17 Burst results for "Ken Oletta"

"ken oletta" Discussed on Math & Magic: Stories from the Frontiers of Marketing

Math & Magic: Stories from the Frontiers of Marketing

08:25 min | 1 year ago

"ken oletta" Discussed on Math & Magic: Stories from the Frontiers of Marketing

"Brooklyn born raised in California tax lawyer entrepreneur in the video business. What made his real mark in the advertising business. I at Western an international media and now with media link the company he founded a strategic advisory firm that sits at the intersection of Marketing Media Advertising Entertainment and attack truly a one-of-a-kind guy one of a kind company. If you read Kennel Lettuce two thousand eighteen book frenemies the epic disruption of the Ad Business and everything else you'll be familiar with Michael's role as the connector of the advertising industry. He has a radio show on her own W. O. R. New York and on iheartradio and a podcast Haad cast on iheartradio media linked and he is in the Advertising Hall of fame recently inducted Michael. Welcome thank you Bob. Before we get into your story story and the back story on everything I WANNA start off with you in sixty seconds brady go. Do you prefer New York or La New York is my favorite favorite city in the world. Los Angeles is my favorite city to live in Manhattan Brooklyn Manhattan mets or Yankees. Oh I am a dodger fan in all the way the rat pack or the Beatles total RATPAC instagram or twitter. I'm an instagram. sunrises sunsets loved fiddler on the roof but I can take either side of that trait wine or beer. Though I'm definitely a wineman surfing or skiing I gave up my surfboard from my first set of skis when I was fifteen years old Ken Oletta Walter Isaacson. Oh Gosh the jobs book was probably my favorite business biography but Ken got very much under my skin in the three years plus that I spent chatting with him okay. Let's about the harder you ready. Secret talent dancing favorite song mack the knife favorite artist Frank Sinatra first concert it would have been Sammy Davis Junior and the will maston trio shelter he wrote Mickey Mantle Favorite TV show all tie breaking bad. What's one food. You'd never olives okay. Let's dive in Ken Oletta put you front and center of the Yeah business with his book frenemies. Did that make life weird for you. When I read the galleys of that book a bit before they came out I freaked out you might remember for that because you and I spent some time together and you had also read the galleys and you told me I was out of my mind freak out. You talked me off the ledge. So I WANNA want to say this publicly. Thank you Bob Pittman because it's kind of daunting when you pick up a manuscript and it turns out to be a lot about you and you don't unexpected the two people who brought me back to reality were Bob Pittman and Ken Leyrer so the answer is in retrospect. I felt really good about it but the moment I read it for the first time I freaked out you are Michael Casson. Everybody who knows you knows you have this great interest in many things. One of the things you do is work with clients when they do agency reviews. I think everybody in the agency business lives in mortal fear of the agency reviews. They spent an inordinate amount of time pitching business churning a lot. That's got to be a tough job tough to make sure you cover everything on behalf of the client and top because there can only be one winner among the agencies pitching Ching from this insiders view. You probably have the most spectacular viewpoint on all this. Can you explain the process what's really going on in an agency review traditionally. You would be looking at an agency to determine who's the best strategic partner for you. Who's got the best team that they can put on the field. Who's going to offer the best pricing Obviously that becomes an important consideration but traditionally it was strategy. Led pricing was always important because as somebody we both know Alan Grumman famously said it's not about the money it's about the money so at the end of the day that's always been an important piece of it but I think we've moved from the traditional and today unfortunately just the nature of the business in these reviews and we're fortunate to manage most of the large ones in the world. There seems to be a race to the bottom and the race to the bottom seems to be driven by pricing and race by the agencies or pushed by the client pushed by the clients and then the agencies need to rise is to that occasion and so things that shouldn't be the reason you choose an agency. which is who's the cheapest when we first started to do business together? Bob Western question was famous for saying. We buy the same things for less. You know that was a good stick. It worked you know and they sort of did we. SORTA did but today it's it's more difficult to prove that and yet it seems that that race to the bottom is who can deliver the lowest price without as much consideration to strategy. I think strategy is still at the end of the day. The more important of the two elements have the clients or let's but the evil people in here procurement amount procurement people. You'll have realized that of course you get what you pay for and yes. I can get you cheaper spots and there were spots and their worst performing. It seems to me that there's not not nearly as much attention to return and value as there is a unit pricing. What's so interesting is as marketers. There is a much more focused view on return on investment. The marketers are asking now for a better return on their investment does not not come up in the agency reviews does but the procurement. Kermit folks are looking at a grid and on that grid. There's just going to look at cheaper and cheaper doesn't always mean better as you well know and do the CFO's now control control the process more than the CMO's yes they do you know let me step back for a second because you mentioned the word the procurement word. I look at that group not just procurement but in the marketing services area. It's an orchestra what some marketers have done have put procurement in the first year violin and that's not a good good place for them to be. I think they need to be in the string section somewhere but first chair violin is the person who should be leading it and that's the marketer procurement needs to to be a support not a lead. Pepsi several years ago took procurement out of the center and put it back into the brands and that was a good move because what you realize and it's not just procurement as to who can buy pencils cheaper because we're buying more pencils. It's who can buy it smarter one of my friend. The agency business said you know in the old days we spent all the time talking about creative and strategy and a plan and media was like a and win by some media now he's been all the time talking about media and cost and going yeah yeah. It's a good idea. It's completely flip flop. He was bemoaning that fact. Is that accurate yeah. It's accurate so bob when I started in the business in a pitch. If a pitch hitch was ninety minutes eighty five minutes was the creative put it in madman terms it was don draper and Harry the media nerd with the bow tie in the Abacus Carr's figuring out costs per points. He would get three minutes at the end of the presentation. Go you haven't media and nobody cared something happened and I think I was a little bit. A part of that revolution in the ninety s we got the industry to focus on the fact that when you announce a hundred million dollar budget or a billion dollar budget eighty eighty five percent of that budget is the media spend not the creative so maybe you should spend a little more time looking at the media mix and the strategy being applied as opposed to the storytelling towing that being said storytelling still the most important thing in marketing. You can have a great media plan. If it's terrible bit of creative. It's GonNa die. you know the old joke can good media. Save bad creative not so sure but bad media can kill good create right right while you're advertising advertising the wrong message any money to hurt yourself. We're GONNA come to some of these issues a little more but before we leave what advice would you give to agencies both in Review Review and those that are pitching the new business be careful what you wish for and be careful of making wild ass promises that you can't deliver because as procurement it does get a stronger hold on some of this. If you make a promise to somebody that we're going to save you X. They no longer will accept. I'm sorry the dog ate my homework homework and I can't deliver because in this day and age procurement goes up to the CFO the CFO takes.

Michael Casson CFO Bob Bob Pittman Ad Business Ken Oletta Walter Isaacson Advertising Hall of fame Ken Oletta Brooklyn W. O. R. New York Manhattan Ken California Beatles Frank Sinatra New York Bob Western
"ken oletta" Discussed on This Week in Tech

This Week in Tech

03:06 min | 2 years ago

"ken oletta" Discussed on This Week in Tech

"Let's see where were we going? I forgot what I said. I wanted to talk about there's all sorts of news. Let's do some more apple news yet. We were talking about a texture can't believe him at a quote, the New York Post here. But they have a media calm. Pretty good. Keith Kelly apple to shudder texture for news app. Leave Android users out of luck may twenty eighth if you've been subscribing to texture, and I know a lot of you do because they were an advertiser for a long time. Apple's going to shut down those two hundred forty thousand subscribers if you're on IOS, you can just move to news, plus which is pretty much exactly what texture ones or if you're an Android is. There are Andrew. There are other choices I think, but I don't think they have the same number of magazines texture was the best like so many companies have tried this Owl's scripture magazine thing, and there's a reason apple texture the reason they built a whole service around it. What really was the best? Yeah. Do you like apple news? Plus, it's fine. Like, I signed up for the free trial and actually as we were doing this conversation. I remind myself to go cancel it because is perfectly fine. But I don't I don't really need. Magazine articles once in a while, I only really read magazines because I like the feel and I want to sit down with that long form stuff. I don't I it's on the web. If magazine articles on the web, I'll read it there. I don't need this whole other apt to deal with that. I feel the same way in the magazines that I really do want to support note support as opposed to read like the New Yorker in the Atlantic. I will subscribe to use their absence. Subscribe actually read the New York saying. Yorker app is great. I don't read it. But boy crazy go right to the cartoons to say, you subscribe. And that you know, the cartoon. Especially in our business. These days they're doing really good Technic tech company. Do they have good stuff? And so especially in our business. I feel like there is an article by Ken Oletta or somebody like that. I have to read at least once a month there's a law in their long. So there's a long form article. I wanna read in the Atlantic is same thing. I feel like there's especially for politics coverage Atlantic in the New Yorker, I I have to have those and then I pay for the New York Times, which is not on news. Plus, and I pay for the Wall Street Journal, which is, you know, the big beneficiary of news, plus in my opinion Angeles Times. It's a chance for the that's one of the things you get with the news, plus ascriptin real chance for them to get an actional profile. So cute things that stemmed out here. I is that I see absolutely no reason why apple won't release news plus Android. If you look at everything that it's doing recently is all about sevices, right? Apple needs services for its future. You know, they've announced apple TV. That's going to be on some some televisions. They've got up music on Android the going to have news plus on Android because why would you shut out hundreds of millions of potential subscribers to you'll.

apple Keith Kelly apple Atlantic New York Post New York Yorker New York Times Wall Street Journal Andrew Ken Oletta Angeles Times
"ken oletta" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

04:03 min | 2 years ago

"ken oletta" Discussed on KPCC

"Boies, when I think of fairness, I really feel like there were two entirely different worlds. There was the carpeted world. And there was the tiled world. The carpeted world was where Elizabeth was a goddess everyone almost worshiped the ground. She walked on. She can do no wrong. She was the next. Steve jobs. Theranos was changing the world. And then you go onto tile side and nothing works on a sinking ship. Everything's alive. Silicon Valley is a area of the country in a business. That's dominated by men. How do you think gender plays into the story? Well, I think it's hugely important for the story that Elizabeth was creating and by the way was hugely important to a number of the journalists. Notably Ken Oletta from the New Yorker and Roger Parlow from fortune. It was a story that they wanted to tell and frankly, it was a story. We all wanted to hear in male dominated Silicon Valley. Shouldn't there be a woman who has an entrepreneur has an invention of the device and then through her own enthusiasm and effort manages to make a huge success of herself. That's what we all wanted to hear. So she played on that she played on that big time because everybody wanted to get behind that idea. There are people who run cons who at some point recognized that what they're doing is a con Bernie Madoff legitimate investment advisor. And then he started running a Ponzi scheme, and he knew. Had to know. Yes. That he was running a Ponzi scheme. It feels like Elizabeth homes never admitted to herself even that what she was doing was a fraud. How did you think she persuaded herself that it was something other than what it was which was something that didn't work? Well, I think ultimately was this of the end justifies, the means, and there's a really interesting of behavioral economist who's in the film, a guy named Dan area. Ellie who wrote a book called predictably irrational also wrote another book called dishonesty, and he talks about how the mind plays tricks with our with ourselves. And now that if you believe in what you're doing. And if you believe it's for a good cause it gives you license to behave in reprehensible ways, and maybe even to practice a kind of willful denial that you are doing that. I don't ask you one last question, and it's kind of a personal question. And that is what you went through as a filmmaker with Lance Armstrong because you started to miss a film about Lance Armstrong asked and Elizabeth homes like. Character. That's right. This Phoenix who is going to rise up who's gonna prove all of his doubters wrong. Who's gonna have this amazing comeback? And you drank the Kool aid that he was racing clean. You ended up recognizing as everybody did that it was a scam. And you made a film called the Armstrong lie. Did you start to understand how you can be duped by thinking back about how you were duped by Lance Armstrong? Yes, I think it would have been hard for me to make this film without having made the Armstrong lie 'cause I made two versions of that film. One was one where Lance was a great hero coming back. And I I pretty strong suspicions. He adoped in the past. But he had convinced me that he was clean in two thousand nine. And so I showed myself in the remake of that film. The second try. Luckily, the first one was never released I showed myself on the mountain mauve onto cheering for Lance. You know, and I was embedded in the Armstrong team, right? And I like Lance I was hanging out with him. So now, I was inside the tent and I was a fan. Well, that can be dangerous because when you're a fan you want things to turn out well for your team, and you tend to overlook anything wrong because you want to believe that your team is good and your team is going to win. So it taught me a lot about how your emotions play tricks with you. And of course, it would have made for a better film. If Lance Armstrong had won the tour de France in two thousand nine right? So for all those reasons I was all in and when you're all in it's very hard to get outside yourself and see that you're likely making.

Lance Armstrong Elizabeth Ponzi scheme Silicon Valley Boies Steve jobs Bernie Madoff Lance Phoenix Theranos Ken Oletta Dan area advisor Ellie Roger Parlow fraud
"ken oletta" Discussed on The Frame

The Frame

04:16 min | 2 years ago

"ken oletta" Discussed on The Frame

"There was carpeted world. And there was tiled world. In the carpeted world was where Elizabeth was a goddess everyone, you know, almost worshiped the ground. She walked on. She can do no wrong. She was the next Steve Jobs. Their nose was changing the world. And then you go onto tile side. And nothing works run a sinking ship. Everything's ally. Silicon Valley is a area of the country in a business. That's dominated by men. How do you think gender plays into the story? Well, I think it's hugely important for the story that Elizabeth was creating and by the way was hugely important to a number of the journalists. Notably Ken Oletta from the New Yorker and Roger Parlow from fortune. It was a story that they wanted to tell and frankly, it was a story. We all wanted to hear in male dominated Silicon Valley. Shouldn't there be a woman who has an entrepreneur has an invention of the device and then through her own enthusiasm and effort manages to make a huge success of herself. That's what we all wanted to hear. So she played on that she played on that big time because everybody. Wanted to get behind that idea. There are people who run cons who at some point recognized that what they're doing is a con Bernie Madoff was a legitimate investment advisor. And then he started running a Ponzi scheme, and he knew he had to know. Yes. That he was running game. It feels like Elizabeth homes never admitted to herself even that what she was doing was a fraud. How did you think she persuaded herself that it was something other than what it was which was something that didn't work? Well, I think ultimately was this idea of the end justifies, the means, and there's a really interesting of behavioral economist who's in the film got him, Dan area. Ellie who wrote a book called particularly irrational also wrote another book called dishonesty, and he talks about how the mind plays tricks with our with ourselves. And now that if you believe in what you're doing. And if you believe it's for a good cause it gives you license to behave in reprehensible ways, and maybe even to practice a kind of willful denial. That you are doing that. I'm gonna ask you one last question, and it's kind of a personal question. And that is what you went through as a filmmaker with Lance Armstrong because you started to make a film about Lance Armstrong asked and Elizabeth homes like character. That's right. This Phoenix who's going to rise up who's gonna prove all of his doubters wrong. Who's gonna have this amazing comeback? And you drink the Kool aid that he was racing clean. You ended up recognizing as everybody did that it was a scam. And you made a film called the Armstrong lie. Did you start to understand how you can be duped by thinking back about how you were duped by Lance Armstrong? Yes, I think it would have been hard for me to make this film without having made the Armstrong lie, you know. 'cause I made two versions of that film was one where Lance was a great hero coming back. And I I pretty strong suspicions. He adoped in the past. But he had convinced me that he was clean in two thousand nine. And so I showed myself in the remake of that film. The second try. Luckily, the first one was never released. I showed myself. On the mountain mauve onto cheering for Lance. You know, and I was embedded in the Armstrong team, right? And I like Lance I was hanging out with him. So now, I was inside the tent and I was a fan. Well, that can be dangerous because when you're a fan you want things to turn out well for your team, and you tend to overlook anything wrong because he want to believe that your team is good and your team is going to win. So it taught me a lot about how your emotions play tricks with you. And of course, it would have made for a better film. If Lance Armstrong had won the tour de France in two thousand nine right? So for all those reasons I was all in and when you're all in it's very hard to get outside yourself and see that you're likely making a mistake. Alex Gibney is new documentary is called the inventor out for blood and Silicon Valley. Alex. It's always a great pleasure to see you. Thanks for coming. Thanks, John gray throw. The inventor premiers on HBO tonight coming up on the frame. Dick, Dale has died..

Lance Armstrong Silicon Valley Steve Jobs Bernie Madoff Elizabeth Alex Gibney Lance HBO Ken Oletta Ellie advisor John gray Roger Parlow Ponzi scheme fraud Dick Dale
"ken oletta" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

WAAM Talk 1600

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"ken oletta" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

"Pounds GV are based on Ford segmentation. News now, I'm Dan Martin authorities in a mid Michigan community have hired someone to examine a two thousand four investigation that failed to spur charges against now. Imprisoned sports, Dr Larry Nassar, the Lansing state journal reports that retired east Lansing. Police. Officer Ken Oletta will conduct the sixty day investigation into the handling of teenagers complaint. Bryanne Randall gay told Meridian township police Nassar molested her during an appointment. Police dropped the case after Nassar disputed, the allegations are laying duck Bill advancing in Michigan. Republican controlled legislature would make it harder to organize. Ballot drives the house elections and ethics committee passed the legislation on a six to three party line vote today, it would impose a geographical threshold for groups proposing constitutional amendments initiated bills and referee. Randoms? They would be limited to collecting no more than ten percent of their signatures from a single congressional district. A twelve year old boy who had been working odd jobs to raise money for a gravestone for his best friend is getting his wish a local funeral home decided to donate a headstone after reading the Detroit News story about Caleb clock. Lock Caleb had been best friends since second grade with Kenneth k J gross who died in may after years of chemotherapy cage as mother couldn't afford a grave marker so Caleb. Started raking leaves and collecting bottles to raise two thousand five hundred dollars Wham.

Dr Larry Nassar Caleb Michigan Lansing state journal Lansing Dan Martin Bryanne Randall Detroit News Ken Oletta Officer Meridian Bill Kenneth k J two thousand five hundred doll ten percent twelve year sixty day
"ken oletta" Discussed on On The Media

On The Media

04:50 min | 2 years ago

"ken oletta" Discussed on On The Media

"Has been populist and conservative in cahoots with the Republican party sharing daily, talking points and so forth. But these new episodes seem maybe to be taking the channel into a whole other dimension of partisanship, and political activism or aren't they? Well, Roger Ailes was very clear about the way that he wanted to operate and for a long time he was a kingmaker in the Republican party. He would sort of create stars in that party that were media figures as much as they were political figures, what's different is that that influence in that weight has really shifted into the White House. The person who has sort of taken the place of the most powerful person at that network is Sean Hannity interviewed Bret Baier who is one of the more straight and narrow of their personalities. He does one of their news programmes, and he even said very openly that he knows that the president is watching his show. So it's not just the opinion programming. I don't think we've ever seen a sitting politician. That is so influenced by one particular outlet. We'll there's another thing as well. A couple of years ago in the wake of Roger Ailes and Bill o'riley getting the heave ho over their sexual predations. They were soon followed out the door by ails number two Bill shine who was alleged to have covered up the whole culture of creepy conduct at FOX, or at least ignored it. Yeah. And now, he's Trump's deputy communications director and his predecessor hope Hicks is taking the top PR job at FOX have either of them, really even left their previous jobs. You know, it's a small small world for someone like Bill shine. I think he knows the similarities between his old job and his new job. He's worked for ego maniac. Mercurial difficult accused sexual harasser now. He's working for a different one in some ways. He's just swapped out the names for. A very similar type of situation. I think hope Hicks comes with great reputation among some journalists. She doesn't lie to people, but you have to imagine what she had been able to get this particular job if she had just worked for the Trump organization versus in the White House with the sitting president who has the kind of relationship that he does with a lot of personalities that Fox News. And I think that she's going to be playing go between in a way that she had never really imagined ails had never wanted GOP to direct FOX's coverage as you wrote earlier this month ails quote wanted to run the GOP right now. There was some thought that with his departure and with Rupert Murdoch sons and successors taking over the operation. Some of the explicit collaboration would be rolled back and along with it, maybe some conspiracy mongering and hate speech. But. No such luck. This was author Ken Oletta while speaking at a live event with Lachlan Murdoch. But are you embarrassed by what they do? No. I'm not in basketball what they do at all. You have to understand that that Fox News is. The only mass media company in America with strong conservative opinion and Prakan is the only one right? And I frankly feel in this country we all have to be more tolerant of each other's views tolerance seriously. That's gotta just be PR. Glossed protect the goose that lays the golden egg. Well, you've identified something which is the difficult position that the Murdochs all find themselves in Lachlan Murdoch's brother, James Murdoch is leaving the company. He was the one who was most at odds with FOX's opinion hosts but ever since James and Lachlan Murdoch took over the company from their father who is still alive and still plays a major role they have wanted to sort of reform the place, but not change its key market position, which is extraordinarily profitable. They are not going to upset this applecart. The one thing you have to remember about the Murdoch sons is. As much as this political moment is a surprise to them running this company, even though it's going to be a much smaller company because of this sale of most of the company to Disney is something that they have been prepared for their entire lives, you referred earlier to the news shows with the likes of Bret Baier and Shepard Smith which have long been used to support. Fox's claim to be a real journalistic operation..

Lachlan Murdoch Roger Ailes Bill o'riley Fox News director Bret Baier Republican party Hicks James Murdoch Rupert Murdoch Murdoch White House Sean Hannity president basketball Disney Trump Ken Oletta Shepard Smith
"ken oletta" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

WHAS 840 AM

04:30 min | 2 years ago

"ken oletta" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

"Come from advertising, podcasts supported by advertising the internet an app supported by advertising so advertising is in danger what about all the other casualties because of that right Facebook and Google tell. Us about how they acquire all? This information about us Every time you go on Facebook, where every time you do Google. Search they have you cookies and. They have which is that they collected data so. Google you do a search Google knows what you searched what you actually read, what ads you. Click on how much time you spend, on a particular site what you purchase you know what time you. Wake up, how much time you spend on on Email way you travel to. I mean that's tremendously tremendous amount of data or information they have about you so if you think about, it and by what this is, duplicated by Facebook or even better by Amazon which has. What you actually purchased which is the most valuable information you have, at all and so if if you're, walking down the street and and Suzanne we know that you bought a beauty you like red dresses and we know you bought. A beautiful red dress and you bought a a beautiful purse And you only two blocks from the store and. What you, you bought those items but if you walk to that store now. And they they follow you on your GPS on your mobile phone right if you walk to that store, now Suzanne we'll give you twenty, percent off either a new purse or a new trust. So the question is how will you respond to that will you, say oh my God this is a, great service they're offering me a great discount or you say how the health I know so much about me And that's a fundamental? Question we know, the answer to. The privacy issue becomes looms. Large potentially right wow big tech is also collecting marketing data from our homes with the like Alexa Sitting right by my phone and if I say, Alexa It lights up in blue as. Alexa been listening to allow Sure It's so funny because you know the, the the biggest advertising or television at least advertising day of the years is the Super Bowl and all the talk about the Super Bowl, ads but that's kind of turning into a dinosaur now as we as we move into the, future isn't it I don't, know that that that it is a. Hundred over one hundred million people watching Super Bowl, we know that that adds thirty second ads. Are people who spend five and a half million dollars on a thirty second ad for the Super Bowl we knew that live events like the Super Bowl like the Academy Awards like sporting events like a lot of reality shows that alive ads advertisers still crave those advertising on those platforms the problem is that for scripted shows be comedies or one hour dramas advertising is less effective there and and and particularly less effective because when people have. An option of watching Netflix without being interrupted. By and and they don't have to wait, 'til Thursday night to watch the show that a network tells them to wait 'til Thursday night to watch and they can watch as much, as they want and they can watch it without commercial interruption it becomes a real liable to, traditional media What finally do what words of advice do. You have for listeners to be canny consumers I think it'd be multiple parts one is is, you can if you want opt out of. Allowing advertisers to have access your, private information Oreo, cookies on your on, your electronic device when you. Do that wherever you're you're, blocking advertising which, supports the radio you care about the television, you care about the newspapers your care about but you can block it if you want and and and you should look at it and you should also raise the question with your representatives how much information these. People. Have and do I feel? After? I learn how much information that violates my privacy right do you have a website Ken Yes I do Ken Ken Oletta dot com my name dot com okay perfect and the book is called frenemies epoch disruption of the ad business and everything else. Thank. You so much my pleasure Suzanne.

Google Facebook Suzanne Alexa Ken Ken Oletta Netflix Academy Awards Amazon thirty second million dollars one hour
"ken oletta" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

04:14 min | 3 years ago

"ken oletta" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"John Kerry ru he began his career in. Journalism in nineteen ninety four after he graduated from Duke he joined the Dow Jones newswires shortly after he moved, to European version of the Wall Street Journal in Brussels eventually going to. Paris to cover French business, terrorism and everything in, between he was appointed deputy bureau chief for southern Europe and three eventually became the Wall. Street Journal's health and science bureau chief in New York he has. Won numerous awards in journalism including the Pulitzer prize twice, if this sounds like the perfect background. For, any writer curious about the blood testing. Startup theranos well it turned out that is exactly right the unicorn turned out to be a fraud which was broken. By Kerry ruin the pages of the. Wall Street Journal he has written a best book bag Bad blood secrets and lies in Silicon Valley about the entire. Elizabeth homes theranos saga John Kerry ru welcome to Bloomberg thank you for having me my pleasure I have to, start off by saying I love the book it was on my list. Of ten to read the, summer and I just, plow through there's so much material to cover it's such a fascinating story let's just go. Back to the beginning how does theranos and Elizabeth homes out in. Silicon Valley I come on your radar it was mid, December two thousand fourteen and I was. On, the subway commuting back from my office. In midtown Manhattan to Brooklyn where I live reading the New Yorker magazine and in that issue was a long profile. Of Elizabeth homes by Ken Oletta in Kohler glowing mostly. Mostly glowing with some I have to say with some skeptical passages that I immediately picked up on and it was it was, an entertaining read an interesting that there were, as I just said some some things that struck me as odd in that story One of, the ways she she described how her blood testing technology worker how works how she summed it up sounded to me like a high school chemistry student. As opposed to sophisticated lab scientists slash. Inventor but more than any particular, thing it was this notion that. A college dropout someone who'd. Had two semesters of chemical, engineering had, dropped, out and then gone on. And invented groundbreaking new science that was going to revolutionize lab testing so let, me jump in right here so she goes to Stanford finishes drops out after her freshman year, she got no medical training she got no organic chemistry biology Blood chemistry none of the things one, would normally think would go into. Complex medical device manufacturing this isn't a software, startup where you could just hey anybody could code and whether you have the academic credentials are not as relevant this is a serious science isn't it. Right she she had zero qualifications I. Mean she had literally had two, undergraduate courses with the same professor. Channing Robertson who ended up. Being you know her first name That's an interesting choice of words why did you select. Enabler was so he was for those listening weren't, familiar, with him Channing Robertson was Dr right rockstar star of this the Stanford engineering. School faculty had been an, expert witness in? The late nineties for the. State of, Minnesota and its tobacco litigation and also was really popular with students he had a way with, students he, connected with them She'd taken to two courses with. Him and then came back with. This cockamamie patent in After her, her summer in Singapore working at a lab in Singapore so we're now, in the fall two thousand three and the patent was for this device that she envisioned which was essentially a wristband that would have micro needles that, would come out,.

John Kerry Wall Street Journal bureau chief Manhattan Channing Robertson Pulitzer prize Ken Oletta Singapore Europe Elizabeth Stanford Paris fraud New Yorker magazine Bloomberg Brussels Kohler writer Minnesota
"ken oletta" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

04:08 min | 3 years ago

"ken oletta" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"He began his career in. Journalism in nineteen ninety four after he graduated from Duke he joined the Dow Jones newswires shortly after he moved, to European version of the Wall Street Journal in Brussels eventually going to. Paris to cover French business, terrorism and everything in between, he was. Appointed deputy bureau chief for southern Europe in oh three eventually he became the Wall. Street Journal's health and science bureau chief in New York he has. Won numerous awards in journalism including the Pulitzer prize twice, if this sounds like the perfect background. For, any writer curious about the blood testing. Startup theranos well it turned out that is exactly right the unicorn turned out to be a fraud which was broken. By Kerry ruin the pages of the Wall Street Journal he has written a bestselling book bag Bad blood secrets and lies in Silicon Valley about the. Entire Elizabeth homes and theranos saga John Kerry ru welcome to Bloomberg thank you for having me my pleasure I, have to start off by saying I love the book it was on. My list of ten to read this summer and I, just plow. Through there's so much material to cover it's such a fascinating story let's just go. Back to the beginning how does theranos and Elizabeth homes out in. Silicon Valley I come on your radar it was mid, December two thousand fourteen and I was. On, the subway commuting back from my office. In midtown Manhattan to Brooklyn where I live reading the New Yorker magazine and in that issue was a long profile. Of Elizabeth homes by Ken Oletta and Kohler glowing mostly mostly glowing with, some I have to say with, some skeptical passages, that I immediately picked up on and it was it was an entertaining read an interesting, that there were. As I just said some some things. That struck me as odd in that, story one of the. Ways she she described how her blood testing technology worker works how she summed it up, sounded to me like a high. School chemistry student as opposed. To sophisticated lab scientists slash inventor but. More than any particular thing it was this notion that, a college dropout someone who'd. Had two semesters of chemical engineering had dropped out and then gone on and invented groundbreaking new science that was going to revolutionize, you know lab testing so let me jump, in right here so she goes to Stanford finishes drops out after her freshman year Got no medical training she's, got no organic chemistry biology blood chemistry none of the things one would normally think would go into complex medical device manufacturing, this isn't a software startup where. You could just hey anybody could code and, whether you have the academic credentials are not as relevant this is a serious science isn't it right she she had zero qualifications I mean, she had, had literally. Had to undergraduate courses with the same. Professor Channing Robertson who ended up, being you know her first enabler That's an interesting choice of words, why did, you select enabler Well so he was the? Those listening weren't familiar. With him Channing Robertson was Dr right rockstar star of this the Stanford engineering school faculty had been an expert witness in the. Late nineties for the state of Minnesota and its. Tobacco litigation and you know, also was really popular with students he had away with students he connected with them and she'd taken two courses with. Him and then came back with. This cockamamie a patent in After her her summer? In Singapore working at. A lab in Singapore so we're now in fall two thousand and three and the patent was for this device that she envisioned..

Wall Street Journal John Kerry Professor Channing Robertson Ken Oletta bureau chief Manhattan Singapore Pulitzer prize Europe Paris Elizabeth Minnesota New Yorker magazine fraud Brussels Bloomberg Stanford writer
"ken oletta" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

04:03 min | 3 years ago

"ken oletta" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"And there are major changes happening in the world of advertising it's been going on for a while we're seeing the definition of newspapers as such and of course the internet is increasing and getting bigger and bigger all the time and ken oletta joins us right now leading media observer and the author of google and he's got a new book called frenemies the epic destruction of the ad business and can i think people can kind of sense that things are changing dramatically and we find out that we've got well given today's technology ads that are directed to us specifically that we find on places like facebook and twitter absolutely the but but increasingly what's happening is that the major frenemy of of advertising is the public the public doesn't like being interrupted by ads particularly on their cell phones which is the dominant instrument and they used to know as i'm places like netflix and yet when you think about it as you were suggesting advertising is is the funding mechanism for most media for radio for television for newspapers and magazines and without it if advertising shrivels and dies so much of media yeah the because newspapers as such they've got an online presence but we've talked about this before and talking to young people today almost none of them ever read newspapers they get their sources online and sometimes it's from newspapers online but a lot of a lot of young people get their information from twitter and facebook and places like that absolutely and facebook has four times the amount of advertising dollars as all the newspapers united states combined really and and that's a stunning thing it shows the shift of of money to digital giants like facebook and google and away from traditional media like newspapers yeah we're still hanging in there fortunately is a news talk station but i guess ultimately well you're not gonna replace news talk but a lot of music stations are in trouble these days because of music available on your iphones absolutely right and and the question then is is is there another form of advertising that people will find more palatable and and to them at that will allow us to continue sustain radio and television and newspapers etc that's one of the basic questions in the future well it'll be interesting to see how that plays out but again it's changing so dramatically and i think this was what they accused the russians of doing on facebook advertising on facebook regarding our election in two thousand sixteen absolutely what they did was they claim that they use they use facebook do fake news to help in this case they said to help donald trump and they said they will also continue the polarization or further the polarization of the american population and and and there was no question that i mean intelligence agencies all agree either in the trump administration or the previous administration that this happened and and so that's the worry and what's happened is a facebook and google said well we have to police our sights better than we have and they do but you get that's one question for future the other question future is privacy they know so much about us and the question is if they then say well the way to do as is the personalized them because we know about you so you know jack we know you bought a sports coat a month ago and if you're only two blocks away because they have you gps on your mobile phone you only two blocks away from the store you boarded if you go in today we'll give you.

"ken oletta" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

Digiday Podcast

01:50 min | 3 years ago

"ken oletta" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

"Think about a lot in our advertising business you know it's the post is a local brand is it not well again eighty five percent of the traffic to the post digital networks outside of new york dna it's now a national brand and now if page six on on television in ninety six percent of the us markets page and page six meanwhile of that sixty million com score last month twenty million of its page six so page six as a standalone national brand is definitely something we talk a lot about but so so further for the post and television and we're going to be making some announcements in the coming weeks about it i think we have enormous opportunity in scripted ended on screams at if you look at docudramas and docu series that are going on and in the scripted front look we have two hundred years of new york history that we can claim in there all sorts of mazing stories that have happened in that in that place in that time we've got an incredible archive that we can tap into incredible expertise that we can tap into okay ip and tv is a big opportunity of yes i'm hearing that's what that's what your hair has said we're going to hear more about that and not just pee but sorry to interrupt but voice right there is one thing we were talking earlier about kennel eda's book you know ken oletta wrote a book about the publishing industry many years ago and had a great line about the post which was the post wakes up every morning and knows exactly what it is right and that unique voice knowing exactly who you are and telling stories exactly the way you tell them in the way your audience loves them to be told that is differentiated and being able to bring that to tv is different okay i liked when it was voice you actually talked about like the does whereas here in cowan people voice there will be talking about like a anorexic i was like okay we're gonna go there it's where my mind is today sponsor is air table the all in.

us kennel eda new york ken oletta cowan eighty five percent ninety six percent two hundred years
"ken oletta" Discussed on WAFS Biz 1190

WAFS Biz 1190

02:11 min | 3 years ago

"ken oletta" Discussed on WAFS Biz 1190

"On the other hand there are brilliant to go back to the volkswagen ad that do burn back created or levi's riber dads they were brilliant ahead so there are brilliant people who do some brilliant ads and there are people however who do who tried to emotionally manipulate you and for me i don't know whether i'm typical of the public but it bothers me a lot are brilliant people capable of running these huge advertising slash media companies today since they have so many divisions with so many pieces well it depends on what they're brilliant at i mean take martin sorrell who was who in my last chapter the book i said miss you're going to be seventy three when do you think you might step down he said they'll have to shoot really get him out get me out and in fact they did shoot him but you know martin sorrell is a brilliant guy who created the largest advertising holding company in the world that'd be on the other hand is a company that owns four hundred other companies he had no coo so we had basically hundreds of people basically reporting to that's too much even for someone as talented as the next is of ken oletta there's a nexus of your your president book frenemies with google which i think he sold a few copies of it became a required read google is surging forward and google and facebook and others are capturing the vast majority of the marginal revenue growth in profit within digital and digital avocado how does the industry break that ownership of google and facebook gentle excellence one of the things that betting on is that amazon which appears to be entering aggressively the advertising business will become a competitor to google and facebook in there for giving them a little leverage over facebook basil's of frienemie of everybody but the president i mean the president thinks have been as an enemy he they are all frenemies i mean everyone is getting everyone else's business one of the reasons i came up with that title is if you're an.

levi martin sorrell coo ken oletta google facebook basil president volkswagen amazon
"ken oletta" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:08 min | 3 years ago

"ken oletta" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Brilliant ads you go back to the volkswagen ad that o'byrne back created or or levi's ri bread ads they were brilliant so there are brilliant people who do some brilliant ads and there are people however who do who tried to emotionally manipulate you and for me i don't know whether i'm typical of the public but it bothers me a lot are are brilliant people capable of running these huge advertising slash media companies today since they have so many divisions with so many pieces well depends on what they're brilliant at i mean take martin sorrell who was who in my last chapter the book i said miss this or you're going to be seventy three when do you think you might step down he said they'll have to shoot me to get him out get me out and in fact they did shoot him but you know martin sorrell is a brilliant guy who created the largest advertising holding company in the world wpp on the other hand the company that owns four hundred other companies he had no coo so we had basically hundreds of people basically reporting to that's too much even for someone as talented as the nexus of ken oletta is a nexus of your your president cook frenemies with google which i think he sold a few copies of it became a required read google is surged forward and google and facebook and others are capturing the vast majority of the marginal revenue growth in profit with any digital and digital advocaat how does he industry break that ownership of google and facebook general excellence one of the things that betting on is at amazon which appears to be entering aggressively the advertising business will become a competitor to google and facebook and we're giving them a little leverage over facebook jeff bezos frenemy of everybody but the president i mean the president thinks of him as an enemy number he they are all frenemies i mean everyone is getting to everyone else's business one of the reasons i came up with that title is if you're an ad agency.

martin sorrell coo ken oletta google facebook amazon jeff bezos president volkswagen o'byrne levi ri
"ken oletta" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:38 min | 3 years ago

"ken oletta" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I'm with a firm that's investing in artificial intelligence and bucks chain startups that are disrupting the media industry and i'd love to know if you have any thoughts about that there's no quite artificial intelligence a alexa in your home and google home and and ibm's watson all are reliant on artificial intelligence and ability to to crunch numbers fast and target ads is also heavily reliant on artificial intelligence and but it it there's a potential collision ahead between the advances that you make with artificial intelligence and the privacy issue because artificial intelligence allows you to climb inside people's heads in a very fundamental way i don't mean literally climbing there and and we'll people want that who they allow that into what end idea but we know what europe is done as of may twenty fifth the twenty eight nations of western europe past privacy legislation now there's a history of concern about privacy and western europe that we don't have in the united states but it's very hard i it really has made it very hard for people to collect data on people's cookies we are with ken oletta media caught media columnist for the new yorker he's with us to discuss his new book frenemies all about how the digital age is disrupting the advertising business we have one listener who says stop all pharmaceutical ads and another one who says ban victoria's secret ads yes we definitely hear a lot of people who say band ads we'll be right back right after this break coming up in our second hour today my guest will be michael eric dyson his new book is what truth sounds like robert f kennedy james baldwin and our unfinished.

ibm europe united states victoria google ken oletta michael eric dyson robert f james baldwin twenty fifth
"ken oletta" Discussed on Recode Decode

Recode Decode

02:18 min | 3 years ago

"ken oletta" Discussed on Recode Decode

"I'd also like to tell you about one of our other podcasts recode media with peter kafka peter who'd you talk to this week here this week i talked to two awesome guest jessica pressler the great near magazine writer ken oletta the great new yorker magazine writer talked about kens new book if she's called frenemies the ad tech business facebook we also talked about running farrow and how can help run it farrell bring the harvey weinstein stories new yorker jessica we talked about her amazing story about the new york griffin it's one of the great stories of the year which is why we spent nearly half an hour talking about a single story house she puts a story like that together i really enjoyed both these conversations and you will too sounds great peter you can find recode media on apple podcasts spotify google play music or ever you listen to your podcasts our legislators let's go to the facebook hearings for example didn't seem quite up to speed on things i think that's yeah i think i think what did you think i was glad i was not on that committee okay that was kind of bummed at first because i thought you know because i want to get all three from facebook google and twitter in god's gonna lead to a dinner saying oh my god this is an embarrassment right and that's the challenge i mean the to try to sort people up through cyber you obviously some of my colleagues didn't understand how social media works on what the business model is the only good news here is there's nothing inherently democratic or republican about a national security strategy that's built around has cyber is a major component there's nothing inherently you know liberal or conservative about notions of how you put some guardrails around the ecosystem social media but you have to know how to do it or know what to do i mean do you think facebook or i'm using facebook is just one but you talk about twitter and google and others do you think they've been properly looked at by legislator where do i coming in terms of resident in again we've gone back and forth with cheryl and zuckerberg and a lot of the folks that facebook on this you know at first they blew off this threat i i raised it in december sixteen crazy nobody.

peter kafka zuckerberg apple new york harvey weinstein kens new yorker magazine ken oletta jessica pressler cheryl facebook twitter google farrow writer
"ken oletta" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

02:23 min | 3 years ago

"ken oletta" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Support for on point and the following message come from rocket mortgage by quicken loans home plays a big role in your life that's why quicken loans created rocket mortgage it lets you apply simply understand the entire mortgage process fully so you can be confident that you're getting the right mortgage for you to get started go to rocketmortgage dot com slash on point from wb you are boston and npr i'm robert siegel and this is on point from ad blockers to dvr sitting through ads is a thing of the past and advertisers felt the disruption can all let up of the new yorkers says math men have overthrown the mad men of the ad industry rather than creative pithy messaging they're looking to big data to attract consumers agencies and media companies are now frenemies and their biggest frenemy is you the consumer this hour on point disruptions in advertising and what that may mean for us you can join us on air online did you use a an adblocker have used them on your devices would you pay for a subscription to facebook if there were no ads how about google join us anytime at on point radio dot org are on twitter and facebook at on point radio joining me now from new york is ken oletta staff writer at the new yorker he's written the annals of communications column since nineteen ninetythree in his new book is frenemies the epoch disruption of the ad business and everything else and you can find the next trip through the book at our website on point radio dot org a ken oletta welcome to one point thank you how different is the advertising business today from say thirty forty years ago well if you go back to madman days or don draper days if you watch that show the the creative guy don draper in that case rule the advertising world and as the the bill burr real people like bill byrne back and david ogilby today the media agency which has the data tends to have more sway because they come up with the strategy and then figure out how to execute it using data but the best big data is held by the wall gardens of of google and facebook which tend not to share all.

robert siegel google twitter new york don draper facebook boston ken oletta staff writer bill byrne david ogilby thirty forty years
"ken oletta" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:24 min | 3 years ago

"ken oletta" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Harvey weinstein did a perp walk yesterday he was fingerprinted informally booked by new york city police and charges of rape and criminal sex it's been almost eight months since weinstein went from movie mogul to me to catalyst though the effect of that movement has rippled through every industry including our own it began in hollywood and this week and esteemed actor morgan freeman faced allegations of sexual harassment kim masters is the editor at large of the hollywood reporter and joins us from los angeles kim thanks so much for being with us yes the first time i met him face to face it was an off the record lunch at the peninsula hotel in beverly hills i was waiting for him at the table he came in very belligerently and very agitated i think i'd written something he didn't like he started demanding to know why i wrote this terrible thing about him whatever it was obviously not the most terrible thing and then he said what have you heard about me and i thought okay it's time to just do it and i said i've heard you rape women and i haven't specified his answer because it wasn't author i'm willing to say what i said but i'm still a little uncomfortable thing but he said but what i have said is i wouldn't say he denied it mercy so how do you feel it feel this week well i'm a day many people thought they would never see i've it's been a frustration you know for years for people like me and i'm not the only one you know ken oletta from the new yorker other people have swung at this and it was just impossible i know there are certain people who like to fancy that we protect a harvey p type person because they're so powerful but we do not and we would have been very happy but for many years we didn't i mean i'd heard names like gwyneth paltrow and susanna arquette but i hadn't heard nobody who would come forward i mean paltry has addressed the fact that she faced pretty stark choice of proceeding with her career or trying to take on this very powerful and wealthy individual who as we have subsequently seen we'd go to pretty much any length to silence those who would dare to speak out against him kim just from what we're able to see on friday i it's possible that the weinstein defense team is going to i believe.

Harvey weinstein rape hollywood morgan freeman kim masters editor reporter los angeles beverly hills ken oletta new york harassment gwyneth paltrow susanna arquette eight months