17 Burst results for "Ken Marino"

"ken marino" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

KLIF 570 AM

01:50 min | 2 years ago

"ken marino" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

"Nothing to do with Mohammed Atta was on an expired visa when he flew until Ken Marino and a bunch of my friends that will follow him. And and that's a lot of those the Saudi terrorists were on expired visas, or we're in the country somehow illegally. But here's the deal. You're for those who might not know what he is talking about the in two thousand and six Barack Obama Nancy Pelosi Chuck Schumer, actually on all the Senate Democrats every single one of them voted for what was called defense act as a longer name the net, but they approve the building of offense. And and the way they're trying to hide behind that. Now is to say well, Trump wants a wall. We've. Voted for offense. Semantics that's all that is is semantics, but that's what they're hiding around. And the media lets them get away with it. And that's why they're able to do it. Because the media is the media is dead. The news is dead. They just fall lock stock and barrel with them, and they're not going to give it up. But yes in two thousand six the entire every democrat in the Senate voted for the fence act, including Brock Obama and Chuck Schumer, so exactly by their own standards. Ian, are they racist back then or are they reformed? I like, but he and thank you for your call. Do appreciate it. Let's go to Dallas line four KLIF. Roy welcome to the Savage Nation with Lupe. How're you doing today? What's up about the MS thirteen game? Yeah. In Texas of you. Don't get too many of those guys coming across the border legally pressure, but illegally a few. But when they get locked up in our institutions, like a state prison, they start recruiting. Gang members. Right. And those guys get out, you know, when they get out two three five years later. But now, they're they're in the thirteen gangs for life and the problems for you know, the.

Chuck Schumer Ken Marino Mohammed Atta Barack Obama Nancy Pelosi Brock Obama Senate Trump Savage Nation Dallas Ian Roy Texas two three five years
"ken marino" Discussed on Lights Camera Barstool

Lights Camera Barstool

04:12 min | 2 years ago

"ken marino" Discussed on Lights Camera Barstool

"Welcome to the lights camera. Barstool episode one. Oh, nine Jeff flow. Ken, Jack tro, bonds and trombones baby. No juke. Oh, she's made noise. She made her kids made a noise on the podcast. All right. Yeah. Mummies? Mommy, shower says daddy baby podcast on. So yeah, Jeff, it's your flu game. Sorry. You don't. Ahead. Diet to leave the Epcot early disappointing. I'm doing this live from from Disney. So cool. What's the weather like there? Did you get that whole going from twenty five degree to eighty degree weather data? Not. The wind chills like a little up there too. So all of the olds and tourists are very disappointed. Various set. It's like a a chilly fifty here. Well, you know, at least you got the have you seen any of the Disney characters. No. But I'm going to. Twice stands like a week. And but I'm gonna do animal kingdom Tuesday. And so I'm going to be in my balloon Jerry sweatshirt Elliott working for Russell and the dog Doug at the dog's name, Doug, Doug. Yeah. But apparently balloon Jerry is in a character anymore. Probably because he was really creepy old guy. That didn't do it really hard to make that work. Yeah. I mean, also old mascots actually tweeted about the old mascot, the the six flags old guy. The guy who member him. Mm-hmm. The dancing old guy with we like to party. Yeah. But it wasn't a real old guy. It was person. Yeah. A young dancer, and they were creepy looking prosthetics which made it worse because I'm pretty sure you can find there's got to be at least one old person this world that can dance. Really? Well. I'll probably my great-grandfather before he passed away. He capped three days before. So just like Fred Astaire. See I still got it in me. Dick Van Dyke and Mary Poppins does dance. He does. He looks like he's the joke. They kind of joke that he's laboring bit which that's not a spoiler, by the way because they put on the fucking trailer for some reason. Just one why you'd run that surprise my only. Disney fact is he has no Ken Marino. Yeah. Yeah me. So I went on this Aerosmith ride. And when you're on the Aerosmith ride, you you see them. Wait, wait, hold on the Rockin roller coaster. Hell, yeah. Yeah. Yeah. You gotta say the name, Royal. So they so like, there's a senior you watch them in the recording booth, and okay there in the recording with talked about you going to they're showing I looked down in their audio technicians Ken Marino granted breakthrough twenty years ago. But I was like, oh my God that's ever ever in. They're just they're like. Oh, yeah. Steven Tyler land. It's Ken Marino to nobody's interest whatsoever. But it's my only wrote dizzy fach, I love the rides that they don't switch out in a timely manner. Oh, yeah. Like, honey. I shrunk the kids ride or whatever the last seen in spaceship earth, where they they take you back in time and show you all the advancements in the world. The last scene is like Bill Gates in his garage. Like the spread just fucking update. This one ton more, and you can take a poop and flush it, you don't have to carry it out to the street. It's wonderful. See Ken, Jack. I'm thinking I'm going to leave the hotel and go to public sector going to pick you up a sandwich of bringing home for you. Yeah. Get me. A what was it? I got those really gross Turkey wrap that looked like somebody just like vomited up like a momma bird through it up on my plate. Give me that. All right. So this week Thursday will be reviewing into the spider verse. Oh, baby Balm's performances over into the spider verse in mortal engines, which we will get to mortal engines in a second, there's some great news. We'll do that. Not sure what we're gonna do for..

Ken Marino Fred Astaire Jeff flow Dick Van Dyke Disney Doug Jerry Jack tro Steven Tyler Bill Gates Mary Poppins Elliott Russell twenty five degree eighty degree twenty years three days one ton
"ken marino" Discussed on Lights, Camera, Podcast

Lights, Camera, Podcast

04:12 min | 2 years ago

"ken marino" Discussed on Lights, Camera, Podcast

"Welcome to the lights camera. Barstool episode one. Oh, nine Jeff flow. Ken, Jack tro, bonds and trombones baby. No juke. Oh, she's made noise. She made her kids made a noise on the podcast. All right. Yeah. Mummies? Mommy, shower says daddy baby podcast on. So yeah, Jeff, it's your flu game. Sorry. You don't. Ahead. Diet to leave the Epcot early disappointing. I'm doing this live from from Disney. So cool. What's the weather like there? Did you get that whole going from twenty five degree to eighty degree weather data? Not. The wind chills like a little up there too. So all of the olds and tourists are very disappointed. Various set. It's like a a chilly fifty here. Well, you know, at least you got the have you seen any of the Disney characters. No. But I'm going to. Twice stands like a week. And but I'm gonna do animal kingdom Tuesday. And so I'm going to be in my balloon Jerry sweatshirt Elliott working for Russell and the dog Doug at the dog's name, Doug, Doug. Yeah. But apparently balloon Jerry is in a character anymore. Probably because he was really creepy old guy. That didn't do it really hard to make that work. Yeah. I mean, also old mascots actually tweeted about the old mascot, the the six flags old guy. The guy who member him. Mm-hmm. The dancing old guy with we like to party. Yeah. But it wasn't a real old guy. It was person. Yeah. A young dancer, and they were creepy looking prosthetics which made it worse because I'm pretty sure you can find there's got to be at least one old person this world that can dance. Really? Well. I'll probably my great-grandfather before he passed away. He capped three days before. So just like Fred Astaire. See I still got it in me. Dick Van Dyke and Mary Poppins does dance. He does. He looks like he's the joke. They kind of joke that he's laboring bit which that's not a spoiler, by the way because they put on the fucking trailer for some reason. Just one why you'd run that surprise my only. Disney fact is he has no Ken Marino. Yeah. Yeah me. So I went on this Aerosmith ride. And when you're on the Aerosmith ride, you you see them. Wait, wait, hold on the Rockin roller coaster. Hell, yeah. Yeah. Yeah. You gotta say the name, Royal. So they so like, there's a senior you watch them in the recording booth, and okay there in the recording with talked about you going to they're showing I looked down in their audio technicians Ken Marino granted breakthrough twenty years ago. But I was like, oh my God that's ever ever in. They're just they're like. Oh, yeah. Steven Tyler land. It's Ken Marino to nobody's interest whatsoever. But it's my only wrote dizzy fach, I love the rides that they don't switch out in a timely manner. Oh, yeah. Like, honey. I shrunk the kids ride or whatever the last seen in spaceship earth, where they they take you back in time and show you all the advancements in the world. The last scene is like Bill Gates in his garage. Like the spread just fucking update. This one ton more, and you can take a poop and flush it, you don't have to carry it out to the street. It's wonderful. See Ken, Jack. I'm thinking I'm going to leave the hotel and go to public sector going to pick you up a sandwich of bringing home for you. Yeah. Get me. A what was it? I got those really gross Turkey wrap that looked like somebody just like vomited up like a momma bird through it up on my plate. Give me that. All right. So this week Thursday will be reviewing into the spider verse. Oh, baby Balm's performances over into the spider verse in mortal engines, which we will get to mortal engines in a second, there's some great news. We'll do that. Not sure what we're gonna do for..

Ken Marino Fred Astaire Jeff flow Dick Van Dyke Disney Doug Jerry Jack tro Steven Tyler Bill Gates Mary Poppins Elliott Russell twenty five degree eighty degree twenty years three days one ton
"ken marino" Discussed on Movie Crush

Movie Crush

03:57 min | 2 years ago

"ken marino" Discussed on Movie Crush

"And I'd read, I'm sure you did, but that Jonathan Lynn was kind of modeling like the rapid fire pace off of my gal Friday. Oh, really kind of do this in kind of instructed everyone to be keeping the pace up. The pace is so fast it is, but that's not to be lame, but to quote, Ken Marino if I will marry me said we always have you always have to think about the musicality of seen, really? Yeah. And it's very musical. Yeah. Yeah, for sure. They built this amazing set on the paramount lot paramount. That's where we phoned. Mary me unhappy endings. I had no idea. That was my. I mean, I used to and stuff in LA. So that was my film business experience, but paramount was always my favorite to work on that a little tool. Yeah. And it just seemed like the most sort of classic Hollywood is right there in Hollywood. And now the other ones really are in the, you know, the the Bronson gate and we're Charles Bronson named himself after the street, and it's a conic e jiving in there. You're like, wow, you can't how I could not help grateful every time driving in like, wow, how did this is so cool. Well, so many things like you walk through the little New York block and like, wait a minute. The godfather was shot here and like, why am I writing segue and being. A lot of magic. Forgery with no top on, but you know, just like those movies. So yeah, they built very famously built this amazing set at paramount. Like when I was watching it last night with Emilie told her that and she worked in production and you still get fulled like, oh, I thought that was a big house in England in England, all enting from this huge old mansion and it just rained. A lot of that was fake either. Maybe. But I read this, did you read the BuzzFeed article about this? Now? This is really great long. Long article on BuzzFeed about how became a cult hit and the interviewed everyone just about their experience in Martin was just saying how much fun they all had because they're in almost every scene all of them together. And he said it was like a party every day. We had so much fun and he said he felt bad for land. He said it was like hurting puppies aren't get us all to behave. And apparently they all hung out in the billiard room when they weren't. They treat it like a pool room. And when they weren't between setups, they would all just go and chew pool and hang out and just like be besties q. Martin played my father and something, and he was also founded, insufferable my questions about it. No, he was so cool by he was like, we didn't really know gonna be this, have this longer life. Sure. Because he's like we were having so much fun. You can't imagine that it would then be good, right? Because they're kind of opposite, especially after the initial reception and cable TV. You know, like I was one of those kids who watched it twelve times on a Sunday afternoon. Kids are watching things that amount of time now. 'cause there's so much content. I don't know. You watched it so many, and there's so much. Boy, not to be old man about it, but you know these YouTube kids like knees e to. I don't know if they're sitting around watching movies like we did. You know, I don't think they are. You're watching little snippets, right? And I don't know what they're watching. I don't know what the watching either then with a just can't even think about what like our kids are going to be watching in twelve and fourteen fifteen year. I just hope I is a YouTube star. Thank monetization. You too. May not even be around then you never know so many great corny jokes? Yep. Which is kind of one of my favorite things like a.

Charles Bronson paramount Martin Ken Marino Jonathan Lynn YouTube Bronson gate LA Forgery Hollywood New York Emilie England fourteen fifteen year
"ken marino" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

02:03 min | 2 years ago

"ken marino" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

"And we'll right towards it. And that's sort of what we did. Great. What's next? What's next reach view? Erica? What are you working on next? I am working on fresh off the boat and I thank you. Great. TV. So thank you so much. And yeah, I have a script of a movie that I wrote over hiatus that I'd like to get going total. Not not ready for the title. Let's go. It's about children? No. All right. Good Elissa. What are you on? I'm actually reading a an animated feature for Sony, which is such a fun process. There's titled untitled high. It has a title that I don't think I'm allowed to argue about, but but it's really fun. It's there's there's two directors to producers and it's really like a collaborative fund, fun environment and you, you create an outline, and then you go in a week later, and story artist has started to animate that thing. And so it's, it's just it's well, it's fun. Ken, what's next for you? I shot a shot a show as an actor, a series for comedy central called the other two that Chris Kelly and Sarah Schneider. They were the head writers of SNL for awhile and Chr, Chris did the the movie other people, and it's with Molly Shannon and drew Tarver and Wanda Sykes and Elena, Lenny. York. Great house. Yeah. Anything else that you're writing directing? Well, I'm hoping that if if America will let me maybe I can direct her next script. Well, good. Good to know. Well, I can't wait to see what each of you do. Next. You've been very generous with your time. Give it up for Ken Elissa and Erica. Thank you, and that's how the Cuban went down special. Thanks again, decor, riders Elissa Matt Suada, an Erico Yama along with director, Ken Marino for coming down and chatting about their latest film dog days..

Ken Elissa Erica Elissa Matt Suada Chris Kelly Ken Marino Lenny Elena Ken Sony Molly Shannon SNL Wanda Sykes Sarah Schneider director York America Tarver
"ken marino" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

03:55 min | 2 years ago

"ken marino" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

"One who he has to be in contact, but you know, so so, but that that one was the one that I sort of had a hard time kind of nailing down. I guess, Kennedy slide from the difficulties of managing Gertrude. Dog helmet. What was your toughest seen as director. I will say, I mean that that probably that the toughest one just getting back to work with animals or babies is the is the baby crying scene because we had two babies, you had twins, but then we had, I think, four sets of twins and we would have to, you know, we can only have them, you know, in the scene for twenty minutes or thirty minutes and any time that I wanted them to cry. They were not crying and anytime I wanted them to not cry, they were screaming. And so we built that whole scene with and you'll see it at times, you know, with real baby fake baby or sometimes a baby's just like you or you don't see the baby's mouth and putting babies screams in there and like we, that whole scene was built. I just want to say one thing about a scene that I just love elements that you both put in that that I just think it's a beautiful scene and it's the scene with a wall. Here at the end giving the dog back which is like the two of the moments said, like, really moved me in this movie are Walter saying that's on my dog and then egos character saying, thank you. Thank you. Thank you. And I just think that that's that is a beautiful combination of two. Wonderful writers just want to say thanks. Our our times basically up, but we have time for one or two questions from the crowd right there. You ma'am. I mean, I've had this question many times before in the screening series, but I guess we'll get back into it about dog gassing. Nope, she she, she'd read a book. Yeah, she makes it very interesting point that she read that. Sometimes they like to cast animals that have a specialty of doing certain things like like dancing for air on her resume, many years ago, and and they cast according to that specialty versus a trainer training them to do this specific thing which which was the route. Well, I will. So the que- the quick joke answer is not even Joe cancer, but there was the what? There is one dog in Hollywood that has known to hump a leg or hump. That's that dogs in the movie. And in any movie that you see a dog humping somebody. That's that. Tell me the name. Tell me. I don't know the name of the dog don't know the name. I don't know the name of the dog I was. I don't. I don't know the name of the dog, but that dog was the dog in a movie is upping. It was just that that dog humps and it's weird because the ones like okay and hump hump. Hump hump. And so that's the Doug maybe meaning and. Still wanna know the training that goes into the, I don't know. I don't wanna know. I don't want to ask. I don't know. But the when when we as I said in pre production, we did not. So we cast the ad dogs. I and. The way I did it was I met with number of animal trainers and each animal trainer has sort of a corral of their their eighteen. Right? And then they also if you need extra animals, they'll go out to other trainers and bring them in, but they're the sort of the point person of income in charge of all the animals working on the set. So we hired a guy and once we hired him because there was a dog that I liked Charlie dog because Charlie was the most interactive dog in the story. You know to to chin hooch, it's not turning the the huge story and. I said to him, what are what? What can he do? What? What is interesting things he can. He who? And he and he's like, well, he's just goofy. And he's we like he just moves funny and he showed me a video and and basically I, I said to him, I just want all your rockstar dogs. I don't want you to have to teach them anything. What? What are they good at?.

hump hump Charlie director Kennedy Gertrude Walter Hollywood Doug Joe cancer thirty minutes twenty minutes
"ken marino" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

02:16 min | 2 years ago

"ken marino" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

"You were telling me about timing, yourself, onset. I do myself onset, but that's to make my days. So like so I don't believe that with the enormous crew and with everybody working on a movie that you need to go over a twelve and a half hour day. I think twelve and a half hour days of work is a twelve and a half hours of of a day of work is, is is great. And you should be able to get the three or five pages or whatever you whatever, you know, amount of pages you're trying to get, you should figure out a way to get them. I just I don't. I don't like the idea of like I'm going to stay here until I abs- intern. I'm going to stay here in and ruin everybody's lives and get it in eighteen hours like I'm gonna get it in twelve hours and I'm going to figure out how to do that. So the way I do that is I have a timer on set and I give myself a a certain amount of time, and I talked to the crew and I talked to the DP and I talked to everybody involved who has. To do their thing. I and I say, how much time do you need? And then I say, because I have ultimately a total of, let's say, an hour to get this scene. All right. You need forty minutes. That means I have twenty minutes with the actors or you need fifty minutes. Okay, that needs a means. I have ten minutes with the actors, and I will just how I shoot it. How I when I, if I don't, I won't yell cut or you know, like I, I'll just I'll just get the pieces that I need because I don't. I don't want, and I also don't want to go over because then the producers are going to be on me. Right, right. So there's a, there's a lot of good that did you get a tax credit for shooting in LA because it's rare for people to shoot no tax credit on Latin lover. I don't know if we got a tax credit. Interesting. You have a comedy background, so improv is important to that, but at the same time you have a script to the very specific store. You're gonna tell, how open were you to improv what percent? I'm always. I'm always open to improv. I think I would be. I think I would be a fool to not let. Really funny actors who are wonderful actors and they're wonderful comedians. Not not run and open it. Would you say this movie was for improve? You know, the script was really good in the script had like wonderful things like, but, but like for example, like we were talking about the bed, bath and beyond run..

intern LA eighteen hours twenty minutes fifty minutes forty minutes twelve hours ten minutes
"ken marino" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

03:06 min | 2 years ago

"ken marino" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

"So thanks for stopping by and considering supporting my passion project and reading issue, thirty three. But now let's jump right back into my conversation with co writers. Listen, that's way to an Erico Yama along with director Ken Marino about their latest film dog days. So here's what we're going to do. We're gonna get into spoilers right now. If you're a podcast listeners, if you've not seen the movie, press pause, go see the movie comeback, you know, these are these are five groups and because of that, it means that you could actually have a very modular way of telling the story because you need a certain order of events to happen. But I would think in editing you could kind of slide things around a little if you needed to. And I'm just curious right off the bat on the page for for the writers. And of course Kenan editing. Was that something that needed to happen? Did you find yourself kind of rearranging the order of when the family seen with rob cordray's happening versus win? The Walter scene is happening, you know, look. For his dog, etc. Or did it really kind of stay in the order that it was in? I think I think for the drafts that I definitely you know, working with the ebb and flow of things, I shuffled things around all the time. I mean, there's certain things that by nature are going to be towards the end. Right? Like of course. But, but but yeah, I think there was definitely the the shuffle and finding that that rhythm of, you know, when you know you want the the emotions to go on a journey and I think, yeah, shufflings part of that process. Erica agreed. Yeah. And I know Ken. Don't can your husband Kenny. So. You don't what that also, I know there was like all kinds of feelings about wrapping up the Walter storyline before the party or after feel like two endings. And so I feel like it got you nice place. I mean, the truth is we're. We're in editing, and by by the way, just a shadow to Bryan Scofield who teaches here and edited this movie. He did a beautiful job. We were constantly shuffling it around and what what I realized was there's these five stories or four storylines basically right? Then they all have an arc. They all have, you know, an act one and act two, you know, and and enact three. And and so what you wanna do, what or what we try to do is you know, in those moments like what's the, what's the, the strongest kind of representation of the break into the second act and what's the strongest representation of the four stories you have of of? You know, the mid point, you know, and and and you know the all the different parts of of the, you know, the screenwriting kind of storytelling. And so we would look at each story and be like, well, that's the the happens here, but it really happens here. So we're gonna. I'm gonna put that one, you know. And I would I like to work with time. I always liked to go, okay. Well, let's make a, you know, a hundred minute movie. Let's let's let's. Try to make that movie. And you know, of course it's going to go on how to be a Latin lover..

Ken Marino Bryan Scofield Kenan director Walter rob cordray Erica Kenny hundred minute
"ken marino" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

03:53 min | 2 years ago

"ken marino" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

"I'm like, okay. All right. Check my Email. Interesting. Interesting. I haven't heard anyone talk about that. Yeah, because then you during the twenty five minutes, you shut everything else out. Right. And then it's just about one of the apps when it closes you're off your wifi pretty much. Is it one of those or now? It's just a timer. So some writers have done things where they literally locked their wifi. The can't get an Email that can't surf the web, like they're stuck just writing, but so it's not that extreme hardcore writer's block. Erica starting with you and then going to listen to what do you do for it? If you get it, how do you battle it? I think he's just got to push through it and just like put be like, I know this is going to be terrible, but it's something like this. And then just like having something on the page. You can go back. Yeah, Elissa. Yeah, I totally agree. Us have to do it. You have to like, you know, sit down and just power through like, like you said, even if it comes out, not how you want, at least there's something there that can Even work. work with. We're almost getting despoilers in a moment where we'll kind of get a little deeper into the story. But before we do Ken, just your habit is director. Pre-production is a time where directors really able to get everything straight when you have a very quick shoot. How many days was this by the way, the pre production or the shoot the shoes thirty five days. And we had an eight week pre-production, eight week pre-production, yeah. Okay. And we cast, you know, we we didn't. It took a long time to cast the movie because for a while, we were just looking for the Elizabeth character, the Nina Dobrev character. And so the all the dogs were cast before we cast any of the actors. And then the actors were cast about four weeks out. And then all of a sudden it was just this barrage of like, you know, getting getting filling all the parts. What's the most important thing for you during the pre production phase other than casting? Would it be storyboards would? Yeah. For for Latin lover. I tried to. I worked with John Bailey, John Bailey who shot it in Jon Bailey's, like a. Old school DP, and we talked about kind of the idea of what the looks were and stuff like that, but we didn't. We didn't buckle down in a room for long periods of time. This particular project, the DP was somebody I went to high school with who is a DP, and he's. Incredible. And we've been talking about doing a movie together for really long time. And so when once I came on once I came onto this project, he before even eight weeks out, we just started talking about the look and the tone and the colors and the color palette. And we started storyboarding. It really early on because we wanted it to look and and have a like a have a real. The definitive look and feel to it, which I, it was really nice watching it on this screen. We did the premier yesterday and it was in a regular theater and look. Go look good, but like it looked really good here. Look nice. It looks nice. Projections. Good here. We'll so you know, before we get into fully all the spoilers is one question. I gotta ask what this cast of so many great comedians that that are known for being blue that this easily could have been a hard are movie, but you you're not even PG thirteen. This is straight up PG. Was there ever any talk about one point changing the movie to be more r rated? I mean, you'd said that Latin lover. You enjoyed PG thirteen, but I'm just curious again with this cast. And now I think the, I think l. d. always wanted to do a PG movie and and I think we all knew that coming on board. It was never. It was never, you know, let's see what it is. Once you hand in the draft. Right? I mean, okay. Just just curious if that was ever in the cards. You know, one of the things you're earlier giving advice for young filmmakers, Ken, but like one of the most common pieces of advice that directors give each other is don't shoot with animals and don't shoot with babies, and you did both in this movie..

director Jon Bailey Ken Erica writer John Bailey Nina Dobrev Elizabeth eight week twenty five minutes thirty five days eight weeks four weeks
"ken marino" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

03:18 min | 2 years ago

"ken marino" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

"Like what are some of the things that I enjoyed about land lever that I'd like to kind of do again, and you know the the thing about Latin lover, even though it's about a gigolo who teaches a a nine year old boy had a pickup girl's family, entertainment family. It is a family movie Ohana wanted it to be, you know, you wanted. He wanted you to be able to bring your grandmother to your your kids to it, and and we made that movie and and what I loved about it is I was able to bring my kids into the editing room and talk to them about different scenes. And if you if you know my a lot of my work, a lot of it is are rated in little Ron cheer and stuff that I certainly wouldn't show my children until they get a little older and go to college. At one day, what's that Bill? See, they will see it one day, but so so I was just, I just remember there's a scene in Latin lover of with Ohio and Selma Hayek that Erica wrote that was just a wonderful scene between a brother and his sister, and and it wasn't big. It wasn't a big broadcom is just them drinking tequila together, getting drunk and talking about like growing up and then they, they do this dance and and I love that scene and I was like, I would love to do another movie like that about just people relationships and and and just people talking to each other big bro, big set pieces, but rather how people deal with each other and how they communicate or how they can't communicate with each other. And and then I was thinking about love actually in wanting to do a movie with a bunch of different stories, and it was happening. And I was thinking about that as I drove to l. d. about. Out to talk to them about it to talk about this other script. And they put dog days in front of me. And for me love, actually which they described the movie as sort of love actually meets Marley and me dogs actually dogs actually. You know, the I love actually is one of those movies. I don't think it's a perfect movie, but I think it's a movie that anytime it's on TV I'm like, yeah, I'll watch this for a good half hour all the way to the end. There are movies like Shawshank Redemption, and there's like the jerk. There's certain movies that I, it comes on. I watch it and that's one of them. I think the actors have great in it. It's just a few. You just feel good is good jokes in it does. I mean this heartbreaking stuff in it, and there's weird things like the guy with the an iconic scene where he's like joing the the cards, but it's a little weird. But anyway, we we. So I wanted to do movie like that. So I met with them and that was the script they put in front of me. And so I was like, oh, that's great. But you got a little teary. So they, I guess so. So in that meaning they described the same scene and I got teary. Just by hearing the it wasn't even you aren't even describing it. The producer and the room was destroyed. Crying and I started crying, and so I was like, let me read the script and I read the script and then I went to Eric, and I was like, I think there's a, I think I wanted to wreck this. What do you think about it? Here's some things that that I think I might want to do with it..

Ohana Marley broadcom Selma Hayek Ron Bill producer Ohio Eric l. d. Erica one day nine year
"ken marino" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

03:52 min | 2 years ago

"ken marino" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

"So so so I said, let me let me and they sort of looked at me expectantly. Like, what do you think? And I was, you know, let me take let me go home. And so then I thought about it for a couple of days. And then I came back and I pitched them as idea of sort of love actually, but all the storylines in some way, involve a dog. And so the way better then was this idea of like the ways. In which dogs sort of not only foster relationships with between us and the dogs, but also create a sense of community and sort of this love letter to dogs. And that's kind of they said, we, we love this idea, come in pitcher, some storylines and I, I went in and you know, I had one of the exact was she teared up like I was five minutes into my pitch and this what exact teared up. And I was like, oh God, I gotta just get this over with. They're going to buy this. This. This is really going to happen. I'm wanting more. I know I cut one of the store from my pitch for that reason. I was like, I gotta get through this. I think this is going well and then and then and then they bought it in the room. And I was like, that will never happen to me like this. We have a spoiler sexist, so we'll get into it then. But just all just ask for now in the non spoiler section, this podcast is the part that the executive teared up in still in the movie. Yes. Okay. All right. So so you sell it in the room and then you have a time line of to write it, like how long to read it? Did you do a draft. Before bringing Erica, and how'd you decide to bring her so we'll we'll get. So I did do a draft I wanted to take. Okay, so is interesting. So I picked them actually looked at my calendar when when I went to visit set because I think the day that I pitched them the movie to the day, like the day visited set was like thirteen months like it was everything but, but I but I, I can't remember the how many, how much time do I was pregnant at the time. And so my ticking clock for delivering this script was like, I'm going to give birth so on. So I handed on draft and then they gave me note and I was like three weeks for my due date at this point when they're giving me notes on the second draft and the like, look, we're going to triage this like here. The big notes if you get the little ones do it, but you know, just we're cutting is big enough. So I did it and and I handed in my second draft three days before my baby was born and she was a week late. So so as I was passing my due date, I'm like, you know, you got. Their kid. I got. I got more to do. There was there was a baby hiatus to give you that extra time. The baby new. She I gave her a special. Thanks in the credits for that for that reason, I will. So you deliver and then literally yet on on all the counts and. Then you still you've now written to drafts. So when did, when did you decide to go for a co? So then so then the so then I had in my draft and then it was then so so I'll I'll grab the baton here so l. d. entertainment Mickey Ladele. They had seen how to be a Latin lover and they were looking for a director for a dog days and I went in, I read a different script actually to meet them and they and I said, I gave all these thoughts in these notes on the script. And then they said, well, those are great notes. That's really terrific. We don't know if we can make that movie this year. We wanna make a movie this year and it's it's this one. It's it's and they put it in front of me and was dog days and it was. And then they explained the kind of idea and the premise to me and. I had when I was driving over, I was trying to think about like movies that like what would what is a movie that I'd like to do coming off of Latin lover and what did I like about Latin lover?.

Erica executive director Mickey Ladele l. thirteen months five minutes three weeks three days
"ken marino" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

03:37 min | 2 years ago

"ken marino" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

"Before burning love. I had been a wrote. We need as in on children's hospital a little, but I also sort of I worked with David and Ken on on some of their movies, you helped it out. And so it was it was really exciting to have the opportunity to just make something that that I wrote and to get to do it with Ken was really special. And then the fact that we just had this Dreamcast of of actress who were just like, yeah, show up for a couple of days in like, do this crazy thing. It was just really, really fun. And the response was was more than we could have anticipated. I remember when we when. 'cause you know Jennifer Aniston's in the second up and that kind of does a little something for your little web series. It's a a little slight awareness bump. And I remember like just there were all of a sudden so many reviews and interviews are like, you know, articles on the web and people. Finding it so quickly. And I just remember being overwhelmed by that and Ken looking at me and going, this will never happen again. I said, well, what will never happen again? Is it? There was no. I read everything when I when we work on stuff, and I read every article in every review and that particular project. For whatever reason, I think because it was very good but got just positive. Reviews, and I was like, that never happens and it will never happen again. So just beware, I'm sure will happen again for you guys. All right. Getting getting tonight's movie because I, I love it. People are still discovering, bring love. So I encourage anybody that hasn't seen it to see it getting. Tonight's movie Elissa. You came up with the idea, I believe. So tell us how the idea of dog days started. Yeah, so so as you mentioned, so I just finished a movie called the miracle season for l. d. entertainment. And we had a really positive experience working together and they came to me and said, we would love to do something else at you, and we really want to do a dog movie and they gave you the idea. They said they said, we want to do a dog movie, and so the Glick they literally, I got a cat movie if it was Tuesday, but it was Monday. So it was dog. I don't think I would have replied to it cabinet cats with you. And so she we found out dangerous creatures. I'm just gonna go against the grain here. I like cats. Thank you so much more people like hat's then saw burning love or strangely all these all these cat lovers. Were they sitting dog days movie, aren't they? Yeah, come on. I go on. So they wanted to talk so producer called me and said we wanted. And I said, what do you mean by that? And then they were wanting come into the office. We'll talk about it. Okay. So I go into the office. Conference call about a dog. Now you gotta go. So they said, you know, we've got this book. It's about a girl detective and our dog. What about that or or actually? No, no, what we could you could redo turn, which maybe there's a Turner and that we should make. And then they said, or you could do a rom com where there's two people who really like it to their, but their dogs don't. What are you? You and I was like, oh, wow, like they would just and it was. It's barrage of ideas. I mean, they were really going to pursue paying for the intellectual property of turn hooch. I don't. I don't think so. I think something in the spirit of Turner and hooch I think was turn who s? Okay. Yes, the library congress is put Turner, who can evolve, you can't touch it. It's a classic go on. Yeah, yeah..

Ken Turner Jennifer Aniston David Glick congress producer
"ken marino" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

04:18 min | 2 years ago

"ken marino" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

"Well, we shot that one thing that and that person said that one thing earlier, we can say that here and then it's sort of a call back. And then it feels like it's all this nice you're doing that on cetera, and post on said in post it. I mean the whole time breaking stories which we were talking about a second ago. We know yours quite well. It began with the state which which, which I certainly love. Wow, no state fans fans kids in a whole fans. Mister show fans. But but I would say to this because we've we've talked about breaking it from the state before. What would you say your advice would be? It twenty eighteen to to younger filmmakers breaking. In what advice would you give them having seen the thing you've seen and seeing new talent. I, I feel like the most important thing to do as a as a filmmaker or or as as somebody who wants to create in this town and and make things is to surround yourself with like minded. People always kind of be thinking about your craft and, and you know, it's easy this. This is a easy thing to dive into because your research is, hey, let me watch some movies and some TV. You know, it's like it's like, you're, you're in you and study those things. And those are things that I mean, I don't know for most people that's what you gravitate towards. Anyway, you wanna watch. You want to chill out and watch TV and watch a movie. And in the the extra step is just setting it a little bit and and kind of breaking it down and why things work and why things don't work. So my advice is always just surround yourself with like. Minded people constantly try to create and write stuff, don't censor yourself and then and then. Shoot something and put it together. There's so many people here in this town where you can and it's an cameras now, or you know, it's easy to shoot things and it's and you can edit it on your phone now and in the like, just put stuff together, don't get in your don't get in your way. Just generate material progress versus perfection. The old adage Kubrick. Yes. All right. So just one more question for you guys before show. That's a sure to way of saying, there you go. There you go. We'll sue just one more question for you before we get to. Tonight's film, Erica, I know that your first writing gig was with wacky Wayne windy days the the clown in this movie wacky Wayne. I know that you also were on the Eric Andre show. And Derrick Beckles who is also known as TV carnage is also a hero of mine. What was your? What was your greatest part of that experience kind of on your writing learning curve? Because the air under show was just wild as all hell. It was super wild. It was unlike anything else I've done since. I mean, it was just kind of nonsense and craziness in the room. It was like it was all guys pretty much maybe one other female writer anyway, was that was that difficult being these? It wasn't. It wasn't difficult. It was just like an interesting vibe in the room, and they're all like head crazy ideas. And it was just like a very interesting exercise and just anything goes like in the weird or the better. But what made me laugh about that job was like, they would always come up with these very gross in absurd ideas or watch these terrible YouTube videos, and then everyone would eat a salad and meditate at lunch. I just thought that was an interesting dichotomy. All right. All right. For for Elissa this is your second movie of twenty eighteen technically coming out miracle season was something that you co wrote that came out earlier in the year. What was your biggest lesson on that movie? You know it's an interesting like lessons that you learned from from different products. That one was another true story like spare parts was and dog days. Story jokes. Dogs exist. I don't know. I mean, I think I think anytime you work on a new project, you kind of hone your craft and work with new people work with ice..

Derrick Beckles Wayne Eric Andre YouTube writer Elissa Erica
"ken marino" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

04:14 min | 2 years ago

"ken marino" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

"Into nicer resume. I always like to start with Brig in stories. Elissa twenty fifteen spare parts to my knowledge is your first produced screenplay? What were you doing before that before? Right before spare parts. So I actually had just moved to town in two thousand eight. And I had I've been living in New York and I got an MFA in fiction writing. I thought I was gonna read a novel and short stories or whatever. It was Brooklyn college shout out to Brooklyn. And I know no one. So so I came out here and people are like, what are you doing? Writing short stories. It's insane. And then I took some classes at UCLA extension, shout outs UCLA. Maybe we're sitting here. We're sitting here today. Anyway, it's catty. So I wrote a script for UCLA which I want a screenwriting a word, which then led to me getting representation of the script that won the award. It was called happy for you and what was the award? It was just the UCLA cts reading from? Yes. And so then I got a manager in an agent, and then my manager sent me an article was called lovey to robots, which became the reverse. But when I got this article, I was like, I read the title and thought minor doesn't understand me at all. What is this and ends, and then I read it. It was a five page article. And by the end I was tearing up and I thought for sure I want to try to adopt this. So so then I was worked with a couple of producers for about a year and a half on that script. And then it landed on George Lopez's desk and then you know you're later we were shooting the movie. So just one quick question. What was your biggest lesson from spare-parts your first produced movie? I think I think the idea of being sort of flexible when I wrote the script I wrote in real life. There are two teachers as an underdog story with two teachers in real life. I wrote it for like a thirty year old white guy, and then they cashed. George Lopez said that it was like, got to change that entire character change. His backstory make something meaningful out of something new. And so I think just that flexibility in that happened a million times during the during the shoot of, you know. I was actually on set for that whole movie and just things would come up all the time. And so it was sort of that process. Erica, you moved away from acting toward writing. So I came out here. I'm grew up in Alabama. I was always like I gotta get out of Alabama and everybody says that they say that, but I did it. I came to college here and. When I was in college, like I got an acting agent and I was like going on additions, but then I just did not. I was not built for auditioning and. It was. Okay. So like in my special skills, I think I said like dance class, there's took a dance class. What's so this on dishes and they're like. I was wearing like impractical sandals and they're like, okay, well, we're, we're going to need you to dance now. They thought I was like a professional dancer, and so they put on this music and I was just like a blackout. I don't know what it's like a mess, and I was like, I have to stop doing this, so, but while I was out here in college, I was taking acting classes in the acting coach that I met was like, you should take film classes, you should take, so you understand it all. So if you do wanna, keep acting like then you'll understand the business and all the different parts of it. So I took my for screenwriting class. It was like, I like this much better. I feel like this is this is Loyola Marymount university. All right. All right. We're hitting me. Oh, it is by the airport. I know. I know LMU very close to the airport, and so from after taking that screen writing course, that was kind of like you said, nobody would be active. I switch over to Bs screenwriting major and graduated, and yeah, left acting behind for the most part, but not sandal dancing sandal dancing..

UCLA George Lopez Brooklyn Elissa New York Alabama Loyola Marymount university Erica thirty year
"ken marino" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

03:50 min | 2 years ago

"ken marino" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

"You have someone that you look up to as as one of the most hilarious people on the planet, and then you're making them laugh in their movie. That's a real thrill. It was. It's great. I still thankful for it. And then for fans of Ken Marino he has a cameo in dog days as well. Yes, he does a force vein not to put himself in. He's got a background in improv sketch comedy. Yes. You're one of the many comedians who came up with the UC, be upright, citizens brigade that training help inform what you do today a well. I think in a lot of ways it's it's important a lot of ways. But I think the most important is finding a tribe, a like minded tribe of people that are are doing what you do and experiencing what you're experiencing, can kind of you can kind of were. With them and it. It kind of teaches you how to be collaborative, teaches you how to know like yes, I'm succeeding, but I'm only succeeding because you're succeeding, and so that you know is a really strong thing because as you go into these professional environments where like you want the movie to be good, but you also want the scene to be good, and you also want the other actor to look good because that will make you look good and some actors don't think that way. So think the UCB an improv. I think that's a main thing that that you get from that. And then I think it's important to get on stage and and fail a lot. And that place was a pretty safe space to fail. And I don't think I would have been as comfortable breaking the rules. Now, if I didn't know what that failure felt like. Sure, I, those are two very, very a incredible things that people may not realize that you get from that improv schedule, especially that generosity. Yes, you know, just right at the ground level. Yes. And principal. Yeah, rooted in generosity. I agree with what you say and I'm gonna give you some more and keep giving more and to have that sort of guide your life is very. Yeah, very interesting. I think it's important. I mean, I feel lucky for it. I, you know, I stand up is high art, and I think that it's like one of the most important things that we have and do I am. I was always one of my regrets that I didn't put my time into it, and I focused on acting and improv, which is different, the different skill, and it's harder to stand out because there's two people onstage inevitably people are going to pick a favorite three people on stage. People are going to pick two favorites like the deck is stacked. However, if you can succeed there by making the other two people look good and trusting that eventually you'll look good because they're making you look good, then you can kind. It doesn't matter who's on stage. And so that is something that I learned there. And then I also learned how to be a straight up slaying killer. And know that kill you off the stage amount of your. We went from generosity to violence at the end, but to comedies Russians. This is like on stand up. There's like this bitterness and anger, and that's why I'm always impressed by the improv world where it is sort of like shine. No, there's a bitterness and anger there to come out as much. Yeah. Well, it's hidden. It's hidden. Well, I think that's maybe one of. Kills enough of it. You're able to find it. I wanted to talk about another comedian, your former Mindy project colleague fortune fem- stir she was on this show last week, and she told us that the political situation in the US has gotten too dark and polarizing even joke about it anymore. You're fairly vocal about your your views, and you work as a producer and an actor on the president show comedy, central political satire about the White House. What do you think is the role of humor in times like these?.

Ken Marino US UCB principal White House producer president
"ken marino" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

03:58 min | 2 years ago

"ken marino" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

"I do stand up and to do all ages shows. Yeah, it's hard for. I But think. I think but I think that that's the best challenge. Right? That's why comedians like seinfeld's it's so it could work is just about what's funny. It's not using anything else. Yeah, exactly. He's some pretty great stories about your dad that I've. It sounds like he's a super invested in my dad. Yes, yes, for sure. Did it? Was he on the set of dog days as well? No, he didn't make it out to to dog days on my kids came out two days for a lot because of the dogs and every but no, my dad, why can't my dad away that was already, you know, patience is wearing thin. Working with animals didn't need my dad coming around, like combing my hair. What does he like your dad? Sweet, sweet, sweet guy. Do you know he's a doctor who used to be an actor and hell? What was his involvement in acting was just a couple years? No, no. I when I knew him as an actor until I was about eight. And then he went back to medicine. He already had his degree, but he went back to finish pre med school and move the family to Chicago med school, the university of Chicago, which is what my accent sounds like this, and then we've back to New Jersey, but I, yeah, I mean, he, he's just super super invested in very proud and he, you know, obviously think fraught pilots vicariously in a lot of ways. But I don't think it's, you know, I think it's a, that's an okay thing too. I think. We have a good relationship, and I, I'm thankful that I have someone that. Takes on ship over my career like that because a lot of people don't. And that can be rudderless. That support is just fantastic. Think about it's nice. Yeah, the community I come from Indians Pakistanis. There's this classic joke about some. Some kid wants to be an actor and say, I become a doctor and be an actor. And your dad actually did like. Like I think that that that is for Jews as well. We just had this other thing where mothers Jewish mothers, they tell you, like, you know, the father is like good to get a degree, and then the Jewish, you can be anything you want. That's where that's where I think I get that from in your dad's not your only cheerleader. You have a whole cheerleading section that also includes Robert Downey said that. Yeah, he gave me a big start early on a big boost in that was in an iron man. One. I was in the third I was in the third one. Yeah, it's weird to think that that's still early on. It is. Yeah. I mean, it is early on in the vendors saga, but so he gave me a nice boost and I, you know, he checks in time to time. Yeah, he's a great. Do support of text messages? Yeah, he's a great. He's a great dude. It's a nice to have someone like that that like, you know is non judgmental and super funny, talented and kinda just wants to work and reach out and make an actions. He's a good guy. That's nice to meet people like that. And he industry that you're in dog days was directed by Ken Marino. Very funny, dude. He's an actor that people may know from party down idle. Oh, always that right for sure. What was it like working with an idol? Just a great. I had worked with him a little unhappy endings as an actor, but to get to like directed by him and it's it's so great. When you have someone that you look up to his as one of the most. Various people on the planet, and then you're making them laugh in their movie. That's a real thrill. It was. It's great. I still thankful for it. And then for fans of Ken Marino he has a cameo in dog days as well. Yes. Vein not to put himself in the movie. He's got a background in improv sketch comedy, yes. You're one of the many comedians who came up with the UCB upright, citizens brigade that training help inform what you do today a well..

Ken Marino seinfeld Robert Downey UCB Chicago med school New Jersey university of Chicago two days
"ken marino" Discussed on How To Be Amazing with Michael Ian Black

How To Be Amazing with Michael Ian Black

04:06 min | 2 years ago

"ken marino" Discussed on How To Be Amazing with Michael Ian Black

"The night of the election i was with my friend ken marino and we were there to celebrate the election of hillary clinton and when it became obvious what was happening that was rei we just started laughing i mean we just i like kind of uncontrollable hysterical laughter hysterical sense of hysteria something's really funny i want i want to talk about the deal i'm getting to the hopeful part i i do want to talk about the obama white house well here's an interesting question that i've never quite under been able to get my head around you you worked with the president when he was then a senator through the through six years of his presidency so about eight years communications directors i said and then it's a senior adviser and you speak about him with a certain i'll say reference i mean there's a certain amount of reverends there i get the sense not only because of the office but because of the man he spent so much time with him and yet i never quite get the sense from your book that you guys are friends is it possible to be friends with the president i worked for him i am loyal to him i care about him deeply when we see each other we talk like old friends but he like he is a person who has a very a group of real friends who long predate him ever being that just president but in important well known person he still hangs out with most of his friends from high school like on his birthday they would come to the white house and hang with him at camp david i mean and so he's got this group of real friends and i think it's important when you work for the person to i mean we are friendly no doubt but he is the boss and i was a staffer and there is reference for him as the man and i tell the story in the book about i took a job working for him after meeting him for one hour i never spoken before i went to a job interview and i'd like i'd seen some speeches i read his book and basically preparation with the job interview and in that hour at the end of that hour i took a job and you know what i was getting paid wasn't a sure at my title was and i didn't know what when i was moving chicago because that was part of the deal and because i was disenchanted frustrated with politics and democrats losing all the time and so from that day until the day that we interviewed him for the last the last day of his presidency which we have proposed if america so that was almost exactly a decade was exactly to that week it was a decade and in that time never once mean he got mad at me sometimes got frustrated with me sometimes he didn't take my advice but never once in that ten years did i ever did he ever give me a reason to disobey ever give me a reason to question be putting my faith a him and he's just a good person he now he's a good person those i was trying to figure out how to describe it and so in the book i quote chance the rapper who has known since he was a kid because obe because chance rappers father had worked for obama news in the senate and then for fears and the white house with us and i got him ken bennett and chance i'm paraphrasing here bit said he's a good man and he was a guy who worked at red lobster he'd be a good man who worked at red lobster and that's how i think that's the right way to think about obama one of the things you mentioned in the book is how when you you observed how president obama was with somebody new on the team in they he would state a position ask that person what they thought of the position in see if they would i agree or disagree or if they would state their opinion and and if that person could disagree in obviously in a smart way with the president that person was valuable to him what was the biggest disagreement you had with him during your time with with the president the biggest grooming we ever had was around the birth certificate in the.

ken marino hillary eight years six years ten years one hour