35 Burst results for "Ken Burns"

FDR, Woodrow Wilson Were Racists

Mark Levin

01:10 min | 2 months ago

FDR, Woodrow Wilson Were Racists

"FDR really didn't lift a finger For blacks in America Or barely Lifted a finger That's the truth And wouldn't take on Other bigots in his party It's the same thing with Asian Americans Japanese Americans and specific He had said things had written things in 1923 24 25 2060 folks I do my research That's what I do Mark what do you do for a hobby That's what I do And then the back benches can clean up with their pick up the crumbs But that's the facts He wrote viciously About Asians that Asians and Europeans couldn't mix Shouldn't mix You didn't hear this did you Didn't hear this On Ken burns documentary did you Maybe there ought to be a Mark Levin documentary

America Mark Ken Burns Mark Levin
What's NOT Shown in Ken Burn's Documentary on the Holocaust

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

02:04 min | 2 months ago

What's NOT Shown in Ken Burn's Documentary on the Holocaust

"I want to talk a little bit about Ken burns new documentary on the Holocaust, not so much for what's in it, but for what's out of it or what he doesn't cover. Now he has every right, of course, to pick his topic and his topic here is the his the American response to the Holocaust. And Ken burns begins, of course, by conceding that we today are kind of commemorate, or at least remember the Holocaust. Of course, it's famous, the famous phrase associated with the holy ghost, which is never again, there's a Holocaust museum right off the national mall in Washington, D.C., kind of remarkable in and of itself. I mean, think about it. The Holocaust did not occur in America. It happened thousands of miles away in Europe, and yet here we are when the museum of natural history, the museum of American history, you've got all this Americana in Washington D.C. and a series of museums that talk about the Wright brothers and now I talk about Albert Einstein at Princeton and talk about all this stuff. American history replicas of American presidents, the. Cutlery and the dresses of American for his ladies, and then somewhat anomaly, the Holocaust museum now, it looks like what Ken burns is trying to do here is say that the American response to the Holocaust was inadequate. And in that he's right. Americans didn't, first of all, no fully what was going on. Second of all, there was kind of an isolationist sentiment that was happening in Europe is none of our business. And it's a European war. I mean, today we call it World War II, but you have to think about it all of the world was not equally involved in this war. To some degree World War I and two were Europeans civil wars.

Ken Burns Holocaust Museum Museum Of American History Washington D.C. National Mall Museum Of Natural History D.C. Albert Einstein Europe Washington Princeton Cutlery Wright America
Ken Burns: DeSantis’ Actions Are 'Out of the Authoritarian Playbook'

Mark Levin

01:19 min | 2 months ago

Ken Burns: DeSantis’ Actions Are 'Out of the Authoritarian Playbook'

"Cut ten go We woke up to the news this morning that governor Ron DeSantis of Florida sent two plain loads of migrants to Martha's Vineyard off the coast of Massachusetts including kids and whatnot And I'm not saying this is not a one for one This is not a parallel here in any way But it does address some of the same themes that are part of this documentary The abstraction of human life It's basically saying that you can use a human life that is as valuable as yours or mine or limbs and to put it in a position of becoming a political pawn in somebody's authoritarian game This is the coming straight out of the authoritarian playbook This is what's so disturbing about desantis is to use human beings to weaponize human beings for a political Let me tell you something you moron Desantis has done more in support of Israel and the Jews in his state And others in his state than anybody I can think of This is grotesque and to have this clown John Berman with the IQ of a parakeet Goading this kind of conclusion is really appalling And I'm waiting for the anti defamation league to speak up but it won't It embraces this

Governor Ron Desantis Martha Massachusetts Florida Desantis John Berman Israel
Ken Burns Compares Republicans to Hitler, the Holocaust

Mark Levin

01:02 min | 2 months ago

Ken Burns Compares Republicans to Hitler, the Holocaust

"And so he's looking at what these Republican governors are doing and he compares it to Hitler The Germans Jim Crow What happened to the Jews Cut 9 go When it was critical for us to relieve the suffering of refugees coming from the Holocaust we did not do enough And it's on the administration at the time It's on the various executive departments It's on the Congress that had passed pernicious immigration laws in the 20 and it's on the people of the United States who had inherited the kind of toxic anti semitism anti immigrant sentiment the depression was happening There's racism in the country Hitler had admired the way we had taken care of our indigenous populations They studied our Jim Crow laws The German study our Jim Crow laws to fashion anti discrimination laws against the Jews

Jim Crow Congress United States Depression Hitler
The Migrant Crisis at Martha's Vineyard

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:58 min | 2 months ago

The Migrant Crisis at Martha's Vineyard

"We're making some progress. Cut one O one CNN actually believes that sending illegals to Martha's Vineyard has the same themes as the Holocaust. Oh, I'm sorry, all the white Boston Harvard attending liberals that like to walk on there all white beaches, you don't want to see a Honduran. I thought diversity is our strength. Play cut one O one. We woke up to the news this morning that governor Ron DeSantis of Florida sent two plain loads of migrants to Martha's Vineyard off the coast of Massachusetts, including kids and whatnot. And I'm not saying this is not a one for one. This is not a parallel here in any way. But it does address some of the same themes that are part of this documentary. And that's Ken burns who did a documentary on the Holocaust. Same theme. As the Holocaust. The state representative who represents Martha's Vineyard, Dylan Fernandes, Republicans who call themselves Christians, have been plotting for some time to use human lives, men, women, and children as political pawns. It's evil and inhumane hold on a second before we go any further. We just upgraded these illegals. They now are in the top income bracket. This is just hit the lottery. These poor people, they were just in Nicaragua, barely being able to feed their family and now they're in the wealth there on the wealthiest island on the planet. How is that inhumane? Dylan Fernández? Currently immigrants, immediate illegals, are currently being dropped off on Martha's Vineyard by chartered flights from Texas. It's actually Florida, but that's okay. Many don't know where they are. Maybe they shouldn't have broken to our country. They say they were told they were given housing and jobs. Islanders were given no notice. Oh, islanders are given no notice. By the way, can you get the demographics? I think Martha's Vineyard voted like 92% Democrat. Islanders, how dare you invade our island you Nicaraguans?

Martha White Boston Harvard Governor Ron Desantis Vineyard Dylan Fernandes CNN Ken Burns Florida Dylan Fernández Massachusetts Nicaragua Islanders Texas
"ken burns" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

05:01 min | 8 months ago

"ken burns" Discussed on How I Built This

"Difficult to work with, I don't know. I don't know for sure I'm not saying mean things about you, but if we must, because we don't have any yelling, that's my number one rule, and at lunch, I wash the dishes at the editing house. And so we speak to people about that. The intensity is shared by everybody. They want to do that, and nobody is because there's no yelling. This isn't brain surgery. And I actually don't think yelling during brain surgery helps either someone drops the instrument or hands you the wrong claim. I don't want the doctors yelling. No, we don't want we don't want that to happen. So, you know, I mean, I know a lot of filmmakers who are yellers, and I don't get it. I mean, we try to have as good a shot, but it is, it is intense only in our shared dedication to get it right. And I am difficult. I'm sure, and other people can tell you that in ways that I don't even see. I mean, my ancestor Robert Burns said oh, with some power of the gift to give, as, to see ourselves as others see us, but we have happy rooms and people who the young intern who worked on that Statue of Liberty film and was in that room when the ad guy said, don't worry, it's not a puff, it will keep it from being a puff piece. She is my senior editor. And Lenovo and Lynn novick I've worked with came in at 89. We still co directing film, Sarah botstein, who came in in the mid 90s, Jeff Ward, who wrote the first script in the early 80s, Dayton Duncan, who came in and also were refreshed by new folks in people retire and they go on and so I think it's a really good environment. But how do you how do you maintain the quality of what you do and your demands that the quality is so high? But also, be willing to sometimes, because I think we all all leaders deal with this, right? Deal with the pushback sometimes of like, hey, just let it go, or make some comments. Yeah, well, I think we all do that. And I think we're learning. And I think one of the places where I learn is to try to hear that weak voice that says that shot's not working. You know? And even though you loved it, the last time it may not be great, this time and I think PBS is the real answer to your question. There's no other place where any of these films could have been made. You know, I could go out to a streaming service or to a premium cable channel and say, hey, I'm making a film on Vietnam and with my track record, they'd say, how much do you need? And I would say, we need $30 million, which is what it costs to make our Vietnam series over ten and a half years. And they'd say, no problem. And they could write it in one check, not the, you know, the 25 that I took to get. But they wouldn't give me ten and a half years. And PBS does, and so that allows us to incubate this constant desire to get it right to always improve and after a while, it's self fulfilling for everybody. Yeah. I do miss a little bit of those old days when we go out to the archives with the scoop lamps and we'd put them up the pictures up with magnets, everything's now digitized and scanned and, you know, there's a little bit of Gertrude Stein's comment about her hometown of Oakland California. There's no there there in a digital world. Yeah. And we're desperately trying to make a bear there. When we come back in just a moment, how can and his brother decide to take on their own family history project to reclaim the memory of their late mother Lila. Stay with us, a guy rise and you're listening to how I built this. Bomba's mission is simple. Make the most comfortable clothing ever. And match every item you purchase with a donation to someone in need. Baba is designed their socks, t-shirts, and underwear to be the clothes you can't wait to put on every day. Everything they make is soft, seamless, tag less and has a luxuriously cozy feel. So you'll look good and feel great knowing you are helping someone in need. Get 20% off your first purchase at bombas by going to bombas dot com slash podcast that's BLM BAS dot com slash podcast. Everyone's morning rituals are unique and whatever your favorite part of getting ready is. Level up your routine with Harry's. Harry's is giving their best offer to listeners of this podcast. First time Harry's customers can redeem a starter set for just $3 at Harry's dot com slash wondery. That includes a 5 blade cartridge awaited handle foaming shave gel in a travel cover to protect your blades on the go. A $13 value all for just $3. New look, same incredible offer. There's really never been a better time to give Harry's a try. Just go to Harry's dot com slash wondery today to get your starter set for just $3. That's.

Lynn novick Sarah botstein Dayton Duncan Jeff Ward Robert Burns PBS Vietnam Lenovo Gertrude Stein Harry bombas Bomba Lila Oakland Baba California
"ken burns" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

09:58 min | 8 months ago

"ken burns" Discussed on How I Built This

"Film. And so I don't think I quite understood that then, but I do know that I had yet to find a way to express what I wanted to do. So here was the beginning of the abandonment of the original dream of Hollywood and feature films and realizing within the world of documentary. I am coming to a fundamental realization that what is, and what was, is as dramatic as anything anyone can make up. And so all of a sudden, I'm not leaving dramatic films. I'm just saying they've got an alternative universe, which is a new kind of documentary I'm thinking, right? That there's a beginning in the middle and an end and an antagonist and protagonist in a climax and a denouement, all of the laws that we follow are all in Aristotle's poetic hero's journey. It's a hero's journey and all the things that go on, and so I realized that we were obligated to tell a story anyway. And then it just sitting around waiting for the right connection, right? And the right connection turned out to be completely serendipitously completely accidentally. American history. And then all of a sudden, whatever collision created the kind of explosion that just you kind of went literally, yes, I know what I'm supposed to do. All right, so you graduate in 1975. And I guess I guess you and a few other students stay behind in Amherst, started basically making films like for like nonprofits, right? I decided that in Hampshire, we'd started. We had great teachers. We had some equipment and we had no money. So the students couldn't in production couldn't be given a grant to make a film. So we offered our services for free to nonprofits in the pioneer valley of western Massachusetts. The first film I worked on for an upper class person was about the children's protective services in holyoke and Springfield, Massachusetts, and we followed families around. And then when I had moved up and it was now my time to inherit a film, I made the second film that would be made for old sturbridge village, the living history museum in sturbridge, Massachusetts, and I made a half hour film called working in ro New England. It's all live cinematography. We go early, early, early in the morning and stay later after the tourists had left, and before and filmed the interpreters in costume, living the life of the late 18th and early 19th century, 1790 to 1840, pre industrialization, and there were first person voices in this film reading diaries in addition to a very modest third person narrator and it like lit me on fire. And I had a moment with Jerome labeling, which may be arguably one of the most important moments of my life. Everything about the shooting of this film had been informed by who he was and what he wanted me to be. And he came in to look at a somewhere between a rough and a fine cut and he said it's really coming along. I think here I would do this and I would say, no, I really like this. And he pushed back and I pushed back and he pushed back and I pushed back and then he let go, and I realized, oh no. Because it was like jumping off a cliff without a parachute. Yeah. And that meant no longer did I have daddy in a way. Holding my hand and it was a really wonderful moment. But all of that made us all think that we just did not go to New York and apprentice ourselves to some film company and work our way up the career ladder, in fact, later on as Robert Penn Warren told me when I was working on Huey long, he said, careerism is death. So I've actually never used the word career. I use the word unless I'm speaking like this. I use the word professional life because he had instilled in me this sense that a career was actually a form of imprisonment. There was an arc that you went on and that wasn't what it was about. So you are really cutting your teeth, right? Learning about how to make these films by essentially doing it. Right. At some point, you with some friends from Hampshire and an Amy steckler who would become your wife. You formed a kind of a collective that you called Florentine films. What was that? Was that going to be sort of like an umbrella company to make documentaries? Like how did you think about what that was going to be? Well, collectives have really good word guy. I think that's what it was. The company involved buddy squires who stole my cinematographer. Roger Sherman still, one of my closest friends, and Amy steckler, and we sort of started a company in 76 called Florentine films, I had originally toyed with something called kanema productions, the goddess of cinema that was on the top of a dome of some New Jersey movie palace from the 30s. But we changed it to Florentine because Elaine Mays are beloved teacher had lived in Florence, Massachusetts. And so he called it Florentine films after that, and we, you know, made a company and there was a whole set of films that were lining up ahead of me, whatever they might might be, so in your late 20s, you began work on the film that really would become your breakthrough movie it was a documentary on the Brooklyn Bridge. How did that how did you get the idea for that film? My best friend, David blistein, was a book salesman. He graduated a year before me at Amherst college up the road, and he was traveling New England and basically was selling trade paperbacks, not the mass market paperbacks, but trade paperbacks, and he plopped down David McCullough's great bridge, the epic story of the building bridge I had pneumonia, and I read it, and I just said to buddy and roger, this is what we're going to do next. They thought I was crazy. And we just sort of moved ahead. It was sort of had to do with kind of my refusal to give up on it. How did you when you had that idea, right? I mean, now you're going to go collect a lot of images, historic images, you're going to shoot the bridge. I mean, there's a lot of moving parts. You can interview people, you had some experience doing this. We'd cut our teeth at old sturbridge village, I knew how to drop a budget I knew how to tie a tie and you had to make a presentation, but this was a big this was a much bigger, more ambitious. This was a terrifying, and I still can recall the unbelievable anxiety that possessed me every single day of not just that, but of the larger, unanswered questions about my mom, unexamined stuff about family, just every possible insecurity was put on alert. And in fact, Rogers folks had helped us secure the initial $2500. It allowed us to make a couple of interviews and it was just me kind of doggedly taking the Peter Pan bus to New York Sunday Night and coming back Friday night and raising money and trying to get a friend. Where did you raise money from? How did you, I mean, because you were so young, you had no track. No national name. No one knew you. And everywhere I went, you know, people like the Brooklyn museum would say, if there's a film going to be made on the Brooklyn Bridge, we're going to make it. Like goodbye. And I said, no. And so the best story of the money. It was like 500 bucks, or 2500 bucks, or a thousand bucks. I once went to a second or third floor walk up on montague street in Brooklyn, downtown Brooklyn, Brooklyn heights, and met with the democratic boss of Brooklyn, who died in jail, I believe, or at least went to jail. And he gave me an envelope with a $1000 in it from the kings county democratic club. And he said, no film is going to be made on my bridge that doesn't have my name on it. Wow. And so he gave me a $1000, and that's the way it was. And then all of a sudden, maybe a year or two later, it was New York telephone, and it was 12,500, and then we were almost done with the film, and it was Citibank and they were 30,000. This was unbelievable, but it how did you get those meetings? How did you? I mean, this is before email. You were sending lawyers. I was writing letters by hand before there were computers before they were even self correcting, selectric typewriters. I was writing them out. And I had allied myself both smartly, but also terribly it turned out with the department of records and information services of the city which had the Brooklyn Bridge drawings, and they gave me a little desk, and I just worked out of there, and they were going to be the fiscal agent. So as soon as I had massed the money, they just suddenly said, you know, where's our cut? And I go, and I had to go before the board of estimate. I had to do all this stuff and finally. Oh, they assumed that they had some equity in this. Yeah, yeah. And it was not equity. They assumed that there would be some level of control or more importantly if there was money coming in, they wanted to cut. And I mean, these things would send me my heart would be pounding. I lost weight. I was just, I was a wreck, but we finally got to the place where we had amassed enough money to film the archives to film the Brooklyn Bridge drawings to go to rensselaer polytechnic institute, the Library of Congress is where the archives were. You never nobody mailed you a print. You went there and you filmed in person. And meanwhile, while you were doing all of this, I guess you sort of got an offer that could have totally changed the course of your career. You were.

Amy steckler Massachusetts living history museum Hampshire buddy squires Elaine Mays sturbridge New England Brooklyn Bridge holyoke David blistein Aristotle Robert Penn Warren Amherst Huey long Roger Sherman Hollywood Springfield Jerome
Fox's Brian Kilmeade Discusses His New Book 'The President and the Freedom Fighter'

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:34 min | 1 year ago

Fox's Brian Kilmeade Discusses His New Book 'The President and the Freedom Fighter'

"I'm talking to Brian kill me, you may know him from fox and friends, but he's written a lot of books. This one is called the president and the freedom fighter Abraham Lincoln Frederick Douglass in their battle to save America's soul. America soul could use a little saving right now. But we're not going to talk about that. What made you want to write a book combining these two figures? Well, I was looking for the last time I was here. You kind enough to interview me about Sam Houston, the Alamo Avengers. So I try to find an angle not plowed and the Alamo is, but San jacinto isn't 9 months later he ends up taking him out as San jacinto beating Santa Anna in 17 minutes because Texans know it, but the rest of the world. So I go, what's next? The Mexican war, I didn't think had enough. My opinion, I'm sure there's a lot there with Lee in the quartermaster grant and the fact that these generals fought on the same side and then years later, they'd be trying to kill each other and a lot of them successfully. I said, all right, the Civil War. What could I do that's not plowed ground from Ken burns a series to the remarkable book, David blight wrote about Frederick Douglas Scott? I think the book of the year, 5 years ago. And then what about Lincoln? I literally you and I gave the same situation. We get books about linking to our desks all the time, and they're all great. I'm waiting for nobody who's written been written about more. It's like maybe three people like who've written about Napoleon Jesus, Lincoln. I mean, I don't know how many books have been written about Lincoln. So yeah, what do you do for a fresh angle on the Civil War? So what I wanted to do is also I didn't mind tackling race, but I wanted to do it through quotes, not opinion. And racist never left the news, Black Lives Matter is raging at the time. And then you have you have a situation where as late as Condoleezza and rice Condoleezza Rice on the view, having to defend herself growing up in a Jim Crow south who knew all about racism, but grew up as his conservatives says, don't ever let it be an excuse. So I said, what have I talk about their parallel lives to the degree in which they read a lot of the same books? Did they overcame incredible obstacles? Nothing like Frederick Douglass. I get it. The guy was enslaved until he was in his 20 years old, two tries, got out in the second time within 7 years has a biography. It's a bestseller, and then starts a world tour and becomes famous in Scotland, Ireland, Germany, and England. This guy was a slave ten years before, but decides to come back to America because his 4 million enslaved 350,000 slave owners and he sees potential in this guy Lincoln and the Republican Party that we're finally ready to do

Abraham Lincoln Frederick Doug San Jacinto Alamo Avengers David Blight Frederick Douglas Scott Lincoln America Santa Anna Sam Houston Napoleon Jesus Texans Ken Burns FOX Brian Rice Condoleezza Rice LEE Condoleezza Jim Crow Frederick Douglass Scotland
"ken burns" Discussed on SmartLess

SmartLess

01:58 min | 1 year ago

"ken burns" Discussed on SmartLess

"None <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Music> <Advertisement> <Silence> of it is <Speech_Male> yeah. He's

"ken burns" Discussed on SmartLess

SmartLess

11:42 min | 1 year ago

"ken burns" Discussed on SmartLess

"To i that i didn't even see that either high. Is there a filmmaker can that you admire. Is there a doctor in genre in your world that you're like lots you know. I love fred wiseman who does cinema very i. You know. I've i've dabbled in it. The central park five is as close. Not film i made on these dyslexic kids Learning to memorize and recite the gettysburg address. But it's you know i. I love that. I love what errol morris does the highly stylized of that verna hertzog is a good friend of mine and like total opposites of what we do but we use the total opposite of what he we were on a panel once and he he looked at me and he said oh i'm interested in an ecstatic truth. My friend. Ken is interested in an emotional truth. And he turned to michael moore and he said you would your big belly hanging out. You're interested in a physical truth. Then he then he looked to. Da penny baker. the great. You know cinema verite guy and said in you you. I think you're my enemy cinema as the cinema of accountants. I don't know who that is. You see his film My best fiend which is so relationship with clouds which is just it's phenomenal inverted herzog and i say this with a lot of respect and love is a fucking nut job in the best way like inches but so that must be an interesting He's got documentaries after two or three decades and still does features of but he's really Gotten into documentaries. And it's so and and i it's just he. He will run through every. Stop sign that i will a- lightly put on the brakes and look both ways. Proceed with caution. And he doesn't care to your kids want to do it. Dad buzzer well. I've got four daughters. The oldest sarah has been working with me for ten years and and her husband was working with me for longer. My second daughter lily is the principal injects media which does samantha b in daisies marrow and search party and broad city. Those are all hurt. Her shit and She's great and then. I got a sixteen year old gal. Who who is interested in history and and a ten year old gal who makes movies. She goes data. I'm gonna make a movie. And i'll be right back and she comes in two minutes and comes back with this thing and i go. You can't even shoes in in school. I it was pretty good. But i really thought it'd be anthropologists. Which is what my dad was. My mom was sick with cancer. Died when i was eleven and this psychologist maybe to answer the question earlier from jason. You know i i. I went to him. One day my late father-in-law and he said I said i seem to be keeping my momma live at. Couldn't remember to be present. The date she died it was always approaching and receding and he said and i bet you as a kid. You blood your candles. Wishing she'd come back alive. I said how do you know she goes. He goes look what you do for a living. You wake the dead you. Make abraham lincoln and jackie robinson. Come alive who do you think you really trying to up. And so the passion is that if my mom hadn't died we wouldn't be talking if i hadn't gone to hampshire college and met a couple of still photographers jerome labeling. And elaine may's you. We wouldn't be talking. I wouldn't have the guts to start my own company and say no. I'm just gonna do my way every film i've made as a director's cut the better way of putting it. Is there no complaints and even better ways saying if you don't like something so my fault and that's the way it should be. Do you ever feel like being a bully and and doing a two hour documentary just so that you can Wrap up the academy award with no competition whatsoever. Now you know what i got nominated twice for brooklyn bridge which was one hour and for set of liberty which was one hour and we didn't win which was fine and third. Time's a charm and then the civil war. We had like a really great score but somebody on the committee just black couple people blackballed us and it didn't even get nominated Because it was quote. Tv and then we were supposedly the lock for the central park five film and it didn't even make the final cut so it's a it's a. This is about feature films and the documentaries branches. I i think trying to improve and you know it doesn't matter i people say well. Don't you feel bad about having all these grants make you give it to. Pbs said no. I traded for a slightly smaller screen. So go to festivals. Were you know we go every year. To tell you which is the best festival on earth and get two can sometimes and go to new york. And it's great but you take ninety five and you go to new york ninety one down to the merit and the the cross county county to the sawmill milk for for for like two miles to the bronx but dole out. Because then you'll get screwed can't are you. Are you a red sox fan. Is the pope catholic. Yes of course i am. I believe in roo- rooting for the place. Where i've been in new england since seventy one. So when i went to college the bigger red sox fan your doors. Kerns goodwin God you know what she she had the earlier. Love of the dodgers mike barnicle. Well mike mike is the best red eye you. Both of these people are good friends of mine The the love is the same in the and while he's pretty cool. Customer dourson iras neurotic as you could possibly be about the red sox and and i'm i'm like my latest thing is to step out and say not only does big papi deserve to be in the hall of fame. But he's the greatest red sox player ever has the way that will join us. Bristle up your ted williams. Carl stransky crowd. But there's you know babe. Ruth maybe right. Three three world series. I will say this i was. I was at that game in two thousand and four win. Big papi hit that home run when the yankees were up three. Nothing we david cross in fact. Jason was there. Jason left early exit to fly back to hollywood because he had to go to hollywood elite party. But david cross. And i stayed david cross today. Stayed in we watched and we watched that come which was the greatest thing ever. I came when the yankees went ahead fairly early. I just i was in new york. Actually and i went to lincoln center because i'm friends with winston and i just thought okay i'll drown and i was. I was walking around and put it out of my mind figuring it was just like of three the year before we just got screwed. It's over and i watched this whole concert. And then i hear this guy in the next seat he goes fuck. They're tied and i went. And i ran out of lincoln center and i called my then wife and who hates baseball and she goes. It's a game of circumstances i said. Yeah what the fuck is avenue. Tell me what happened she goes. I don't know it's just tied. And then by the time i got you know into the subway and back i you know. I sat there like red buttons in tari. Does that reference mean anything to you guys okay. So there's a great. John ford film called atari about african guys and he's designs this net. That will with a rocket. Shoot over a tree so they can trap these monkeys that they'll take back to the zoo and he's so nervous about it he doesn't watch it and so he misses design and he spent the rest of the movie in his cup. Saying you know. Tell me about it again. Anyway it's great. And then i just didn't miss anything afterwards. My daughter and son-in-law were at the or features on lower at the six game the game and it's incredible. So what what. That documentary did for me with baseball Huge classical music fan. And i'd love to become as passionate about jazz or even country music if i watched jazz or if i watched the country music one will i. Will i get the same. Would jason could anything make him passionate about anything. As long as ken burns. Says a film about it. I'm going to fall in love with aching. Feel if i if i had that That mythical dinner party. I didn't abraham lincoln but i'm more interested i would invite mohammed ali and louis armstrong. Well yeah so. Watch jazz. I before country. No they're all related there. What commerce inconvenience makes us put silos around this stuff. Stop trying to rank everything. All of the great. The pantheon mount rushmore country music at black teachers ray. When ray charles had creative control of an album for the first time his first album of his own design was modern sounds in country and western music and the number one hit of nineteen sixty to nineteen. Sixty two is. I can't stop loving you by ray charles singing don gibson's country song and it's a black soul singer singing a country voice. It is. it's unbelievable and there's just no borders. Look the best selling country. Single of all time is by little gnaws x. Who is a black gay rapper. Wow i mean that's what this is. Where look here's my last stick. I promise is that. I've been making films for forty five years almost fifty years about the us. But i've also been making films about us and the thing. I learned country music. Jason is that there's only us there's no them and if anyone tells you there's a them which is what everybody's doing these days run away from them. There's only us right now. Ken burns great to end. Thank you so much. It's what an honor to have. You know these guys that i could talk to you all know you're saying it was a nine hundred ninety nine parts never had a guest. I don't think ever had a guest where we have talked over each other so much trying to get in there with a question. We we're we're we're all three of us just completely enamored with you and you can't thank you enough for coming on. Salutations and all the incredible work. You've done for the last forty five incredible incredible under so much more to come so excited about the hamad ali documentary. That's coming out in september. Were really excited about it. It it's so great. Like i said i just started it and You know just all wishing all the best and so much success in august things in your life can really great thanks. Thanks thank you so much. Better by by wells got scott. He's obsessed obsessed with the roosevelt. He's seen it like ten times. I have not seen that one. Oh it's fantastic. There's there's plenty his that i haven't seen because he has been so prolific but my god the ones i have seen and there are a lot of unsound. The only one you've seen as the baseball one no one talked about because it's just you know baseball's past the one you've seen you know what i'm gonna do. I'm gonna watch each one of them. You don't have enough time. Yeah no. I'm going to like one tonight one every other night. That's doing this wouldn't no no. I'm talking about like all of them. Though i mean vietnam ten parts the wars tip. I mean it's it. Yeah i would i would. I'll i'll be there right there with you right after. I finish driving back from wells house after watching ali. We'll i'm coming over for. Listen the war is really good. is really really good to In i do want to watch jazz and country. Music to really and Will you will never be that as a as a guest that that's that's the that's your your best Your best guest ever i trust. Dana's yeah me too but you know what all of his filmmaking completely fair and impartial.

fred wiseman red sox verna hertzog Da penny baker david cross samantha b errol morris cross county county Kerns goodwin mike barnicle abraham lincoln Carl stransky michael moore herzog hampshire college lincoln center new york jackie robinson Jason yankees
"ken burns" Discussed on SmartLess

SmartLess

06:56 min | 1 year ago

"ken burns" Discussed on SmartLess

"And now back to the show. You've been making films about the american experience in about america for the you know whatever it's been over forty years. Do you have a cynical view now of where we where we're headed and where where we've come from a is it is it doom and gloom or are you feel ok well. I don't think anybody has the luxury at this moment of being cynical cynical say You know like just debauchery as just a luxury of too much time and too many things that you're not doing with your hands that you begin doing their hands It's it's it's really serious either. Three crises before this the civil war the depression and world war two. This is equal to it and It's the first time that we've got lincoln gave this great Talk when he was very very young to the young. Men's lyceum on a saturday afternoon. I think it was And people will write in and tell you that that wasn't a saturday afternoons afternoon conversation about foreign policy. He said this is when he's like not even twenty nine. He's a lawyer. In springfield he said went show. We expect the approach of danger. Shell some transatlantic giant step the earth and crushes at a blow and then he answered his own question never all the armies of europe asia and africa could not by force take drink from the ohio river make a track in the blue ridge in the trial of a thousand years if destruction be our lot we must ourselves be its author and finisher as a nation of free men we will live through all time or die by suicide and we're you know we're looking right down the muzzle of that beyond that that quote is so great it's also there's a band called titus andronicus and they actually have that quote. Have you ever heard that song yes. It's pretty cool The way they. It's really co- i that's the the civil war series. I mean it's the end of the intro and you just kind of like. Oh oh that's right. you know. We got these two great oceans that provide this kind of geographical force field and to relatively benign neighbors north and south that that provide the same thing. And so if we're going to hell it's from within and that's what's the biggest. Tell if you would tell jason what the civil warriors Instead of criminal prosecution there's civil prosecuted courtroom drama. That's right it's it's it's about people fighting politely. Corbin bernsen in it or right. Yeah exactly. yeah you're totally in all of your passion And respect For for america and its history and its promise and its idea And an all this sort of altruism. You've you've shown us with the stuff that you've given us to watch and learn from. Do you feel a sense of urgency right now to speak even louder and work even quicker with something because obviously what you do take so much time and so much care that even if you started something you know on january seventh to address the crescendo. That we seem to have hit. It ain't gonna hit us for another year or so three years for me. I mean i as people say people ask me about ali they go so why lead now and i go started you talking about i. Didn't you know black lives matter me too. It's not there but they're all relevant at you. Know everything rhymes if people ever reached out to you and said like from other countries or other parts of the globe and said like. Can you tell really great stories about america but we have this going on over here. We would love if you would tell the story about what's happening in our country as interesting. The longest film that's ever been shown at the cannes film. Festival is not show which is phenomenal film. But our series on the second world war called the war that cannot it's increasing seven but it's american centric people always completely american centric and we told the story of the greatest cataclysm in human history from the point of view of four geographically distributed american towns and it was amazing group of people like a little united nations that went from one screening room to the other as as can moved it from a big screening room in the main building two smaller rooms and in that same building and some people just sort of gave up their agenda and watched it and then went back to denmark or then went back to japan. So we wanna do this sort of stuff but our films play really well the civil war and now a lee and jazz have gone all over. The place and people felt that the civil war series. I got this from canadians and mexicans as well as everybody else This is the rosetta stone is finally kind of understand. Mike complicated neighbor to the south. Yeah you know that. Was the general letter from canadian. I didn't learn. I didn't learn american history in this. I am a big fan of history is to is exclusively Pretty much what. I read And i've had to educate myself on american history. As as i got older because and and of course your film was instrumental in helping me understand the civil war in the intricacies and and but i will say i've often thought i. I wish that ken burns would make movie about eastern europe Because i think i am right now by the way are you are yeah. I'm making a film called the us and the holocaust and it's what we knew when we knew it what we did what we didn't do it but the central story is is poland. Yes yes those stories. Poland ethnic poles in ukraine. If you start getting into that we could really start understanding why the world is the way it is today. Stay tuned next fall next. I'm coming over. There are their subjects or things that you will not touch our go near or one. No no no. I mean i i have up until now been entirely american history and it's and i am what i tell people is that i'm a filmmaker. I'm not trained in history. I i took a russian history course. My first year college the last time. I took american history courses eleventh grade. You know and they put a gun to your head and make you take it. I love it. But i'm a storyteller and i just happened to work in history. The way somebody might were painter might work in oil as opposed to watercolor or do still as opposed to landscapes. And and that's it and it's it works out pretty well because the word history is mostly made up of the word story plus high which is a good way to begin a story. And and that's what i've been doing i am. I have to admit the team. My oldest daughter sarah burns and her husband. David mcmahon and i we made the central park five and jackie robinson i e pita film. They did call east lake meadows. That came out last year. About a public housing story. Lanta horrible Amazing transcended story. But we've done this leafing together and the next thing we're doing is our first non-american my first non-american topic on leonardo da vinci. Well i can't wait. You know a gay Bastard who you know is arguably in the running.

Corbin bernsen america titus andronicus ohio river springfield lincoln europe depression asia africa jason ali Poland united nations denmark ken burns japan Mike ukraine sarah burns
"ken burns" Discussed on Sports Media with Richard Deitsch

Sports Media with Richard Deitsch

02:23 min | 1 year ago

"ken burns" Discussed on Sports Media with Richard Deitsch

"Most beloved person on the planet and one of the reasons is not that he was a great boxer. It was because he had appealed to an inspired and been courageous. End had gained a kind of freedom that permitted him to a influence people. Not just in. The united states particularly black people but many many other groups but also to inspire people around the world in sub saharan africa aaron africa and the middle east and asia where he was Held up rightfully as someone who seemed to be speaking for the oppress people who felt the boot of the man on their neck. Ken It strikes me that one of the biggest challenges of not the biggest challenge of this. Is you you the documentary. That you guys have done is separated into four parts. It's it's It's given to us as viewers chronologically but the reality is and you know this like you could do a four hour. Documentary on a single mohammed. Ali fight you could do a twenty hour documentary. I would think. Muhammad ali and the role of religion in his life. So you had a certain point have to make these decisions as editors and so this is sort of a two part question one. Why did decision to do it. Chronologically and to how challenging was it just to edit down a life that really some very small minor parts of that life could be explored with significant length of what a wonderful. What a wonderful complex. Excellent question Chronological is the way a shelby foote once told me god is greatest dramas which is a way of saying and then and then and then. That's the way people tell stories certainly there. You can do flashbacks. And we've got flashbacks. We learn about Elijah muhammad's history we learn about you know joe frazier's history go back and do minor little things but mostly it is a straightforward chronology. As are all our films are as are most stories told that way so chronology. Let's just set that to rest but what you've hit on is the central thing. It is presumed that film like architecture is additive that you're just building a house and if that's true then on every house that we build we bring about.

africa saharan shelby foote middle east Muhammad ali Ken asia united states Ali Elijah muhammad joe frazier
"ken burns" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

The Ezra Klein Show

05:01 min | 1 year ago

"ken burns" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

"The assassinations would have you is dealt with strictly from the standpoint of how did this affect this man and how did he process this even with malcolm you know where he was vitriolic and in rather hateful in his rhetoric. How did this shape the person that we're trying to learn about. And i think that's what documentary filmmaking should be. I think there is a conversation between the individual the biographical subject and the era. That not only is was the right word shaping them but they are shaping as well and i think with mohammed ali. You get a chance to see that the way in which an events like with malcolm x. Are sort of shaping him good and bad and also the ways in which he's has the opportunity to change who we are and you know largely for the better. Yes is indeed. I'm curious speaking of documentary. Filmmaking what do you both feel about how it's evolved and with those kinds of things that we're seeing especially in sports documentaries. I mean we're seeing this these ten episodes of the last dance. But they're produced by michael jordan especially and obviously. There's some key things that were left out. We see a documentary about woody allen produced by fron farrow and other members of the family. How do you feel like these pieces. Introduced into the space documentaries affects or doesn't affect what you do well. I think there's been a huge golden age of documentaries and been going on. For decades and decades people have trusted at the stories that we tell obey the same laws of storytelling has a feature film make curb. But we can't make stuff up and yet. There's a freshness to them. There's something new. And i'm excited by it but i think being in pbs. I'm concerned about the documentaries. That are being made you know in which the subject is a huge part of the production team. That's an important thing or we're leaving out one aspect of it but that's okay. We've adopted a certain style of making films. That liberates us a little bit from having to choose a particular side though. It's very very clear in many cases or subtly woodside were on. I think it's good. We should make stories. We should have the debates. Were also having a debate with roadrunner about the use of Manufactured voices for something that anthony bourdain wrote but never said and there's no warning of it and it's only after the fact that we've learned about it which raises the same kind of huge ethical questions that the use of making a ten part documentary about michael jordan produced by michael jordan raises. And i still thank god for being. Mbbs because neither of those things could happen in our place and we wouldn't be faced with that kind of ethical dilemma. At the same time you know. These are very interesting and fascinating films. And they've got to be part of our conversation but all of it has to be part of our conversation. It's the more films the better you know. I mean there's lots of dead wood out there. What's called so-called reality. Tv of course isn't nobody eats bugs on tv. Nobody runs around naked in the woods for days and nobody proposes to somebody else in front of millions of other people. That's hardly reality. So i think that when we're talking about documentary we were talking about a wonderful spectrum from things that are almost feature films they ecstatic trues of verner herzog. The stylistic trues of an errol morris are kind of emotional archaeology the political advocacy of a michael moore and then some of these great subjects whether it's nexium or bourdain or oj. Are michael jordan. You know we were given stuff that has got at. Its heart something that really happened..

malcolm michael jordan fron farrow mohammed ali woody allen pbs anthony bourdain verner herzog errol morris michael moore
"ken burns" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

The Ezra Klein Show

03:55 min | 1 year ago

"ken burns" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

"But it's this really telling moment about where we are in nineteen fifty five between that moment when we put that scene in the film and the next time we watched as we're working on editing. The mother emmanuel massacre happened and we were suddenly in the middle again of anew conversation about the confederate flag and where it belongs and doesn't belong in this country and that was going to happen and telling a story like that and i think that with a league. It's the same that we understand him in his life and we want to look at the context of his life and what's happening with civil rights and what he's sort of in conversation with in his own time but it's also in conversation with right now. It's been of course five years now since ali died. How did this phone get started. It was in the wake of his passing. No in fact we've been working on our film on prohibition with different producing team not sarah dave With jonathan i and then jonathan had been helpful in our jackie robinson. Film that sarah. And even i made and he was already into a biography of muhammad ali. And said you should do this. He said to. Sarah dave and they said in a nanosecond yes and came to me and in a nanosecond i said yes because we know who this is. Sarah saying. This is a guy who intersects with all of the important issues of the last half of the twentieth century about sports about athletics about black people in sports about race about faith about religion about politics about war and as we get into a personal story about things that are bubbling up to the surface. Now in the me too movement and so mark twain is supposed to have said history doesn't repeat itself but it rhymes and we've never had film whether it's jackie robinson or this one that hasn't rhymed in the present and.

sarah dave emmanuel Sarah dave jonathan jackie robinson ali muhammad ali sarah Sarah athletics mark twain
"ken burns" Discussed on SI Boxing with Chris Mannix

SI Boxing with Chris Mannix

04:20 min | 1 year ago

"ken burns" Discussed on SI Boxing with Chris Mannix

"He did whatever felt like and Ali was for everybody else in had the all the difference in the world and makes him that that profit of love you. I watched How many ali fight you watched in the process of making this but as you as you go through all that film any of those fights stick in your mind. oh yeah. I mean there are tons. They're the ones that little known. That michael bent kept pointing. Secret weapon is we embedded. Michael bent former heavyweight champion every one of our boxing scenes and he not. He's it's for those of us who aren't really into boxing but are interesting he'd give you the strategy and tactics but also psychology and the blow to blow and the round around stuff and what their hearts are like and it's also very very interesting but you know and we tried it we do about twenty twenty five in the fights you know significantly but obviously the i listen is great just because of the drama the ligament that gets on the glove Listen corner so ali's blind against one of the greatest and most formidable sluggers of all time for around and a half. I mean the fact that he's still alive surprises me and the fact that he won is one of the great. You can't make this up in hollywood stories and then of course i think the first frazier is just an amazing which he loses as you know and i think obviously the one of the great masterpieces of all time is is The rumble in the jungle. The the george forman fighting seventy four where people in his corner. Nobody thought he was going to win. No one thought he was going to win. And people in this corner were worried that he was going to be killed and It's the other way around. He just demolished george foreman with with guile and intellect and strategy. And it's just it's a beautiful masterpiece but in some ways..

boxing ali Ali michael Michael george foreman frazier hollywood
"ken burns" Discussed on SI Boxing with Chris Mannix

SI Boxing with Chris Mannix

03:10 min | 1 year ago

"ken burns" Discussed on SI Boxing with Chris Mannix

"I don't think you need to see a. I don't think it'll be able to see a different beyond a while the stage greg is what he is and what he is is dangerous with that right hand. Yeah i think that's true of all boxer for the most chris no matter if you're twenty five or he'll be thirty six years old on october a couple of weeks after the fight but i think most boxers are where they are and typically revert to what they are when things aren't going well in a fight or as browns go by just more comfortable doing what they've always done so i wouldn't expect to see a dramatically different deontay wilder and even believe scott said and deontay wilder said look. He's just kind of bringing out some of the things that i've always been able to do but abandoned for one reason or another probably because you're a devastating puncher. And you're always overly reliant on that power bailing you out just like he did against the lease ortiz down. You know what. A- lost maybe every round before he knocked out luiz ortiz in the seventh round of their rematch. So yeah may maybe focusing. Because when he throws his jab jab he's got a good power jab when he actually uses use it nearly enough but he but he does a good job when he when he utilizes it. So maybe he'll do that more. Listen whatever he's going to do a better be a whole lot different than what he did in february twenty twenty or it's gonna be maybe even a shorter night for him that was at and of course. I think i'll ask him this. If given the opportunity to speak to him at some point hopefully during fight we have. I don't know up to chase him around. Mgm grand or whatever. But i could you just come into the ring with nothing to know. Theatrical snow just shirtless i mean. Don't even don't even put the towel with the head cut with a tie. Don't even just come in with nothing so we don't hear any nut. Nothing could impact your performance. Don't worry about enter entertain people when the bell rings. Don't worry about coming to the ring. And all that. I i would hope. He learned that in valuable lesson. From what happened. You know before the rematch. I would think i certainly hope so To but it'll be interesting to see you write about why jappie does go back and watch the earn fights. Second one the first one rather what he wanted the title. That was an example of his. Use of that jab. Keith always good to talk to you man. One of the upshots of not having any big fights coming up the lie to you about like on date. Ex- you know headed the figure or at least thing i know. I know you're hopping flight to fort lauderdale. Tomorrow morning i know in. I'm ready to see the resumption. Vanderbilt's career and You know we'll start. The senior circuit toured boxing. Unfortunately for me. I'm doing both of these shows off of tv. On back. toback nights. I don't have to leave the house. Which is which is a nice change of pace but we hopefully next we talk. Chris will be talking about real fights and a being less pessimistic about the future.

deontay wilder luiz ortiz browns greg ortiz chris jappie scott Mgm Keith toback fort lauderdale Vanderbilt boxing Chris
"ken burns" Discussed on SI Boxing with Chris Mannix

SI Boxing with Chris Mannix

04:47 min | 1 year ago

"ken burns" Discussed on SI Boxing with Chris Mannix

"I mean i understand. He needs to get back in the ring because he hasn't fought in a year and a half basically are almost a year and a half so he wants to get back in there. I don't know how much they're paying him in san door martine. I don't have no idea but why waste the money on something like that when you could apply. Whatever he's being paid for that toward better fight you know maybe then you could pay him closer to what he wants to fight reaches program not saying fighting regis Coming off a year and a half layoff is ideal but the pandemic affect every boxer and every person on earth in various ways. I mean everyone was impacted by financially in another way. So that's certainly applies to make your see as well. So i don't see the point of putting him in there with a guy who is going to be a hundred to one favorite may be more to beat now if you're if you're paying him next nothing which i doubt but if you're paying him next to nothing will then fine but but again you subscriber something worth watching on october sixteenth. There's not a other boxing right now because the espn car manual. Never retail against Is now going to be friday october. Fifteen so you'll have the night to yourself so to speak in boxing in the us but while hope they put something on the other heart man. I love the idea of mikey against redesign. That is a great style. Match up it is a meaningful fights. The winner will take a huge step forward. I hope that smarter heads can get received a really want. Every time i see him on social media he's clamoring more that fights hopefully the finances workout last thing for you Woke up on thursday morning and strolling through twitter. And i see tyson fury and gillian way. You know calling each other fat coke heads and all sorts of ridiculous. Things at each other in theory is plan at least right now. He says is to.

san door martine boxing espn tyson fury us gillian twitter
"ken burns" Discussed on SI Boxing with Chris Mannix

SI Boxing with Chris Mannix

03:35 min | 1 year ago

"ken burns" Discussed on SI Boxing with Chris Mannix

"Look i'll just make sure that that. That is on top of him throughout his training camp will they were on top of him throughout this training camp. He tested positive and they were saying who cares the fight anyway. So so maybe there's going to be a change made to the way. The wbz runs clean boxing program. But but they come out of this looking. The couldn't look worse. In my opinion to as far as this whole thing goes and it really speaks to how poorly policed. Pdr in boxing. It's the wild wild west and everyone says until we have a national commission. Let's stop talking about a national commission because it's not happening. so how. how can you fix it moving forward when you have people adhering to two different standards to different organizations and then Doing different things even chris. Because if you remember in your great state of massachusetts three years ago dimitrius android was supposed to fight. Billy joe saunders and what was the good fight up. There was at the the boston. celtics arena. It was a fight. People wanted to see was a pay per view fight or anything but it was good. Fight for zone. And billy joe saunders. Android were both undefeated at the and everything. And it's a very similar instance in that billy joe. Saunders tested positive. He said that came from a nasal spray or something but it was a very similar thing in that it was allowed in competition but not out of competition and although the massachusetts state athletic commission adheres to wada code just like tribal commission does the massachusetts state apathetic commission refused to license. Billy joe saunders. Because they said you saw you willingly signed up for vata testing and you did not adhere to what the what the list of banned substances so so. The massachusetts commission did the right thing and now the arizona commission had the opportunity to do this the the similar right thing and did the complete opposite. It's incredible. I mean you think of a sport where it's more important to earn the side of caution when it comes to drug testing in boxing. I can't miss people at looking. You know we're not being melodramatic in any way set people's lives like literally every time you walk up the steps you don't know any certainty that you're coming down. You don't know that. I mean this is a brutal brutal sport you know we have an eighteen year old woman dying within the last week a and maybe she wasn't protected. The right way as it turns out. And you know it's a brutal sport and anything that can be done to make it just a little bit safer because it's inherently dangerous but anything that can be done to make it safer should be done and if you're on board with it not being done shame you shukor. Stevenson made the point in your story about what happens if you know valdez. If not pop then hit somebody in the back of head cause serious injury or even death to his fighter and then it was revealed that he was positive for something. I feel like that's a question of when not if that's going to happen like that's going to happen at some point. Someone's going to get seriously hurt or killed and we're gonna find out after the fact that the fighter that did the damage was on a banned substance and then you're comes all the mainstream attention that you want on that comes the congressional hearings here. Comes everything else box needs to get in front of us. They need to be proactive on this and they refused every step of the way they refused it..

Billy joe saunders national commission boxing dimitrius massachusetts state athletic c tribal commission massachusetts state apathetic massachusetts commission arizona commission billy joe celtics wada Saunders massachusetts chris boston shukor Stevenson valdez
"ken burns" Discussed on SI Boxing with Chris Mannix

SI Boxing with Chris Mannix

05:51 min | 1 year ago

"ken burns" Discussed on SI Boxing with Chris Mannix

"And i don't think the entire interview ran but like maybe two minutes of it ran market a great job at asking. Him pointed questions and oscar galvez said. I don't know how it got in my system. That is not an acceptable answer. An under any circumstances that is not an acceptable answer. And i've been told oscar. Bell beds is a nice kid he is but before this oscar valdez was a prime example of everything. That's right about boxing. A mexican immigrant. Who fought his way out of poverty. One at every level despite being limited talent wise and from a physical standpoint to some degree and then he gets into the biggest fight of his career against Gilbert shelled and beats the crap out of him right and knocks him down. Three times viciously knocked out in the tenth round a huge underdog going into the fight. He's everything he's what boxing embodies. I mean oscar. Valdez is a great kid. That has nothing to with the fact that he tested positive for banned substance. It's irrelevant whether he's nicer. Not your nice. I'm nice if we do something stupid. It costs you know whatever we break the law or whatever. Will you have to suffer the consequences. Whether you're a nice person or not is irrelevant. You don't get the benefit of the doubt when you pass when you when you test positive for a substance like this because whether it's fair or not it then cast doubt on everything that you've done before and now i wrote a story for the website that appeared today of course stevenson questioned and i think rightfully kushtia course stevenson. Someone who risked his life every time he gets into the ring just like every box does and he said look now i kind of look at the shelter win a little differently like was he on it before and yet you know. Look i'm not saying that's entirely fair. But it's a reasonable skeptical opinion to have because there are masking agents. There are ways that you can beep at a lot of guys in boxing. You know the suspicion that people are ahead of the tests and i'm not saying valdez Puts in his body. And what he doesn't. What's indisputable an inaugural. Is he tested. Positive for a banned substance according to that as guidelines and that should matter apparently a dozen. Yeah i i remembered the belief that i don't think valdez should have to kinda wear this as a scarlet letter for the rest of his career. I do they get certainly possible. Especially for a guy that doesn't have any history of testing positive for banned substances to have accidentally taken something. I will allow for that. That doesn't change to your point the consequences of these actions. The consequence should be that you have your fight..

oscar galvez oscar valdez boxing kushtia stevenson oscar Valdez Gilbert valdez
"ken burns" Discussed on Le Batard and Friends - South Beach Sessions

Le Batard and Friends - South Beach Sessions

05:45 min | 1 year ago

"ken burns" Discussed on Le Batard and Friends - South Beach Sessions

"I am now honor bound to give you an experience as cinematic experience that you will not fall out of that you will attend to and you know and and god bless you for giving me that that amount of time and i am honored bound to honor your attention to me the hard question when you say that you thought you knew what vietnam was and you didn't know a fraction of what vietnam was when you parse through those horrors. Do you see them. Playing out again in afghanistan right now in real time across today's news because of what you know of course this country and what this government is capable of of course of course and it doesn't necessarily point to very simple good and bad black and white. You know kind of thing. It's just so we like to say history repeats itself it never ever has an it never repeated itself the universe would come to a stop if it did mark twain is supposed to have said history doesn't repeat itself but it rhymes and what that suggests is that human nature remains the same and the cleese asti said there's nothing new under the sun meaning what has been done. We'll be done. What has what has been will be again. There's nothing new under the sun so human nature doesn't change and so we see these themes these motifs. These rhymes happening all the time. Whenever i finish a film. And i swear to you. We focused intently on getting that film. Right he lift up and then you can't help but be shocked by how much it's rhyming. In the present. I could do that. With vietnam give you the stump speech for that and blow your mind with how much was exactly what was going on twenty seventeen but i can do the same thing with the civil war or the brooklyn bridge or the dust bowl or prohibition all of these things when you study something in the past and you do a good job about it and you render the the people dimensional and real complicated. Then it's going to speak to the present because human beings remained the same the same amount of greed and generosity the same amount of periods and puritanism. It's all it's all there and you can watch it. Play out in in lots of different ways. I've got a thousand questions. But we're pressed for time so i will just leave you this as a promotion for the film when ken burns looks at american history. I wanna ask you top three american musicians or top three american artists of all time but wherever it is and however it is top. Three religious figures ali. And the movie that you're now making if you were going through all of american history as you know it and saying i would place him top of the category. Where in american history. So he's obviously having a a time and newsweek and sports illustrated all said he was the athlete of the century. So i accept ad. And i can have an argument in a bar about the greatest athlete of all time. But let's just say maybe the best way to do this..

vietnam mark twain afghanistan ken burns ali
"ken burns" Discussed on Le Batard and Friends - South Beach Sessions

Le Batard and Friends - South Beach Sessions

05:56 min | 1 year ago

"ken burns" Discussed on Le Batard and Friends - South Beach Sessions

"Time on this. I'm influencing stuff like that. It aspires to be a fair recall yesterday historic events. And here you are on your. You're not being objective. And i happened to find you on the right side of truth but the way that you speak of race in this country is not in any way whitewash. You're speaking of it as the plane. Sort of same truth but with a degree of indignation behind. I'm surprised still to see you. Tell me as a thorough researcher of this stuff. I underestimated badly underestimated how bad the race problem was in this country and i was polarizing and left disney at least in part because i wouldn't shut up about race. Well i applaud you for that. That's the problem. I think everybody was like now. We're post racial. We don't have to talk about it but tell that to tamir rice's mommy's a twelve year old kid with a plastic gun cleveland park. Tell that the trayvon martin. It does just going for a jog in a florida suburb. Tell that to brianna taylor. Who's just sitting in her bedroom. You know and it's an oops wrong mistake. Tell to george. Floyd these are people that are murdered. None of us you know. I always thought that cova did the year. You know twenty twenty. It reminded us a little bit. We're able to have a little bit of a racial reckoning. Will now say it so often that it's not happening that be in large part because it was never a problem for us to go to the convenience store white people to convene now it was going to get sick. I'm going to get this disease. Am i going to die and all of a sudden if you had a brain in your head or more importance something beating in here you would say my goodness this has been an f. I mean mothers never knew in eighteen ninety whether their kid was gonna come home from school. You know alive. I mean this is what this is. This is a story and this is us as much of all the wonderful things that we've done in my films document those wonderful things that well. It's just really important that we are honest about what what's going on. It doesn't take as bob dylan. Said a weatherman. To tell you which way the wind is blowing. Did you underestimate it. As a thorough chronicler of facts gathered about what america's fabric is did. You can burn. Get surprised by how bad it is no now. I'm disappointed by what's been going on now. The sort of eating away. Roading of voting rights voter suppression stuff. The civil rights bill and and the voting rights bill of the mid sixties. I was stunned that that people could figure out a way to justify to do that..

tamir rice brianna taylor cleveland park trayvon martin cova disney Floyd florida george bob dylan america
"ken burns" Discussed on Le Batard and Friends - South Beach Sessions

Le Batard and Friends - South Beach Sessions

05:57 min | 1 year ago

"ken burns" Discussed on Le Batard and Friends - South Beach Sessions

"Telling us for thousands of years. That heroes aren't perfect. Achilles has his heel and his hubris to go along with his great fl great strengths. And so it's the negotiation. Sometimes the war between someone's inner strengths and weaknesses that defines heroism and of course defines a good story. So this is. This is a classic american story. This is a hero's journey a rags to riches story. It's the story of america's age old question of race. You know it's there's a moment. Dan really wonderful moment. When the supreme court exonerates him He's been convicted of avoiding the draft refusing induction and sentenced to five years. He loses three and a half years of the prime is his career. Supreme court unanimously on a technicality Let him go and somebody asked him a reporter. Six a mike and his face says what do you think about the system. And he says you know what. I don't know who's going to be assassinated tonight. I don't know who's going to suffer. Injustice or inequality and. So here's this guy who could be lauding his great victory and instead he looks back to three hundred and fifty years of the treatment of african americans on this continent thinking about emmett till whose open casket. He is a boy. Almost the same age as immaterial saw a deeply affected him all the way back to sixteen nineteen and then of course all the way forward to things he couldn't possibly know that we're yet to come like rodney king and trayvon martin and tamir rice and brianna taylor and george floyd and so he was speaking. Yeah okay so. I got it. But this doesn't mean the struggle is over and to have that kind of composure. And being still in your twenty s. I think or early thirties is just is just lunacy. It's lunacy because he was sixty years ahead of his time and we still don't have an athlete who can tackle this stuff with the facility. He did exactly right and people say well why aren't aren't the modern day athletes who are using their their position to social and they're very important is there's only i can only think of carlos and smith from his time who suffered the ultimate penalty for speaking out by raising their fists at the sixty eight olympics and then colin kaepernick. I mean you could say curt flood to because he was the first trial balloon against free agency. And that was it could by kurt and it would take a couple of guys to begin to make the process as happen but colin kaepernick suffers. So you know when people are doing standing up for things which is really important and people in sports shouldn't shut up and dribble. They should do whatever they they want to do. And say the things they're they're really important spokespeople out there. They're not putting it. On the line. In the way that mohammed ali he said face a firing squad and face a machine gun rather than go against my religious teaching which was to go fight in a war and you know that takes an extraordinary amount of courage well beyond what we see today and he is still teaching us today. That's what's so interesting. That he his like an intersect with all the major themes of the last half of the twentieth century. But he's intersecting with everything that's going on today good and bad. And he's speaking to and there's a wonderful shot towards the very end of the film of of young black woman in protest across the brooklyn bridge. And we we. Don't we consciously don't tell you what the protest is about is just a cut away from something that one of our commentators howard bryant is saying but she's wearing a teacher just a simple black t. shirt and it says mohammed ali on it as if that alone was enough to go pursue tests it muhammad ali do..

tamir rice brianna taylor george floyd colin kaepernick Achilles trayvon martin rodney king emmett supreme court Supreme court Dan mike america curt carlos mohammed ali olympics kurt smith howard bryant
"ken burns" Discussed on Le Batard and Friends - South Beach Sessions

Le Batard and Friends - South Beach Sessions

05:35 min | 1 year ago

"ken burns" Discussed on Le Batard and Friends - South Beach Sessions

"Only a giant fan of this man's work he takes really really hard things to do and makes them well makes them thoroughly a tapestry as a documentarian he really is an artist. We are pleased to have metal arc media lynn novick who has helped him with many of his projects but ken burns. I'm i've told you off air. And i'm telling you on air. I just can't believe the things that you tackle and the degree of difficulty You've got an ali film. Now everything has been said about ali. This subject matter has been covered. But you love tackling things that that are hard to tackle. Well thank you first of all. This is a film that is co directed by. Sarah burns my daughter and her husband. David mcmahon we collaborated on the central park. Five and jackie robinson. We felt that there are lots of really good films on mohammed ali. I mean really. In many cases great films on muhammad ali some take particular fight some take a couple of years in his life none. We felt. we're doing what we're always interested in. Is that kind of soup to nuts. From birth in the forties in jim crow louisville kentucky death by parkinson's not that many years ago to two thousand sixteen and all the time between so not just boxing. In the course of our film. You'll get inside. Maybe twenty five boxing matches with the help of a lot of commentators in sports writers. Who were there. And the help of michael bent The former heavyweight champion. who's so fantastic. But you also get to know about his childhood and how he got into. Boxing is early years of boxing his his wives for of them his children his friends the intersection with the nation of islam and with islam in general the american civil rights movement of courses his refusing induction into the draft in the us army. So is it contextualized mohammed ali. But what comes through is that he is without a doubt the greatest athlete of the funniest century. Probably the greatest athlete of all times. But he's also this avatar this kind of profit of love and kindness. That made him a when he died. In two thousand sixteen he died the most beloved person on the planet. Which is you know something. The rest of us can only dream of you. Say that but jim brown famously said of muhammad ali. He didn't become america's he didn't go from america's most hated athletes to its most beloved until he lost his ability to speak when he when he had the microphone. You stripped down. Hemingway uncomfortably. You strip down. Hemingway and took a lot of the myth away. I'm guessing that mohammed ali probably falls on the right side of history so often that you see. He's even better than you thought he was. I have that wrong or did you. Were you able not to strip this away where you have. You have an exactly right dan. It's very thoughtful in astute last film. I did on ernest. Hemingway didn't end so well. It ended with a self inflicted shotgun blasts alone in ketchum idaho. This ends with somebody who has punch through Jim brown is absolutely right. In one way that is to say he was one mohammed. Ali was one of the most divisive figures of the sixties and early seventies. But i would suggest it was less the parkinson's that brought him back to us than the fact that he was right on so many things when he comes back after three and a half years of absence at the height of his career and loses to joe frazier after winning a couple of bouts. He he's he's becomes a champion..

boxing mohammed ali lynn novick Sarah burns David mcmahon muhammad ali ken burns jackie robinson ali jim crow central park Hemingway parkinson louisville kentucky us army jim brown america michael ketchum
Ken Burns on America, Selling His First Film and More

61 Minutes

02:04 min | 1 year ago

Ken Burns on America, Selling His First Film and More

"This Independence day, we turned to a man who tells the story of America in her glory and struggle for unity. Ken Burns. Documentaries range from the Civil War to baseball, country music, and this year's Ernest Hemingway. As we first told you last fall, Burns calls himself an emotional archaeologist. He excavates lost love letters, forgotten photos and overlooked heroes. Research so deep viewers can feel like strangers discovering America For the first time, his films ask what it means to be American. So we asked What does it mean to be Ken Burns? Have had the privilege of spending my entire life making films about the U. S. Capital U Capital s, But I've also had the privilege of making films about us. The two letter lower case plural pronoun that has a kind of intimacy and warmth to it in the country Music film Merle Haggard says. Country music is about those things we believe in but can't see like dreams and songs and souls. It's telling us that there is in front of us are kind of Rational world in which one in one always equals two, but that the thing that compels us forward as human beings is that we look for one and one Equalling three. We find that in our faith, we find that in our art we find that in our love of each other, and I think one of the things I discovered working on country music is that When I understood this dynamic between the US and us lowercase uppercase that I realized there's only us know them. The choice was easy because us the Americans struggle to forge union from diversity has been Ken Burns obsession since he was 11 years old at the end of this lane in Ann Arbor, Michigan.

Ken Burns U. S. Capital U Capital Ernest Hemingway United States Burns Baseball Merle Haggard Ann Arbor Michigan
New Documentary Examines Ernest Hemingway's Complicated Life

Kickass News

00:58 sec | 1 year ago

New Documentary Examines Ernest Hemingway's Complicated Life

"If you've never picked up a hemingway book in your life you probably have no trouble conjuring an image of the man himself. The fighter the lover the hunter the fishermen the living breathing punching shooting cursing drinking bundle of tropes about manhood but the myth that ernest hemingway created was both a blessing into curse. It turned him into a global celebrity. And it certainly didn't hurt his book sales but it also became an avatar of sorts. That master far more complex man and became more and more exhausting. Live up to as age. Alcoholism and countless injuries took a physical and emotional toll on him now revealing new three part documentary from award winning filmmakers. Ken burns and lynn novick attempts to separate the myth from the man. Hemingway airs on. Pbs tonight april fifth through seventh from eight to ten pm

Ernest Hemingway Lynn Novick Ken Burns PBS
Comic-Con to hold in-person Thanksgiving weekend convention

TV's Top 5

02:40 min | 1 year ago

Comic-Con to hold in-person Thanksgiving weekend convention

"This week organizers of san diego comic con announced that they would hold an in person comecon special edition that was already eyebrow raising what raised even more eyebrows was when they decided they were going to announce it for for some reason. a comecon. special edition is coming on thanksgiving weekend. I do not understand this. It makes no sense to me. And i know that it also confuses you which is why you and several of our great colleagues on this are people responding to this as an idea being floated by the good people of comecon. Not great dan. Yeah we. I did a bunch of reporting alongside friend of the five aaron couch and are fearless leader. Boris kid we reached out to networks and studios and movie studios and book comic book publishers. And everyone in between artists cetera and the general consensus is yet good luck in addition to there being a big question of if it is actually going to be safe enough to have an in person event. A lot of people are saying for a multitude of reasons. This is just not going to work. It's from a practical standpoint. Most people haven't seen their families and over a year and thanksgiving is a special holiday. Obviously i don't need to see that. But when everyone is looking forward to seeing their family again since the holidays from two thousand twenty were awash and yet the idea of having to sacrifice the first holiday season together to go to comecon is not one. That's going over well and then you get into all the logistical part of of what's going on here. So look thanksgiving is one of the most expensive travel weekends of the year. It's one hundred percent bound to be bad this year. Conditions permitting but it think of it this way most of these and studios and streamers and especially lower level and comic book publishers etc. They have their budget for the year. Already in place when you get to the end of the year. You're sitting there saying we'll crap now. I got to spend money to get to san diego or now. I have to spend money on a booth or talent prep or we have to fly people out to get to get there and then you get into it and like look. Even though. The event is friday through sunday. You're going to have to the load in. If you're a dealer on the convention floor is going to be on thursday if you have a friday panel the fly talent on thanksgiving day to get them to san diego you have to send pr and security and everyone else to get there ahead of the panel you you have run throughs you have all these other things all these logistical pieces. That no one's going to want to do on a holiday

Aaron Couch San Diego Boris DAN
Internet memes are the new coronavirus coping mechanism

The 3:59

04:27 min | 2 years ago

Internet memes are the new coronavirus coping mechanism

"I'm Roger Chang and this is your daily charge with US special guest abroarall hedy bright. You've got this fantastic story. Which initially we wrote off as a fluff piece because it's Internet memes and means you're so disposable but there's actually like a series star behind such a fascinating story behind it kind of breaks out. What exactly where. Exactly how our Internet memes Being designed or created as a reaction to what's going on with crowbars absolutely you're right. It's it's true that you can kinda push off these things that we see on instagram and twitter ads. Just these these things that people joke about but it turns out that means can be a very healthy way to cope with stress and anxiety. And there's a lot of stress and anxiety right now. Given the krona virus pandemic psychologists actually saved that means our healthy way to cope with anxiety because humor is something that we have used as humans to cope for ever so this is something that people did during the world. War is something people did during the civil war. They found ways to incorporate humor into magazines and posters and journal entries and this is how we process things and make light of them And so it means are kind of the modern day way that we do that we take a very serious situation like quarantine and then we find ways to make jokes about that like. I'M GONNA put on my living room pajamas as opposed to like my bedroom pajamas. Like all the ways that we find You know the ways that we find humor in kind of the serious reality of the world right now so this is actually something. That is very help healthy for a lot of people to use a time like this. Yeah I love Sort of the the quick kind of walk back through history of how humorous played a role right. And it's fascinating to me that you know that the civil war civil war era was largely considered the age of practical jokes article. Joking which you know when you're watching those. Ken Burns documentary like I don't it. It's weird to Kinda like juxtapose. How the Civil. War's been presented with the fact that people were playing practical jokes on each other. Which boggles my mind. But you're it's a great point. We've we've long used humor as a way to deal with extraordinary circumstances and this is a particularly extraordinary circumstance absolutely and this is something that I spoke with Dr who runs this me McCowan. And he was saying that you know sometimes a laugh is the only bit of sanity that you have in your day because when you don't have that ability to kind of diffuse that tension and a few that anxiety like what else do we can't somebody. One of the psychologists I spoke with Dr Andrew's was saying that this isn't a scenario where we can kind of band together and be like okay. You know. We're all facing this crisis together. Let's go and volunteer drives at helped people. We can't even come together. Well if we have to stand six feet apart from each other we have to social distance we have to be essentially isolation from one another and the only way we can really reach other is through the Internet and so when we are communicating through the Internet. One of the best ways we can make light of a situation and one of the best ways that we can connect with. People is with humor because when you relate with somebody when you can share a joke with somebody that's really what creates those connections and those connections are so critical right now at a time when people really crave social interaction. Exactly this is an audio podcast right now just given our limitations but as wondering if you could run through some of the more memorable means that you ran into and of course reporting and I know this isn't a visual medium but You can talk to your best. Describe the the memes that the great. Yeah absolutely there's wine with Matthew mcconaughey where he's like smoking a cigarette and he's really intense looking at phone and then the caption says me reading about current virus thirty seconds after. I swore I wouldn't read about corona virus anymore and it just really captures like like. Why am I doing this? Why can I not put down my phone? Why can I not step away? You pledge that you're not going to do it and then you do it again There's a lot of good distracted boyfriend means where it's like. Yeah yeah look over. And it's like oh two weeks according t and you're looking over and it looks so good and then like work is in the background trying to juggle. Like hey headway how do I do this There's there's one that was kind of a little bit on the on the darker side. It was a picture of a baby. And you know how like sometimes people will have a sign that says like my first Easter. My first Christmas it said my first pandemic and I was like wow. That's funny. It's extremely dark. Extremely funny exactly are fascinating but even even dark humor psychologists. I spoke with April. Former saying they'd even dark. Humor can be a healthy way to to cope with these things. And so you laugh and you feel like slightly like. Oh my God. This is awful. But then you're like you know like it's the reality. We have to make some

Roger Chang United States Instagram Hedy Bright Ken Burns Matthew Mcconaughey Twitter Dr Andrew
Regina A. Mason: Searching for William E. Grimes

In Black America

09:32 min | 2 years ago

Regina A. Mason: Searching for William E. Grimes

"Jimmy Mason is a remarkable woman. She spent fifteen years of a life researching alive for great great. Great Grandfather William Grimes with nothing to go on the connection to the underground railroad. She spent countless hours in libraries reading books. Looking at Michael Film and Census Records Grind was changes. Oh when he was sold away from the arms of grieving mother to a far plantation hair grew up friendless and mother list apparently no surrogate slave family or loved ones to embrace him. No one even to look after him. Grimes was the first person to go through slavery in the South and write about it. This was the first time cousin. Slavery exposed onto the spectrum of one who had lived in and he was the first author to write about the harsh realities of the north. Despite the narrative of his big F- freedom land. Recently in Black America spoke with China rant to produce of Gina's journey the site for William Grimes and Regina e Mason on today's program. We conclude our conversation and so my co-producer contacted his agent his agency and they sent it over and to my astonishment he came back and was like I'll do it and it was more than a reasonable rate and which also made us faint and the next thing I was out in In Hollywood in in Melrose actually at his recording studio and and directing keep David in the booth which was mind blowing to say the least and he was astonished to see you know me and and and you know given my age and done and being an African American male to be directing this film so that that really made him happy when he saw that he just was was really blown away with it but he blessed the project came in. He did the most amazing work on it and it really just elevated genus story and Grind Story to a whole new level so we will be internally thankful to him for that and every once in a while I do have talks with them still. He's just a really good person and I think he's a studier of history. He's very big in the voice over world. He's an Emmy Award Winning Boys Actor. Who's done a ton of Ken? Burns documentaries so he was really into and this is his thing so I think he really enjoyed working on this project and we were better for Ms Mason ominously. This was labor intensive. This is way before Google and everything else. So what gave you that consistent drive to want wanting to complete this project William Grimes himself you know when you read his narrative all that. He endured life to the cruelty the abuse at every turn. He was reminded that he was nothing but he never bought into the status quo. In fact he defied the status quo. Every turn just the fact that he had the notion that he was capable of writing his own story without any assistance from white people speaks to who he was and how self assured he was so his example of perseverance and endurance gave me the will to to just carry on it. And see this per- This project to to the end and I'm speaking of the book project and I do have to say this once. I started digging into this story and realizing that no other scholars and really looked at it. In fact when I went looking for any body of research that was done on William Grimes it was so inaccurate and they were historians to just took liberty to to write about this man having not done any research whatsoever and then I came across the Work of Dr William L. Andrews scholar from UNC UNC Chapel Hill University of North Carolina Chapel Hill extraordinary expert on early African. American autobiography. I came across his book to tell of Free Story and he studies the slave narratives and included in his body of work which is sort of like the scholars Bible. Today he wrote about William Grimes not a whole lot more than I had found those about four pages of work and I needed to make sense of that genre of literature that I really knew nothing about so I reached out to him and he at the time was the only living collar who that who I could talk to and we sort of built a relationship every now and then I would send him information about what I found a William Grimes and he one day wrote me back and he says look the work you've done has to be preserved in some fashion or another then. He approached the idea of partnering to do a book. Because I knew that bill knew that I I wanted to bring this story to light this new scholarship that had never been done before on William grinds and he definitely was the right person because obviously he had studied grimes he had written about grinds and there was really no one else that I could associate myself with and he was the man when it came to early African American autobiography and so we partnered and We developed what we call all. What has been the authoritative edition of the life of William Grimes runaway slave? What was it like your feelings when you you read his narrative and then understood that your great great grandfather was just not an ordinary slave Well I WANNA say this William Grunt was an ordinary man. Who didn't extraordinary thing? I want to move to realize we may not have those narrative is out there. We may not be able to to. We can maybe able to find our ancestors who had been enslaved on In plantation records or slave inventories. And all you see our names sadly those voices we will never know their voice or their humanity because the story doesn't exist so to find this first person account of slavery and by the way we them grams. It's the first person of color to go through slavery in the south. Handle right about it so for the first time we got to hear about southern slavery from the perspective of the Sleigh and not from the slave owner himself so it's a different kind of storing. It's more authentic and true in terms of the experience so to recover this and then associate myself to this narrative. I realize that all of his virtues are inside of me so when you say William Grimes was not the ordinary slave he definitely speaks for those who didn't have a voice and I believe that. None of the slaves bought into the enslaved narrative that was supposed to be their destination and ultimately was their destination or a. Yes. I believe that they all had that will to be free. And and in their own circumstances they asserted whatever power they had in a rebellious way. And so to know though that William Grimes was able to make out of slavery and to tell his story is huge it is it's just incredibly empowering and I realized that again that his virtues existed me and he was my example every step of the way when I wanted to give up when I was faced with all kinds of closed doors I realized that he faced those same and he was told no over and over again but he found a way to get it done and so I I it brings me great. Pride that this enslaved man who never bought into the status quo live within

William Grimes Jimmy Mason William Grinds William Grunt Unc Unc Chapel Hill University Dr William L. Andrews Emmy Award Michael Film Google KEN Black America Melrose China Hollywood Gina David Regina E Mason Bill
Yankees minor leaguer becomes first MLB-affiliated player to test positive for coronavirus

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:29 sec | 2 years ago

Yankees minor leaguer becomes first MLB-affiliated player to test positive for coronavirus

"Now we have coronavirus impacting baseball that's right Jenny the Yankees of a minor leaguer that has tested positive for the corona virus the unidentified player is the first known case for major or minor league baseball Lee also said a short while ago that baseball issued a memo to all thirty clubs telling teams to end organized workouts elsewhere with baseball in mind if you haven't seen or you want to see the baseball series by Ken burns once again it's streaming on PBS dot

Yankees LEE Ken Burns Jenny
Video Marketing Pet Peeves

HEY.com - Video Content Marketing Tips

09:29 min | 3 years ago

Video Marketing Pet Peeves

"My name is dame golden from pretty up and big target and with my co-host she's my new co host. Jeez Ari and TWA L. E. Y. Remained healy from video explained. Welcome Rene Lo. I love the interaction and now people know how to spell my name correctly. I don't think they actually understood it. I I'm GonNa say it again. R. E. N. W. E. T. W. L. E. Y. And if they didn't before now they do so it's really great that you join me as a co host of the podcast. Because you know it's it's it's tough running the show all by myself. You're an experienced hand and today we wanted to talk about pets. Pr Pet peeves about video marketing. Things we would like to change about the video marketing techniques and so forth is that worked for you renee absolutely. Let's talk about pet peeves. Alright so minor mostly with you too because I work almost exclusively with Youtube. You have a broader Palette than I do but My first pet peeve is videos on youtube where for businesses where. The subject doesn't look at the camera. And you know Rene that I really am an advocate of looking at the camera. The challenges the course a lot of business videos corporate videos there. It's an interviewer talking to the subject. Right yes so I found that The the closer you look to the camera the more you're connecting with your audience and sometimes I have seen business videos where someone is off camera and so the subject is looking a little bit off camera. But I think it's intentional because it's supposed to look like a conversation between two people and the cameras like the third person that's listening in. Yes and I think that that's great on. Ken Burns documentaries which I love. But I'm not watching. Ken Burns on Youtube. So I don't agree. I think there's tools like the I forgot my friend's name. What what are they There's tools like the aigdirect e y e d e c t that you can use or you can just use a teleprompter on an iphone and get people to look through the transparency of the camera. So I feel that. That is an outdated approach. I know you don't entirely agree. Rene in some cases but I am one hundred percent belief that youtube videos. The business person should look at the camera. Yes so I I. One hundred percent agree when one person on on camera. And it's supposed to be one person just having that conversation with their audience I feel like there's a place for it wouldn't more of an interview style video and the the person who's interviewing them as is off camera I'd love to hear just a little bit more about. What is I direct? Oh it's a it's a it's a tool. It's a sideways periscope. If you remember the periscopes you had when you're a kid. Yes and so what this does. Is it sideways? So that the with using mirrors the interviewee looks directly at the interview. Irv that's behind the camera but they appear to be looking through the camera. How Weird I would love to try this out as a very intriguing. Yes so it's a it's not a totally cheap item. If you're a regular producer you can By one thousand dollars but if you know a lot of production companies are always renting equipment. And I've done it before they ship you stuff overnight in a big. What is it a Pelican case? And and that's what they do with these. A lot of companies rent them in their. You know a few hundred dollars a day yeah I also like that. You brought up tele prompting APPS and I use teleprompters So I use a teleprompter at at in my home studio but then I also used an APP called big view which is for the iphone and one of the things that I love about. Big View is that The words that appear are closest to the camera on your phone so So it it is getting your eyeliner close to the camera as possible as opposed to other parts of the screen on the iphone. And so it it. It basically is helping to do what you're asking for which is to get the person actually talking directly to the camera. Yeah it's just very simple. My opinion is that if you're doing video four business you are most important salesperson for that business at any given time and if you're not looking at the camera it's sort of like as a salesperson if you walked into a customer's office and looked over their shoulder it's rude that's a good point. All right so my my pet peeve the first of all I want to talk about here is this one has come up a lot recently. So my pet peeve right now is when people say you need to be on Tick Tock. I have heard so many people recently. Just say that everybody needs to be on duck. If you're not on tick tock you know you're you're you're missing out and I think I disagree with that. I think that there is There's a place for it. There's there's definitely certain people that should be on tick tock but not. Everybody needs to be on talk. Need to be where your audiences and so for me. I primarily focus on bb tech companies and and sort of a you know an older demographic I'm not sure I'm going to do a lot of business on tick tock so. I don't know that I need to be there and then I missing out. Okay well I didn't know you're going to say this but I'm going to say something that may potentially controversial because I'm GonNa say I will never do business on talk and I'll tell you why because it is an unsafe Platform we complain so much. Oh facebook Scott a lot of your data or whatever but talk Companies that are based in China Have been demonstrated to be not very good with your data and I used to work for the federal government and my a data at the Office of Personnel was hacked including three hundred million other people and basically they stole all some very private data from the US government. That was like five seven years ago now now fast forward to today. Chinese companies are basically very strongly influenced by their governments. And I just think you know what country that's not that good with human rights. I don't want to give them my data of what location. I've I matt where I've been acting you upset about the data sharing with facebook. Get Ready. Because it's GonNa be a lot. Bigger challenge with a strongly influenced Chinese company. That is going to have all your data all your kids data where you've been what you've been doing. Just say no and that. I don't think that that is being I don't think it's unfair criticism. Yeah I I agree with you. I think there's there's two issues at play so one is people saying you need to be on tick tock for business reasons than and things like that so I i. I don't agree that you that everybody should be on Even privacy concerns aside But yes there's absolutely privacy concerns tick tock has already been sued for collecting information on on minors And then also storing information about people on Chinese servers and so under the the military just went through a band with tick tock in terms of banning military personnel from having tick tock on military phones and discouraging them from having it on their personal phones. And so I think there's some interesting things that are happening in that space. I think it's It's GonNa be interesting to see that had plays out and and you know what happens with Tick Tock But I don't believe that that everybody needs to be there even for marketing reasons. Privacy stuff aside. Well I'm I'm okay. If other people being I will never be there i. My pet peeve is videos where the subject is too small in the frame. Most people are on mobile phones right Rene when they're looking at Youtube. Yeah Yeah I mean. Even if they're not on a mobile phone and it's kind of awkward if someone is a little too far away so the closer that you can be to the camera and I think the better connection that you're going to have with your

Youtube Rene Lo Ken Burns R. E. N. W. E. T. W. L. E. ARI Facebook Renee Producer IRV Healy Federal Government L. E. Y. United States Scott Office Of Personnel China
Ken Burns: 'America's Storyteller' on His Creative Process

After The Fact

06:03 min | 3 years ago

Ken Burns: 'America's Storyteller' on His Creative Process

"Ken Burns has been called America's storyteller a title earned over more than four decades and thirty three films including his most recent one on country music. We traveled his barn. That is his office in Rural New Hampshire talk about how he creates art from history. My first film was on the building of the Brooklyn Bridge and when I started fundraising forward in seventy seven. I looked about about twelve years old and people delighted in turning down saying that. This child is trying to sell me the Brooklyn Bridge and when I finally amassed a a can't say a critical mass But some money to film I started filming and I finished most of the principal photography in the summer of nineteen seventy nine and realized allies with all this footage and no money that I needed to get a real job and I had a really nice offer for a job but I felt in my bones in my guts that if I put the footage up on top of the refrigerator on a shelf I'd just wake up. Twenty twenty five years later and having not finished it so I wanted to move to someplace where I could live for nothing and figure out how you made a film about a bridge. How you how you told stories in history how you animated old photographs how you use sound effects and music and I moved here to the house? I'm living in now. I rented it for a couple of years. My oldest daughter was born there and so I had to buy hi it. The best professional decision I ever made was deciding to stay here. Once that film was nominated for an Oscar. Everyone said Oh you come back to New York and I said no I think. Can we stay here. The work I do is so labor intensive it's like academic or medical scientific research takes years and years and years to do it right and and it was more important to put the very difficult still to this day grant money and I'm very grateful for for pews involvement for for decades in the work that we've done put that all on the screen to have zero overhead in essence So that we can tell the funders that look. It's it's on the screen if we're take ten and a half years to do Vietnam or eight and a half years to do country music or the war. The history of the Second World War that we did that that the the felt that their money was going not some costly rent in midtown Manhattan But in a rural area where it's very clearly all all up on the screen. The work clearly energizes you. Are there things outside of work that allow you to have the energy and vitality and creativity the practices that you do yourself that allows you to sort of grows beyond as a filmmaker that also influences you as a filmmaker. Being a father is the most important activity. Yeah I have four daughters. I'm blessed I'm rich and daughters who ranged from the late thirties to a nine year old. They're the greatest teachers. I live in the spectacular. Her place that nature continually Reminds me of my insignificance and so the humility that comes from understanding the ending. How much nature us is actually makes you bigger just as if you if you think that you can say to somebody you know? Don't you know who I am. Doesn't commend you to the smallest and weakest little place and first of all in Walpole New Hampshire any notoriety variety award celebrity plus fifty cents. Gets you a cup of coffee. I do the New York Times Crossword puzzle in INC in physically. I buy the paper everyday we day and I read novels or magazines and watch television mostly for news and sports rabid baseball fan and then mostly I walk and I do that at least once a day. If not twice a day by the end of the day I have about ten miles. What happens in walking is very interesting hosting its meditative? Sometimes it's it's it's social. I can talk to daughters. I can talk to colleagues but mostly it's so lower with my dog and we've just sort of watch things leaves falling from trees SUNSETS and sunrises. That's what Emily Dickinson called the far theatricals of day which I still think is one of the greatest phrases of all times and I am very much addicted to the far theatricals a day. One of the things we want to do is talk just about your creative process. That's how you go about doing what you do. We start with the most basic question. Which is how you pick your topics? You've talked a lot about how you've got a whole range going out for the next next ten twenty years which is amazing. But how do you decide you know the glib answer is that they choose me. I I'm just looking for good stories in American history and that's what I want to say I is that I'm a storyteller. I'm not looking to make a political comment on the present though I know is Mark Twain is supposed to said that history doesn't doesn't repeat itself but it rhymes that is to say I've never finished a project where I haven't lifted my head up at the end of this long usually multiyear process and not seen the way in which the themes the important themes are not only evergreen but are resonating in the present. We do get completely distracted by the idea. That history repeats itself it does not it never has please show me where it has you know. Are we condemned to repeat what we don't remember no. It doesn't seem team that that's the case is knowing history thing. Of course it is so I think we just come to it from the sense that we have an amazing story to tell in our country. I feel that too often. It's it's been sanitized and that the real version which is incredibly diverse. An incredibly complicated is the one we ought to be focusing on and that in no way does does it diminish the positive aspects to give Some of the negative stuff the novelist Richard Power said the best arguments in the world won't change. I'm just single persons mind. The only thing that can do that as a good story so I'm not in the business of changing people's minds but I am in the business of trying to figure out what a good story stories

Brooklyn Bridge Rural New Hampshire Ken Burns New York Times Principal America Walpole New Hampshire Emily Dickinson Oscar New York Vietnam Mark Twain Manhattan Richard Power INC
Piranha-Proof Fish Gives Inspiration for Body Armor

60-Second Science

02:48 min | 3 years ago

Piranha-Proof Fish Gives Inspiration for Body Armor

"I'm Alicia Burke host of that made all the difference a new podcast from Bank of America where I talked to achievers like Ken Burns and Arianna Huffington about the moment sentence fire them to make an impact you can find that made all the difference anywhere you get your podcasts this is science thanks for listening for scientific American sixty seconds science I'm Christopher Indonesia

Ken Burns Arianna Huffington Christopher Indonesia Alicia Burke Bank Of America Sixty Seconds
Corals Can Inherit Symbiotic Adaptations to Warming

60-Second Science

02:13 min | 3 years ago

Corals Can Inherit Symbiotic Adaptations to Warming

"Komo Alicia Burke host of that made all the difference a new podcast from Bank of America join me as I talked to Ken Burns about the moments that inspired his work as a documentary dementri filmmaker. You can find that made all the difference anywhere you get your podcasts. This is scientific civic. Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Dodd Yata Marine Heatwave in two thousand sixteen killed off a full third of Australia's Great Barrier Reef the largest coral reef system in the world and it's terrible watching your favorite ecosystems slowly. Di Carli can't go is a marine biologist at the University of Southern California Nia who's studied that coral bleaching event bleaching occurs when the waters around corals become too cold or too salty or too hot but mostly too hot and then the symbiotic algae that live inside corals which are photosynthetic food factories abandoned the coral which causes them to die because they're losing their nutritional source so they're essentially starving to death but coral can house multiple species of algae some more heat tolerant than others so sometimes in the face of stress the heartier algae proliferate delivery and that change offsets the damage caused by the exodus of the more sensitive species have processes called shuffling chemical in her colleagues studied shuffling in corals roles affected by the two thousand sixteen bleaching bet on the Great Barrier Reef and they found that adult corals can actually pass those reshuffled. Al Go residents along to their offspring in in their eggs pointing to a possible way. Successive generations of coral could adapt to warmer waters. If your mom can kind of crime you for the environment that you might be experiencing presumably would improve your fitness. The details are in the journal scientific reports so can this help corals beat back bleaching the pace of climate change and the frequency and intensity of the stress events is such that I don't think this is enough in face of so many threats. Even this trick may fail to provide relief for the reef. Thanks for listening for scientific American sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Indonesia.

Great Barrier Reef Christopher Dodd Alicia Burke Ken Burns Christopher Indonesia Di Carli Bank Of America University Of Southern Califor Australia Sixty Seconds
'Downton Abbey,' 'Breaking Bad,' and Why TV Is Still Jealous of Movies

The Big Picture

10:18 min | 3 years ago

'Downton Abbey,' 'Breaking Bad,' and Why TV Is Still Jealous of Movies

"Chris. You're here along with Amanda because you know a lot about television and Amanda and I are for a little bit out on television sort of as a general rule. I'm post. TV POST TV separate succession. Now there are some television shows that I love. I started to watch when this weekend that I think is incredibly well made which is called unbelievable but I was just home with my mom for a little while and she while she's a stranger to cable news but she adorable still gets a lot of her news from the newspaper so two days later she'll be like. Did you hear about Joe. Biden and I'll like what what do you mean. Did something new happens you know. Did you hear about this phone. Call and that's just what you did with unbelievable where you were like. I'm breaking to you guys that there's this show well no now. I admit I am one one week late and you've already covered the show on the WOK yeah. We've already covered the sh the show on the site. I just didn't have the time to get to you. I hear you I'm seeing all these movies but one thing that is interesting that it's happening right now is is that I even though the just happened and even though TV is having this incredible boom time I feel like TV is still a little jealous of the movies and we know that because Downton Tanabe rather than comeback as an eight part miniseries has decided to become a full length feature film and the people said. Yes they said Yes to the tune of thirty three million dollars a lot of money for an extension of the Downton Abbey University was a show that was popular and a phenomenon sort of when it started. I believe the first episode of the Hollywood respective podcasts was a recap of the Dow naby premier guess which is just amazing what times past its Niche Butler's Butler's and and and you know that's a show that I liked and I really did you recap Amanda you recap what an amazing time capsule of our life on the Internet in creating culture and now it's a fulling feature feature film which is something that I think twenty years ago it had happened you would have said Downton Abbey really grew up and stepped up to the big leagues in this case. I wonder how you guys feel about what what it means to extend what was once a broadcast. TV Show into movie platform and also like why why this movie work. Why did it work so well. I have a couple of sites and the answer answer of why to turn it into a feature film is money which worked out because it made thirty three million dollars we had a great piece on the ringer last week by writer named Kate Loyd who's based in London and it was he's about the downtown Abbey Economy essentially in how the show changed both tourism in the UK and like she went to a lot of fancy locations and like talk to British these people but also how it changed the British TV industry and down abby the show. Was this wakeup call I think for people in the UK okay that people would from other parts of the world would watch when these costume dramas it was kind of a revival of the costume drama and also had a finance the shows so that they could me distributed around the world and so the piece argues that you know everything from peaky blinders to howards end to all of the things that we now consume and treat as part of the television firmament at least the latest generation of them are a result of Downton Abbey success right that show relaunch yeah Adia so in that way. It's not that surprising to me that it did while because it was like a legitimate phenomenon and we've lived with it for a long time in maybe season six. I wasn't as great as season one but it made a lot of money in a lot of people liked watching it. It's short relief to because the two other big releases over the weekend and that it beat out were ad Astra which was covered at length on this podcast last week and as a movie that I would recommend people see and Rambo last blood. Did you catch up with that Chris. I didn't see I saw ad Astra instead of Rambo because this was not playing anywhere near me. Oh that's a shame why was that I woke neighborhood for you. so neither of those films which are very male centric stallone doesn't play well in. Philly yeah that's a good point you'd think he'd be in every theatre getting but I guess partially one of the the reasons why down succeeded so well is because a lot of women saw this movie and it was the primary opportunity for women at checkout films one week after hustlers dominated the box office and sensing a trend here if you like this happens four five times a year when people are like there are movies for women as well yeah. I think that's true also float yes women see movies. Rah Rah route whatever old people really see movies and the theatres is there is nothing better to do with your time if you got a mom or Gramma Ma than to take them and see the Downton Abbey. That is just wholesome entertainment for everyone so I think that that is as important. The age is as important as the gender breakdown on this one. Let's let's just very quickly. Even though Chris has not seen the downton movie talk about what's good about the downs and movie you and I attempted to recap the film for Chris via slack last week. You feel like we did a good job. Ah Yeah I think so recognized all the names. All the actions made sense I just did they didn't really come together in a sort of visual sentence for me so that is actually a notable spoke to Michael Angler about this. It is a little bit of Downton on steroids. You know the theme music is amplified in such a way that maybe they had three hundred more brass instruments. Mintz played playing the theme song. There's a lot of drone shots of Downton Abbey. It is it is a a muscular rise version of this upstairs downstairs costume drama the film itself did strike me though I think you may have originally said this to me as just one long episode of Downton Abbey to me it was like a Christmas special sel which they do in the UK and I think it was the season two Christmas special of Downton Abbey which is when Matthew and Mary finally get together and like kissing the snow outside outside of the side of the House I would say it's on par with the Christmas special except for like to party set-pieces instead of one as you said and fancier dresses addresses and I guess there's like a first episode climax halfway through the movie and then a second episode kind of bringing everyone home. The thing is downstairs to get into some hijinks and then there's ramifications upstairs. It's crazy what happens on almost like it's upstairs downstairs I thought it was an enjoyable movie and I'm not surprised that it was successful. I'm surprised it was successful. It was also the biggest movie in the history of focus features which just fascinating I have spoken to some people who worked worked on this movie and they have when they acquired the rights to release this movie. They said we have our IP. We have our version of superhero movie and focus features. That's what I was. GonNa say really leans into that older audience that you're talking about the identify women as their audience much more clearly and this is a part of the same strategy so I wouldn't say necessarily the Ad Astra had this problem but I do think that it is near impossible to sell anything anymore without some pre existing kind of awareness of what you're getting when you walk into it just because there's so many options for people that if you just sorta like here's a movie about butlers and rich people story. Michelle dockery people are going to be like I don't know but if it's something that they have this decade long relationship leashes ship with if they have the kind of extra screen relationship that they have they cared about and if there is like I was I was watching a lot of linear television this week because I was with my mom. We were watching the Ken Burns documentary. There was down Abbey stuff sandwich. Every episode of the Ken Burns Documentary Music talking to the country music to let you know it's coming out. Here's the history of the show. Here's a recap of everything that happened. Here's the making of the show like they actually did their push. It just just happened on public television. We didn't see it as much necessarily as like Robert Downey junior driving around in an Audi with a Samsung phone pushing vendors do you think that this is now now a sort of MCI -ation of Downton or is this just a one off thing that they struck gold on this one movie or is there going to be another one have been teasing the sequel for weeks. Now that's yeah yeah they've been talking about how the possibilities open and I think you know which is code for. Yes it will happen and they certainly leave the door open in the movie. Everyone is in in a happy place but more hijinks cannon sue and I'm sure well a Dan. I'm curious how far you can probably only take down into world war. Two 'cause post World War. Two I think all of those states just for their museums museums the economy economy of the upper class in the UK just breaks down and it's just not how upstairs downstairs doesn't really apply as much anymore the film kind of glances at the end to the how much longer can this go on which I thought was an interesting potential way to seal office equal in the end zone dunkirk what we'll talk about this more. Maggie Smith is in this movie Maggie Smith Chris do modify spoil Israel okay. I guess if you are really really strict about spoilers. Turn it off now. Even but Maggie Smith gives a speech that's kind of like a farewell speech but notably nothing actually conclusively happens to whether Maggie Smith math will be in future episodes of down nappy. TV show or something happens to her but then they're like. We'll see what happens yeah she could've done urge becomes iron man. It's incredible credibly. She defeats the end of the movie. It's wild. It's nineteen twenty seven in this movie that's right. They've got like twenty more years. Yeah okay. What's interesting to me about. This is is the movies in theaters. It's an extension of a television show there have been there's been the super sizing of TV shows into movie form a lot over the last year. This isn't the first first time it's happened. In the ninety. s we saw the kind of like met a rift commentary on things by having. Beverly hillbillies movies and Brady Bunch movies now what we have is just a more clear extension of the stories that originally told there was a dead movie earlier. This year was a between two ferns movie also released over the weekend which is not quite the same serialized television but is in the same tradition in a way away and then in October. We have a breaking bad movie called El Camino Dave Dina do this for a long time. They've been dying to get this kind of multiplatform storytelling going because of the amount of money there is if you can actually do what they wanted to do with dark tower where you can tell something that has has a feature presentation that maybe is the sort of the danger of the story but like you have other storylines going on TV and that you could actually create a like twelve month a year sport out of your story. That's why they want you know and now there are different things now.

Downton Abbey Downton Abbey University UK Downton Tanabe Amanda Maggie Smith Chris Downton Ken Burns Biden JOE Abbey Economy Rambo Abbey Ad Astra Michelle Dockery Stallone Philly Gramma Ma
Ken Burns explores the true roots of country music in new documentary

5 Things

00:54 sec | 3 years ago

Ken Burns explores the true roots of country music in new documentary

"Country. Music comes from right in here this heart so that we all have you can dance to it. You could make after the eagles played at a funeral is has something in it for everybody. Country Music is about human emotions. Renault documentary filmmaker Ken Burns latest project is here country music known for his Docs on Baseball Jazz and the Vietnam War Burns's now tackling the history of country music music the more than sixteen hour series will air on PBS beginning on Sunday and will serve as an oral history of the music genre the DOC is already sparking conversations about the state have country music and a new project from the USA Today Network Country Mile Examines Country Music history its current landscape and where it's going he can check it out at USA. Today Dot Dot Com and you can tune in to the country music documentary at eight PM eastern Sunday night on

Country Music Eagles USA Usa. Sixteen Hour