6 Burst results for "Kennedy Archives"

"kennedy archives" Discussed on KPRC 950 AM

KPRC 950 AM

04:37 min | 3 months ago

"kennedy archives" Discussed on KPRC 950 AM

"Well, I mean, when we have a birthday party for a building and half the city shows up in a line, there's refreshments. I or people cry? Oh, the summits, not the seven anymore. It's a church. That's the funniest part about it. Quite honestly, the fact that the city remakes things And they like that A basketball stadium turns into a church is the most Houston thing ever. We should actually embrace that. The funniest thing about that what That would be. The funniest thing is, if they kept the banners hanging up in the rafters, I should screw it. I don't care. Just get him like that's why I like the dome. Put him above the pulpit when the dome was gonna turn into a parking garage. That was the most Houston thing ever. Oh, yeah. Just the most Houston thing ever just turning it into a parking garage because it's like a monument to the fact that we love cars. Just do that, like everything should be. You know, that's the most I wish they would have just blown over the fact that it left a pile of rubble there. Just like Leave it there. Don't move it. You guys come get it. Whatever. Bring your bring your diesel trucks and your and your lifted If you need some concrete and rebar, you're lifted four by fours and crap with like the backwards Texan logo on the back. You know that. You know that your buddy made at the flea market, you know, just come in. Grab your rebar and grab your concrete and just The fact that Astro world is like a parking lot to eat this like that's the most. What if they blew love? This isn't sold the pieces off because you know somebody would buy because I'm a dummy that has $400 Astrodome seats in my living room. Are they comfortable? No, I don't sit in them. They're gross. I brought. I brought him home years ago I had to clean, like old like coked syrup bottle of woman like there was like Popcorn kernels on him and stuff. They're an albatross. I don't want home. Did you immediately go? Oh, what did I do? Really? I did because then I had to buy a $200 like brackets so they could like, Sit up, right. So now you're 600. They're happy. They're heavy is held to pick up like I want to sell them really bad there. Like I said, they're an albatross around my neck. I don't want him I'd buy him but they're too expensive for me. And I feel bad If you have to come get him from my apartment like bringing down the elevator. Come get him, But I don't want to pay $600. For some seeds. I just don't want to do that. Are you saying that I should just give him to, you know? No. I think you want them. I would take them if you were throwing them into the curb. If you're thrown into the curb I take. Um I wouldn't. I would actually probably give you a couple $100 just to take him off my hands. No, I no, no, no, I would Venmo. Yours l or whatever it is. I didn't know you $200. I don't know if those were craps from me. No, I wouldn't take him from you Would I would I would take him if I see if some guy goes. Hey, I'm getting rid of my dome seats for 100 bucks. I'd probably go get those. But the thing is, they're in. They were in investment. I'm not going to sit in them. I'm gonna put him in my office because I have a home with an office. Nobody wants to sit in those things. You know what they feel horrible. There's a space where no one can sit in the office at the ceiling Slower. It's a zoo space where I have memorabilia. Mark my words. By the end of this year, you will have a pair of dome seats of your house. We'll revisit this in a year if the Lord Terry's and ill and you could be like Craig What happened on the show this week. Well, we talked about Justin getting my Astrodome seats. I'm just there. Have your Kennedy papers. You should do you have my Kennedy archives. I guess it's just I'm taking Kevin, by the way. I think you could normally burn him with another high. Figured you guys burned him during the freeze just for warmth for the family. So that was like, No, They're very thin paper. It would be like, boom. It wouldn't be if you like. They're hanging up there. Not seconds of warmth there framed. I guess I just really want to give things away. And part of the dome seats is that I got them at an A in one of those, like fits of nostalgic mania where I was like, I gotta get these before they tear the dome down. It's a decade later. It's still there. Nobody cares. It's just sitting there. I still think that you should run for some sort of a office in the city, and we should blow up the dome and then have people come pick up the rubble. Yeah, that's a good idea. For $2. A truck lie would sell each one of those like The windows on the top flight $500 apiece. That's some dumb ass like that has a bar in town, like put him on the back of the bar.

$200 $400 $600 $500 100 bucks $2 Kevin 600 Houston Justin this week $100 Craig end of this year Venmo a decade later Kennedy each one Lord Texan
"kennedy archives" Discussed on Moonrise

Moonrise

05:54 min | 1 year ago

"kennedy archives" Discussed on Moonrise

"Hopeful pros of Kennedy's speech may give the impression that he had been won over by the Grand Promise of scientific achievement men to the moon shot represented not exactly later that fall of nineteen sixty two JFK they had a meeting in the Oval Office that laid bare his views on space. There was a secret recording made of this meeting reading and it's incredible. It's so cool. It's like you listen to. It and it's like you're a fly on the wall for Kennedy's moon conversations in the White House it took about forty years from the conversation for the Kennedy Archives to find this recording and make it public. Good things come to those who made the the whole process of declassifying information is is is complex. This is Jamie Roth the deputy director of the Kennedy Library. We didn't know about the tapes until after the Watergate scandal happened. Nixon talked about how presidents had taping system but once they were found and then declassified and finally released the audio gave a really amazing window into Kennedy's Kennedy's views on the moonshot particularly this recording of the Oval Office meeting in the fall of sixty two. The tape is a bit hard to make out clearly in spots but I'm obviously going to play it for you anyway because it's so fascinating this is November twenty first nineteen sixty two at the White House and Kennedy is arguing with NASA administrator. Jim Webb about the progress of the Apollo Program. You know I do not. I think you were okay so JFK's asking Jim Webb here. If if the Moon Program is Nastase top priority and web actually says No. He says we have a bunch of top priorities and Kennedy. He's like Whoa stop right there. Clear Kennedy political the region work. The president is saying like it or not. We are doing this for international geopolitical reasons and we are in a race here. Web starts to push back on him saying listen soon. This is hard. NASA might need more time and resources to pull this off web says that live under the condition addition and the President's science advisor Jerome Wiesner cuts in the service and we're making the wildest guess sure they're all going back and forth and they're getting kind of riled up. The scientists are like we need you to support all all these other space science initiatives that will help us get to the moon we can't actually land there unless we put some time and money into figuring out these related space. Speiss challenges and Kennedy's Lake. Let me be very clear. There's only one reason we're spending this kind of money and even going to the moon at all to beat the Russians that we do order to get all of the ball every time. They believe that we've told people were preeminent in space. No one believes us. It's like what we need is to just get to the moon. It's fun to listen to the dynamic and the tension and seeing the president asking questions and and and really discovering what he's looking for and web giving it back to the president on bit saying you know what you're talking about and can use your right. I don't I am not interested enough. Now should be sending money because I'm not that interested. Statement gets good. We ought to know about it. Reasonable to whip partner by in Asia is to be damn where I'm not that interested in space. That's the big takeaway. Though the only justification to do it is because we hope to be them Kennedy as real from conversations that happened in the White House. It's that they're on tape now. We Kennedy really didn't care about the space program Nasa Bill Barry again but Web saw the space program is a is a very different if you did just what the president asked you to do which is sending people are GonNa get back. All you're really doing is a political spectacular which really has has no basis in reality and you so web is making the argument throughout the sixties whenever he meets the president that you know we need to have a robust based program we need. We may be studying the planet's. It's we need to be doing research. All kinds of things not just building a rocket. This in three is to the moon and Kennedy's not interested the tension between Kennedy Mighty and web kept bubbling up over the course of the following year Kennedy's a Boston. Your Democratic Democrat politician and web is an old southern boy who's used to talking a lot and explaining things and making his pitch and so they really roussel oil water in many ways.

Kennedy president Kennedy Archives Kennedy Library White House Jim Webb JFK NASA Oval Office NASA administrator Jamie Roth Jerome Wiesner Apollo Program deputy director Nixon Bill Barry Boston
"kennedy archives" Discussed on The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

04:07 min | 2 years ago

"kennedy archives" Discussed on The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

"So to think that it was faked. And go back and fight again. And again, and again and that you could have a conspiracy minutes, four hundred thousand people involved in the Apollo project, and the I could fake. It's crazy. So I didn't even bring it out. You could have you could have a conspiracy with four hundred thousand people. But it would last seven second. Full people lost seven seconds. I think what it speaks to is the kind of unbelievable nature of what happened. If you look back at sixty one sixty two America as a rocket up just Abou it's come back, and that sort of eat of a candidate come up with this goal. And I looked to the Kennedy archives where he's so scientific advises at going. Well, we could build a space station because I want something bigger. Well, we could send something to the moon bigger can send a person to moon and then he adds to the top of by the end of the decade, it's just ridiculous. And yet they did it so not to learn lessons from the psychology. I think it's a real shame. And I was astounded that, that in this fifty years sat down and try to work out psychologically, how the whole thing being put together reminds me of Roger Bannister, the first man to, to run the four minute, mile and up until the time before he. He did it people getting close. But, but people thought it couldn't be done. Couldn't be done, and then he did it. He broke the barrier the four minute mile. And then after that, it was happening over much more rapidly. Other people were doing 'cause people say that there was a psychological barrier about that four minute mile. Absolutely. Yeah. I think we just convinced selves certain things on possible, and actually, one of the lessons from stretch goes is that, you know, even if you don't reach that mazing go, you will over before you would do very well. So I think that's really important. And the book is full of kind of exercises and just getting back to that mistake mistake coach. There's a love the exercise, which state backs to Caen, even though it's been kind of forgotten now, which is most of the moment would say, oh, if you're going to keep a journal end of each day, right, down the best thing that's happened to you because it makes you feel good for you. Get to bed. Con Niki actually kept a journal which was called damn stupid things. I've done. He wrote down the end of each day, the most stupid thing he'd settled on what he could do in the future to stop that happening again. And that's all part of this kind of, like we open about these mistakes, and learn from them. And I do think that's been shut off. Now, we tend to just kind of celebrate successes and all celebrate fight the big component of science overall. Is that very attitude? Absolutely. Because what's interesting about publishing science. You normally publishing successes and so actually, the whole follow drawer effect in the sense there your failures. And I just actually is quite nice to kind of go. You know what actually a loss of the time these things work out. Well so be awesome. In tool the other night, you've done these books and buildings YouTube things. How is it you've done these things that have been successful? I said, complete Lucien, you don't see all the things that don't work out those sitting below the surface of the water. So don't. Not start something. Because you think, oh, this isn't going to work out. I said most things don't but lucky Kennedy line. We don't try a Guaranty's failure. So, yeah. I think it's just a lot to be learned from this. This kind of amazing Dipa reminds me of that famous, Edison, quote that I have not failed. I've just found ten thousand ways that won't work yet. Really good. Absolutely. Yeah. And also the Apollo they did simulations, what they're doing is constantly simulating, the missions in order for problems to come up and then then then sold them as for the famous one in the very, very last simulation is go. Look never going to be an overload on the computer..

Niki Kennedy Roger Bannister Dipa Caen YouTube America Lucien Edison four minute seven seconds seven second fifty years
"kennedy archives" Discussed on The Brain Candy Podcast

The Brain Candy Podcast

04:57 min | 3 years ago

"kennedy archives" Discussed on The Brain Candy Podcast

"Now they can afford express those as well. And as you see in the history of their called some jewelry laws, where rich or Royal people will forbid, people who aren't richer Royal from wearing things that they wear right now, they just can't really do that anymore. I've rhythm of it. Yeah. To what are the parts of the book that was so interesting. Was the discussion about Jackie Kennedy. And how much of a role she paid in this leopard-print phenomenon. Can you describe for our listeners what that was all about? We'll see head a leopard for coat that she were in sixty one and sixty two, and it caused the sensation and leopard for was already Gary expensive. A very flamboyant. You know, it was really the leopard fur coats were really made popular in the US by flappers and other some flamboyant women, but for Jackie Kennedy to come out and make this big statement. And I, you know, I went through a lot of images at the JFK library. That's where I was looking at a lot of this an old newspapers. And then I had people who were of an age to remember her wearing that coat telling me what a stir it created, you know that people were talking about it. Yeah. And so it's very exciting moment. It's, you know, someone who's so well known for her fashion sense is just to really seal it. And but the leopard population became threatened. And a lot of people identified that coat as part of the the rush on leopard for and Oleg Cassini who designed it felt terrible about it. And so he became a huge advocate for fake furs high fashion. With what we think of as yeah, what we think of as fake for wasn't developed with artificial fibres until the nineteen thirties sort of there was fake for before, but not the way we think of it. Yeah. And. You know. So he really worked to make that acceptable in fashion, not just as you know, kind of a. Lowbrow fashion, but as fashion itself and really pushed for that and worked for conservation of cats anti-fur. And that was a big chain age for a designer to be interested in protecting the animals and had a lot to do with that coat right in he is, I credit him because the legitimize this thing that might not have been able to be mainstream before he was like, no, it's cool. We can do better and broad that. And you know the weird thing about the Jackie Kennedy, the image in the book in particular you, I look at it and I wasn't around at that time and I would have just thought, okay. Yeah, Jackie Kennedy were reprint code. That makes sense. But you provide this context of like, no, this was like a big deal and view were around that time. People were, as you say, talking about and and it kind of created a stir. Yeah. And then there was a stir, again later. On when. The Cimoli ambassador wanted ticket of Hubert, Humphries wife an expensive gift, and she said, I can't accept it personally. I can accept it on behalf of the government and now like we gave Jackie Kennedy, these expensive, leopard, I, this is all according to the newspapers, right? So I'm quoting from the newspapers and you know the value of what a government Representative in the US could accept at that time had changed so she couldn't have accepted it. But then the opium who had some border tension with Somalia said, no, we gave Jackie that coats. I went and I went into the Kennedy archives, and I found a photo of her in the rose garden with Ethiopian emperor wearing a coat. He had just given her, but it was after the other code had been warned. There's two coats. Can you believe that Ireland. Taste is over here. If you've been looking at a load of cats, you like, oh, those are. That's not. That's not from the same cat, right your way. But like I don't know how you can keep track. I'm amazed at that by the way. Oh, thanks. It was like almost stopped and said, I think I'm just gonna read a book about this. Just that. Yeah, but that was a big turning point that the for the anti for and anti industry. Anti for movement. Yeah. And so those exotic cat furs did become illegal for trait aid in the early seventies in Kevin's..

Jackie Kennedy Oleg Cassini US JFK opium Gary Kevin Somalia Representative Ireland Hubert Humphries
"kennedy archives" Discussed on Young Charlie by Hollywood & Crime

Young Charlie by Hollywood & Crime

09:54 min | 3 years ago

"kennedy archives" Discussed on Young Charlie by Hollywood & Crime

"Hi, it's Tracy Patten. A few months ago you asked us what you should listen to after young Charlie was finished, and I'm sure you know, once you find a show you love, it doesn't take long to binge through it. That's why we're back with a few more shows that I think you'll love first. If you haven't already listen to the first season of Hollywood in crime stop what you're doing right now, stop listening to this and go check it out. Young Charlie was the second season and were hard at work on season 3 of Hollywood and crime. But season one started with a body. A woman found in a vacant lot near Lemerle Park on January fifteen nineteen Forty-seven heavy guest to the day Elizabeth short, better known as the Black Dahlia died was the day she was born into immortality forever. But did you know she was just one in a series of women whose bodies were found mutilated around Los Angeles around the same time? These cold cases have long haunted Los Angeles PD and over the. First season of Hollywood and crime, We dug into those cases eventually bringing in experts to determine whether this was the work of a serial killer or a series of copycats. Listen to the Black Dahlia, serial killers from Hollywood and crime in Stay tuned for a Sneak Peek at the end of this episode. Next, I recommend Good Life project. This is a big departure from what kinds of shows we've typically talked about here. But people listen to podcast for all sorts of reasons. One is to be informed. We do that on our show talking about the history of crime in Los Angeles another's to be entertains. But a lot of people listened to be inspired. Don't be surprised if you leave in episode of the good life project feeling inspired and ready to change your life. Here's a preview from the good life projects host, Jonathan fields Lurch. What if you could Pullara chair next to some of the wisest most-accomplished teachers creators and leaders in a world and ask them your deepest questions in the NHL? Learn learn from their wisdom Bull. That's what we do on good Life project podcast, and we're inviting you to come with us Every week we bring you raw unscripted revealing conversation stories, ideas, and insights from luminaries like Elizabeth Gilbert on ever trying to do is how people being were free. And if they CBN's sleeved than anything I say, has no meaning one authority. Do I have to stand there and say to them, don't let this happen to you, Sir. Ken Robinson because were obsessed with things like IQ people. Think even give a number two intelligence. So the question is, how intelligent guy my cases, the intelligence Assani dive us. Thanks all kinds of form. So the question is not how intelligent all you've been. How are you intelligent Dr terror I Trent. If we gave at this critical naive, seen the human potential without Jaji liquid doom for humankind to every day leaders who stories will move you chiefly, reconnect you. You with what it means to be alive. Reawaken a sense of purpose and possibility. And leave You inspired to hand craft your best life. Start listening to good led project now on your favorite. This podcast is all about you discovering stories, resources, and a community that can help you change your life. You'll learn from the culture shattering world shakers like Elizabeth Gilbert Bruny Brown, Seth Godin, and Gretchen Rubin, and the equally inspiring everyday gas and learn that every story matters and you can start living your greatest life today. Finally, I wanna tell you about the show that will help you keep learning something you should know hosted by Mike Carruthers is a show dedicated to bring you the information that will help you save time and money. Advance in your career, become wealthy, improve your relationships, and just get more out of life. He knows that one little factor piece of wisdom can change your life forever. In this episode, You're about to hear a clip from host my Carruthers speaking to Cambridge, professor Brian Little about personality and why you Just click with some people And what that means. It's Do we know roughly how much of our personality Nino is pre wired comes with the package versus how much of it develops over time, we formulated the ear in the the the nature, her controver The has actually been resolved because most of the people in our field, at least a feed them as being co-constitute until the two were sort of Anaconda choreography 'and and in the course of development, both have an influence, but Trump are interdependent. And so what are those things whenever they are? What are the things that determine who we are and who we become? I think it's it's really helpful to distinguish between the relatively fix fixed-rates that could have what Michael la, A bio genetic influence and what I call free-trade with Shum take us into the main of human growth and and how we can shape our own lives. So the big five treat spill out an ice acronym Ocean though CAN were always open this to experience seat conscientiousness. E extroversion. They agreeable Nison in Nevada system. And those have thumb biogenesis influence That is that they appear relatively early in life is subject to undevelopment across a life span. And they're really consequential for the ways in which show our lives according to go. They can predict two successive bloom in academic can Dr. vocational Pursuits happiness and well-being and health and so on. But Tom, I believe. That if we just stop there, Um, we miss So some of the most intriguing aspects of what it is to be a human being Ice Queen, the term free trades to describe how many of us will act out of character in the course of our development. And we act out of character because of the personal projects that matter to us in our life at various stages. Uh, so the example I use with my students is I'm very young. Uh, introverted The I, I have all the characteristics that would be associated with it from the biological perspective. But my students seem mucin over the top extrovert. Uh, because Saihi a uh, I'm pursuing with them a project to matters dearly to me, which is to convey with pass from what I believed to be true as a professor. And if I have to stand on my head in the next uprooted way at eight in the morning to keep them excited, I'll do that. And I'm certainly not rare. Many people listening to this might realise that they have been acting. Out of character for before some time. Well, when you say we act out of character, would another way of saying that be you know, were different people in different situations. I don't act the same with my children as I acted work as I act when I go to a meeting when I as I act when I go to the grocery store, I'm I'm very different people. Yes, indeed, You're absolutely right, But fat tendency to be different. People is itself an aspect of human percent want the So this one personality characteristics. No-one is self-monitoring, those who are high in sulphur monitoring shape through behavior to conform to the situation there in, as as you said, you know that at the soccer pitcher, you act soccer dad when talking with old friends your yet another person. Some suddenly see you as a kind of Stand up chameleon constantly-shifting you're, uh, you're personality to suit the situation. On the other hand, there are those who were low in sulphur monitoring her just themselves. So you've got, um dog who is always dog. Diesel never Douglas and he's never Dougie. He's always the same in every situation. And those two individuals, high and low sulphur monitors can really find it difficult to sustain a relationship for example. Because. The low self-monitor says, I don't care who I married. You're a different person. Each time I see you in a different setting. You seen, I don't know who I actually fell in love with. Now you can side every episode if something you should know on Apple podcast or wherever you're listening to this. You know the Kennedy name, but you don't know the whole Kennedy story go behind the ambition, the wealth than the power of America's most famous family in the new CNN, original series American dynasties, The Kennedys with rare in intimate home video from the Kennedy archives, Discover how Unbreakable family bonds fueled their rise to power through early tragedy during World War Two to the dream of the presidency and the devastating events. That would follow narrated by Martin Sheen watch new episodes of American dynasties the Kennedys Sundays at nine eastern on CNN. Thank you for listening. I think you really like these shows Hollywood and crime Good Life. Subject in something you should know are all available on your favorite podcast platform, And here's a clip of Hollywood and crime. In This episode. We're talking about Georgette Bauer door and heiress who was known for leading soldiers in need of a place to crash sleep on her couch. But did her generosity put her at risk? She was found murdered in her bathtub on October 1944. Take a listen.

Hollywood Los Angeles Mike Carruthers Charlie professor Lemerle Park Elizabeth Gilbert Tracy Patten Kennedy CNN soccer Ken Robinson Elizabeth Martin Sheen Anaconda NHL Elizabeth Gilbert Bruny Brown Dr. vocational Pursuits CBN Pullara
"kennedy archives" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"kennedy archives" Discussed on WGN Radio

"The now um you know what made that decision to make it public now as opposed awaiting or or doing earlier i think there's always kind of groups that are trying to have some of the stuff declassified earner i think some of the may just be you know time limits i we don't after a certain amount of years if there isn't anything that's making nina the danger to society or the government or something like that that it's that had prevailed safe period of that now it's save we can let it go ri gutters the of you have oh i got a chance to see it and dan did you see that the video where it's you know it's a handful of seconds ramos like twenty thirty seconds it looks as though there is a a pilot seeing something they through the process of some of the media coverage that i've seen they kind of identify what you're seeing on the screen and then it it's basically the pilot kind of just describing what it is river kind of interacting with other pilots a didn't but you know did kennedy your point though am the fact that there's video of it you know a lot of the things with the past the uniting with now the roswell thing in kinda similar story in the past there there was no videos now it's everybody's got a video camera in their pocket so that'll be one of the interesting things where everything is going to be critical so if indeed is out there we're going to find it sooner rather than later just for that reason alone when i have a picture of the heavy bitter with me i'll be able to snap out off and so now the internet what what what you really need as the estate guy zia he's a stake guy you're always scottie made kennedy archive he's g those pizza role does that's that's definitely a snack of that's why they've come here that love you we all remember he traveled billions of miles and give those tapes a roles i would i had when there is eleven herbs and spices out there you can have all the technology of the world but if you don't have that exact flavor here you're going to need to hitting to pony up for we all remember what is it manhattan you know where it is whatever you know have.

dan ramos media coverage kennedy manhattan twenty thirty seconds