but it's certainly not a.

"kenneth shropshire" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:44 min | 2 years ago

"kenneth shropshire" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Back on racism and it's not just Nike there's a rush to anti racist messaging by consumer brands Kenneth Shropshire fire at the global sport institute at Arizona State University attributes this partly to the clarity of the incident George Floyd's death under a policeman's ni captured on video in a moment of pandemic the severity of the incident near universal reaction in the time that people have the focus returning to media these messages can be smart marketing appealing to young consumers but Michigan state advertising and PR professor Salim al how Bosch says more is at stake for corporate America communities are now suffering companies and brands should be asking what side of history do I want to be on there can be risk for brand standing with civil rights protesters while looting and arson fill TV screens Wharton professor of marketing Americus reed says it could alienate law and order consumers you are willingly saying I'm going to be okay with some customers walking away from my product but they're going to be enough for deeply loyal because you are taking that stance there's another risk for outspoken brands seeming to jump on the bandwagon just to score good PR and sell more construction here at A. S. U. so this companies will need to follow up on the racial justice agendas with concrete action he's analyzed major apparel companies including Nike in terms of the boardrooms not our leaders in corporate America in terms of diversity at the highest levels he says consumers who agree with companies talk will be waiting to see if they walk the walk after this crisis is past I'm Mitchell Hertzog for market place back in March president trump declared a state of emergency over the corona virus pandemic could give city and county and state authorities access to federal resources editor earns out they can use that declaration to ask for help after protests too but as market place's annual reports there's a whole lot of bureaucracy you gotta get through first when you think of disaster relief you probably think of things like hurricanes wildfires and floods their emergency operations there are disaster declaration is there a major disaster declaration and then there are public health emergencies Carlos Martinez a senior fellow at the urban institute he says the official federal definition of an emergency is even broader any occasion or instance for which federal assistance is needed to supplement state and local efforts and capabilities to save lives and protect property and public health and safety there are a whole bunch of different pots of money you can open up depending on who is doing the declaration and and what the actual cost of declaration but Samuel rose in a finance professor at Temple University says it's not necessarily like there's just you know a big government chest of money that anyone can ask for money from an eight times this kind of these designated programs paid for by federal tax dollars or higher government debt Texas governor Greg Abbott issued his own disaster declaration after protest over the death of George Floyd the declaration allows federal law enforcement officers jurisdiction in the state governor Abbott and president trump are political allies and that matters says Eric Tate at the university of Iowa national political influence it could improve the governor's request you know what if there's some differences in party affiliation Alexion you're not he says it's tough to tease out exactly how much political influence plays out in disaster relief allocation but it's certainly not in a political.

Nike
"kenneth shropshire" Discussed on The Work in Sports Podcast - Insider Advice for Sports Careers

The Work in Sports Podcast - Insider Advice for Sports Careers

10:45 min | 2 years ago

"kenneth shropshire" Discussed on The Work in Sports Podcast - Insider Advice for Sports Careers

"The fan base in Florida and different from the fan base in Newfoundland. So it's definitely I gotta imagine a kind of a fun challenge. I will say to when I talk with people in Minor League Baseball They talk about how it's imported is to be both unique and hyper local in their team. Names and logos That the revenue generated and the merchandising has been key to their profitability. How big of a role does that play in the E. C. H. L. Argue guys really focusing on the the names and logos and likenesses and some of the other sponsorship activities that you can do to help drive merchandise sales. Yeah at the end of the day. That's the James Decision. And we have some teams that have had their logo and more for over twenty years but At the same time for some of the newer teams move like I do think. Minor League Sports Is Hyper local and has the ability to get fun and creative and create that family environment with a fun character so I certainly Preached that any new ownership or membership group coming into the League again ultimately it's their idea to run with it but I think it it is an opportunity for us to create something fun so when you look around and you see a Walleye with with a missing tooth and hockey sticks or the ever AIDS Down in Fort Myers which is such a creative play on words. Phenomenal logo Again I just think we've been afforded that opportunity so why not run with it and and get some Not only local appeal to it but I think if you create something really fun and exciting It can get national appeal. I mean I I remember when the growlers I launch their logo whatever it is year and a half two years ago You know not shortly thereafter. I was on the West Coast and I saw somebody wearing a growlers. So if you if you take that opportunity and create something really cool. I think in today's world where everything gets shared so quickly it can resonate Around the country around the confident maybe even around the globe I even saw to. Actually my kids really perked up when I talked about this. I even saw that. You guys did. Some sponsorship deals with Marvel Comics DC comics and marvel so you had an iron man night. And you had superman jerseys. How much does this stuff make an impact because that really seems very family friendly? Yeah no no. I mean you're talking about a great opportunity for our league and our teams to partner with international entertainment brands and able to take what they're doing with their characters and their stories and interweaving them with our hockey so it heightens the entertainment value. Creates that family friendly environment as you were discussing creates really COOL JERSEYS. While we're at it and you know the other thing too is when we're producing those nights and then bringing them to our market fans of those brands. That may not necessarily be hockey fans and never even think of coming out to the arena. But this gives them an opportunity to you know put on their marvel costumer. They're D- gosh humor. Whatever it is It gives them that opportunity and they want to be part of that but also experience a hockey game at the same time and maybe they become hockey van over the long. Yeah it does seem like minor league sports in general especially the C. H. L. You know that you're a family. Your your goal is to bring in families and introduce young fans and have a great experience. How do you go about focusing on that and making sure that your brand is associated with the really family fun events I first off? We preached that Mantra as being affordable family entertainment putting packages together that Appeal to families again. Incorporating some of those Entertainment Brands I know. We also work with Nickelodeon I have two young boys with this point. Hockey's not really on the radar but every nickelodeon character is so when you when you put packages that family Of any size can afford and come out and have a good time. That's how I think you position yourself for success. And then you know in terms of our own ice product It's never been faster more skilled and family friendly and You know it's still hockey. There's there's there's body checking and can be rough and tumble at times. But on the whole I think we've got a really family oriented product. Trust me my eight year old saw me researching yesterday and saw the picture of the the Iron Man Jerseys you guys have. And then on the Nickelodeon ones there was like dad. I want one. So you're hitting the mark. I think you're doing really well. What are the biggest challenges? You face a league moving forward. You're in some really. Big markets are in some smaller markets yards in different places. What are the? What are the challenges? You Face Commissioner. What do you look forward towards your future? Well I think the biggest challenge is creating new fans and welcome them to the arena I look A market research and polls all the time and professional ice hockey Across the country and certainly in our markets still doesn't resonate and I I use this story all the time. But you know you'll ask people if they want to go to a hockey game and they'll say no. I don't like hockey and then you say well. Have you ever actually gone and they say no. Well how do you know that you actually don't like going to hockey game? If you've never been so it's how do we create those fans and get them to come out and experience our product because We often hear. Afterwards how rate the atmosphere was. How fast paced environment was how they had such a good time. Great experience but we need to get them in the building. I who have that experience. So that's our challenge and You know we still have a long road ahead of us but I'm confident that we're doing things that are sending us in the right direction. I do think it's fascinating so I grew up in Boston. So hockey is just kind of in your blood and I add a high school friend who played the NHL for seventeen seasons. And so you go to the Games and it's a completely different experience you know people don't always understand that being in the arena no matter what the size is no matter what. The skill level is at a hockey game is one of the coolest experiences you could ever have in sports and I think that once you get people there they get hooked so I find it interesting. That like you know that. That's the challenge is. Let's get them in the door. Let's get them having experienced taboo this fun and there are GonNa be hooking. They're gonNA WANNA come back. Yeah no I mean. That's that's priority. One we certainly have plenty else to work on but That's at the top of the list for sure so we have a lot of interns in our audience. A lot of our audience is very young trying to carve their own niche into the sports industry. And they're trying to make a name for themselves. What final advice would you give to any of the young people out there listening and hoping to maybe someday be a commissioner? Like you like all of us. You started out as an attorney grew up to a point of your career that you're doing incredibly well. Now what advice would you have for the younger audience just to help? Set them on the right path. I I think it starts with what I said earlier in terms of. Don't be afraid to take on new challenges to the contrary seek out new challenges the more that you can take on and expand your skill set and show your value to the organization the better you're going to position yourself to advance in that organization. So listen there. There were times where I was taking on challenges that I didn't have the the slightest of clues but I researched it. I mean you've got you know the world at your fingertips these days so I would research and learn. Maybe even put my own spin on things but just continued to grow. My skill set even going outside of my comfort zone. And when you do that you you build yourself as a person as and as an employee and people around you will see that. It's so true everybody wants to hire and be around people and promote people who are problem solvers like figuring out solutions to problems and being that person willing to jump in and take action and get smarter and be curious. So that's a really powerful message to share Ryan Ryan. Thank you so much for coming on the show. Today it's going is great advice. You sharing our audience is really going to gravitate towards all of this and I hope all of them go buy tickets to an HMO game to thanks for coming on all right thanks bye. Big thanks to Ryan for coming on the show. My hopes I mean this. I've been thinking about Ryan the show a lot matter of fact if you've heard my interview Kenneth Shropshire and Greg Hilton lately. I keep asking others other experts out there. What do you think about the smaller leagues? Do you think they're going to be able to come out of this Because honestly the GEL is on my mind? I know we have many people in our audience. Who Work in the show and I strongly believe minor league. Sports are wildly important to our overall sports atmosphere. I personally love going to minor league games. It's like sports at. Its finest if you ask me is a bunch of people who are getting paid much. You just really love and are passionate you get up close and personal to the game. It's intimate it's fun. It's creative some of my most enjoyable sports moments have been at minor league games and guy who grew up in Boston. Going to Celtics Games bruins gains and Patriots Games. Red sox games at some of the Cathedrals of sports. If you ask me but some of my fondest memories are going to Portland Pirates Minor League hockey game or we're going to the Trenton Thunder Minor League baseball or the wister rail Taylor's so many different minor league teams out there. And that's that's sports at its purest fiasco may so my thoughts are with the H. L. and every other smaller league team out. There is trying to find their way through this global pandemic good luck h. l. and thanks again to Ryan for coming on the show and for all of you listening at home. I really appreciate every single one of you and I want to be here to help so connect with me online din. Join OUR PRIVATE. Facebook group for this podcast. You can search for the work in sports podcast.

Hockey Ryan Ryan Boston Portland Pirates Minor League AIDS Baseball Commissioner Trenton Thunder Minor League Nickelodeon Fort Myers West Coast Phenomenal Marvel Comics DC comics E. C. H. L. Florida Newfoundland Facebook partner NHL
"kenneth shropshire" Discussed on The Work in Sports Podcast - Insider Advice for Sports Careers

The Work in Sports Podcast - Insider Advice for Sports Careers

03:32 min | 2 years ago

"kenneth shropshire" Discussed on The Work in Sports Podcast - Insider Advice for Sports Careers

"K. Hey everybody I'm Brian Clark. Vp of content and engaged learning at work in sports DOT COM. And this is the work in sports podcast a little housekeeping before we head into this episode last week during the whole week at work in sports we had multiple leadership meetings all focused around. What can we do that helps right now? You know there's so many brands out there right now. That are that are sharing their story sharing what they're doing sharing how to help. And we're inspired by that. Just like all of you. Are you know. There's a lot of great stories out there of people as individuals and businesses who are changing their focus or Changing the way they do things in order to to help out those that are in need and we're amongst those So I want to run through some of the things. We came up with last week to help and that we're going to be implementing in the first week next couple of weeks and then we'll get into some of the subject matter for this episode. You think will be really helpful as well number one. We're going to ramp up our content because I think right now inside social isolation we kind of need it. We need another voice. We need somebody to listen to her talk to. I hope that I can provide some of that but we also need advice for kind of surviving. What's going on right now and leveraging the opportunities that we do have rather than just wallowing in and what we don't have so we're three podcasts week. Mondays and Fridays will continue to be well. Can't really continue to be Mondays. And Fridays will be focused on surviving and thriving in these crazy times as it relates to your career so for example last Friday. I did an episode that was specifically on how to properly work from home the Friday before that I interviewed Kenneth Shropshire Co the Global Sports Institute. About what this means for the sports industry moving forward last. Monday advice for conducting video interviews and more so these are all very timely to what's going on right now with corona virus. We are going to start doing more video interviews. Everybody is because this is just people will still need to hire. There's been my philosophy is it? Yes there's going to be a downturn in the jobs that are available but what. I'm hearing a lot from employers. Is if they were hiring for a role and they were hoping to hire in the next thirty days. A lot of them are just saying okay. We're GONNA stay on this path but we're going to maybe higher in ninety days more hundred twenty days so there is pushing back their timeline. They're not stopping their hiring. But a lot of it's going to be conducted via video so again we're GONNA try to look for those things that are going to be a trend in the time that we're in and try to ramp lean into that content. I'm going to get more guests. That are going to specifically talk about how we're affected now what it will look like moving forward so again look for those episodes. Listen to them. It's very timely information on Wednesdays. We're still gonNA stick with our expert interviews so right now. They're not going to be corona virus related. There will come a time when we get some of those but these are these right now are going to be more of the normal career focused expertise. Part of that is because a lot of I conducted a lot of interviews before. This was that big of a deal. So I have a backlog of interviews that are really smart and important and I don't want to waste them because I don't know I think we only break from the corona virus coverage as well so Wednesdays we will still maintain career focused expertise mostly going to be very active on our private facebook group which you can join by searching for work in Sports. Dot Com. I'm sorry working sports podcast group on facebook. It's your few questions and I'll grant you.

Sports facebook Global Sports Institute Vp Brian Clark Kenneth Shropshire social isolation
"kenneth shropshire" Discussed on The Work in Sports Podcast - Insider Advice for Sports Careers

The Work in Sports Podcast - Insider Advice for Sports Careers

07:25 min | 2 years ago

"kenneth shropshire" Discussed on The Work in Sports Podcast - Insider Advice for Sports Careers

"Is You know we try to think back to? When hands the hand sanitizers began to appear. And it's certainly it's been for. It's been a presence but I but I think we're GONNA see a much greater presence of of that kind of Aid for for fans. That's kind of a minority if you will in facilities and that kind of encouragement of of using these things you know something beyond you know the guy He's GonNa just whack you sit down for a tip so it is something I it's probably something something we should be billing anyway and again you know highlight is five times today. You and I are doctors so we don't know but there is no conversation about You know things should there be some degree of of of Disease and folks around anyway to keep people healthy. You know that sort of stuff. I probably. I don't know but it probably will be part of greater other goals. W More discussion about. Should we keep dying this kind of thing? Or what layer should we leave in that we brought in so you? So you actually right. I can remember. I worked at the nineteen eighty-four Olympics. And you think about that moment in time it was the first time on mass that I can say the word at the time magnetometers brought in metal detectors and it was a whole big and it was because of the threat of whatever kind of Soviet on those call. Terrorism whatever the Soviets might do at the Olympic Games And then from that day forward and metal detectors in a regular part of forty minutes it is interesting in the United States. We definitely have more social society. We like to go to arenas and Events and festivals and and that is a we tend to spend more to go to these types of events and yet at the same time. There's been this draw for people to come closer to home bigger. Tv's more better abilities to to watch and do more things from the privacy of your own home. I wonder we've always talked about the sports industry in general being very strong in a recession. Because people still want to be entertained and yet in something like this I wonder if it might have a different spin on things and it would incentivize more people to stay home but again to the point you made earlier. I mean the meteorites deals are still where the teams make a lot of their money. I wonder how this will play out in the future. If more people will stay home or if they'll come flocking back to the arena's yeah and this and that that problem you know facilities and Schwartz enterprises were having anyway White screaming screen at home and I got my own special flavored popcorn. And you know I. I got my own restroom right here you know. Why do I need to go? And you'll all these people so the idea of dealing with with people and and this native moment will serve a encouraged Another faction of people just saying I'm not going anymore. I've I've got my my setup in place to to watch easy deal with this so yeah absolutely right it but it's no fortunately for the business of sports at that thinking has been Addressed in part of the Calculus on building these new facilities and what kinds of Amenities yellow available. What are you? What a little perks do you get? Because you came to the game live. What is it that you get that? You CAN'T GET Sitting in your living room. So so that's that's long. Been a part of of what the business sport has had to deal with so It's nothing but it will be ramped up even more. I was reading during the last recession that the economist stated that sports in particular are by and large standing up to the recession better than most industries. I found that fascinating because again like I was looking for historical points of reference to you. Could kind of project Veritas might affect things? What do you think about the Global Sports Industry? Do you believe that? It is better positioned than other industries for recovery wants this is contained. You look closely at that stuff for maybe five ten years there are a bunch of articles written in pre and probably the area are sports recession. Proof and for the most are the arguments. Are that that that they are that there. There is a great desire to preserve that part in spending in kind of look at it. People have these dollars that they make they keep carved out because people even if they don't recognize that it's an important part of their life but it is a segment that if things are too bad can go You know going to a game because it out before you cannot food so it's not it's not that severe So the idea that that it's recession proof it. It's also something that's society sort of encourages participation and attendance at You know all the You know President Roosevelt during World War War Two. Let's keep the baseball games going to to to keep you know the public Energized and excited about something you know something to do so there is always that town. There's always this moment of of deciding not to hold the Games. I was Kinda looking around to see what kind of commentary would comparisons with the with the World War Two moment with the Kennedy assassination woman with the nine eleven molin. You not just. This is just one of those decisions but in many ways I think this one was In the end again with the NBA's leadership a lot easier in more sensible decision to just. Let's not play for a while. It's not it's not that that important so the idea that Once gets available again and no matter where the economy is It's freely certain people will find a way to come back if it's available. Professors shops higher. Thank you so much for coming on and discussing with. The things are changing so rapidly at this time. It's always nice to have some reason discussions where we can look to the future a little bit because we will get back to normal at some point and it's interesting to look back at history and understand how that projects to our future. Thank you so much for joining me today. Thank you thank you to professor Kenneth Shropshire for coming on the show today. Ceo of the Global Sports Institute at Arizona State University People. There's not a lot of hard and fast. We know this is going to happen type responses we can give right now but we can project out on things like layoffs and how this will impact employment and whether the fans will come back to games where their processes will change so. It's a very interesting conversation to be having right now. I will try in the coming months to have more guests. Like Dr Shropshire. Come on who can explain a little bit more about this will project out into your futures and how you all be affected by it. Thank you for tuning into the special edition of the work in sports podcast. Please remember to subscribe share and save. It's important to us to grow this thing and to continue influencing and informing all of you in the audience who are interested in sports. Business professionals. thank you again for tuning in and everybody wash your hands and stay safe all right. Get back to work from home..

Kenneth Shropshire Olympics Schwartz enterprises United States NBA Arizona State University Peopl baseball Global Sports Institute President Roosevelt professor Ceo Kennedy
"kenneth shropshire" Discussed on The Work in Sports Podcast - Insider Advice for Sports Careers

The Work in Sports Podcast - Insider Advice for Sports Careers

13:08 min | 2 years ago

"kenneth shropshire" Discussed on The Work in Sports Podcast - Insider Advice for Sports Careers

"Multiple Sports Leagues and longstanding events are being suspended if not outright canceled an effort to isolate and comb the spread of this deadly outbreak star players. We know and root for Hollywood actors heads of state are coming out is infected by the virus responsible for the covert nineteen disease. I want to be clear. We are not panicked. We are looking to the future. These cancellations and suspensions will have an impact on the business of sports. And it's time to discuss and prepare for the ramifications joining me today to discuss the short and long term effects of the corona virus. Outbreak is professor Kenneth Shropshire. Mr Shropshire is the CEO of the Global Sports Institute at Arizona State and has held consultations roles but the NCAA Major League Baseball NFL NFL and United States Olympic Committee. Dr Shropshire. Thanks for joining me. So this conversation can really break into different categories. We aren't doctors. We won't speculate on the virus itself but we can't discuss what's it what this means for the now what this means for the future. So let's start with the now in your view is the decision to suspend the seasons of the NHL The NBA and Major League Baseball March madness and other major events like the masters and the EPL is this to be an example of discretion being the better part of valour deeply. This is the right move. Yes I I. I think what we ended up with us You know to some extent there may have been an initial balance of economics versus Level of health crisis. And then I think it'd be pretty clearly with the NBA's in Kinda once again. Leading the way in the space became a question of life or death and dropping the economics. And how do we make sure we are both as safe as possible for the fans and the threat spread throughout the side but I think the NBA brought to the fore that you know the athletes who are endangered? So this whole idea plane before Venues and and that sort of thing that was not the answer. Either that the complete shutdown seems to be the path to as we all know now into flat mccur of. I think that's what we're we're all seeking to do. Yeah we have heard that term a lot over the last few days so when leagues do the right thing and suspend play. There's an affected class of daily workers. Do the do you believe the league's ownership bear any responsibility to these workers who depend on these rules for their survival. I think there's a moral responsibility moral opportunity. You know the the reports of the Kevin Love donation of one hundred thousand dollars now. It's reflecting on how far that could go. Fee scale those people impacted and a few players a few executives certainly. If owners stepped up and thought about numbers in that regard it can have a huge impact on what would really could be a crushing blow to the income of these people to work in these these jobs that are dependent upon jobs associated sporting events from people that are parking vehicles to insecurity You know working in concession stands now those largely hourly workers who have other jobs as well but this is income that they count it on. So if there's a way to address that I mean that that is I it's becoming to be becoming more elevated than it had been in terms of The scope of discussion but it is something that that we really should take into account. Yeah I've read many people in my Lynton. Today were mentioning that. They're an intern or their game. Day worker or they're a seasonal employees in those their roles have already changed because there's less work for them to do in the short term outside of the Game Day staff we just discussed. Do you think this will lead to further reaching layoffs across sports? I mean as a direct impact of the revenue model. So will there be layoffs. Listen you know. You said if they're getting we're not we're not doctors and we're also Matt sports forensic accountants and the the other side of the equation is how much money is being saved by not play How does that balance out? I think in the end. It's you know certainly is a a deficit overall but probably not as severe as we initially contemplated about dollars not coming in from from ticket sales and concessions and that sort of thing You know whatever in whatever setting are. Meteorites deals where there's not some insurance it steps in and makes payments that that's an issue too so it is a long term impact for sure But you know probably not as severe as we anticipate initially but still a big number wonder about the major leagues. We know with their long-term deals in meteorites deals. They're they're going to end up out of this fine but what about those smaller leagues that have the Razor Thin margins for success I mean the the XFL the professional Lacrosse League lower division soccer leagues or we can go on and on with this one? You named initially is is the one to watch the xfl that he was a startup. Lee that was on the on the upswing. I think they're having a pretty positive lines interferes with with that launch and certainly in all the contemplation they had. I'm sure pandemic was not a list of possibilities. They did probably look at early. Shut down and what that would mean or stoppage and work stoppage in some sort of way. So there's probably some contemplation there and again there is probably some degree of of of cost savings. But you know they're they're lease deals and those sorts of things probably did not contemplate a whole lot of this so so there. There's going to be you're exactly right. The League's tight margins leads leagues where a profitability? Like the xfl was in the future as opposed to to now that that that's where the real problems will will occur the other space and as the thing about it this morning With the NCAA is is the revenue they were coming in for the tournament again? We don't know what the actual impact on uppers GONNA be overall But you forget about basketball itself. Think about the percentage that was going to each of these conferences and think about how the middle schools tended to use those funds to support the non revenue sports as they're called. What's the impact going to be there if you if you do have to make cuts because there's a lack of income? What decisions do you make and then compliance with title nine? So there's a whole lot on the horizon both of the professional level in the collegiate level that we haven't Sena find that interesting. I was looking at that this morning as well the NCAA tournament brings in over nine hundred million dollars in revenue to the NCAA. If you take that nine hundred dollars nine hundred million dollars of revenue out of the pocket of the athletics like you said this is going to affect a lot of different groups and as we talk about football basketball they'll be able to rebound but those smaller non revenue generating sports could really be impacted. Yeah and again. It's it's you know since this in the midst of this conversation we were talking about compensating college athletes and all those sorts of things. Well here's a here's a big removal of some of that revenue so it is a moment where college sports gets gets rethink. What are we doing? What are we what are we really WANNA fund? And how do we WANNA do this? And what's important so we'll see what comes out of that. I also wonder about the mental health of the athletes themselves especially the college athletes. I mean these men and women have been competing for championships one day and then the next. It's just over. A lot of their careers ended abruptly a lot of spring leagues. Or are saying. We're just GONNA CANCEL THE SEASON OUTRIGHT. A lot of the spring season sports. How damaging do you think this can be to them? Who are spending so much of their time in identity listed a bundled up in their athletic prowess and now has just taken away. No you're right I mean if if you know we we step anything about the people that are thought about lease at our most impacted by this. When you rightly mentioned that the workers a decent facilities but think about the you know the college player that was about to enter now at the highest levels. I first time to get into The NCAA tournament but think about also play tennis in North Western. Their team was You know he's two years Albany watching the team and their team was doing extraordinarily this year and now tennis is over so they don't get to see where they were. GonNa go whether we're GONNA do the idea that You know we talk a lot and think about this whole athlete identity than problem really. How a lot of these kids. This is who they are mess. That's not right. That's not who they should be. But as you mentioned for mental health purposes there has been awareness that if this was removed from a young person as well as adults to can you guys in the NBA. Not playing to some degree of this problem. You know the the idea who. Who Am I? The idea that I'm just a student know. And plus it. I'm sure all these teams are finding ways to practice and sort of do all these things were they keep that identity intact rightly or wrongly but there is a great hit second place at the mental level to these kids looking forward eventually teams and leagues are going to get back to play Will eventually get back to that place. Do you think they'll have to make an effort to make up all the lost revenue or go the other way where they'll have to incentivize people to come back to the events and to show up? Will they have to do special deals in order to incentivize people to come back to the arena? Or what do you think approach will be once we get back to a great question. I guess we think about La when we think about that. Kind of removable. Sport sport comes back in in terms of the NFL. Nowhere there were sitting. There was none for long and you have to two different outcomes. You have the rams at great success in the chargers where took a little time for people to come back. So I think what we've seen is It's it's a little bit of a A toss up as to how it will work you what you need to do. And maybe looking at those two franchises as they started back up in La. We'll give some kind of insight but I think you know. If the absence of of sports people will be hungry. People want to come back in and there will be some High level of excitement that that's my initial thought but la and it's a model to take a look at it. That's interesting I hadn't thought of the model. It's a really good point. When do you usually see the broader economic impact? We obviously stock market. We've seen affected immediately. We were seeing happening minute by minute. But what about things like employment moving forward? Do you think they'll be the decrease in revenue? We'll start to affect jobs and opportunities for people in the sports industry moving forward short-term for sure Whatever jobs weren't fill jobs were open There's GonNa be some thought of keeping those jobs on field and open for a while There's GonNa be some something about Whether or not People everybody should be brought back. I'm sure there's a conversations about people being laid off and that sort of thing I mean that's where you know. Frankly all these governmental actions and supplements could be of assistance could could influence these leagues and other entities as businesses to to think in favor of the worker as opposed to. Let's do what's best economically For for the business in the short term. So yeah it's GonNa be all over the place I think in terms of how people are are impacted in a lot of it will have to do with How important is the job that someone is in? And how important is it If in fact operations began in the off-season kind of mode which will be the case for for some of these won't be playing going on. Necessarily will everybody be back but the decent delaying bringing people back? It's uncertain yeah. It's really interesting to see how this will play out You were talking about how you look back historically to La as a good example to kind of see the precedent that was set as sports change. There I was also thinking about after nine eleven. There was a massive change in the way we handled security at arenas there was just a completely different process that we started go through of pre-nine. Eleven versus post nine eleven. Do you think this will have the same sort of an impact moving forward? Do you think things will operate differently at Arenas and stadiums after the virus outbreak? I think so you know it..

NCAA NBA La XFL NFL League Mr Shropshire Kenneth Shropshire Outbreak Hollywood Global Sports Institute basketball professor NHL United States Olympic Committe CEO Arizona State tennis intern