17 Burst results for "Kenneth Kooky"

"kenneth kooky" Discussed on The Economist: Babbage

The Economist: Babbage

08:27 min | 1 year ago

"kenneth kooky" Discussed on The Economist: Babbage

"Really. It's only been a few weeks since they've been reported so we should be hoping to find out more in the coming months but you can also be vector of transmission so that throws a big question mark on the lockdown exit strategies. If people are not immune. Can we really open up our economies? Yeah that's the big question and one that I think people need to grapple with a bit more than we have been doing. We've been assuming that once you're infected by south to that you've recovered you know. Healthcare workers can go back to the woods where people are being treated for this or perhaps we can get people immunity passports now. This would be essentially a certificate to say that you've been infected by SARS COV to you cleared the virus and therefore your immune and you can go about your business in the world without worrying about reinfection. There's a massive uncertainty about whether that's a good idea just because as the World Health Organization has said we don't know if being it gives you a Long-term Unity. It's massively uncertain. Politicians around the world have been talking about following the science unfortunate science hasn't told us about this and and we know for at least another year. Maybe more so what we have to do is just try and Hijau bets by trying out several strategies exit which don't also involve relying on immunity. Okay Lock thank you very much very well can can. You can read more about the uncertainty over immunity to covet one thousand nine hundred in the coming edition of the Economist. And if you're not already a subscriber you can become one. Please visit economists dot com slash. Radio offer there. You can begin subscription for twelve issues for just twelve dollars or twelve pounds. It has long been known that loneliness can be bad for your health. In fact research has shown that it rivals obesity and possibly smoking as a risk but as covert nineteen forces people to spend more time apart. There's a danger that feeling lonely may actually weaken people's immune system vicious have been showing that lonely disassociated with Essentially a depressed immune profile. So when you're lonely you're immune system is is not a strong which is of course Kind of a double edged negative in the during the pandemic song is a psychologist at the University of California at Riverside. It's really very big problem. Because to avoid the corner virus we are being told to be basically a stay in California where I am at least six feet from other people and to sort of shelter in place and and yet if that kind of isolation self-isolation makes us lonely than that depresses our immune system. Which is which is what. We need to sort of fight off viruses as well as bacteria. It's a little bit of a vicious cycle but address it. We must because by the time we all come out of locked down. There will be people who've been lonely and who are now going to find it harder to sort of reintegrate into society because they are going to be suspicious of other people because that loneliness has had a physical manifestation on their health and also on their cognitive abilities to forge ties absolutely before. Actually I want to say that. There is a potential silver lining though people who are lonely. Feel very much alone like. They're the only ones feeling the way that they do. And then when everyone now has to stay home and be alone it is possible that lonely people actually might feel in a way less alone because kind of like we're all in the same boat so that actually is an open question on the other hand we already are seeing anecdotal evidence that especially older people are feeling even more isolated so I agree that it is very important to try to understand how we can kind of address this loneliness problem. Your research has looked at some of these issues hasn't it? My research is on how doing exit kindness for others. When people help other people how that can boost their wellbeing make them happier. Make them feel more connected with others and and for a number of years. I've been thinking that perhaps one way to help people are lonely is not to sort of throw kindness at them or throw friends at them. Actually kind of do the other way round Ask them to help others so so when a lonely person actually takes initiative to help someone else then they're the ones who are going to benefit and so we've done. Studies will be randomly assigned to either do acts of kindness for others or maybe do acts of kindness for yourself or engage in various neutral kinds of activities to see what psychological and genomic effect that has on individuals and what was the effect so we have found again in a number of studies that first of all that asking people to do acts of kindness for others makes them happier and more connected to the people that are helping and that's very important to understand in itself and then a few years ago we kind of took a step further and we did a kindness intervention we call them kindness interventions. They're kind of clinical trials but instead of randomly assigning some people to take a particular drug. We randomly assigned some people to do acts of kindness or not. We did a study what we collected blood spots basically blood from people before and after the kindest intervention we found that people were asked to do acts of kindness for others show changes in their blood changes and there are innate gene expression the were associated with a stronger immune profile basically. We found evidence of down regulation of pro inflammatory genes. Now more information as bad so down. Regulation of inflammatory genes is a good thing so we found that only in the group that was asked to do acts of kindness for others. We also had a group that was asked to do acts of kindness for themselves. So like kind of like you know. Have a nice lunch you know. Take a nap. Get a massage and that group did not show shifts and aren't agent expression so being kind actually makes you happier yes. They're actually quite a few studies now showing that when people are kind to others generous to others they become happier and we actually have a study where we compared the givers and receivers so I if I'm the giver. I'm helping you the receiver. The receiver gets happy right away but the givers happiness lasts longer as people. Wait for this period of self-isolation to end many of them have turned to online socializing to tackle feelings of loneliness. For example video. Calls like the one we're doing right now. Is this effective way of dealing with the problem does online. Virtual interactions work. You know you could argue. That human beings were hardwired to attract face to face. You know we use cues. That are available face to face Involving not just eye contact but gesture and synchrony and touch and smell some of those but not all of them are available on say video calls and I think we've probably all noticed that online interactions are more exhausting in a way right after kind of zoom calls. You feel much more tired than after a in person meeting for example and I think in part is because we're just our brain sort of working overtime to process all these cues So my lab has been studying. You know will what if you ask people to Reach out to others and help others sort of online as opposed to in person and we actually have some mixed finding so we have a study that shows that face to face. Kindness was associated with higher increases in satisfaction with life or well being than digital kindness and digital kindness. I mean basically maybe reaching out to someone on facebook thanking them or sending someone gift certificate or sort of something. That's sort of not not face to face and that makes sense because you feel more connected to the other person. They feel more connected and appreciative of you. When you're when you're face to face generally because the pattern is that in person kind acts are more powerful more impactful but we are finding that even digital kindness can also increase well-being so I think both are important but just it's a little bit more powerful one things are In person on Lubomirski. Thank you very much. Thank you and that's all for this edition baggage while you with us. Please give us a rating on Apple podcast or wherever you listen. I'm Kenneth Kooky and from my linen closet in London. This is the economist.

World Health Organization obesity facebook Kenneth Kooky California Lubomirski University of California London
"kenneth kooky" Discussed on The Economist: Babbage

The Economist: Babbage

04:35 min | 1 year ago

"kenneth kooky" Discussed on The Economist: Babbage

"Of Millennia? Yes so obviously. There weren't people around two thousand two hundred years ago to measure soil moisture but we do have or trees going back that far and trees grow differently depending on the amount of moisture every year. You get tree rings where every year you have. A ring added to the trunk of the tree. And when conditions are warm and wet generally a tree tends to grow faster and during a drought when conditions are colder often and especially drier. The tree will grow more slowly in years. When you have a drought when moisture is particularly low. The tree ring will just be extremely narrow. Now Mega droughts have been around for a while in the past. So is it possible to tell how much this begged? Drought is due to man made climate change. How do you measure that? One of the things this study did was try to look at the contribution of climate. Change to this mega droughts that is still ongoing by the way according to their to their measures. And what you do there. Is you use climate models which allow us to in a sense run. Simulations of what the past leading into the president would have looked like with and without the impact of greenhouse gas emissions. And when you choose on what you find is that in all likelihood the southwest of the US would have experienced drought but it wouldn't have been as bad. They've got various estimates of the scale of that and when I spoke to the researchers they were fairly cautious about really pinning much to the numbers. I think there's something like fifty percent of the severity of the drought could be attributed to greenhouse gas emissions but the research was quite clear that that number specifically the absolute value is. Maybe not something that you would want to rely on too much. What's very clear is that you have the conditions. Set up right now for natural drowned. But it's made much much worse. It sort of tipped over into this mega drought scale by greenhouse gas emissions. Is there anything we can do to try to dampen for speak? The impact of the drought said the causes of draft in this region are layered and complex. You've got as we said. The sort of natural variability things like El Nino and La Nina cycles that will periodically dry out the region. You have climate change on top of that. That is drying out the region and then you also have human use of water particularly as a result tive agricultural perations and irrigation. Water Use in this particular region is very intense. It's been drying out huge watercourses like the Colorado River to the extent where irrigation is now tapping into underground aquifers and using up stores of water. That are not necessarily going to be certainly rapidly replenished. It's fairly clear that the water-management in this region is unsustainable and addressing. That will go some way to helping with the Drought Suda water. Authorities need to recalibrate their models to account for this. I think certainly that would help. And that's true for many different climate systems around the world. The other interesting thing. The the study highlighted was that the Twentieth Century unexpectedly was actually quite wet. When put into this thousand two hundred year historical context and Irrigation Water Management Policies that were established in the region were designed in the twentieth century based on these what turns out to be unrealistic expectations of water availability. I think it's important for the politicians in the region. And the policymakers in the region to realize that their systems are based on unrealistic historical expectations and certainly unrealistic expectations of what the future might bring capturing slinky. Burma thank you. And that's all for this episode of thank you for listening and while you're still with us give us a rating on apple podcasts. Or wherever you listen. I'm Kenneth Kooky and in west London. This is the economy.

Twentieth Century Kenneth Kooky Burma Colorado River US president apple London
"kenneth kooky" Discussed on The Economist: Babbage

The Economist: Babbage

04:43 min | 1 year ago

"kenneth kooky" Discussed on The Economist: Babbage

"Long does the process take so genetic testing you had everything lined up and you know you took your Swab and put it straight into a machine that can duly analysis and everything probably takes between five to seven hours but of course generally speaking swap has to be taken to the bar tree and then the whole thing tell batches and so typically seeing twenty four to forty eight hours between swells being taken unresolved coming along. Is there a way to do the test sooner? Maybe while the person is there in front of you yes. The genetic testing are discussed his was created just after the genetic sequence of the virus was published in January so the world health over relations. That's how some protocols and many public health agencies around the world built in test but essentially requires central laboratories is quite cumbersome so what needs to happen now and what is happening now companies are coming along and sort of commercializing the test a little bit by slotting them into platforms already exists so you can get platforms machines. Already that can do a whole lot of viral tests. We just need is the particular cartridge for that task. So they're developing those when you can do with. Those machines is that you might be able to have them. That could be the size of a desktop printer for example and they sit in clinics or maybe even doctor surgeries and you could plug in Someone sample do all the analysis in that machine gives you result. Maybe the couple of hours so that will be very useful for community spread and more details out in the community. And what's the timeframe for having those tests ready well attested? Companies have already created the technology to do it. They've already got the platform. The created the cartridges. They just need approval from health. Authorities to actually do it. Some of them are in the process of getting emergency. Authorities might take a few weeks but generally these things take many many months things. I guess speeded up because of the severity of the outbreak. So we're talking months. The most I think in this case now are there some places that have a shortage of tests for example America or Britain? America has a specific problem in that the Centers for Disease Control and prevention which is the American public health agency decided to create its own version of the. Who a test and the first version didn't work properly and so he had a bit of a lag in terms of fixing that and sending out the proper tests. So there's a little bit of a shortage but I do think it's something that's going to be a problem for them if they want to. Ramp Up. Production because companies can just Do that quite quickly. The UK has decided not to test everybody. They want to test people with symptoms and wanted to test people in hospitals. But not everybody and I spoke to the expert at the lone school hygiene tropical medicine. He told me that. Actually she thinks that's actually quite a good strategy to not continue the testing because he he got limited amount of resources and your priorities to make sure that whoever gets infection doesn't die from it all that the resources are spent on people who can be helped hospitals and at this stage. You don't need to do lots and lots more tests because those people who are not so severe will stay home anyway so there are tests available. It's just a case of allocating resources. Alec it seems to me that we're still flying blind into this pandemic because not doing random sampling so that we can pick up new things and learn new patterns of spread of the disease simply by looking at people who've symptoms as well as those who don't show symptoms. You're right I think actually read it and right now we're still in crisis mode and Resources Ltd and time is limited and people have multiple things to do. I mean if you're a doctor. He didn't have time to do research. You've got to just help people get over the infection. Once we have the blood tests that will become easy because those are very quick easy to do with a cheap that can be done on a large scale whenever arrives the next few weeks You can start to do random sampling much more easily and less invasive -ly than having to stick a piece of plastic and someone's throat and so. I think that you're right. That's the only way we're going to find out what this denominator is. How many people are actually infected? Then you can really tell how serious in terms of Death. Mortality Rates is who gets Symptoms how and people don't get symptoms. What does it look like when somebody doesn't have symptoms? I mean it passes on to other people people infectious there is so much we don't know and you're absolutely right. We need to do random sampling. We need more of these sorts of tests easily available to create until data set. Thank you very much. Thank you can. And that's all for this episode of Babich. Thank you to everyone who got involved and send us your questions. I'm Kenneth Kooky and from my home in west London where I'm social distancing. This is the economist.

Symptoms America Long Centers for Disease Control Kenneth Kooky UK Babich Resources Ltd London Alec Britain
"kenneth kooky" Discussed on The Economist: Babbage

The Economist: Babbage

07:30 min | 2 years ago

"kenneth kooky" Discussed on The Economist: Babbage

"Now regular. Babich listeners know that we occasionally giveaway a book on the show to the person who answers one of our imaginative have questions with insight and a fortnight ago we asked what aspect of the physical universe are we not aware of today because we cannot measure it but over the next fifty years we will be able to cover because we will be able to detect it. We received a Cornucopia of answers from measuring time to the Irish wish backstop a reference to brexit but our favorite and the winner comes from Laszlo Iraq a professor of digital electronics in Switzerland. Here is a portion of his answer answer. The fact today is that most of our observations of the world is based on electromagnetic waves. We measure everything with em waves radio-activity eighty x rays light infrared radar radio etcetera the few exceptions are tactile measurements sound ultrasound and astronomical. Gernon gravitational waves so how likely is it that we are missing something not just registering it because our equipment does not see it because it might might be not electromagnetic in other words most of the things detector based on electromagnetic waves and we have to think about the world in a different way that's non electromagnetic to measure it in an entirely new way to uncover new phenomenon that physics has so far not considered the congratulations Laszlo. He has won a copy of what Israel the unfinished for the Media Pont in physics by Adam Becker. Thanks to everyone who emailed us a reply participated in the contest and finally the scintillating being sound of smooth sand. Try saying that ten times fast. It's a tongue twister like she sells seashells on the seashore but what about she scientifically studies seashells along the seashore to fight back against Sam thieves well. That's what some scientists are striving to succeed feet at the demand for sand too serious so much so that go an entire beach some five hundred truckloads was stolen from a resort sort North Jamaica. Now scientists think they found a way to tell if Santa has been stolen but how does it actually work David Adams writing about at this for the economist. Hello David Hello David Weiss Stolen San such big issue paradoxically. There's not enough to go round. Although it looks like there's loads of sand is used massively in construction buildings and there's a boom in buildings especially in the developing world. Basically they can't dig enough sand above the ground. I'm cooking off so as a result people steal it. I mean sometimes. That's the easy way of doing it. They either will steal it from beaches for example. What is already there or they can legally mine? Oh you know because a lot of these countries you need a permit and they'll just go out and do it anyway. Dig a hole in the middle of the night and dig up sand okay so what is the process for identifying what sand sounds sounds like essentially sand is a collection of bits and between those bits is gas and some of those bits when you put them in water or acid dissolve into gas so if you take a handful of sand this they drop it into a very mild acid the sand burbs it releases the gas stuck between different grains is usually carbonate chemicals so it remains of shower of mollusks corals and things like that that are part of the sound as dissolve aw that produces carbon dioxide gas and the evolution of this gas will these bubbles change the sound properties of the liquid so far listers sisters who are wondering what a quote unquote sand burp sounds like this is what you would hear if you were actually to run the experimental though in this instance. We're using sodium carbonate. The noisy you can hear is a magnetic stirrer uh-huh. Maybe you just want to school. You know these jumping beans that fiddle around at the bottom of a beaker of water or acid and mix it together and the sound you can hear is just hitting the side of speaker the reason you hear the sound is because the sound is obviously travel through the liquid into the air and the more bubbles there are in the liquid the sweat without sound moves so what you will have heard that is a deepening of the note of the town and that's because it's taking longer for the sound and to reach us basically it's almost like the beaker of liquid becomes a loudspeaker if your hair in the bubbles in the water because they slow down the sound and that makes the pitch deeper so oh how scientists using this each batch of sound basically has its own signature sound and depending on where you get it from either weather beaches or even particular positions on a beach so if you have say ten samples and you have a reference sample you know this came from. I don't know a particular the beach and you give ten samples and say which sample came from this particular beach they can just basically match the acoustic fingerprint and this this acoustic fingerprint that applies to all the different sands in the world is unique. What else can we do with this technique. In terms of sand you can use is it to see what happens for example to the sound that people put on beaches as a way of trying to protect the coast so this study came the Netherlands where clearly that's a big issue because most to the country's below sea level instead of analytical techniques you can use it to premise distinguish any kind of power that has gas wrapped up in it so they've done it was salt for example. There's supposed Himalayan salt on the market. You know very expensive table salt but most of it's fake I mean there is more soul than he's ever been mind and you can do it with pharmaceutical compounds. You can find contaminants. Maybe contaminant would change the acoustic signature for example that terrible scandal a few years ago in China with baby milk powder and people died. You wouldn't necessarily know what it was that the the powder was contaminated with but you would see the signal had changed changed and therefore it wasn't pure now. I'm told that listeners can do this at home and it's called the hot chocolate method. Please explain it doesn't even have to be the hot chocolate so that's what it was called because the scientists who discovered it was making hot chocolate but almost the easiest way is just salt. Get get a cup of water and I've decent amount of so good tablespoon of salt and stir and has he stereo make sure the use of clatter the side of the glass with a spoon and you'll hear a Lincoln and in time it will deepen and then once all of that salt dissolved and all of the gases evolved from it and in your head sound go back to what it was before interesting so I can find out if it's Cadbury's hot chocolate or if it's sort of Godiva chocolate. Probably you might need to very sensitive microphone. Maybe you've got very sensitive is possible. Look David. Thank you very much you and that's all for this edition addition of Babich. Please don't forget to raise some apple podcasts. It's important so more people can discover and enjoy the show. I'm Kenneth Kooky and in London aspiring to travel in a flying taxi. This is the economist..

David Hello David Weiss Laszlo Iraq Switzerland Babich professor North Jamaica David Adams Kenneth Kooky Sam Israel Adam Becker Cadbury Santa Netherlands China London Lincoln
"kenneth kooky" Discussed on The Economist Radio

The Economist Radio

04:05 min | 2 years ago

"kenneth kooky" Discussed on The Economist Radio

"And finally engineers have recently demonstrated an artifice limb that users can control just by thinking about moving. They're missing arms or legs. It exploits a phenomenon known as phantom limb where amputees continue to feel sensations where the missing body part used to be to discuss how this works. I'm joined by lockjaw the economists science correspondent Hello Tyke in a lock moving. Prostatic spy thought is not actually knew. So what is actually happening now? So this that's been demonstrated by a team of French searches uses cold phantom limb phantom limb is widely nine phenomenon. When you if you have an all more leg, this missing often, you get a lot of pain still associated with the missing limb and say phantom limb is kind of seen as negative thing. And so what is new is? These researchers have used this kind of negative and kind of tabu thing to actually allow these patients to actually control. Prosthetic now. Yes, you can control processes using thoughts all electronics before. But it's quite invasive. So if you have an Alm that's missing surgeons might do is to take the nerves that used to supply that all those Huns, for example, and retouched them to some muscles in your chest. And then what you have to. Then do is learn certain twitches in your chest, which produce electricity in on your skin, which is the dent detected by electrodes, and then that will control your home. And it's quite invasive can be quite dangerous. But it's quite well known technique is called targeted muscle reinvasion and takes a long time to learn all his twitches. And sometimes it doesn't work people often give up so it's not great. So how is this technique different? So what the French scientists did in this case was rather than any surgery what they simply did attach some electrodes onto the skin of the stumps of to patients and these detected electrical presence on the muscle as the patients thought. About moving their phantom limbs, and those movements in their minds are associated with certain muscle twitches in the arm, which they didn't think about that just happen. And so the scientists in this case managed to detect those muscle twitches using electrodes and then use that to drive the percents arm downsides this technique. Well, so the algorithms in question didn't recognize the sort of speed or the amplitude of a person's movements. They recognize the type of movement. So if a person thought about closing the hand, then the algorithm would then close the hand of the prostatic, but you couldn't do it to sit in force or any of that the other thing. This was interesting was that the amount of processing compete depressing. It takes to read electrical signals on the arm processing permission and then move actual limit. There's a delay is half a second delay, which might not sound like huge amount. But as she stops you from embodying that percents part of your body that delays that makes you think it's something else. And it's very difficult to use in that case. So that has to be improved. But it sounds like these techniques are all things that do get improved with the young technology, and that this will be the new way that prostatic will function. Well, you'd hope so. Yeah. So I think I it seems to be much much simpler for start. You don't have any surgery much safer for that reason too much cheaper again surgeries always a difficult thing to do. And if you can stick three or four electrodes onto onto skin and find these sort of muscle actions allow to control the of course, they'll be it'd be much better. I think that the reason lots of development necessary because the techniques mentioned already the surgery and the other percents that quite what established for several years. Now, I think that the reason this happened more quickly than other technologies because the way that's the electrodes record information. And then pass it onto the prosthetic arm uses machine learning to detect patterns activity, which is not possible before. That's really interesting. Alec. Thank you very much. Very welcome. And that's all for this. Don't forget to pick up. The latest issue of the economist or. Online at economist dot com. I'm Kenneth kooky. In london. This is the economist.

Hello Tyke Kenneth kooky london Alec
"kenneth kooky" Discussed on The Economist: Babbage

The Economist: Babbage

04:05 min | 2 years ago

"kenneth kooky" Discussed on The Economist: Babbage

"And finally engineers have recently demonstrated an artifice limb that users can control just by thinking about moving. They're missing arms or legs. It exploits a phenomenon known as phantom limb where amputees continue to feel sensations where the missing body part used to be to discuss how this works. I'm joined by lockjaw the economists science correspondent Hello Tyke in a lock moving. Prostatic spy thought is not actually knew. So what is actually happening now? So this that's been demonstrated by a team of French searches uses cold phantom limb phantom limb is widely nine phenomenon. When you if you have an all more leg, this missing often, you get a lot of pain still associated with the missing limb and say phantom limb is kind of seen as negative thing. And so what is new is? These researchers have used this kind of negative and kind of tabu thing to actually allow these patients to actually control. Prosthetic now. Yes, you can control processes using thoughts all electronics before. But it's quite invasive. So if you have an Alm that's missing surgeons might do is to take the nerves that used to supply that all those Huns, for example, and retouched them to some muscles in your chest. And then what you have to. Then do is learn certain twitches in your chest, which produce electricity in on your skin, which is the dent detected by electrodes, and then that will control your home. And it's quite invasive can be quite dangerous. But it's quite well known technique is called targeted muscle reinvasion and takes a long time to learn all his twitches. And sometimes it doesn't work people often give up so it's not great. So how is this technique different? So what the French scientists did in this case was rather than any surgery what they simply did attach some electrodes onto the skin of the stumps of to patients and these detected electrical presence on the muscle as the patients thought. About moving their phantom limbs, and those movements in their minds are associated with certain muscle twitches in the arm, which they didn't think about that just happen. And so the scientists in this case managed to detect those muscle twitches using electrodes and then use that to drive the percents arm downsides this technique. Well, so the algorithms in question didn't recognize the sort of speed or the amplitude of a person's movements. They recognize the type of movement. So if a person thought about closing the hand, then the algorithm would then close the hand of the prostatic, but you couldn't do it to sit in force or any of that the other thing. This was interesting was that the amount of processing compete depressing. It takes to read electrical signals on the arm processing permission and then move actual limit. There's a delay is half a second delay, which might not sound like huge amount. But as she stops you from embodying that percents part of your body that delays that makes you think it's something else. And it's very difficult to use in that case. So that has to be improved. But it sounds like these techniques are all things that do get improved with the young technology, and that this will be the new way that prostatic will function. Well, you'd hope so. Yeah. So I think I it seems to be much much simpler for start. You don't have any surgery much safer for that reason too much cheaper again surgeries always a difficult thing to do. And if you can stick three or four electrodes onto onto skin and find these sort of muscle actions allow to control the of course, they'll be it'd be much better. I think that the reason lots of development necessary because the techniques mentioned already the surgery and the other percents that quite what established for several years. Now, I think that the reason this happened more quickly than other technologies because the way that's the electrodes record information. And then pass it onto the prosthetic arm uses machine learning to detect patterns activity, which is not possible before. That's really interesting. Alec. Thank you very much. Very welcome. And that's all for this. Don't forget to pick up. The latest issue of the economist or. Online at economist dot com. I'm Kenneth kooky. In london. This is the economist.

Hello Tyke Kenneth kooky london Alec
"kenneth kooky" Discussed on Command Line Heroes

Command Line Heroes

02:39 min | 2 years ago

"kenneth kooky" Discussed on Command Line Heroes

"Tools new frameworks new protocols new ways of thinking about data, and there's so much sort of innovation and change happening in that space. And so many different products and projects that are interacting that it's very hard to do that in a way that is sort of based on a traditional model where you have different companies having partnership agreements and co-development whatever open source to removes all of that friction. Sage while as a senior consulting engineer at red hat and the Seth project lead. I'm gonna circle back to Kenneth kooky from the economist. So we can zoom out a bit. Because I want us to remember that vision he had about our relationship with data and how we've progressed from clay tablets to the printing press to cloud-based wonders like the one sage built this is about human progress. And it is about how we can understand the world. And the empirical evidence of the world better to improve the world. It is the same mission of progress that humans have always been on. The mission never ends. But in the meantime, learning to process, the data we've gathered and put that flood to work. That's an open source mission for a whole generation. We are ending data journey with a quick stop at the Oak Ridge, National Laboratory in Tennessee, it's home to summit the world's fastest supercomputer, or at least fast as twenty eight teen this machine process is two hundred thousand trillion calculations per second. That's two hundred pedophile. If you're cutting processing speed like that isn't practical for hospitals or banks or all the thousands of organizations that benefit from high performance computing today supercomputers like summit, a reserved more for Hadron collider territory, but not again, we were once recording just one hundred bytes of info on clay, tablets, the story of data storage, data processing is one where extrordinary feats keep coming. The new normal one day, we might all have summit size supercomputers in our pockets. Think of the answers will be able to search for that. Next episode. We're going service or are. We episode seven is all about our involving relationship with cloud based development. We're figuring out how much of our work we can abstract, and what we might be giving

Kenneth kooky engineer Oak Ridge National Laboratory Tennessee one hundred bytes one day
"kenneth kooky" Discussed on Command Line Heroes

Command Line Heroes

04:57 min | 2 years ago

"kenneth kooky" Discussed on Command Line Heroes

"The tidal waves are on the horizon. This is episode six of season to the data flood. So how do we handle such enormous amounts of data? How will we make use of that data once it's captured big data is going to solve some of our most complicated problems. How we manage traffic? How we grow food. How we deliver supplies to those in need. But only once we figure out how to work with all that data how to process it and at breakneck speed by having more data. We can drill down into these sub groups particulars these details in a ways that we never could before Kenneth kooky is a senior editor at the economist. And he's also the host of their tech podcast called Babbit JR. It's not to say that we couldn't collect the data before we could it just was really really expensive. The real revolution. Is that we can collect these this data very easily. It's very inexpensive. And the processing is. Super simple because it's all done by computer. This is become the huge revolution of our era. And it is probably the most defining aspect of modern life. And we'll be for the next next several decades if not the next century. That's why big data such a big deal a little history can remind us how radical that changes been think about four thousand years ago, we were scratching all our data into dried slabs of mud. These clay discs were heavy the data that is imprinted in them. Once they're baked can't be changed. And all of these features of how information was processed stored transferred created has changed right changed big tied around the year. Fourteen. Fifty you get the first information revolution with the invention of the printing press and today, we have our own revolution. It's lightweight. It can be chained super simply because we can just use the delete key and change the stance of the information that we have in whether it's magnetic tape bore in the transition electron electric transistors processes, we have. We could transport it at the speed of light on like say this that you have to carry. The printing press leveled up our understanding of things with the fifteenth century flood of data that ushered in the enlightenment and today big data can level up again. But only if we figure out how to take advantage of all that data only if we built the dams and the turbines that will put the flood to work, there is a huge gap between what is possible, and what companies and individuals and organizations are doing, and that's really important because we can already see that. There is this latent value in the data at the cost of collecting, storing and processing the data has really dropped down considerably to where it was of course hundred years ago, but even just ten years ago, and that's really exciting. But the problem is that culturally, and in our organizational processes, and even in the budgets that are CFO's and our CIO's a lot today. We're not there yet. Super frustrating when you think about it enlightenment knocking at the door. And nobody's answering part of the reason we're not answering though is that well who's actually behind the door. What's all this data gonna deliver? Kenneth figures, the newness of big data keep some companies from taking that leap. So what is the value of the data? Once you collect a lot of it. The most honest answer is if you think, you know, you're a fool because you can never identify today all the ways with which you're going to put the data to uses tomorrow. So the most important thing is to have the data and to have an open mind and all the ways that it could be used. What can it's envisioning? If we get big data right is a wholesale transformation of our attitudes towards what's possible a world where everybody not just data. Scientists can see the potential in gain insight by understanding. The world is one in which we can. Collect empirical evidence about it in order to understand it and in order to change it and improve it improvements can happen in an automated fashion. We will see the world in a different way. And I think that's the really interesting change. That's happening now culturally or psychologically around the world where policymakers and business people and Starbucks barista's, everyone and all walks of life sort of have the data, gene..

Kenneth kooky Starbucks Babbit JR senior editor CFO CIO four thousand years hundred years ten years
"kenneth kooky" Discussed on The Economist Radio

The Economist Radio

04:59 min | 3 years ago

"kenneth kooky" Discussed on The Economist Radio

"Hello and welcome to Babyjohn communists radio. I'm Kenneth kooky a senior editor of the economist and coming up later in the show I will be discussing cybersecurity with Michael Chertoff the former US secretary of homeland security in China. They are now working on a proposal for show credit score including who your friends are and what they do, and they will decide if you're a good citizen, you're a bad citizen that begins to make nineteen four look like a nursery school. But before that this week has had the announcement from Jack Ma the founder of the Chinese ecommerce giant Alibaba that he will be stepping down as the firm's chairman a year from now to concentrate. Another causes from its humble beginnings in an apartment in Hong Zhou in one thousand nine hundred nine Alibaba's rise and Mr. MAs along the way is a symbol of the success of China's own internet and economic boom. His announcement therefore makes it a good time to look at his legacy and ask the question, could China ever produce another story like Jack Ma to discuss this? I'm joined on the phone by Stephanie Studer, the economists, senior China business correspondent of, oh, Stephanie headache. And so this must be huge news in China. What was the reaction to it? Yes, it has been big news here. So investors, he been watching the company closely. It's perhaps been not as bait because Jack Ma had been distancing him. From the day to day running of the company. He stepped down as CEO in twenty thirteen, but of coolest, full hundreds of entre preneurs hair in China Hume. He is an icon, a symbol of success. I think that this was a surprise shock and people expect. However, he will remain in the public presence for many years to come through house trauma Mel compared to the China twenty years ago that gave rise to him and can we see another figure with such a meteoric rise? Part of the reason why it'd be difficult to see another Jack Ma is because China hasn't plea changed so much when it started off in nine thousand nine hundred nine China hadn't yet joined the WTO. It was just gearing up to do that in the almost twenty years. The Alibaba has been operating middle class. Incomes have risen dramatically. In China. The internet expanded unruly Alibaba has been able to capitalize. Beginning I e comas, but now expanding out into so many areas of the economy be that finance healthcare, even insurance on that too, of course, makes it more difficult to imagine somebody creating a business so disruptive that it would have the statue of analogy baba. Is he still considered an icon for sparring entrepreneurs or or others taking that mantle to very much considered an icon. I think it's partly because of the source of thicker that he cuts. He has been unusually bold in charismatic for a Boston China. Obviously, he his skillfully worked with the government which is essential to doing business hair in China, says knee when you get his lodge is Alibaba. But I think he's also been able to push the boundary sometimes a little bit. And when he speaks on stage, many will remember quotes then memorialize. And inspirational says. But of course, is a new rising generation in China. Now, a younger generation of founders he assaulted that companies need with the last five to ten years. And so in some ways that business moguls and the way that they manage that companies may start to become more relatable for younger generation of aspiring entrepreneurs to might be more restrictions on these new generation of entrepreneurs. I think that's where my son in. It's probably the greatest obstacle to seeing another Jack Ma awry is in China. When he started off the government was concerned the time about company that will growing so disruptive since then it his cool top in understanding what it thinks it needs to regulate a now under he Jinping, the current ruler wants to have a say earlier on much earlier on in development of. Important businesses and even Barbara sofas feeling that it has been difficult for its fintech off, shoots and financial to grow in the way that the Jack Ma was hoping it would amend the renew it technology companies, for example, bite Don, Stony up in twenty twelve which has already gone so far as to apologize to the government for certain content on its apps. So it's definitely a changed environment. Now. Thank you very much. Thank you..

China Jack Ma Alibaba China Hume founder Kenneth kooky Michael Chertoff Babyjohn Stephanie Studer Hong Zhou US senior editor WTO Mr. MAs chairman Boston Jinping Mel CEO
"kenneth kooky" Discussed on The Economist: Babbage

The Economist: Babbage

04:59 min | 3 years ago

"kenneth kooky" Discussed on The Economist: Babbage

"Hello and welcome to Babyjohn communists radio. I'm Kenneth kooky a senior editor of the economist and coming up later in the show I will be discussing cybersecurity with Michael Chertoff the former US secretary of homeland security in China. They are now working on a proposal for show credit score including who your friends are and what they do, and they will decide if you're a good citizen, you're a bad citizen that begins to make nineteen four look like a nursery school. But before that this week has had the announcement from Jack Ma the founder of the Chinese ecommerce giant Alibaba that he will be stepping down as the firm's chairman a year from now to concentrate. Another causes from its humble beginnings in an apartment in Hong Zhou in one thousand nine hundred nine Alibaba's rise and Mr. MAs along the way is a symbol of the success of China's own internet and economic boom. His announcement therefore makes it a good time to look at his legacy and ask the question, could China ever produce another story like Jack Ma to discuss this? I'm joined on the phone by Stephanie Studer, the economists, senior China business correspondent of, oh, Stephanie headache. And so this must be huge news in China. What was the reaction to it? Yes, it has been big news here. So investors, he been watching the company closely. It's perhaps been not as bait because Jack Ma had been distancing him. From the day to day running of the company. He stepped down as CEO in twenty thirteen, but of coolest, full hundreds of entre preneurs hair in China Hume. He is an icon, a symbol of success. I think that this was a surprise shock and people expect. However, he will remain in the public presence for many years to come through house trauma Mel compared to the China twenty years ago that gave rise to him and can we see another figure with such a meteoric rise? Part of the reason why it'd be difficult to see another Jack Ma is because China hasn't plea changed so much when it started off in nine thousand nine hundred nine China hadn't yet joined the WTO. It was just gearing up to do that in the almost twenty years. The Alibaba has been operating middle class. Incomes have risen dramatically. In China. The internet expanded unruly Alibaba has been able to capitalize. Beginning I e comas, but now expanding out into so many areas of the economy be that finance healthcare, even insurance on that too, of course, makes it more difficult to imagine somebody creating a business so disruptive that it would have the statue of analogy baba. Is he still considered an icon for sparring entrepreneurs or or others taking that mantle to very much considered an icon. I think it's partly because of the source of thicker that he cuts. He has been unusually bold in charismatic for a Boston China. Obviously, he his skillfully worked with the government which is essential to doing business hair in China, says knee when you get his lodge is Alibaba. But I think he's also been able to push the boundary sometimes a little bit. And when he speaks on stage, many will remember quotes then memorialize. And inspirational says. But of course, is a new rising generation in China. Now, a younger generation of founders he assaulted that companies need with the last five to ten years. And so in some ways that business moguls and the way that they manage that companies may start to become more relatable for younger generation of aspiring entrepreneurs to might be more restrictions on these new generation of entrepreneurs. I think that's where my son in. It's probably the greatest obstacle to seeing another Jack Ma awry is in China. When he started off the government was concerned the time about company that will growing so disruptive since then it his cool top in understanding what it thinks it needs to regulate a now under he Jinping, the current ruler wants to have a say earlier on much earlier on in development of. Important businesses and even Barbara sofas feeling that it has been difficult for its fintech off, shoots and financial to grow in the way that the Jack Ma was hoping it would amend the renew it technology companies, for example, bite Don, Stony up in twenty twelve which has already gone so far as to apologize to the government for certain content on its apps. So it's definitely a changed environment. Now. Thank you very much. Thank you..

China Jack Ma Alibaba China Hume founder Kenneth kooky Michael Chertoff Babyjohn Stephanie Studer Hong Zhou US senior editor WTO Mr. MAs chairman Boston Jinping Mel CEO
"kenneth kooky" Discussed on The Economist Radio

The Economist Radio

04:23 min | 3 years ago

"kenneth kooky" Discussed on The Economist Radio

"Hello and welcome to Babich on communist radio. I'm Kenneth kooky a senior editor at the economist and coming up on today's show. Eleven European governments are mandating that research gets published in open access journals. So this would immediately rule out as it stands eighty percent of journals. So what are we going to do that. And could the future of manufacturing optical fiber be in space? I think definitely we're going to be seeing more made in faith capabilities that make our current kneeing theme. Almost our catch and primitive. But first social media platforms are in the docks, again getting grilled by politicians in Washington DC, but how to regulate them is the bigger question to discuss this. I'm joined on the phone by Gadayev Stein. The economists media editor who's been writing about it for this week's paper halloo gatty. Hello? Ken. How of the big tech platforms been shielded from liability for the contantly carry? Right. So since nineteen ninety six, the Communications Decency Act as protected them under section two thirty, which basically says that they're not to be held responsible or internet services are not to be held responsible for content of the Kerry basically over their wires or that is published on their platforms. Now, this is before the existence of any of these social media platforms, and it was it was a law meant to protect, you know, internet service providers and allow them to be intermediaries without being sued. And it was also to encourage them to be good citizens about policing their content. So the social media companies inherited that protection. And so why is that broken down? Why do people want to change it now? Well, the idea behind it was that you give them a shield. Politicians would put it this way and they. They use their discretion and responsibility to keep their platforms clean. And the view and Capitol Hill is that they haven't held up their part of the bargain. They've allowed election interference. They're not protecting data. There's fake news spreading all throughout their platforms. There is a demand for accountability. And so what might that accountability look like? What would new rules be like? Well, it's possible they could lose their special protection and it's unclear what would happen at that point in how a new kind of regime would look. They're certainly going to be under more scrutiny. I'm sure the tech companies are going to try and come up with proposals about how they can better self-regulate. And beyond that, I think we're speculating there could be who knows external oversight of some sort. There'll be a lot of resistance though, to politicians getting involved in regulating these companies. Why should that be the case? It seems like Donald Trump is always on Twitter. People want him to be more activist. Well, I'm not so sure everybody would agree that we want Donald Trump to be more activists. I'm sure some people would like him to be a lot less activist. I think a lot of people would like the tech platforms to do a better job of being stewards of what goes on their platforms. But what comes with combating fake news with combating hate speech is also the specter of censorship. And of course, the argument that comes from companies like Facebook and YouTube, and there is a lot of sympathy for that. If you can imagine regulating one of these companies in authority -tarian environment, like in China, then you basically have limited freedom of expression online. That is worrying. So what does sensible middle of the road regulation look like and other companies willing to adhere to it? I don't think we have an answer yet on what sensible regulation looks like. I don't think we have an answer yet, Hon. What is the proper way to even police these platforms and how where they should draw the line? These are questions. NHS that basically we've never had to face before. I mean, Facebook is everything from where you share your baby photos to where conspiracy theories spread about crisis actors in school shootings. The breath of what is dealt with on platforms like Facebook and YouTube is something that is a new challenge that we have yet to come up with philosophical framework that is sufficient to address it..

Donald Trump Facebook YouTube Kenneth kooky Babich senior editor Gadayev Stein editor NHS Washington China Ken Twitter Kerry eighty percent
"kenneth kooky" Discussed on The Economist: Babbage

The Economist: Babbage

04:23 min | 3 years ago

"kenneth kooky" Discussed on The Economist: Babbage

"Hello and welcome to Babich on communist radio. I'm Kenneth kooky a senior editor at the economist and coming up on today's show. Eleven European governments are mandating that research gets published in open access journals. So this would immediately rule out as it stands eighty percent of journals. So what are we going to do that. And could the future of manufacturing optical fiber be in space? I think definitely we're going to be seeing more made in faith capabilities that make our current kneeing theme. Almost our catch and primitive. But first social media platforms are in the docks, again getting grilled by politicians in Washington DC, but how to regulate them is the bigger question to discuss this. I'm joined on the phone by Gadayev Stein. The economists media editor who's been writing about it for this week's paper halloo gatty. Hello? Ken. How of the big tech platforms been shielded from liability for the contantly carry? Right. So since nineteen ninety six, the Communications Decency Act as protected them under section two thirty, which basically says that they're not to be held responsible or internet services are not to be held responsible for content of the Kerry basically over their wires or that is published on their platforms. Now, this is before the existence of any of these social media platforms, and it was it was a law meant to protect, you know, internet service providers and allow them to be intermediaries without being sued. And it was also to encourage them to be good citizens about policing their content. So the social media companies inherited that protection. And so why is that broken down? Why do people want to change it now? Well, the idea behind it was that you give them a shield. Politicians would put it this way and they. They use their discretion and responsibility to keep their platforms clean. And the view and Capitol Hill is that they haven't held up their part of the bargain. They've allowed election interference. They're not protecting data. There's fake news spreading all throughout their platforms. There is a demand for accountability. And so what might that accountability look like? What would new rules be like? Well, it's possible they could lose their special protection and it's unclear what would happen at that point in how a new kind of regime would look. They're certainly going to be under more scrutiny. I'm sure the tech companies are going to try and come up with proposals about how they can better self-regulate. And beyond that, I think we're speculating there could be who knows external oversight of some sort. There'll be a lot of resistance though, to politicians getting involved in regulating these companies. Why should that be the case? It seems like Donald Trump is always on Twitter. People want him to be more activist. Well, I'm not so sure everybody would agree that we want Donald Trump to be more activists. I'm sure some people would like him to be a lot less activist. I think a lot of people would like the tech platforms to do a better job of being stewards of what goes on their platforms. But what comes with combating fake news with combating hate speech is also the specter of censorship. And of course, the argument that comes from companies like Facebook and YouTube, and there is a lot of sympathy for that. If you can imagine regulating one of these companies in authority -tarian environment, like in China, then you basically have limited freedom of expression online. That is worrying. So what does sensible middle of the road regulation look like and other companies willing to adhere to it? I don't think we have an answer yet on what sensible regulation looks like. I don't think we have an answer yet, Hon. What is the proper way to even police these platforms and how where they should draw the line? These are questions. NHS that basically we've never had to face before. I mean, Facebook is everything from where you share your baby photos to where conspiracy theories spread about crisis actors in school shootings. The breath of what is dealt with on platforms like Facebook and YouTube is something that is a new challenge that we have yet to come up with philosophical framework that is sufficient to address it..

Donald Trump Facebook YouTube Kenneth kooky Babich senior editor Gadayev Stein editor NHS Washington China Ken Twitter Kerry eighty percent
"kenneth kooky" Discussed on The Economist: Babbage

The Economist: Babbage

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"kenneth kooky" Discussed on The Economist: Babbage

"Biggest problems of all i think it's pretty spectacular actually and so from this database we can learn more about what has happened in the past ten billion years do you think we'll be able to use it to predict the next ten billion oh certainly certainly i mean we're on the embiid of guy is to provide a high resolution map of how the dog mattress distributed in the milky way it's probably possible we don't know it might take twenty years to get that phone but once we know how the dot matter distribution how much over there is then we can work out what accurately when and how we are going to move with the andromeda galaxy maybe five six seven billion years in the future not that far away not long after aaron sundays the milky way and andromeda will merge together and all of the other stuff and what we call the lego group and now patch of the universe will merge together into a new giant single galaxy ola history will be forgotten washed out at that stage so it'd be very dull being an astronomer off to that you have no idea what happened on that will create this big star pile and when we know how the dow matters distributed we'll be able to work out how that's going to happen win that's going to happen in much greater detail and so we will quite literally be able to predict the death of the milky way as well as exploring it's booth that's all for this show i'm kenneth kooky and in london this is the bunch of robots producing the economist the right hire can have such an impact on your business that's why you should post your job unlinked in it intelligently targets candidates based on their skills recommendations even how open they are to new opportunities insights that are only on the link in network so your post is matched to the best people for the job that's why new hire is made every ten seconds using lincoln go to lincoln dot com slash economist podcast for fifty dollars off your first job post that's linked dot com slash economist podcast terms and conditions apply

aaron kenneth kooky london lincoln five six seven billion years ten billion years fifty dollars twenty years ten seconds
"kenneth kooky" Discussed on The Economist Radio

The Economist Radio

03:05 min | 3 years ago

"kenneth kooky" Discussed on The Economist Radio

"Hello and welcome to babich on a communist radio i'm kenneth kooky a senior editor at the economist and coming up on this week show the laurien growth of bogus scientific journals everyone who's participating in the scam has found a way to profit from it does the football world cup continues we discuss if there is an optimal strategy to the penalty shootout what's also interesting about how is this basically no relationship between the quality of the team on who's going to win for years american space companies have gone into the stratosphere looking for new business opportunities the chinese have not been players but that's all changing today a new chinese private space company called one space is entering the field after successful launch it may it is looking to get into the game using solid fuel not liquid fuel like the americans use joining me in the studio to discuss one space and just what is solid fuel and why it's important is how hodson the economists science and technology correspondent hello how harry akin so tell us first about the launch so the loan chapman in may was by the standards of your space x and your blue origins that the american private space companies this was kind of small potatoes but it's still china's first private space launch it was a nine meter solid fuel rocket did a parabola that was about two hundred and sixty kilometers long and forty kilometers high landing in the chinese desert and this is a pretty big step for china's private space industry which has gone from non existence in two thousand and fifteen to four or five competing launch companies multiple micro sat companies and it's moving quite quickly and one thing that's distinctive about the company is that's role that it plays with solid fuel that's right so all of the american private space companies use liquid fuel now there are advantages and disadvantages of each liquidfuel allows you to control your rocket a little bit better you can throw it up be constructed down but it is more expensive to handle than solid fuel so the field just more convenient and easier it also makes for slightly smaller rocket an overall it makes for cheaper launches especially when you get down to small rockets which are going to be launching these small satellites and seeing as that's kind of the the seems like may be quite quite fortuitous move from the from the chinese companies so if it's so smart to you solid fuels why wouldn't american pioneers who are in privatization of space these themselves i don't know the answer to the that but i think it has a lot to do with the sort of historical government legacy of state run programs the chinese state launches have relied more on solid fuel than the us ones as far as i can tell but it seems to just be to my current knowledge a quirk of the ways that the programs have operated to this point the the new chinese private firms are definitely builds upon the chinese state technology but the idea is that they can move faster build rockets for cheaper and start to innovate and create new designs based on that so.

senior editor kenneth kooky forty kilometers sixty kilometers nine meter
"kenneth kooky" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:23 min | 3 years ago

"kenneth kooky" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The spread of ideas in that can make a tremendous difference and so i do think we have this wonderful kind of tool at our fingertips we just have to be i think a little bit careful weather choosing out winger returns later to describe why exactly we need to be careful but first let's just say big data is like is like a super born term right like i don't even know if people are good download this episode it is the most vibrant thing happening in the world today this is kenneth kooky a he is a senior editor of the economist and co author of the book big data where you've heard about how all that data flying off of us all the time that kind of digital exhaust is changing the way we live if every aspect of living gets this shadow to at this veneer of data suddenly we can learn new things that we never could before and i see it as part of the sort of timeless march that we've been on of improving our society by applying our reason to it and our technical skills to it in an our technical skills the really the skills were building and our computers to process huge amounts of data in a way the human brain never could kenneth explained all this on the ted stage so what is the value of big data well think about it you have more information you can do things that you couldn't do before one of the most impressive areas where this concept is taking place is in the area of machinelearning came machine learning is a branch of artificial intelligence which itself is a branch of computer science the general idea is that instead of instructing or computer what to do we were going to simply flow data at the problem and tell the computer to figure it out for itself and it'll help you understand it by seeing its origins okay in the 1950s a computer scientists that ibm name arthur samuel like to play checkers so he wrote a computer program so he could play against the computer he played he won he played he won because the computer only knew what a legal move for us so he wrote a small subprogramme alongside.

kenneth kooky machinelearning artificial intelligence computer science arthur samuel ibm
"kenneth kooky" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:04 min | 3 years ago

"kenneth kooky" Discussed on KQED Radio

"To be careful the first let's just say big data is like is like a superpartner term right like i don't even know if people argued like download this efsa it is the most vibrant thing happening in the world today this is kenneth kooky a he is a senior editor of the economist and co author of the book big data where he wrote about how all that data flying off of us all the time that kind of digital exhaust is changing the way we live if every aspect of living gets this shadow too at this veneer of data suddenly we can learn new things that we never could before and i see it as part of the sort of timeless march that we've been on of improving our society by applying our reason to it and our technical skills to it and our technical skills the really the skills were building in dark to process huge amounts of data in a way the human brain never could kenneth explained all this on the ted stage so what is the value of big data well think about it you have more information you can do things that you couldn't do before uh one of the most impressive areas where this concept is taking place is in the area of machinelearning came she learning is a branch of artificial intelligence which itself has a branch of computer science the general idea is that instead of instructing a computer what to do we are going to simply throw data at the problem and tell the computer to figure out for itself and it'll help you understand it by seeing its origins okay in the 1950s a computer scientists that ibm name arthur samuel like to play checkers so he wrote a computer program so he could play against the computer he played he won he played he won because the computer only knew what a legal move for us so he wrote a small subprogramme alongside.

kenneth kooky machinelearning artificial intelligence computer science arthur samuel ibm
"kenneth kooky" Discussed on The Economist Radio

The Economist Radio

01:39 min | 4 years ago

"kenneth kooky" Discussed on The Economist Radio

"Hello and welcome to bob age from the world of science and technology why fishermen in alaska are having a way lee bad catch so the mess current estimates of how much the wells are taking off the the are between five and fifteen kilograms her every 100 heck's that are baited on a line and a familiar voice joins us it is great to be back on the show it's kenneth kooky a he sat down with technology veteran timor riley to discuss where we're all so negative of at the years ahead technology does not want to eliminate jobs it wants to solve problems i'm how hudson the technology correspondent for the economist and your host for today our first story is hush off the press minutes ago the journal nature announced an important element in gene editing crisper is often described as acting like a pair of scissors sniffing out mistakes in the dna code however scientists have now developed a new technique natasha loda is the economist healthcare correspondent and she's been following this story natasha i understand their able to change the dna without cutting it yes that's right a team at harvard university has found a way to do something could face editing and this is when you change the leftists have code on a dna strand without cutting is a tool and that's a direct chemical manipulation that they're doing on dna in simple times what they mean is they've taken the crisp cast nine editing system that the old one that cuts demands swaps out.

alaska kenneth kooky technology correspondent natasha loda harvard university lee hudson fifteen kilograms