30 Burst results for "Ken Burns"

"ken burns" Discussed on Kickass News

Kickass News

02:49 min | 2 months ago

"ken burns" Discussed on Kickass News

"Very very close onerous is like a polite word albatross. You know to have to be that person. And i always when we working on the film in thinking about you know the places that he tried to work in focus and do this quiet internal interior processes of writing. He had to have material to write about so he would go out into the world. Had these big adventures and come back and write about them but it was always noticing the world around him and paying close attention to help people talk and what they wore in what they ate Now how the flowers looked on the trees. Just you know who's aware of everything. But when he became the center of attention and everyone's looking at him and he's the center of everything that's going on sort of wonder. How could he do that kind of work and play that part at the same time in the simple answer is he couldn't right. I mean he begins to fail himself both literally. But i think more importantly humanly. We're the beneficiaries of the good stuff and we point out that there's not so good stuff for mediocre stuff for great by any other standard but not ernest hemingway standard. But i think the real tragedy is of course in the way in which that as well as all of the demons that are involved mental illness of concussions of ptsd of being jilted Family dynamics Alcoholism some sort of psychosis of some sort medicating that alcoholism all of these things were. Just a An impossible cocktail no pun intended of of a horrors by the end of his life. Yeah and one of the ways that this documentary gets to sort of the deeper truth of hemingway is actually through the women in his life. And i found that to be such a fascinating and revealing window into the man i mean for all the bravado and hype a wife or partner always sees the man for who he is and calls him out on his bs and you could almost divide the chapters in hemingway's and career by the women he was with at the time talk a little about the influence of his four wives and his lovers physically on his life and is riding. Yeah we Jeff ward wonderful writer. Who wrote a script. When he was working on the film came to us and said you know the this is how we're going to organize the story around the relationships in his life. I his mother and his sisters the nurse who broke his heart and boudoir one and then the four women that he married among many other and filarial relationships as well and through how he behaves with them through the connections they find through the ways those relationships fall apart and his role in that his way of explaining that to himself into the world. You get an intimate look at this man. As ken was saying of ball and complicated and sensitive man who women were drawn to. There's no question you know. We hear that over and over again..

Jeff four women ken both four wives one
New Documentary Examines Ernest Hemingway's Complicated Life

Kickass News

00:58 sec | 2 months ago

New Documentary Examines Ernest Hemingway's Complicated Life

"If you've never picked up a hemingway book in your life you probably have no trouble conjuring an image of the man himself. The fighter the lover the hunter the fishermen the living breathing punching shooting cursing drinking bundle of tropes about manhood but the myth that ernest hemingway created was both a blessing into curse. It turned him into a global celebrity. And it certainly didn't hurt his book sales but it also became an avatar of sorts. That master far more complex man and became more and more exhausting. Live up to as age. Alcoholism and countless injuries took a physical and emotional toll on him now revealing new three part documentary from award winning filmmakers. Ken burns and lynn novick attempts to separate the myth from the man. Hemingway airs on. Pbs tonight april fifth through seventh from eight to ten pm

Ernest Hemingway Lynn Novick Ken Burns PBS
Comic-Con to hold in-person Thanksgiving weekend convention

TV's Top 5

02:40 min | 3 months ago

Comic-Con to hold in-person Thanksgiving weekend convention

"This week organizers of san diego comic con announced that they would hold an in person comecon special edition that was already eyebrow raising what raised even more eyebrows was when they decided they were going to announce it for for some reason. a comecon. special edition is coming on thanksgiving weekend. I do not understand this. It makes no sense to me. And i know that it also confuses you which is why you and several of our great colleagues on this are people responding to this as an idea being floated by the good people of comecon. Not great dan. Yeah we. I did a bunch of reporting alongside friend of the five aaron couch and are fearless leader. Boris kid we reached out to networks and studios and movie studios and book comic book publishers. And everyone in between artists cetera and the general consensus is yet good luck in addition to there being a big question of if it is actually going to be safe enough to have an in person event. A lot of people are saying for a multitude of reasons. This is just not going to work. It's from a practical standpoint. Most people haven't seen their families and over a year and thanksgiving is a special holiday. Obviously i don't need to see that. But when everyone is looking forward to seeing their family again since the holidays from two thousand twenty were awash and yet the idea of having to sacrifice the first holiday season together to go to comecon is not one. That's going over well and then you get into all the logistical part of of what's going on here. So look thanksgiving is one of the most expensive travel weekends of the year. It's one hundred percent bound to be bad this year. Conditions permitting but it think of it this way most of these and studios and streamers and especially lower level and comic book publishers etc. They have their budget for the year. Already in place when you get to the end of the year. You're sitting there saying we'll crap now. I got to spend money to get to san diego or now. I have to spend money on a booth or talent prep or we have to fly people out to get to get there and then you get into it and like look. Even though. The event is friday through sunday. You're going to have to the load in. If you're a dealer on the convention floor is going to be on thursday if you have a friday panel the fly talent on thanksgiving day to get them to san diego you have to send pr and security and everyone else to get there ahead of the panel you you have run throughs you have all these other things all these logistical pieces. That no one's going to want to do on a holiday

Aaron Couch San Diego Boris DAN
"ken burns" Discussed on Awards Chatter

Awards Chatter

02:29 min | 1 year ago

"ken burns" Discussed on Awards Chatter

"In any way goal or local recited says I don't want that in there I don't know that it happened or didn't. I just can't even put myself in in harm's way. Just released on our website, UNOM, a clip from film the Statue of Liberty from nine, hundred, eighty, five and James Baldwin's saying. The Statue of Liberty is bitter, joked to black people, meaning absolutely nothing to us, and you know I remember showing into the underwriter and then going. Like this I go, your comes a fight. And then I heard the ad guy say to them. No, it's puff. Piece doesn't add this. And I just thought okay. This is the way you know if you think it's just gonNA float away without anchored by Baldwin maybe that's true, maybe not true, but you know nobody I didn't have to have an awkward moment and I enjoyed that awkward I. Never Want To have a conversation with you. where I'm apologizing, because somebody said you should do this. Almost done here. Who's the greatest living documentary filmmaker not named Burns. Cheese at so hard I. think the thing that came to mind is my dear friend of Verna. Herzog! is so different than me. He wants to describe on a panel. He said I'm after an ecstatic truth. Mike friend can use after an emotional truth, and there's a truth to what he said I love what he does. I love his attitude about it. Love his commitment is passion is bravery. All of the things in here's a guy who's the first. Clue decades just doing feature film so ready. If you had to decide today. You attend this year's tyrod film festival given all. That's going on I. Know I. get to see their every year. Yeah, I'm not am not I can't I. DON'T WANNA turn beautiful town that I love and I gone to for three straight years thirty, one overall I premiered Huey long there than civil war I've never not gone. It's incredibly painful not to go there. But I don't want to turn tyrod into Manhattan when it was at a hot spot. Right last to WHO will win in November Joe Biden. And last question. I have answered that I hope you'll give but. Will you ever retire and if you were to retire, what would you do? Well I know I.

Herzog James Baldwin Joe Biden Burns Huey Manhattan Mike
"ken burns" Discussed on Awards Chatter

Awards Chatter

05:45 min | 1 year ago

"ken burns" Discussed on Awards Chatter

"A one off. That could essentially conceivably at a thirty theatrical before the PBS broadcasts. Will we ever see a non documentary narrative from Ken Burns. It's all I never say never. people are always testing. May You know Jack Johnson's? The latest Gennady Jackie Robinson before that was a possibility. I love my day job so I'd have to make some room and there's very little route. If. Say Netflix came to you tomorrow and offer you an obscene amount of money to come work exclusively for them. Would you do that? No Rub seen amount of money is almost redundant uncomfortable. I I love PBS I. Mean There's some you know scenario where the back catalogue goes to some, but I'm I I WANNA release everything on P. B. I believe in what it stands for. S is the Public Broadcasting Service Not System Service in I hitch my wagon to that long ago. I'm very proud that they would have me and I I counted as one of the great blessings of my life that in part of that family. have. You ever considered either before since the pandemic making a film about the Spanish flu or the current pandemic, there was a film for The American experience at believe on the Spanish flu, a Weenie twenty twenty five thirty years out so God willing that I do have a chance to do something on on trump or do something on. The black lives matter or do something on a Corona Vars, but I'm planned out I. You know I got all the film's going through twenty thirty so. Busy. Should baseball players who used steroids be allowed into the hall of fame at what is going to be on a proportional basis said there's no asterisk next to the winners of the Nineteen nineteen world series. Lists Cincinnati red stockings. We all know what happened. The Chicago White. SOX called black socks series because gangsters over the money to do that. There's no astros. It's why storyteller It's why we did the tenth inning to comment on it, but I guess an. Way, of answering is that I can't remember how many home runs Barry. Bonds, but I'll never forget that Hank Aaron as seven hundred fifty five. What's the story that you could see? These are all over the place, but what's the story behind the Ken Burns Bulk Oh well. This one is now I'm clearly trying out for a geriatric. BG's tribute band. because. I've been without a haircut. I just had hair down for my hippy days in Ann Arbor down to my waist, and when I got out of college, I had cut to kind of the. John Paul George Ringo saying that seems at least you know not losing everything, and it's just stayed, and in fact, a care so little about it and people bring it up so much that I only really concentrating What is there is just. A triple Leo that means anything in astrology, which apparently means that my main is is a large part of it and may explain why there's there, but I take get rid of it now. I mean it's. The same barber for all these years, this gorgeous young woman cut my hair when I was whatever it was twenty one and She's long since retired at her house. It's an hour and a half away and I haven't seen her since before. The stuff, which is why you know, I'm really rocket new do now. Pushing back and Mullahs. And some alone I'm not going to trust my kids to come. Trust my dog here. Last few. You apparently became very close with President Obama during his presidency. Can we expect one day Ken Burns doc about President Obama I sure hope so yeah, no I I. I'm not sure saying. We became incredibly close There's a mutual respect, and and that of course complicates doing a Vilma by because the film has to be dispassionate and critical and You know I hope that I'll be I'll be doing that. I think I could do a good job. Is a fair to assume you are less interested in doing a trump about donald trump. No, I think he really important. One I mean I hope that we can look back and say we dodge this bullet This is the greatest threat in history of our republic his administration. It's not even as administration added Said Yeah. That's how ever GonNa see a Ken Burns. That has nothing to do with America well. We're actually one of the aid projects Saddam working on including Hemingway and. Muhammed Ali and Benjamin Franklin in the US and the Holocaust and the American Revolution in Lbj the Great Society, the history of the Buffalo is one of my daughter and son-in-law ir making on the Vici so there's your stop the presses, saying the first the first non-american topic that we've done, but I don't see that as a as a range of now. I'm they may, but I'm to parochial and provincial to leave this. Will Churchill came up at one point sure. Joey talked about it and you can get away with that. Scott goes. You know in Jewish law. His MOM is. So. He's an American actual. Sort of facetiously, but why do you hate reality TV I hate it because it's not reality, it's just not reality. You, know reality is what I'm looking at right now at my window. This beautiful slate spring in Walpole New Hampshire you don't eat bugs in front of millions of.

Ken Burns Jackie Robinson donald trump astros President Obama Jack Johnson PBS Netflix Hank Aaron baseball Corona Vars Ann Arbor Leo Cincinnati Chicago Weenie twenty John Paul George Ringo Walpole New Hampshire SOX
"ken burns" Discussed on Awards Chatter

Awards Chatter

04:40 min | 1 year ago

"ken burns" Discussed on Awards Chatter

"And blues, and country and folk and rock and classical and rap. There is no border. Nope, passports retired what who resurrects. Johnny cash's career at the end. It's rich rue, and what's he? Rick Rubin? What's he? What's He is last? Big Hit is Trent reser. Who did the soundtrack for our Vietnam there? I mean that's Johnny cashes last big yet, and you've said your mic drop. Moment is to have little. Now's a black gay man with a country song. That is the biggest head of. The biggest country single ever of all times is by a black. Gay router. That is a mic drop moment. That's you know I mean you know you can't say anymore only in America. We got too many problems to say that you know, but it's it's. It is a testament to our own myopia that look what I've said all the way through. Is that Commerce inconvenience? Suggests that we shouldn't silo these these different musical forms, and you could apply that to almost everything else that we've covered a subject matter. and. So you get know billboard country chart. Dober- news out of this journey chart, okay. But let's remember that there is everybody's listening to everybody else. If you've got an NBA station, I could guarantee the riot. The listenership is not. One hundred percent African American in the same with a country station is not Rian. Gins is saying Oh man. You didn't get in front of my grandma when he hallways on. What so! Amazing and I will say I've had the maybe I. would say I guess probably a rare opportunity to see a lot of your work in a short period of time to prep for this I've seen it before, but went back and. Poured over a lot of the I think the country music in terms of the structure, and the editing is as good as anything I mean. Will the circle be on broken up? So for example is as good as anything I've ever seen I. Agree Scott, thank you, That's a testament first date Dunkin's extraordinary script, and then the editing of that particular episode of Craig Melvin, shoes the longtime editor for us. He's that came in as an intern thousand years ago and is now one of our senior editors. It's a spectacular story and I love it. It's also the longest I was told by the head of programming at PBS I, said Look. I got I got a mole under two hours, but this one's like to twenty. She does not. GonNa Happen this time. Can Different World Not GonNa Happen my civil just at least look at it, so she were in my barn in fifty people looking and she came up and said I great issue bathroom. It's the fastest. Just like our shortest episode in Vietnam is ninety minutes at a well under ninety minutes in its the six episode about the offensive. It feels like the longest because nobody wants to be inside a Tete, and we make you live inside of tat and It's a conscious and deliberate by said. There's no way we're doing this for two hours. This is going to be one of the four ninety s out of the with the six other two hours for Vietnam. It's complicated, but it's it's. You know I'm glad you saw. That I agree that that not only can country musical tone against any of them. The whole thing is to tally. Jeff story is so riveting and so you know dance that lots of folks in Nashville were saying I? Didn't know that but I think that particularly that episode is a masterpiece following one song all the way through. And covering as much ground as does, as namely, I think again, thank you. Thank you for that course well. I hope we can wrap up with one minute of what we call rapid fire. Just one sentence of what comes to your mind as much as that's possible. I have a brief nine to answer. So. Okay, here we go. Is there such a thing as objective truth know? God knows and she's not telling. Are, you a filmmaker who focuses on history or historian who focuses on films I think we've filmmaker that focuses on history, yeah! Will we see another Ken Burns? Fat Length Doc, or is it be Docu series I think most of the films are coming out will be at least two parts, if not three and series, but I know there's could easily be.

Rick Rubin Vietnam Johnny cash Craig Melvin Trent reser NBA Ken Burns Gins America Nashville Jeff story intern Dunkin Scott editor
"ken burns" Discussed on Awards Chatter

Awards Chatter

01:42 min | 1 year ago

"ken burns" Discussed on Awards Chatter

"End So when they want and they won in such unbelievable fashion I mean the world series didn't even really matter it was the news dependent again coming back from three games another from the Yankees and then I realized that I it was impossible to just celebrate my team, so we celebrated the braves when we celebrated the Anqing, so we celebrated great play all around like the giants and we celebrated. Investigated the strike in we investigated performance enhancing drugs in all of it, and so nestling areas my red sox. Victory but it. You know the last thing that we covered is the two thousand nine world series when the Yankees won so if You were fair to to my boys. Jorrie was one of the real stars of advil. If you had a point one talking really popped out a manny joe is really great, so baseball was ninety four jazz was two thousand, but in between the what has been described as called the American lives series within a very short period of time Thomas, Jefferson Lewis and Clark Frank Lloyd. Wright not ourselves alone as As you mentioned Elizabeth, Cady Stanton and Susan, B Anthony Mark Twain all excellent. All I could ask you about but I don't have. We don't have enough time to dive super into that so I'm GonNa go right to jazz. Two thousand ten two hour episodes six years of work, and another one that in a way I think sort of emanating indirectly from civil war right well, you know I saw. Shortly after the civil I met wint Marcellus and we become friends. Really GonNA brothers. and. He suggested to me. You know you should do some jazz and I'm like yeah..

Yankees giants braves wint Marcellus manny joe advil Anthony Mark Twain Clark Frank Lloyd Jorrie Cady Stanton Wright Jefferson Lewis Elizabeth Thomas Susan
"ken burns" Discussed on Awards Chatter

Awards Chatter

03:52 min | 1 year ago

"ken burns" Discussed on Awards Chatter

"Daddy look. They won't Ken Burns. Now this is before the Internet the names where it's all one word, but it was the greatest lesson to her I was daddy to me. I was me, but there was somebody else called. Ken, Burns and She wanted to warn me that. These people were coming to see Ken Burns and screw. It was like falling in the snow slipping in. It was kind of wonderful gifts so in this town if I stood on any kind of ceremony. It's not is not what matters I've been very fortunate. The films made. Money People Watch but I'm I'm still I mean I'm still here and that's. That's the most important thing so it's. It's meant everything to be to stay here. I think the professional change may have been that was that when you started having multiple projects? Going at the same time, no agreed began earlier. The Nets guy began when I was gonNA. Do a film on the Statute of Liberty, and then the Huey long thing was suggested by professor at Lsu and is I couldn't say no, and so I was while I was doing a war. War was finishing statue at Huey, and also Congress Thomas Benton and it's been very rare. Cincinnati that I've ever had only one shot right now. They're aid sales visit. You know it's a lot of it has to do with the extraordinary people. I mean this is the other fallacy of the tour. Theory is that it then presupposes that everybody's doing. Everything in the tour is doing everything. I worked two extraordinary writers over the. Last thirty years. Plus Cases Jeff reward thirty years in the case of Dayton Dunkin Mayes son-in-law, and my David McMahon my daughter Sarah Burns are writing of films like the Central Park Five Jackie Robinson and now we're working a big multi part series for parts eight and a half hours in the homily written. They're really good at it. I do a lot of writing myself on credited, but it's just in the service of making things better. Well I get I. Guess Coming Out of civil war, though the relationship that began on that one I think that has maybe been in some ways. The the most senior collaborator would be Lynn Novick. Lynn I hire just have to we. We're about to lock it and hired her. She said well I can't start because I'm getting married and going on my That's fine and then so she came in really to watch the end of it. She and I became co producers on baseball jazz and several things in the nineties, but also we always had other producing lines as well. You know So I've worked with Paul Barnes Dunkin Sarah. Burns and now David Schmidt Sarah Sign, so there are lots of different producing things, but Lynn has been if not the oldest one one of the one of meals. So, as you came out of civil war, maybe even while you were finishing it up. You seem to have already decided that baseball was going to be next. How do you decide to go from civil war to? and. I guess we're you already a big Fan of the sport I've been a fan since the very very beginning at I, I saw it is the sequel to the civil war series. I really did I mean I thought of friend of mine at a bar. In Washington, DC suggested baseball. We were writing stuff down, Napkins and. Mike killed suggested heart a great idea and I just assumed it'd be like a two hour kind of film, and then as we got into it, we we realized this is a story about raises the story about the first real progress in civil rights after the civil warrants Jack Roosevelt Robinson the grandson of a slave making this way to first base at ebbets field on April.

Lynn Novick Sarah Burns Ken Burns Jackie Robinson Dayton Dunkin Mayes baseball Lynn Huey Paul Barnes Lsu ebbets field Nets Washington Cincinnati David McMahon David Schmidt Sarah Sign professor Congress Thomas Benton
"ken burns" Discussed on Awards Chatter

Awards Chatter

04:04 min | 1 year ago

"ken burns" Discussed on Awards Chatter

"Was like a fingerprint for the detective with the with a good. Magnifying glasses. down. one quick follow up is correct that you took only one history class ahead after I had read that. Yeah, Russian history. I'm the last time I took an American history. Course was in eleventh grade when they kinda. Hold a gun to your head, so you have to take it I loved I always loved to history, but I wouldn't anywhere thought that I would have been involved in what I'm doing, so yeah, no I took a Russian history goes, but but I'm a filmmaker I'm not a historian I just. Just work in history, the way somebody works in oil as opposed to watercolor or does still lives as opposed to landscapes. It's it's just medium and most of the word history is made up of the word story plus high, so there's a good introduction and that I mean I I'm interested in telling stories. I just happened to tell him in American history and that's what I enjoy doing, so you graduated in one, thousand, nine, hundred five. You started Florentine Foams as you mentioned in seventy six. Why in those? I guess fourteen years before the civil war went out to the world. Did. You experience what you've described as. Debilitating crushing anxiety was at the the sort of world of how DOC Scott Finance at that point I know that pretty quickly. You guys were raising funds to try to make the first film out of School Brooklyn Bridge, so again you started the company seventy six that went out to the world in eighty one, and did very well got its Oscar nomination, but for. For I guess probably specifically for the years before Brooklyn. Bridge puts even on the map. Why was life so stressful? And and what did it look like when you need it to raise funds for documentary in those days, well I think. The original period of stress was in the years leading up to my mom's death. When she died, there was a kind of. Release and it was always back there and unresolved and I think. Coming into my own as an adult living away from home, and then choosing is completely independent route sort of reawakened. And so was certainly present all the way through Brooklyn Bridge through the civil war beyond the civil war. It really took other kinds of work myself to figure out and I'm still. I think an anxious person how to understand it, but someone told me. A therapist told me really important thing that the anxiety is in a perverse way a friend. Because, it's it's focusing on the thing. That isn't the problem, so it's distracting you from what the real thing is. And that's both friendly, and it also prolongs stuff. So at some point I engaged probably ninety three when talking to my late father in law in kind of a work on oneself in a real serious way, and that's that's been obviously ongoing in lieu. Jefferson said pursuit of happiness. He didn't capital age. All the founders knew he didn't read the pursuit of whatever you wanted to do, or the pursuit of objects in a marketplace things. It was talking about lifelong learning. Self discovery it was about the arts about literature about music and higher things. Those were the things that would produce Internet lighten context happiness. So that's our job is to work as you do. Is We all try to do at some point? But it was so dare a terrifying. It's demean is still I. Still Wake up at four in the morning. About this or that, I now have relationships to it, but back then I didn't have any any any tools you know i. develop some stuff for myself and at a helped other people would help to all of my kids. with which I call. The three things might might fifteen year old who's benefited most recently from it a cousin with three truth,.

School Brooklyn Bridge Jefferson Brooklyn Florentine Foams DOC Scott Finance Oscar
"ken burns" Discussed on Marty and McGee

Marty and McGee

13:02 min | 1 year ago

"ken burns" Discussed on Marty and McGee

"The work. It's about the work and when you look at his films and when you watch his films that depth of the work in the obvious preparation and execution of that preparation and meticulous demand for excellence in every. Single Facet is readily obvious. Oh it took eight years for the country music documentary ten years for the Vietnam and he said if they find out new information they don't let a a scene set they go and fix it like the attention to detail by this man is first class so so in doing must study for the interview. I learned that for the country. Music documentary film which was eight. Two hour episodes. Sixteen hours of content made it to air. He interviewed more than one hundred so so he interviewed one hundred and one artists that doesn't even include the peripheral voices one hundred one artists and more than one hundred seventy five hours of interviews. Think about that man. That's unreal and then to pare that down to sixteen hours. Nude I do a twenty five minute interview with Tiger Woods and I can't cut that down. I can't imagine the painstaking process. Can you imagine the stuff that didn't make it into that? Sixteen hours imagine the utter gold had to carve out of that peace and look we. We focused mainly on the country. Music documentary documentaries on baseball and World War Two and the Vietnam War are just. They are so well done with with all the interviews that he has. I think I'm GONNA leave you. I'm going to start Ken. Ken Burns America. And just release all the scene audio from those words. I guarantee you this you would. You would emerge far more intelligent from the Ken Burns America than you ever will from the Marty. Smith's America we talk about country music in a different way than us. He doesn't talk about cold beer but I really liked how he was talking about. He does stuff on the United States does stuff on the on the US but on the lower case us to like that was so profound simple but yet so deep. I am a better man for having had that. Twenty twenty five minutes with him and Y'all need to understand something about this first of all I will implore you especially while we're in quarantine like this being. Don't Binge Watch Tiger Cain go binge-watch. Ken Burns work. Go to PBS on their website. And you can stream. All of these episodes documentaries that you will be such a more well educated human being about where we came from in the decisions that had to be made in certain instances and as I was studying. He has so many films yet to come his contract. I think this not. Don't take this for Gospel. But I'm pretty sure he's contract with. Pbs Goes Through Twenty thirty. He they should just give them a lifetime contract. Yeah he has movies on so many amazing things coming Ernest Hemingway. I think he's doing it above a Barack Obama Film on and on just fascinating content. So go watch that go. Binge-watch that how would you like to be the guest after we air this interview on this podcast will? I hope that my excitement for having had the time with him is palpable. Y'All don't understand. How long Travis Chase? It's been six months probably right. It was a couple of rounds. And then I you know when the quarantine happened the one silver lining for us as. I know that people are home and so went back to emails that I've sent out and fired him off again. Trying to get some people and Ken Burns's has a crazy schedule and luckily we're able to get put in it and I I. I emailed him when the country. Music documentary came out though. So take their see. That's interesting to me. Take the listeners. Through the process of what do you do when you're trying to book a guy like Ken Burns? Who IS SO IN DEMAND? Do you go to. Pbs's website and click contact. Like how's that work. I've I can't remember exactly for Ken but people send out you know. Hey you should have this person. You should have this person. And they're great names and ideas but trying to find. The contact info is half the battle and I was able to find Can't remember if it was a publicist manager. Whoever for can email me and then you're hoping that they responded and with someone like Ken. I can only imagine the requests that are coming in. And you're just hoping that they make contact if they make contact then you've got that door open. And they said unfortunately he wasn't available at the time. So thank you and I I always tell them you know if something changes feel free to reach back out and then this happened and so I went back into my emails and found the email and just followed up and said hey you know hope. You're you know you and your family safe and healthy. I was wondering if with the crazy schedules. Ken might be available to come on. And that's how it is at Gerald McCoy on a couple of weeks ago but the first time we had him on it took a while for him. These people live crazy schedule so reaching out and trying to get a guest within a week is usually very tough. You have to build these out further in advance. Well you do such a good job at it and I'm so grateful it's funny. I wear a travis out. I'll hear something or read something or see something. Who Was it a couple of we? Oh I randomly. We'll send travis a text that nowhere. You'll get me kid rock like that's the directive. Go Get me Kid rock please. I do use it manners. They're very out of the blue to. It's just like we'll be talking about something or we're not even tech and all of a sudden it's hey let's get kid rock and I told you I love a challenge and you know at times people will just say no. They don't get back but that's the worst. That happens the best as they say. Yes and all of a sudden. We have an interview with Ken Burns. There was there was so much more I wanted to get to with kin. I wanted to know what he feels like his. What is his proudest work? I wanted to know which film troubled him the most or gave him the most difficulty. In in edit I wanted to know about Johnny cash is complexities. And what he learned from. Guys like Mardi Stewart. Who was such an integral voice to me. Marty Stuart was the thread that wove from Mabel. Carter all the way through Eric. Church is he was the he was at one voice that was able to weave through the entire sixteen hour documentary and really so it altogether and see the most underrated like country artists. Yeah he doesn't always get the credit that the other people are going to get but the talent that he has in everybody that he's worked with like you just said is unmatched yes. There's no doubt I mean and and and and when you think about the fact that he played in Johnny cash's band when he was playing professionally as a little boy it's hit and you talk about country music historians. I saw a piece on. Cbs Sunday morning. A couple of years ago Marty and it may be somewhere else now but at the time it was in storage he has a collection of country music memorabilia that is unparalleled unmatched including the country. Music Hall of fame. He has like he has like Marty Robbins original jacket. You know that he war in El Paso or whatever he has the most unbelievable collection of country music memorabilia. Because of course he does but I wanted to ask you can guarantee though. I'll be sending them delinquent posts in all so it'll be an email we would love to have him on again to get more into the country music whenever he is free. Because that's I tell a lot of guests but there's some that I mean it even more when they're available were available because the last week our schedule is with the podcast world. We are very flexible with some guests. It's Utah loss as well. Great job brother. I'm so grateful for his time and his perspective and insight an in depth man and his passion he just exudes it and you guys know man went when somebody has that. There's a lot of talented people. There's a lot of will accomplished people. But when you have passion it takes your entire catalogue your entire body of work to a whole other plane because you feel it in your soul. And that's how I feel about that interview. We just did that man. That man lives his work and I'm grateful for his work. I saw in this time. I just WANNA say Make sure to continue to social distance. Guys make sure to continue to stay away from each other. That goes completely against the primal human need for togetherness but right. Now that's what we have to do. But here's here's how you can still stay together. This is something that I've been trying to do. I'm not a big phone person but because I live alone and so the self quarantine is once a day or maybe every so often I'll just facetime somebody or hit up some college friends and we had a zoom happy hour. So there's still ways that you can reach up people that you normally wouldn't talk to and stay connected. Virtually but follow the self quarantine social distancing. I'm really grateful to all the country artists and and amazingly talented people who are doing live streams and if a country artist is doing a livestream than I'm watching it and I I did didn't event actually the day after we did the interview with Ken Burns on Instagram. Live with my good friend. Justin Moore where we did a story tellers event and he played five or six songs and we just had a great discussion about the passions and the inspiration behind those specific songs. And because of that. Lowe's home improvement. Warehouse donated twenty five thousand dollars to the American Red Cross in Justin's name and in my name in those funds were allocated to first responders in Nashville Tennessee where a tornado went through right before corona. Stop the world and to Jonesboro Arkansas near Justin's hometown that just went through there and so these things are making a difference and I'm so grateful for everybody giving your time in this very unique and unprecedented time. These those strange concerts have been a joy to me to just one provides payment but then to see these artists scaled-down. Ab It may be a friend. That's on guitar and hear them. I mean seeing Luke. Combs COVER FAST cars is. I've probably watched that video ten times over. I sent him a text about that and just told I just said thank you. I said brother. I know that it's just what you do. But for those of us who are such passionate consumers of what you and your peers do thank you and I mean that I mean that across the board whether it's luke or it's just an or it's Luke Bryan or whomever. It is a Morgan Wallin. I've watched a bunch of different guys. Do these shows and all of them are just just tremendous. The thank you so much. It can barnes for your time. We know how precious it.

Ken Burns Ken Travis Chase Ken Burns America Pbs Luke Bryan Tiger Woods United States Justin Moore Vietnam Johnny cash Marty Stuart Marty Robbins Barack Obama Ernest Hemingway Gerald McCoy Tiger Cain El Paso Jonesboro Arkansas Marty
"ken burns" Discussed on Marty Smith's America The Podcast

Marty Smith's America The Podcast

13:02 min | 1 year ago

"ken burns" Discussed on Marty Smith's America The Podcast

"The work. It's about the work and when you look at his films and when you watch his films that depth of the work in the obvious preparation and execution of that preparation and meticulous demand for excellence in every. Single Facet is readily obvious. Oh it took eight years for the country music documentary ten years for the Vietnam and he said if they find out new information they don't let a a scene set they go and fix it like the attention to detail by this man is first class so so in doing must study for the interview. I learned that for the country. Music documentary film which was eight. Two hour episodes. Sixteen hours of content made it to air. He interviewed more than one hundred so so he interviewed one hundred and one artists that doesn't even include the peripheral voices one hundred one artists and more than one hundred seventy five hours of interviews. Think about that man. That's unreal and then to pare that down to sixteen hours. Nude I do a twenty five minute interview with Tiger Woods and I can't cut that down. I can't imagine the painstaking process. Can you imagine the stuff that didn't make it into that? Sixteen hours imagine the utter gold had to carve out of that peace and look we. We focused mainly on the country. Music documentary documentaries on baseball and World War Two and the Vietnam War are just. They are so well done with with all the interviews that he has. I think I'm GONNA leave you. I'm going to start Ken. Ken Burns America. And just release all the scene audio from those words. I guarantee you this you would. You would emerge far more intelligent from the Ken Burns America than you ever will from the Marty. Smith's America we talk about country music in a different way than us. He doesn't talk about cold beer but I really liked how he was talking about. He does stuff on the United States does stuff on the on the US but on the lower case us to like that was so profound simple but yet so deep. I am a better man for having had that. Twenty twenty five minutes with him and Y'all need to understand something about this first of all I will implore you especially while we're in quarantine like this being. Don't Binge Watch Tiger Cain go binge-watch. Ken Burns work. Go to PBS on their website. And you can stream. All of these episodes documentaries that you will be such a more well educated human being about where we came from in the decisions that had to be made in certain instances and as I was studying. He has so many films yet to come his contract. I think this not. Don't take this for Gospel. But I'm pretty sure he's contract with. Pbs Goes Through Twenty thirty. He they should just give them a lifetime contract. Yeah he has movies on so many amazing things coming Ernest Hemingway. I think he's doing it above a Barack Obama Film on and on just fascinating content. So go watch that go. Binge-watch that how would you like to be the guest after we air this interview on this podcast will? I hope that my excitement for having had the time with him is palpable. Y'All don't understand. How long Travis Chase? It's been six months probably right. It was a couple of rounds. And then I you know when the quarantine happened the one silver lining for us as. I know that people are home and so went back to emails that I've sent out and fired him off again. Trying to get some people and Ken Burns's has a crazy schedule and luckily we're able to get put in it and I I. I emailed him when the country. Music documentary came out though. So take their see. That's interesting to me. Take the listeners. Through the process of what do you do when you're trying to book a guy like Ken Burns? Who IS SO IN DEMAND? Do you go to. Pbs's website and click contact. Like how's that work. I've I can't remember exactly for Ken but people send out you know. Hey you should have this person. You should have this person. And they're great names and ideas but trying to find. The contact info is half the battle and I was able to find Can't remember if it was a publicist manager. Whoever for can email me and then you're hoping that they responded and with someone like Ken. I can only imagine the requests that are coming in. And you're just hoping that they make contact if they make contact then you've got that door open. And they said unfortunately he wasn't available at the time. So thank you and I I always tell them you know if something changes feel free to reach back out and then this happened and so I went back into my emails and found the email and just followed up and said hey you know hope. You're you know you and your family safe and healthy. I was wondering if with the crazy schedules. Ken might be available to come on. And that's how it is at Gerald McCoy on a couple of weeks ago but the first time we had him on it took a while for him. These people live crazy schedule so reaching out and trying to get a guest within a week is usually very tough. You have to build these out further in advance. Well you do such a good job at it and I'm so grateful it's funny. I wear a travis out. I'll hear something or read something or see something. Who Was it a couple of we? Oh I randomly. We'll send travis a text that nowhere. You'll get me kid rock like that's the directive. Go Get me Kid rock please. I do use it manners. They're very out of the blue to. It's just like we'll be talking about something or we're not even tech and all of a sudden it's hey let's get kid rock and I told you I love a challenge and you know at times people will just say no. They don't get back but that's the worst. That happens the best as they say. Yes and all of a sudden. We have an interview with Ken Burns. There was there was so much more I wanted to get to with kin. I wanted to know what he feels like his. What is his proudest work? I wanted to know which film troubled him the most or gave him the most difficulty. In in edit I wanted to know about Johnny cash is complexities. And what he learned from. Guys like Mardi Stewart. Who was such an integral voice to me. Marty Stuart was the thread that wove from Mabel. Carter all the way through Eric. Church is he was the he was at one voice that was able to weave through the entire sixteen hour documentary and really so it altogether and see the most underrated like country artists. Yeah get the credit that the other people are going to get but the talent that he has in everybody that he's worked with like you just said is unmatched yes. There's no doubt I mean and and and and when you think about the fact that he played in Johnny cash's band when he was playing professionally as a little boy it's hit and you talk about country music historians. I saw a piece on. Cbs Sunday morning. A couple of years ago Marty and it may be somewhere else now but at the time it was in storage he has a collection of country music memorabilia that is unparalleled unmatched including the country. Music Hall of fame. He has like he has like Marty Robbins original jacket. You know that he war in El Paso or whatever he has the most unbelievable collection of country music memorabilia. Because of course he does but I wanted to ask you can guarantee though. I'll be sending them delinquent posts in all so it'll be an email we would love to have him on again to get more into the country music whenever he is free. Because that's I tell a lot of guests but there's some that I mean it even more when they're available were available because the last week our schedule is with the podcast world. We are very flexible with some guests. It's Utah loss as well. Great job brother. I'm so grateful for his time and his perspective and insight an in depth man and his passion he just exudes it and you guys know man went when somebody has that. There's a lot of talented people. There's a lot of will accomplished people. But when you have passion it takes your entire catalogue your entire body of work to a whole other plane because you feel it in your soul. And that's how I feel about that interview. We just did that man. That man lives his work and I'm grateful for his work. I saw in this time. I just WANNA say Make sure to continue to social distance. Guys make sure to continue to stay away from each other. That goes completely against the primal human need for togetherness but right. Now that's what we have to do. But here's here's how you can still stay together. This is something that I've been trying to do. I'm not a big phone person but because I live alone and so the self quarantine is once a day or maybe every so often I'll just facetime somebody or hit up some college friends and we had a zoom happy hour. So there's still ways that you can reach up people that you normally wouldn't talk to and stay connected. Virtually but follow the self quarantine social distancing. I'm really grateful to all the country artists and and amazingly talented people who are doing live streams and if a country artist is doing a livestream than I'm watching it and I I did didn't event actually the day after we did the interview with Ken Burns on Instagram. Live with my good friend. Justin Moore where we did a story tellers event and he played five or six songs and we just had a great discussion about the passions and the inspiration behind those specific songs. And because of that. Lowe's home improvement. Warehouse donated twenty five thousand dollars to the American Red Cross in Justin's name and in my name in those funds were allocated to first responders in Nashville Tennessee where a tornado went through right before corona. Stop the world and to Jonesboro Arkansas near Justin's hometown that just went through there and so these things are making a difference and I'm so grateful for everybody giving your time in this very unique and unprecedented time. These those strange concerts have been a joy to me to just one provides payment but then to see these artists scaled-down. Maybe it may be a friend. That's on guitar and hear them. I mean seeing Luke. Combs COVER FAST cars is. I've probably watched that video ten times over. I sent him a text about that and just told I just said thank you. I said brother. I know that it's just what you do. But for those of us who are such passionate consumers of what you and your peers do thank you and I mean that I mean that across the board whether it's luke or it's just an or it's Luke Bryan or whomever. It is a Morgan Wallin. I've watched a bunch of different guys. Do these shows and all of them are just just tremendous. The thank you so much. It can barnes for your time. We know how precious it.

Ken Burns Ken Travis Chase Ken Burns America Pbs Luke Bryan Tiger Woods United States Justin Moore Vietnam Johnny cash Marty Stuart Marty Robbins Barack Obama Ernest Hemingway Gerald McCoy Tiger Cain El Paso Jonesboro Arkansas Marty
Internet memes are the new coronavirus coping mechanism

The 3:59

04:27 min | 1 year ago

Internet memes are the new coronavirus coping mechanism

"I'm Roger Chang and this is your daily charge with US special guest abroarall hedy bright. You've got this fantastic story. Which initially we wrote off as a fluff piece because it's Internet memes and means you're so disposable but there's actually like a series star behind such a fascinating story behind it kind of breaks out. What exactly where. Exactly how our Internet memes Being designed or created as a reaction to what's going on with crowbars absolutely you're right. It's it's true that you can kinda push off these things that we see on instagram and twitter ads. Just these these things that people joke about but it turns out that means can be a very healthy way to cope with stress and anxiety. And there's a lot of stress and anxiety right now. Given the krona virus pandemic psychologists actually saved that means our healthy way to cope with anxiety because humor is something that we have used as humans to cope for ever so this is something that people did during the world. War is something people did during the civil war. They found ways to incorporate humor into magazines and posters and journal entries and this is how we process things and make light of them And so it means are kind of the modern day way that we do that we take a very serious situation like quarantine and then we find ways to make jokes about that like. I'M GONNA put on my living room pajamas as opposed to like my bedroom pajamas. Like all the ways that we find You know the ways that we find humor in kind of the serious reality of the world right now so this is actually something. That is very help healthy for a lot of people to use a time like this. Yeah I love Sort of the the quick kind of walk back through history of how humorous played a role right. And it's fascinating to me that you know that the civil war civil war era was largely considered the age of practical jokes article. Joking which you know when you're watching those. Ken Burns documentary like I don't it. It's weird to Kinda like juxtapose. How the Civil. War's been presented with the fact that people were playing practical jokes on each other. Which boggles my mind. But you're it's a great point. We've we've long used humor as a way to deal with extraordinary circumstances and this is a particularly extraordinary circumstance absolutely and this is something that I spoke with Dr who runs this me McCowan. And he was saying that you know sometimes a laugh is the only bit of sanity that you have in your day because when you don't have that ability to kind of diffuse that tension and a few that anxiety like what else do we can't somebody. One of the psychologists I spoke with Dr Andrew's was saying that this isn't a scenario where we can kind of band together and be like okay. You know. We're all facing this crisis together. Let's go and volunteer drives at helped people. We can't even come together. Well if we have to stand six feet apart from each other we have to social distance we have to be essentially isolation from one another and the only way we can really reach other is through the Internet and so when we are communicating through the Internet. One of the best ways we can make light of a situation and one of the best ways that we can connect with. People is with humor because when you relate with somebody when you can share a joke with somebody that's really what creates those connections and those connections are so critical right now at a time when people really crave social interaction. Exactly this is an audio podcast right now just given our limitations but as wondering if you could run through some of the more memorable means that you ran into and of course reporting and I know this isn't a visual medium but You can talk to your best. Describe the the memes that the great. Yeah absolutely there's wine with Matthew mcconaughey where he's like smoking a cigarette and he's really intense looking at phone and then the caption says me reading about current virus thirty seconds after. I swore I wouldn't read about corona virus anymore and it just really captures like like. Why am I doing this? Why can I not put down my phone? Why can I not step away? You pledge that you're not going to do it and then you do it again There's a lot of good distracted boyfriend means where it's like. Yeah yeah look over. And it's like oh two weeks according t and you're looking over and it looks so good and then like work is in the background trying to juggle. Like hey headway how do I do this There's there's one that was kind of a little bit on the on the darker side. It was a picture of a baby. And you know how like sometimes people will have a sign that says like my first Easter. My first Christmas it said my first pandemic and I was like wow. That's funny. It's extremely dark. Extremely funny exactly are fascinating but even even dark humor psychologists. I spoke with April. Former saying they'd even dark. Humor can be a healthy way to to cope with these things. And so you laugh and you feel like slightly like. Oh my God. This is awful. But then you're like you know like it's the reality. We have to make some

Roger Chang United States Instagram Hedy Bright Ken Burns Matthew Mcconaughey Twitter Dr Andrew
Regina A. Mason: Searching for William E. Grimes

In Black America

09:32 min | 1 year ago

Regina A. Mason: Searching for William E. Grimes

"Jimmy Mason is a remarkable woman. She spent fifteen years of a life researching alive for great great. Great Grandfather William Grimes with nothing to go on the connection to the underground railroad. She spent countless hours in libraries reading books. Looking at Michael Film and Census Records Grind was changes. Oh when he was sold away from the arms of grieving mother to a far plantation hair grew up friendless and mother list apparently no surrogate slave family or loved ones to embrace him. No one even to look after him. Grimes was the first person to go through slavery in the South and write about it. This was the first time cousin. Slavery exposed onto the spectrum of one who had lived in and he was the first author to write about the harsh realities of the north. Despite the narrative of his big F- freedom land. Recently in Black America spoke with China rant to produce of Gina's journey the site for William Grimes and Regina e Mason on today's program. We conclude our conversation and so my co-producer contacted his agent his agency and they sent it over and to my astonishment he came back and was like I'll do it and it was more than a reasonable rate and which also made us faint and the next thing I was out in In Hollywood in in Melrose actually at his recording studio and and directing keep David in the booth which was mind blowing to say the least and he was astonished to see you know me and and and you know given my age and done and being an African American male to be directing this film so that that really made him happy when he saw that he just was was really blown away with it but he blessed the project came in. He did the most amazing work on it and it really just elevated genus story and Grind Story to a whole new level so we will be internally thankful to him for that and every once in a while I do have talks with them still. He's just a really good person and I think he's a studier of history. He's very big in the voice over world. He's an Emmy Award Winning Boys Actor. Who's done a ton of Ken? Burns documentaries so he was really into and this is his thing so I think he really enjoyed working on this project and we were better for Ms Mason ominously. This was labor intensive. This is way before Google and everything else. So what gave you that consistent drive to want wanting to complete this project William Grimes himself you know when you read his narrative all that. He endured life to the cruelty the abuse at every turn. He was reminded that he was nothing but he never bought into the status quo. In fact he defied the status quo. Every turn just the fact that he had the notion that he was capable of writing his own story without any assistance from white people speaks to who he was and how self assured he was so his example of perseverance and endurance gave me the will to to just carry on it. And see this per- This project to to the end and I'm speaking of the book project and I do have to say this once. I started digging into this story and realizing that no other scholars and really looked at it. In fact when I went looking for any body of research that was done on William Grimes it was so inaccurate and they were historians to just took liberty to to write about this man having not done any research whatsoever and then I came across the Work of Dr William L. Andrews scholar from UNC UNC Chapel Hill University of North Carolina Chapel Hill extraordinary expert on early African. American autobiography. I came across his book to tell of Free Story and he studies the slave narratives and included in his body of work which is sort of like the scholars Bible. Today he wrote about William Grimes not a whole lot more than I had found those about four pages of work and I needed to make sense of that genre of literature that I really knew nothing about so I reached out to him and he at the time was the only living collar who that who I could talk to and we sort of built a relationship every now and then I would send him information about what I found a William Grimes and he one day wrote me back and he says look the work you've done has to be preserved in some fashion or another then. He approached the idea of partnering to do a book. Because I knew that bill knew that I I wanted to bring this story to light this new scholarship that had never been done before on William grinds and he definitely was the right person because obviously he had studied grimes he had written about grinds and there was really no one else that I could associate myself with and he was the man when it came to early African American autobiography and so we partnered and We developed what we call all. What has been the authoritative edition of the life of William Grimes runaway slave? What was it like your feelings when you you read his narrative and then understood that your great great grandfather was just not an ordinary slave Well I WANNA say this William Grunt was an ordinary man. Who didn't extraordinary thing? I want to move to realize we may not have those narrative is out there. We may not be able to to. We can maybe able to find our ancestors who had been enslaved on In plantation records or slave inventories. And all you see our names sadly those voices we will never know their voice or their humanity because the story doesn't exist so to find this first person account of slavery and by the way we them grams. It's the first person of color to go through slavery in the south. Handle right about it so for the first time we got to hear about southern slavery from the perspective of the Sleigh and not from the slave owner himself so it's a different kind of storing. It's more authentic and true in terms of the experience so to recover this and then associate myself to this narrative. I realize that all of his virtues are inside of me so when you say William Grimes was not the ordinary slave he definitely speaks for those who didn't have a voice and I believe that. None of the slaves bought into the enslaved narrative that was supposed to be their destination and ultimately was their destination or a. Yes. I believe that they all had that will to be free. And and in their own circumstances they asserted whatever power they had in a rebellious way. And so to know though that William Grimes was able to make out of slavery and to tell his story is huge it is it's just incredibly empowering and I realized that again that his virtues existed me and he was my example every step of the way when I wanted to give up when I was faced with all kinds of closed doors I realized that he faced those same and he was told no over and over again but he found a way to get it done and so I I it brings me great. Pride that this enslaved man who never bought into the status quo live within

William Grimes Jimmy Mason William Grinds William Grunt Unc Unc Chapel Hill University Dr William L. Andrews Emmy Award Michael Film Google KEN Black America Melrose China Hollywood Gina David Regina E Mason Bill
Yankees minor leaguer becomes first MLB-affiliated player to test positive for coronavirus

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:29 sec | 1 year ago

Yankees minor leaguer becomes first MLB-affiliated player to test positive for coronavirus

"Now we have coronavirus impacting baseball that's right Jenny the Yankees of a minor leaguer that has tested positive for the corona virus the unidentified player is the first known case for major or minor league baseball Lee also said a short while ago that baseball issued a memo to all thirty clubs telling teams to end organized workouts elsewhere with baseball in mind if you haven't seen or you want to see the baseball series by Ken burns once again it's streaming on PBS dot

Yankees LEE Ken Burns Jenny
Video Marketing Pet Peeves

HEY.com - Video Content Marketing Tips

09:29 min | 1 year ago

Video Marketing Pet Peeves

"My name is dame golden from pretty up and big target and with my co-host she's my new co host. Jeez Ari and TWA L. E. Y. Remained healy from video explained. Welcome Rene Lo. I love the interaction and now people know how to spell my name correctly. I don't think they actually understood it. I I'm GonNa say it again. R. E. N. W. E. T. W. L. E. Y. And if they didn't before now they do so it's really great that you join me as a co host of the podcast. Because you know it's it's it's tough running the show all by myself. You're an experienced hand and today we wanted to talk about pets. Pr Pet peeves about video marketing. Things we would like to change about the video marketing techniques and so forth is that worked for you renee absolutely. Let's talk about pet peeves. Alright so minor mostly with you too because I work almost exclusively with Youtube. You have a broader Palette than I do but My first pet peeve is videos on youtube where for businesses where. The subject doesn't look at the camera. And you know Rene that I really am an advocate of looking at the camera. The challenges the course a lot of business videos corporate videos there. It's an interviewer talking to the subject. Right yes so I found that The the closer you look to the camera the more you're connecting with your audience and sometimes I have seen business videos where someone is off camera and so the subject is looking a little bit off camera. But I think it's intentional because it's supposed to look like a conversation between two people and the cameras like the third person that's listening in. Yes and I think that that's great on. Ken Burns documentaries which I love. But I'm not watching. Ken Burns on Youtube. So I don't agree. I think there's tools like the I forgot my friend's name. What what are they There's tools like the aigdirect e y e d e c t that you can use or you can just use a teleprompter on an iphone and get people to look through the transparency of the camera. So I feel that. That is an outdated approach. I know you don't entirely agree. Rene in some cases but I am one hundred percent belief that youtube videos. The business person should look at the camera. Yes so I I. One hundred percent agree when one person on on camera. And it's supposed to be one person just having that conversation with their audience I feel like there's a place for it wouldn't more of an interview style video and the the person who's interviewing them as is off camera I'd love to hear just a little bit more about. What is I direct? Oh it's a it's a it's a tool. It's a sideways periscope. If you remember the periscopes you had when you're a kid. Yes and so what this does. Is it sideways? So that the with using mirrors the interviewee looks directly at the interview. Irv that's behind the camera but they appear to be looking through the camera. How Weird I would love to try this out as a very intriguing. Yes so it's a it's not a totally cheap item. If you're a regular producer you can By one thousand dollars but if you know a lot of production companies are always renting equipment. And I've done it before they ship you stuff overnight in a big. What is it a Pelican case? And and that's what they do with these. A lot of companies rent them in their. You know a few hundred dollars a day yeah I also like that. You brought up tele prompting APPS and I use teleprompters So I use a teleprompter at at in my home studio but then I also used an APP called big view which is for the iphone and one of the things that I love about. Big View is that The words that appear are closest to the camera on your phone so So it it is getting your eyeliner close to the camera as possible as opposed to other parts of the screen on the iphone. And so it it. It basically is helping to do what you're asking for which is to get the person actually talking directly to the camera. Yeah it's just very simple. My opinion is that if you're doing video four business you are most important salesperson for that business at any given time and if you're not looking at the camera it's sort of like as a salesperson if you walked into a customer's office and looked over their shoulder it's rude that's a good point. All right so my my pet peeve the first of all I want to talk about here is this one has come up a lot recently. So my pet peeve right now is when people say you need to be on Tick Tock. I have heard so many people recently. Just say that everybody needs to be on duck. If you're not on tick tock you know you're you're you're missing out and I think I disagree with that. I think that there is There's a place for it. There's there's definitely certain people that should be on tick tock but not. Everybody needs to be on talk. Need to be where your audiences and so for me. I primarily focus on bb tech companies and and sort of a you know an older demographic I'm not sure I'm going to do a lot of business on tick tock so. I don't know that I need to be there and then I missing out. Okay well I didn't know you're going to say this but I'm going to say something that may potentially controversial because I'm GonNa say I will never do business on talk and I'll tell you why because it is an unsafe Platform we complain so much. Oh facebook Scott a lot of your data or whatever but talk Companies that are based in China Have been demonstrated to be not very good with your data and I used to work for the federal government and my a data at the Office of Personnel was hacked including three hundred million other people and basically they stole all some very private data from the US government. That was like five seven years ago now now fast forward to today. Chinese companies are basically very strongly influenced by their governments. And I just think you know what country that's not that good with human rights. I don't want to give them my data of what location. I've I matt where I've been acting you upset about the data sharing with facebook. Get Ready. Because it's GonNa be a lot. Bigger challenge with a strongly influenced Chinese company. That is going to have all your data all your kids data where you've been what you've been doing. Just say no and that. I don't think that that is being I don't think it's unfair criticism. Yeah I I agree with you. I think there's there's two issues at play so one is people saying you need to be on tick tock for business reasons than and things like that so I i. I don't agree that you that everybody should be on Even privacy concerns aside But yes there's absolutely privacy concerns tick tock has already been sued for collecting information on on minors And then also storing information about people on Chinese servers and so under the the military just went through a band with tick tock in terms of banning military personnel from having tick tock on military phones and discouraging them from having it on their personal phones. And so I think there's some interesting things that are happening in that space. I think it's It's GonNa be interesting to see that had plays out and and you know what happens with Tick Tock But I don't believe that that everybody needs to be there even for marketing reasons. Privacy stuff aside. Well I'm I'm okay. If other people being I will never be there i. My pet peeve is videos where the subject is too small in the frame. Most people are on mobile phones right Rene when they're looking at Youtube. Yeah Yeah I mean. Even if they're not on a mobile phone and it's kind of awkward if someone is a little too far away so the closer that you can be to the camera and I think the better connection that you're going to have with your

Youtube Rene Lo Ken Burns R. E. N. W. E. T. W. L. E. ARI Facebook Renee Producer IRV Healy Federal Government L. E. Y. United States Scott Office Of Personnel China
"ken burns" Discussed on After The Fact

After The Fact

09:45 min | 1 year ago

"ken burns" Discussed on After The Fact

"Not you know they know coming in who I am and maybe they WANNA be shelby. Foote is the worst thing in the world to WANNA be somebody or not. I had one person I was interviewing for film and he he was just staying on the surface and I finally just said to him at the beginning of the third or fourth realism about to roll films about to end it and I just said you saw bad stuff off and he just his lip start equivalent cheek started twitching and then all of a sudden out came these stories of a nineteen year old grizzled veteran trend Of A war who was handling the kids and and I finally stopped. I said wait a second. How old are you because nineteen our these kids eighteen so the difference Prince of just a few days a few weeks few months in combat had changed person? You have plotted out films for the next ten ten years. How do you decide? Decide the order of them. Well they sometimes change. You WanNa make sure that you're not so certain that you can't change country. Music for example was not going to be country music. Get it was another subject that we hadn't really even begun. We were sort of early in thinking stages and when country music came I just went to Dayton Dunkin. Who's going to be the partner around that project and just said don't WanNa get rid of this but what about country that other one that we haven't talked about in literally and years and years and years it wasn't abandoning doing something? That was just early so we bought stuff out. who were working on a biography of Ernest Hemingway biography of Muhammad Ali biography of Benjamin Franklin Glenn. We're doing a history of United States in the Holocaust. Were doing the story of the Buffalo. A kind of biography of an animal. which is also I presume I'm a parable of de extinction but it's mostly about the human beings that both prize the buffalo the other human beings that brought it to the brink of extinction Shen and the human beings of the same tribe? Who said let's save it? It's a really really great story We're doing a history of LBJ and the Great Society the the second most accomplished in terms of legislative achievements after FDR in the history of our country. So if I were given a thousand years to live. I wouldn't run out of topics in American history. We're also so doing a film on Leonardo Da Vinci which is our first non-american Todd News. I Don non-american topics huge huge for us. But he's such a polymath interesting. He seems to be speaking to the highest aspirations of what the United States and Julia will relate him. Well I don't think we'll relate indirectly but I can't help but think I think that the life of Leonardo doesn't inspire a kind of desire to be more than just the thing that you're supposed to be doing. Your historical advisors is provide materials. They often do. And that's extremely helpful. As I understand it. The very famous Sullivan Blue Letter came from one of the advisers during the civil war. It was Robert. Johansen was sort of so soft spoken member of our advisory board and and he taught in Illinois and he sent something that he'd come across across in the Illinois state historical society or something like that which was based on a Rhode Island soldier and it? I read it out loud by the time time I finished reading it in my office over there I was breaking up and everyone else was in tears and I handed it to my brother and I said make a copy of it and put it at the end of the first episode. You said why Battle of Manassas put it. The in NASA has no these are the stakes for the whole film we can retrospectively retrospectively. Looked back at MANASSAS. Look ahead to what the whole thing is about because this is the greatest love letter ever written. I believe and putting it at the end said this is what the stakes are going going to be. Can I ask you to read it. Sure Okay my very dear Sarah the indications Sion's are very strong that we shall move in a few days perhaps tomorrow. Let's I should not be able to write you again. I feel impelled to write a few lines that may fall under your I when I shelby no more I have no misgivings about our lack of confidence in the cause in which I am engaged and my courage does not halt are falter. I know how strongly American civilization now leans on the triumph of the government. And how great a debt we owe to those who went before us through the blood and sufferings of the revolution solution and I am willing perfectly willing to lay down all my joys in this life to help maintain this government and to pay that debt. Sarah my I love for you. As deafness it seems to bind me with mighty cables that nothing but omnipotence could break and yet my love of country comes over me like a strong wind and and bears me irresistibly on with all these chains to the battlefield. The memories of the blissful moments I have spent with you come creeping over me and I feel most gratified to God and to you that I have enjoyed them for so long and how hard it is for me to give them up and burn to ashes. The hopes of future years when God God willing we might still have lived and loved together and seeing our son's grown up to honorable manhood around us. I have I know but few in small claims names of divine providence. But something whispers to me that I shall return to my loved ones unharmed. If I do not dear Sarah Never forget how much I I love you. And when my last breath escapes me on the battlefield it will whisper your name. Forgive my many faults in the mini pains. I have caused you how. How thoughtless and foolish? I have often been. How gladly would I wash out with my tears every little spot upon your happiness? But Oh Sarah if the dead can come back to this earth and flit unseen around those. They loved I shall always be near you in the gladys days and in the darkest nights always always in. If there'd be a soft breeze upon your cheek each you'll be my breath as the cool air fans your throbbing temple. It shall Oh be my spirit passing by Sarah. Do not mourn me dead think I am gone and wait for me for we shall meet again Sullivan. Balu was killed a week later at the first battle of bull run never fails I carry that around in my pocket that copy one of them I put up on the wall on the side of a piece. He's furniture in my office. And the other. I put my wallet and I would bring it out and read it for the next twenty years until it just completely dissolved and I just it's got when it's all in a million different pieces I can remember hearing it for the first time in my living room in suburban Philadelphia and my wife and eye weeping next to each other on the couch you create a cumulus experience for millions of Americans. It's it's Is a huge group of people that made that happen open. It is particularly the the genius of Sullivan Blues. Great writing it is Paul Roebling Who Read it an actor actor it is the music of j onger Shokhin Farewell Underneath it? It is the choice of editing that the editors and I chose to put into into illustrate in that small. It's my deciding that we should call the scene honorable manhood and then it served as the Coda the location of it. So it's a whole bunch of things coming together. You have said that in your work you wake the dead and maybe there's no better example than that letter in some ways. Well I think that that's Elvin Balu is talking about something that's way above my pay grade My late father in law told me that I had an early death of my mother and he I seemed to be not able to be present at the anniversary of her death and he said I bet you blew out the candles on your birthday cake the same way and I go yeah. How'd you know? And he said it's the magical thinking of an eleven year old And look what you do for a living. You wake the dead you. Make Abraham Lincoln and Jackie Robinson. Come alive live. Who Do you think you're really trying to wake up? And so it's It's sort of stuck in that. What we've tried to do is take old photographs and animate them not through traditional animation? But just by the way we re photograph refilling them and bring them alive. We add a complex sound effects. Track back to that that listens to them we add first-person voices complimenting me hope third person and we add music and the commentary of other people and footage and all of that together gives a sense that history is not was is which is what faulkner always talked about can burns. Thank you so much. My pleasure our deepest. Thanks to Ken Burns and his team for their generous time with us. During in our visit to New Hampshire this marks are second conversation in our occasional series with artists discussing their creative process. You can find our talk with Pulitzer Prize winning composer Jennifer Higdon on our website pewtrusts dot org slash after the fact. And if you're a new listener. Welcome check out our range of episodes explorations of faith today way conversations with scientists at work around the globe examinations of the American family and looks at the future of learning all of it grounded in data all of it nonpartisan on partisan we appreciate you tuning in and hope. You'll keep listening and keep sharing this podcast with friends for the future trusts on Dan. Luke.

Sarah United States Elvin Balu Sullivan shelby Foote Pulitzer Prize Leonardo Da Vinci Ken Burns Illinois NASA Dayton Dunkin Ernest Hemingway New Hampshire FDR providence Leonardo Great Society Jennifer Higdon partner
"ken burns" Discussed on After The Fact

After The Fact

08:38 min | 1 year ago

"ken burns" Discussed on After The Fact

"There is a presumption by folks. Don't really think about it or consider it that what we do in writing an article or making a film is an additive thing and it is of course. But it's really subtractive. We live in New Hampshire. We make Maple Syrup here and it takes forty gallons of sap to make one gallon of Syrup. It's very much like our process of forty to fifty to sixty to seventy five to one shooting ratio. So it's distillation it's subtraction. It's what doesn't fit at the same time. You are also not trying to simplify it to the place where it no longer resonates with the complexities. That thing has filmmakers are notorious for saying well. That's a good scene. Let's touch it's working. That's working and I've got a neon sign in my editing room. That says it's complicated. Welcome to after the fact for the Pew Charitable Trusts on Damn Luke. And you're listening to Ken. Burns described the subtractive art of his creative process. You can see it at work in his epoch. Look at the civil war. The eleven and a half hour documentary captivated the nation in in nineteen ninety and was cold from twenty two point seven three miles film. And that's our data point for this episode. Ken Burns has been called America's storyteller a title earned over more than four decades and thirty three films including his most recent one on country music. We traveled his barn. That is his office in Rural New Hampshire talk about how he creates art from history. My first film was on the building of the Brooklyn Bridge and when I started fundraising forward in seventy seven. I looked about about twelve years old and people delighted in turning down saying that. This child is trying to sell me the Brooklyn Bridge and when I finally amassed a a can't say a critical mass But some money to film I started filming and I finished most of the principal photography in the summer of nineteen seventy nine and realized allies with all this footage and no money that I needed to get a real job and I had a really nice offer for a job but I felt in my bones in my guts that if I put the footage up on top of the refrigerator on a shelf I'd just wake up. Twenty twenty five years later and having not finished it so I wanted to move to someplace where I could live for nothing and figure out how you made a film about a bridge. How you how you told stories in history how you animated old photographs how you use sound effects and music and I moved here to the house? I'm living in now. I rented it for a couple of years. My oldest daughter was born there and so I had to buy hi it. The best professional decision I ever made was deciding to stay here. Once that film was nominated for an Oscar. Everyone said Oh you come back to New York and I said no I think. Can we stay here. The work I do is so labor intensive it's like academic or medical scientific research takes years and years and years to do it right and and it was more important to put the very difficult still to this day grant money and I'm very grateful for for pews involvement for for decades in the work that we've done put that all on the screen to have zero overhead in essence So that we can tell the funders that look. It's it's on the screen if we're take ten and a half years to do Vietnam or eight and a half years to do country music or the war. The history of the Second World War that we did that that the the felt that their money was going not some costly rent in midtown Manhattan But in a rural area where it's very clearly all all up on the screen. The work clearly energizes you. Are there things outside of work that allow you to have the energy and vitality and creativity the practices that you do yourself that allows you to sort of grows beyond as a filmmaker that also influences you as a filmmaker. Being a father is the most important activity. Yeah I have four daughters. I'm blessed I'm rich and daughters who ranged from the late thirties to a nine year old. They're the greatest teachers. I live in the spectacular. Her place that nature continually Reminds me of my insignificance and so the humility that comes from understanding the ending. How much nature us is actually makes you bigger just as if you if you think that you can say to somebody you know? Don't you know who I am. Doesn't commend you to the smallest and weakest little place and first of all in Walpole New Hampshire any notoriety variety award celebrity plus fifty cents. Gets you a cup of coffee. I do the New York Times Crossword puzzle in INC in physically. I buy the paper everyday we day and I read novels or magazines and watch television mostly for news and sports rabid baseball fan and then mostly I walk and I do that at least once a day. If not twice a day by the end of the day I have about ten miles. What happens in walking is very interesting hosting its meditative? Sometimes it's it's it's social. I can talk to daughters. I can talk to colleagues but mostly it's so lower with my dog and we've just sort of watch things leaves falling from trees SUNSETS and sunrises. That's what Emily Dickinson called the far theatricals of day which I still think is one of the greatest phrases of all times and I am very much addicted to the far theatricals a day. One of the things we want to do is talk just about your creative process. That's how you go about doing what you do. We start with the most basic question. Which is how you pick your topics? You've talked a lot about how you've got a whole range going out for the next next ten twenty years which is amazing. But how do you decide you know the glib answer is that they choose me. I I'm just looking for good stories in American history and that's what I want to say I is that I'm a storyteller. I'm not looking to make a political comment on the present though I know is Mark Twain is supposed to said that history doesn't doesn't repeat itself but it rhymes that is to say I've never finished a project where I haven't lifted my head up at the end of this long usually multiyear process and not seen the way in which the themes the important themes are not only evergreen but are resonating in the present. We do get completely distracted by the idea. That history repeats itself it does not it never has please show me where it has you know. Are we condemned to repeat what we don't remember no. It doesn't seem team that that's the case is knowing history thing. Of course it is so I think we just come to it from the sense that we have an amazing story to tell in our country. I feel that too often. It's it's been sanitized and that the real version which is incredibly diverse. An incredibly complicated is the one we ought to be focusing on and that in no way does does it diminish the positive aspects to give Some of the negative stuff the novelist Richard Power said the best arguments in the world won't change. I'm just single persons mind. The only thing that can do that as a good story so I'm not in the business of changing people's minds but I am in the business of trying to figure out what a good story stories you'd mentioned the binary aspect and unfortunately that's what we're in that that phase of our society today but you were also in a world where where you know attention spans shortened were in social media driving so much of what goes on you. Continue to draw tens of millions of viewers to eight ten twelve eighteen hours worth of material. What does that tell you about where we are as a people? Well it's really good is when the civil war series came out in nineteen ninety. There were just was no real cable proliferation. So we're dealing with around forty million people who watched that summer all of it the first time it was out that was a big and surprising chunk. But we've kept that forty million people as the cables have proliferated a five hundred or fifteen hundred channels and the Internet has exploded with literally tens of millions if not hundreds of millions of places. I was told by the critics. This is really good but no one's going to watch it. Everybody said that through baseball baseball through jazz through world. War Two through the national parks. But they didn't say it for the next big series which was the Roosevelt's and they didn't say for Vietnam and they didn't say it for country music and that's because we're starved for curation were also starved for meaning.

Ken Burns Brooklyn Bridge Vietnam New Hampshire Maple Syrup Pew Charitable Trusts Rural New Hampshire sap New York Times Emily Dickinson Walpole New Hampshire Oscar Mark Twain New York Manhattan principal America Roosevelt
Ken Burns: 'America's Storyteller' on His Creative Process

After The Fact

06:03 min | 1 year ago

Ken Burns: 'America's Storyteller' on His Creative Process

"Ken Burns has been called America's storyteller a title earned over more than four decades and thirty three films including his most recent one on country music. We traveled his barn. That is his office in Rural New Hampshire talk about how he creates art from history. My first film was on the building of the Brooklyn Bridge and when I started fundraising forward in seventy seven. I looked about about twelve years old and people delighted in turning down saying that. This child is trying to sell me the Brooklyn Bridge and when I finally amassed a a can't say a critical mass But some money to film I started filming and I finished most of the principal photography in the summer of nineteen seventy nine and realized allies with all this footage and no money that I needed to get a real job and I had a really nice offer for a job but I felt in my bones in my guts that if I put the footage up on top of the refrigerator on a shelf I'd just wake up. Twenty twenty five years later and having not finished it so I wanted to move to someplace where I could live for nothing and figure out how you made a film about a bridge. How you how you told stories in history how you animated old photographs how you use sound effects and music and I moved here to the house? I'm living in now. I rented it for a couple of years. My oldest daughter was born there and so I had to buy hi it. The best professional decision I ever made was deciding to stay here. Once that film was nominated for an Oscar. Everyone said Oh you come back to New York and I said no I think. Can we stay here. The work I do is so labor intensive it's like academic or medical scientific research takes years and years and years to do it right and and it was more important to put the very difficult still to this day grant money and I'm very grateful for for pews involvement for for decades in the work that we've done put that all on the screen to have zero overhead in essence So that we can tell the funders that look. It's it's on the screen if we're take ten and a half years to do Vietnam or eight and a half years to do country music or the war. The history of the Second World War that we did that that the the felt that their money was going not some costly rent in midtown Manhattan But in a rural area where it's very clearly all all up on the screen. The work clearly energizes you. Are there things outside of work that allow you to have the energy and vitality and creativity the practices that you do yourself that allows you to sort of grows beyond as a filmmaker that also influences you as a filmmaker. Being a father is the most important activity. Yeah I have four daughters. I'm blessed I'm rich and daughters who ranged from the late thirties to a nine year old. They're the greatest teachers. I live in the spectacular. Her place that nature continually Reminds me of my insignificance and so the humility that comes from understanding the ending. How much nature us is actually makes you bigger just as if you if you think that you can say to somebody you know? Don't you know who I am. Doesn't commend you to the smallest and weakest little place and first of all in Walpole New Hampshire any notoriety variety award celebrity plus fifty cents. Gets you a cup of coffee. I do the New York Times Crossword puzzle in INC in physically. I buy the paper everyday we day and I read novels or magazines and watch television mostly for news and sports rabid baseball fan and then mostly I walk and I do that at least once a day. If not twice a day by the end of the day I have about ten miles. What happens in walking is very interesting hosting its meditative? Sometimes it's it's it's social. I can talk to daughters. I can talk to colleagues but mostly it's so lower with my dog and we've just sort of watch things leaves falling from trees SUNSETS and sunrises. That's what Emily Dickinson called the far theatricals of day which I still think is one of the greatest phrases of all times and I am very much addicted to the far theatricals a day. One of the things we want to do is talk just about your creative process. That's how you go about doing what you do. We start with the most basic question. Which is how you pick your topics? You've talked a lot about how you've got a whole range going out for the next next ten twenty years which is amazing. But how do you decide you know the glib answer is that they choose me. I I'm just looking for good stories in American history and that's what I want to say I is that I'm a storyteller. I'm not looking to make a political comment on the present though I know is Mark Twain is supposed to said that history doesn't doesn't repeat itself but it rhymes that is to say I've never finished a project where I haven't lifted my head up at the end of this long usually multiyear process and not seen the way in which the themes the important themes are not only evergreen but are resonating in the present. We do get completely distracted by the idea. That history repeats itself it does not it never has please show me where it has you know. Are we condemned to repeat what we don't remember no. It doesn't seem team that that's the case is knowing history thing. Of course it is so I think we just come to it from the sense that we have an amazing story to tell in our country. I feel that too often. It's it's been sanitized and that the real version which is incredibly diverse. An incredibly complicated is the one we ought to be focusing on and that in no way does does it diminish the positive aspects to give Some of the negative stuff the novelist Richard Power said the best arguments in the world won't change. I'm just single persons mind. The only thing that can do that as a good story so I'm not in the business of changing people's minds but I am in the business of trying to figure out what a good story stories

Brooklyn Bridge Rural New Hampshire Ken Burns New York Times Principal America Walpole New Hampshire Emily Dickinson Oscar New York Vietnam Mark Twain Manhattan Richard Power INC
Piranha-Proof Fish Gives Inspiration for Body Armor

60-Second Science

02:48 min | 1 year ago

Piranha-Proof Fish Gives Inspiration for Body Armor

"I'm Alicia Burke host of that made all the difference a new podcast from Bank of America where I talked to achievers like Ken Burns and Arianna Huffington about the moment sentence fire them to make an impact you can find that made all the difference anywhere you get your podcasts this is science thanks for listening for scientific American sixty seconds science I'm Christopher Indonesia

Ken Burns Arianna Huffington Christopher Indonesia Alicia Burke Bank Of America Sixty Seconds
Corals Can Inherit Symbiotic Adaptations to Warming

60-Second Science

02:13 min | 1 year ago

Corals Can Inherit Symbiotic Adaptations to Warming

"Komo Alicia Burke host of that made all the difference a new podcast from Bank of America join me as I talked to Ken Burns about the moments that inspired his work as a documentary dementri filmmaker. You can find that made all the difference anywhere you get your podcasts. This is scientific civic. Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Dodd Yata Marine Heatwave in two thousand sixteen killed off a full third of Australia's Great Barrier Reef the largest coral reef system in the world and it's terrible watching your favorite ecosystems slowly. Di Carli can't go is a marine biologist at the University of Southern California Nia who's studied that coral bleaching event bleaching occurs when the waters around corals become too cold or too salty or too hot but mostly too hot and then the symbiotic algae that live inside corals which are photosynthetic food factories abandoned the coral which causes them to die because they're losing their nutritional source so they're essentially starving to death but coral can house multiple species of algae some more heat tolerant than others so sometimes in the face of stress the heartier algae proliferate delivery and that change offsets the damage caused by the exodus of the more sensitive species have processes called shuffling chemical in her colleagues studied shuffling in corals roles affected by the two thousand sixteen bleaching bet on the Great Barrier Reef and they found that adult corals can actually pass those reshuffled. Al Go residents along to their offspring in in their eggs pointing to a possible way. Successive generations of coral could adapt to warmer waters. If your mom can kind of crime you for the environment that you might be experiencing presumably would improve your fitness. The details are in the journal scientific reports so can this help corals beat back bleaching the pace of climate change and the frequency and intensity of the stress events is such that I don't think this is enough in face of so many threats. Even this trick may fail to provide relief for the reef. Thanks for listening for scientific American sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Indonesia.

Great Barrier Reef Christopher Dodd Alicia Burke Ken Burns Christopher Indonesia Di Carli Bank Of America University Of Southern Califor Australia Sixty Seconds
"ken burns" Discussed on The All New Dennis Miller Option

The All New Dennis Miller Option

08:43 min | 1 year ago

"ken burns" Discussed on The All New Dennis Miller Option

"Whether it's a fireside chat from your president or whether it's the music of Jimmy Rogers or with this new music incubating in the dancehalls of Harlem called swing. You know whatever it's going to be. It's going to stitch together and it's GonNa make it possible for the people to work together through the depression so that they can work even harder together to get through the Second World War even Dolly way out and other people like Dahlie way out in places where there are no electricity of so heartened at the fathers would work hard and go get a battery powered radio and her thing is she said and I remember going out and put in the water on the ground and it would it would whistle in and out but we that's where we'd hear the Grand Ole opry. You know you just you just look and you know this is Dolly. Parton who is very movingly in our film says look. I modeled my look on the town trollop. She said Charles Pushes a great euphemistic great word and what she means is she comes in from the Holler to go to town the big town which is Vera Ville and there's the woman of ill repute but to her this little girl she looked so beautiful and she wants to be Laker painted and big hair and big boobs and whatever that is that and but the fact that you could take some icon like Dolly Parton who is free to admit that sort of stuff it it just it's so refreshing to find somebody so honest and so direct yes. I'm MARLA. I modeled my look after the town trump. I thought she was beautiful. And that's the the way I wanted to look because when you see Dolly in her high school photo she looks like Scalp from Harper. Lee's to kill a mockingbird cut and they they see neither the city girls with their color and their their amplitude all that and of course two young girl that would look like that we're talking to Ken Burns and the documentary you can tell I'm completely involved in. I mean literally anticipating tonight's episode because I I believe will run into Waylon and Willie all those cats tonight is currently airing on pbs you can find a whole series at pbs dot org and the PBS APP when isolate on a couple of the people that I love so far just listening into I when Dwight Yoke and talks about Merle Song about the lights leaving holding things together yeah what a wipe out and not so here I am I'm in I'm in the Capitol records you know Hollywood and vine capital in the studio where buck look in the maddox brothers and rose and Merle and Dwight have all recorded field guys the Bakersfield guys with people holding down you know we're not going soft and syrupy the the way the national sound which is a nineteen fifties is desperate to have some crossover success because rock and roll is really sending country down and so they're having you you know and let's not we don't have to make the other wrong here. Crazy written by Willie Nelson Song bypass decline is the number one jukebox tune of all time and that's most definitely a Nashville sound but there's folks out there saying no we have a Twang and we're proud of his Twang and this is real and this is how we're going to do do it and we're not going to bring in strings to replace fiddles and we're not going to have backup choruses to replace our nasal harmonies. This is who we are and so they come out so dwight is a wonderful person who understands this loved buck buck sort of thought he was like his own son and he's trying to resurrect direct the importance of Merle Haggard and connects it to his okie past you know when his father had arrived there and then they were denigrated as being shiftless Lazy Zeno Account Workers when in fact they were the hardest workers just desperate for a chance to get a job and then later waves of Brown people in the Central Valley. All you would also experience this thing that dispossession if you will and and you send this marvelous job he says but my favorite song is holding things together and he starts off that sentence is fully prepared to do it and he starts singing it and then he can't go any further because he realizes it's right to the bone and it's like so many moments points in the film. He just stopped. She's like twelve second pause. You know my friend. What a twelve second pause. It's like we're just waiting. We're not judging we're just waiting for and Dwight to catch up and he just looks up and he says Merle's good and then he doesn't sing but he speaks to sort of killer. Verse that kind of era of right to your heart and then you realize it's not just Merle. That's all you need to know about Merle but it's also dwight and you realize that this is a family story and American family story which is being handed down generation to generation Dahlie in another part of it causes an heirloom Sung's and experiences and truth the very beginning of the film Merle says it's about things that we believe in and can't see like songs and dreams and so I just go okay no. That's it just up there. That's what it is. It's about things that we believe in but can't see and that's what it's echoing whitten. Who says you know music's the art of the invisible the only art form we don't see and it works on us that much faster because we don't see it. We don't see it coming coming up. We don't see it grabbing. Hold of our our our you know our stomach our hearts or minds and it doesn't we just don't appreciate how powerful of course it is and country. Music is just one delivery vehicle for bringing the three chords truth right to you. When you see Merle Haggard get folks and believe me. He has visitation from almost an angel in the Johnny cash plays the Q. and he gets it that he has to get together. He gets straight two and half years later. He's out. He becomes an important important player in this whole thing and when you see him when he's young. He's almost conway. Birdie tire was that the characters characters name abide by Birdie handsome and then as an yeah yeah and you see a life lived eventually. When you need looks folks when you're young because the world doesn't know you you need wisdom when you're old and you've traveled the trail because you look at Maryland boy. There's a life lived right Ark.. You and I are in total sync on this brother because whenever he come on in the editing room I just yell Zeus like everytime on whether whether he wanted you to understand how important is the maddox brothers and rose or comment on Bob will and his Texas playboys the Western swing or whether he's talking about his own experience experience or whether you just comedies like almost two cheers himself talking about one of the road today I started loving you again. He is Zeus He. There's no there's no thunderbolt of anger. What a retribution his. Just you have as you say the wisdom you see all the miles on his tires. You see what he's been through and the fact that this Hollywood handsome guy is Ralph emery calls them the radio disc jockey from Nashville. Doesn't you need to put that on anymore. It doesn't have to be he doesn't have to he's prettiest Warren Beatty when he comes up and and now he's just himself off and he you know he lied okay hat and he's got the whiskers and he looks and he swallows hard. Sometimes a tear comes in his eye or he's. He says oh he's as serious as a heart attack you know are you talking about the maddox brothers and rose because sometimes you go to a place and you think why did I come here but whenever you saw the maddox brothers brothers and rose you knew you would come to the right place in summoned like the monolith or something in two thousand and there were resonances out in the force and and people went to them we're talking to Ken Burns his sixteen hour a work well like I said how many times can comes out of the box almost for me with civil war and that's my bailiwick. That's what I love to read about and I'm thinking how does this guy. It's like you know. A Buzz Aldrin coming back from the moon and selling yachts is in Tempe where the fuck the ago after you do that first but he answers the call every time and I am completely immersed as you will be in country music. It's currently airing on pbs you you can find the whole series on pbs dot org and the PBS APP. Whether you're an athlete weekend warrior someone who deals with constant joint pain back pain lean muscle soreness or arthritis finding a natural remedy that instantly works might seem nonexistent most.

Merle Haggard Dolly Parton Dwight Yoke Ken Burns maddox Nashville Hollywood president depression Grand Ole opry Willie Nelson Jimmy Rogers Harlem Warren Beatty Maryland Johnny cash Vera Ville Bakersfield Lee
"ken burns" Discussed on Longform Podcast

Longform Podcast

06:02 min | 1 year ago

"ken burns" Discussed on Longform Podcast

"And so two with country we stop for all intents and purposes in the mid to late nineties with the height of Garth Brooks popularity in the death of go monroe the father of Bluegrass then in the last chapter follow the last area productive very creative use of Johnny cash who marries into the Carter family who begin our film mm-hmm so any dies in two thousand and three but we're not gonNA fight the dixie chicks toby Keith or decide who's better Kenny Chesney or Blake Shelton or whether Taylor swift we have really is country our country. I mean this stuff has been going on in the previous eight. Episodes and history doesn't repeat itself but it rhymes. There's rhymes names of all the contemporary stuff in all the episodes I mean the number one example is that everybody wants us to comment on little nauseous and Old Town road and every episode details the African American contribution to country music so it's unknown country music doesn't pedal out of time advertising it but it's true and it's is there and is in every episode of hours so for US Little Nasdaq's black gay rapper having the number one country song of all time is for us and mic drop. We've I've been telling you this since episode one the Banjos from Africa when you're asking people to remember events when they were in their eighty now we're kind of interview techniques. Do you feel like really like unlocked the greatest memories and the things things that were the hardest to extract from people. You know when you're doing something like country music. It's less critical because the emotional stuff the stuff if that hurts them are often the way in which a song reminded them of their own struggles or it's the sadness at the death of somebody. They admired tired when your subject is war. It's a lot more difficult because human beings aren't supposed to see what people see in war is not fund to have your best friend brains splattered all over your jacket. It is completely understandable if you come back and you for Safety Lakhpat Pat away into the tightest compartment and you don't want to open it up and we feel so grateful to those who are willing to open it up. We also know that the people who who are unable to hide it away ab struggle is whoa was called. Shell shock and World War One and combat dig in World War Two and the soldier's heart in the civil war and divine madness back during the Greeks same thing people when postal and killed each other in the marketplace or themselves or their wives or drank rank themselves to death and what we now call. PTSD you know the best review of ever had my life was we heard about a soldier who had been Vietnam Vet who'd been in and out of va hospitals for all fifty years since the war and had watched last winter the Vietnam War series five five times. That's eighteen hours time five as told somebody to tell me that he said. I think I'm okay. Now I mean I don't know of a better view. It could have and I think I'm okay now makes me wanNA cry Right now. As it just means that somehow the way we presented it gave him the kind of safe harbor. My father felt out of a life that had dealt a pretty rough hand and had illness and death in it his own psychological issues and if movie in this case odd men out by Sir Carol Reed starring James Mason about the Irish troubles could give him the opportunity to cry. It's is there anything you still want to do that. You feel like you haven't been able to is there a story. That's frustrated you that you think all circle back on my last swing or well. I've been very lucky. I haven't had to abandon a project but I've been itching for three decades to do something on Martin. Luther King were actually now in the process of collecting dozens and dozens of interviews people who knew him so that when we are able to make that film that we haven't lost Harry Belafonte is in the Andrew Young's and the John Lewis and and to some extent more importantly the woman who drove king in Montgomery or the man who was a teenage kind of gopher an intern and during the Albany Movement in Georgia in the early nineteen sixties late fifty s but I'm sixty six years old. I'm a GRANDPA many times over. I have a kind of greater urgency. I know that if I were given a thousand dozen years which I will not begin I would never run out of topics in American history and so that greed hires talking about. Is there just WANNA I do more. It's hard to say no. I just I just want to say yes to every idea that comes in that isn't an idea and head but something to hit you in the harder the gut and the way country music didn't and you got to do it and here. I am eight and a half years later going well. What was that is going to get the number of that truck. Thank you you so much for the interview thank you that was a long foreign podcast thanks to Ken Burns and everyone from his team that help make that possible thanks to my co host Max Linski and Evan ratliff. Thank you to our editor. John Pifer thank you to our new intern intern Marina CLEMENTI. Thank you to the amazing people at mail chimp and hit raiders to how the show possible also sponsors like vistaprint just a print. They're all dear to our heart and we thank them. He liked to get in touch podcast at long form dot org. We loved the email. We love to hear from you. Thank you for listening and we'll see you next week..

intern Garth Brooks Africa toby Keith Kenny Chesney US Little vistaprint Old Town Sir Carol Reed Blake Shelton Johnny Carter Luther King Ken Burns va
'Downton Abbey,' 'Breaking Bad,' and Why TV Is Still Jealous of Movies

The Big Picture

10:18 min | 1 year ago

'Downton Abbey,' 'Breaking Bad,' and Why TV Is Still Jealous of Movies

"Chris. You're here along with Amanda because you know a lot about television and Amanda and I are for a little bit out on television sort of as a general rule. I'm post. TV POST TV separate succession. Now there are some television shows that I love. I started to watch when this weekend that I think is incredibly well made which is called unbelievable but I was just home with my mom for a little while and she while she's a stranger to cable news but she adorable still gets a lot of her news from the newspaper so two days later she'll be like. Did you hear about Joe. Biden and I'll like what what do you mean. Did something new happens you know. Did you hear about this phone. Call and that's just what you did with unbelievable where you were like. I'm breaking to you guys that there's this show well no now. I admit I am one one week late and you've already covered the show on the WOK yeah. We've already covered the sh the show on the site. I just didn't have the time to get to you. I hear you I'm seeing all these movies but one thing that is interesting that it's happening right now is is that I even though the just happened and even though TV is having this incredible boom time I feel like TV is still a little jealous of the movies and we know that because Downton Tanabe rather than comeback as an eight part miniseries has decided to become a full length feature film and the people said. Yes they said Yes to the tune of thirty three million dollars a lot of money for an extension of the Downton Abbey University was a show that was popular and a phenomenon sort of when it started. I believe the first episode of the Hollywood respective podcasts was a recap of the Dow naby premier guess which is just amazing what times past its Niche Butler's Butler's and and and you know that's a show that I liked and I really did you recap Amanda you recap what an amazing time capsule of our life on the Internet in creating culture and now it's a fulling feature feature film which is something that I think twenty years ago it had happened you would have said Downton Abbey really grew up and stepped up to the big leagues in this case. I wonder how you guys feel about what what it means to extend what was once a broadcast. TV Show into movie platform and also like why why this movie work. Why did it work so well. I have a couple of sites and the answer answer of why to turn it into a feature film is money which worked out because it made thirty three million dollars we had a great piece on the ringer last week by writer named Kate Loyd who's based in London and it was he's about the downtown Abbey Economy essentially in how the show changed both tourism in the UK and like she went to a lot of fancy locations and like talk to British these people but also how it changed the British TV industry and down abby the show. Was this wakeup call I think for people in the UK okay that people would from other parts of the world would watch when these costume dramas it was kind of a revival of the costume drama and also had a finance the shows so that they could me distributed around the world and so the piece argues that you know everything from peaky blinders to howards end to all of the things that we now consume and treat as part of the television firmament at least the latest generation of them are a result of Downton Abbey success right that show relaunch yeah Adia so in that way. It's not that surprising to me that it did while because it was like a legitimate phenomenon and we've lived with it for a long time in maybe season six. I wasn't as great as season one but it made a lot of money in a lot of people liked watching it. It's short relief to because the two other big releases over the weekend and that it beat out were ad Astra which was covered at length on this podcast last week and as a movie that I would recommend people see and Rambo last blood. Did you catch up with that Chris. I didn't see I saw ad Astra instead of Rambo because this was not playing anywhere near me. Oh that's a shame why was that I woke neighborhood for you. so neither of those films which are very male centric stallone doesn't play well in. Philly yeah that's a good point you'd think he'd be in every theatre getting but I guess partially one of the the reasons why down succeeded so well is because a lot of women saw this movie and it was the primary opportunity for women at checkout films one week after hustlers dominated the box office and sensing a trend here if you like this happens four five times a year when people are like there are movies for women as well yeah. I think that's true also float yes women see movies. Rah Rah route whatever old people really see movies and the theatres is there is nothing better to do with your time if you got a mom or Gramma Ma than to take them and see the Downton Abbey. That is just wholesome entertainment for everyone so I think that that is as important. The age is as important as the gender breakdown on this one. Let's let's just very quickly. Even though Chris has not seen the downton movie talk about what's good about the downs and movie you and I attempted to recap the film for Chris via slack last week. You feel like we did a good job. Ah Yeah I think so recognized all the names. All the actions made sense I just did they didn't really come together in a sort of visual sentence for me so that is actually a notable spoke to Michael Angler about this. It is a little bit of Downton on steroids. You know the theme music is amplified in such a way that maybe they had three hundred more brass instruments. Mintz played playing the theme song. There's a lot of drone shots of Downton Abbey. It is it is a a muscular rise version of this upstairs downstairs costume drama the film itself did strike me though I think you may have originally said this to me as just one long episode of Downton Abbey to me it was like a Christmas special sel which they do in the UK and I think it was the season two Christmas special of Downton Abbey which is when Matthew and Mary finally get together and like kissing the snow outside outside of the side of the House I would say it's on par with the Christmas special except for like to party set-pieces instead of one as you said and fancier dresses addresses and I guess there's like a first episode climax halfway through the movie and then a second episode kind of bringing everyone home. The thing is downstairs to get into some hijinks and then there's ramifications upstairs. It's crazy what happens on almost like it's upstairs downstairs I thought it was an enjoyable movie and I'm not surprised that it was successful. I'm surprised it was successful. It was also the biggest movie in the history of focus features which just fascinating I have spoken to some people who worked worked on this movie and they have when they acquired the rights to release this movie. They said we have our IP. We have our version of superhero movie and focus features. That's what I was. GonNa say really leans into that older audience that you're talking about the identify women as their audience much more clearly and this is a part of the same strategy so I wouldn't say necessarily the Ad Astra had this problem but I do think that it is near impossible to sell anything anymore without some pre existing kind of awareness of what you're getting when you walk into it just because there's so many options for people that if you just sorta like here's a movie about butlers and rich people story. Michelle dockery people are going to be like I don't know but if it's something that they have this decade long relationship leashes ship with if they have the kind of extra screen relationship that they have they cared about and if there is like I was I was watching a lot of linear television this week because I was with my mom. We were watching the Ken Burns documentary. There was down Abbey stuff sandwich. Every episode of the Ken Burns Documentary Music talking to the country music to let you know it's coming out. Here's the history of the show. Here's a recap of everything that happened. Here's the making of the show like they actually did their push. It just just happened on public television. We didn't see it as much necessarily as like Robert Downey junior driving around in an Audi with a Samsung phone pushing vendors do you think that this is now now a sort of MCI -ation of Downton or is this just a one off thing that they struck gold on this one movie or is there going to be another one have been teasing the sequel for weeks. Now that's yeah yeah they've been talking about how the possibilities open and I think you know which is code for. Yes it will happen and they certainly leave the door open in the movie. Everyone is in in a happy place but more hijinks cannon sue and I'm sure well a Dan. I'm curious how far you can probably only take down into world war. Two 'cause post World War. Two I think all of those states just for their museums museums the economy economy of the upper class in the UK just breaks down and it's just not how upstairs downstairs doesn't really apply as much anymore the film kind of glances at the end to the how much longer can this go on which I thought was an interesting potential way to seal office equal in the end zone dunkirk what we'll talk about this more. Maggie Smith is in this movie Maggie Smith Chris do modify spoil Israel okay. I guess if you are really really strict about spoilers. Turn it off now. Even but Maggie Smith gives a speech that's kind of like a farewell speech but notably nothing actually conclusively happens to whether Maggie Smith math will be in future episodes of down nappy. TV show or something happens to her but then they're like. We'll see what happens yeah she could've done urge becomes iron man. It's incredible credibly. She defeats the end of the movie. It's wild. It's nineteen twenty seven in this movie that's right. They've got like twenty more years. Yeah okay. What's interesting to me about. This is is the movies in theaters. It's an extension of a television show there have been there's been the super sizing of TV shows into movie form a lot over the last year. This isn't the first first time it's happened. In the ninety. s we saw the kind of like met a rift commentary on things by having. Beverly hillbillies movies and Brady Bunch movies now what we have is just a more clear extension of the stories that originally told there was a dead movie earlier. This year was a between two ferns movie also released over the weekend which is not quite the same serialized television but is in the same tradition in a way away and then in October. We have a breaking bad movie called El Camino Dave Dina do this for a long time. They've been dying to get this kind of multiplatform storytelling going because of the amount of money there is if you can actually do what they wanted to do with dark tower where you can tell something that has has a feature presentation that maybe is the sort of the danger of the story but like you have other storylines going on TV and that you could actually create a like twelve month a year sport out of your story. That's why they want you know and now there are different things now.

Downton Abbey Downton Abbey University UK Downton Tanabe Amanda Maggie Smith Chris Downton Ken Burns Biden JOE Abbey Economy Rambo Abbey Ad Astra Michelle Dockery Stallone Philly Gramma Ma
Ken Burns explores the true roots of country music in new documentary

5 Things

00:54 sec | 1 year ago

Ken Burns explores the true roots of country music in new documentary

"Country. Music comes from right in here this heart so that we all have you can dance to it. You could make after the eagles played at a funeral is has something in it for everybody. Country Music is about human emotions. Renault documentary filmmaker Ken Burns latest project is here country music known for his Docs on Baseball Jazz and the Vietnam War Burns's now tackling the history of country music music the more than sixteen hour series will air on PBS beginning on Sunday and will serve as an oral history of the music genre the DOC is already sparking conversations about the state have country music and a new project from the USA Today Network Country Mile Examines Country Music history its current landscape and where it's going he can check it out at USA. Today Dot Dot Com and you can tune in to the country music documentary at eight PM eastern Sunday night on

Country Music Eagles USA Usa. Sixteen Hour
"ken burns" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

Maltin On Movies

12:20 min | 1 year ago

"ken burns" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

"I can't stop loving you and the number. One hit of the summer of nineteen sixty two was ray charles singing at vince gill said head to us at that point in the film. He said he did more for country music than we did for him and he reminded us of how soulful our film is and if you take just want to back up and focus a little bit <hes> for second country music very briefly is that if you took all the people that might appear on mount rushmore of the early <hes> country music greats tapie carter of the carter family african american mentor lesley riddle. They traveled appalachia and a._p. Could remember the lyrics and lesley riddle could remember the memory and they bring him back to sarah may bail and they became the carter family. Jimmy rogers the saturday night to their sunday. Morning was influenced by african african-american. <hes> <hes> teachers all the way through bill monroe had <hes> arnold scholz had an african american mentor hank williams had rufus t he taught pain and gus cannon <hes> was the tutor of johnny cash so if you were just taking the first few decades of country music since the late twenties when jimmie rodgers and the carter family and were recorded. Everybody had an african american mentor so when we say this is a lily white music. It's not it's informed. Entirely just as jazz has is just as the blues is obviously rhythm loses as rock is infused with the american experience of music which is a friction a rub. Has we call our. I episode between black and white in the american south. You know the punchline is the fiddle comes from europe and the british isles the banjo comes from africa and is brought by slaves so the two central elements of the early country bands are fill in the banjo the rub the combination of cultures and when you say american music. You're not talking about homogeneous. <hes> you know rumanian folk dances. You're talking about a mix a mongrel of all these different things and it's always been that way and then country music set off just <hes> numerously tried to gobble up everything else and what you what you grapple with and what some of your interview subjects grappled with throughout the eight part series is what is country music and what isn't music and this is a never ending debate <hes> because people insist on label s right <hes> for business purposes yep just for just for report oriel purpose and i said before a uh-huh commerce inconvenience can really unintended lee segregate things and say well this isn't this isn't but it's not it's all with artists as a you know there's a brenda lee says well i i was rockabilly and then i was country and then i was folk and then i was rock and i just thought i was singing a song that i like to sing and it reminded me of something we heard louis louis armstrong had said when we were working on our jazz series at the end of the nineties he said there ain't but two kinds of music in this world good and bad music and good music you tap your foot to so if you like little nasdaq's then it's good right period full stop and by the way starting starting from the beginning at those three minute country songs are arias. Let their operatic thing. Opera is about a simple and basic of staff in what is you know. Harlan howard called country music three chords and the truth. It's not doesn't have the sophistication and the elegance of classical music and some forms jazz but the truth part is dealing with elemental human emotions the joy of birth the sorrow at death a broken heart losing love falling in love of anger jealousy being lonely seeking redemption from your your maker all of these things and what happens because we can't deal with the two four letter words. It's mostly about love and loss. Is we disguise it with you know part of what is an important sub-genre country music but we say oh no it's about good old boys boys and pickup trucks and hound dogs and six beer because it's really hard sometimes to sit in front of you know the lyric of hank. Williams called the hillbilly leash shakespeare. You hear that lonesome whip a- will he sounds too blue to fly. The midnight. Train is wine and low. I'm so lonesome i could cry the silence of a falling star lights up the purple sky and as i wonder where you are i'm so lonesome i could cry. I grew up listening to that song. Everybody heard that song of certain as an and but i never really absorb those lyrics and recognize them for what they are which is poetry poetry and beautiful haunting haunting poetry and that's part of what makes covers so fascinating right and that's why it's it's exciting. When i was growing up there was a whole series of punk goes blank punk goes pop punk goes rock punk goes acoustic and it was really interesting because hearing hearing a punk band cover hearing a punk band do kelly clarkson cover. It's like sometimes all you have to do is change it just that much and people suddenly listen to see an in a different light. The fact that johnny cash nine inch nails song hurt hurt that was one of his one of those beautiful things you've had breakings are breaking that song when he sings it you just and if i said he did. That's trent redner. That's nine inch nails. Sorry that's what yeah that's the guy who won again. When i was a kid. He was one of the ultimate yeah no no. I don't remember i'm sure sure i must have been exposed to this at some moment in my life but i did not remember do not remember seeing that photo from obviously television broadcast rest of johnny cash and louis armstrong playing together so in our first episode i episode <hes> jimmy rogers. The first grade super perserve country music has a song called blue yodel number nine standing on the corner no booze kind of blues song and he plays it with louis armstrong who's just been coming yeah and then when johnny cash has his late sixties early seventies national television show. He's bringing everybody on. He's bringing odeta. He's bringing james taylor. He's doing gospel song to the terror of the network in every show and he brings on louis armstrong and they do blue yodel number nine in our film and you just go the circle. Michael is unbroken. Yeah the circle is broken and what i think is there's a moment when charlie parker the founder of bebop this elaborate complicated thing not not not too dissimilar to what bill monroe did string music and making a whole new sub-genre call biba iming called cobb bluegrass. You got this bebop pioneer. He's on fifty second second street in the late forties and between sets he's feeding the jukebox we learned from nat hand off the great jazz critic in our jesse's and all the cats are turnaround. Hey why are you playing thing country songs. You know hank williams. I'm so lonesome i could try and birds listen to the stories and that's that that is in the end. The stories are how we edit human experience and project beyond ourselves and even beyond our lives in the case of people who have created the art of the invisible music or even anything else <hes> in the realm and we all seek the kind of feeling feeling of temporary immortality by the things that we've done extending beyond the borders of our our lives. That's a very satisfying very humid. I mean none of us are getting out of this alive and it's it could be reasonably presume that we could all be in a fetal position sucking her thumb at at that thing but we don't we raise children. We tend gardens. We make films we right. I'm so lonesome. I could cry and somehow charley. Pride says the opening of f._m. This country song you know that make you cry but it might make you feel you know good for doing it. That's what i believe in and i sort of think our eighth episode is free psychiatry tree. If you want a real cleanse get a box of kleenex put on episode eight and then just don't tell me that if the beginning of dwight and <hes> <hes> buck owens singing the streets of bakersfield into whitten talking about what it all means to come together and all these things into where have you been a story that written by john invesment sung by his wife kathy matteo into a vince gill go rest high on that mountain into the last as of johnny cash and i still miss someone. The second verse is so simple. I go out on a party to have a little fun but i find a darkened corner because i still miss someone one. I mean this is a haiku. This is like a spare as it could possibly be and i mean i. I'm a basket case. I i've seen this one hundred times. You know we as roseanne to sing it. At a concert film we did of kind of land yeah or d'oeuvres to the series where showed little clips. I was the host at the reimann and we had fourteen fifteen of the stars in the film singing kind of the history of country music various artists and roseanne saying i still miss someone and a where sobbing seven incredible for you to be at ryan do that well. You know it was great is at p._b._s. Was there with nine. Cameras are series is broadcast begins to be broadcast august episode. One is sunday september fifteenth but the previous sunday the eighth. They're running that concert and i everybody i've seen just bumped into around the country entry. Who was there we we did on march. Twenty seven said douse the best concert i've ever been to and when we're backstage while it was happening. All the artists go. We never do this. Why don't we do this. Why don't we have these reunions all the time. Why aren't we sitting in collecting the threads of our history and singing. I'm never had more fun than i had done and boy. He didn't do very well in the rehearsal but what he just knocked down apartment just now in the little red light came on and just it was this loving it was like thanksgiving in the kitchen backstage of the raymond was like being in the kitchen at thanksgiving p._s. Ah which leads to the word family yeah and it's mentioned many times in the film of many people and <hes> sometimes it's used a glibly loosely by people to describe a group of folks who get together create something <hes> but sometimes it's more like gypsy families pack for tents getting caravans and they move on but this is an enduring family is indeed with <hes> <hes> with many many threads and <hes> it's a metaphor but <hes> there there really is a family feeling doing yeah and and a and a through line component that they provide and my wife and i were watching we watched that last last episode just last night and <hes> we're clutching our hearts as we're watching it and and i can't i don't think there is another brand or john of music that engenders that specific feeling or shares it goes out of its way to share it directly rex lee with its fan. That's exactly right so there's little families like the carter. Cash family in the williams family and we've got hank as a subject. He's been dead since he was twenty nine. On january first fifty-three we've got a son aint junior and his daughter granddaughter <hes> holly and we've got lots of caches and carter's hanging around the film and then there's the family of the country music musicians who like gypsies as you say travel you know they may be at the operate saturday night not paid so well and then they travel around onto better paying gigs and time to get back to the next saturday night but then the extended family and this is the whole point of my work are the fans of the country music and there's no communication communication <hes> except among equals in the world. If i put you above me are puts you below me. I've ended the possibility of their being a connection and the great thing about country music stars and their fans as they understand that in fact our last episode is called. Don't get above your raisin which means old southern say oh don't get too big for your britches. Don't forget where you came from and.

hank williams johnny cash louis louis armstrong carter family tapie carter bill monroe jimmy rogers lesley riddle vince gill ray charles mount rushmore arnold scholz jimmie rodgers Harlan howard brenda lee kelly clarkson europe roseanne
"ken burns" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

Maltin On Movies

12:53 min | 1 year ago

"ken burns" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

"Party party reached out to a foreign power during the time of the national election to affect that election you would say i just made this ten part eighteen hours series on what had happened the last <hes> year and i said but all of those things were true when i began work on the vietnam project at the end of twenty wendy oh six and they were still true when we finished editorially locked the picture in december of twenty fifteen one month before the iowa caucus. It's amazing is truly amazing and i could do that leonard jesse with every film that i've made just say let me let me disguise it and and present it to you as a set of of this moment things and then tell you what the film is any film now so we all know your wonderful storyteller and a masterful filming and but you're you're also a good businessman <hes> and <hes> that's not a pejorative stale. Thank you it. It's a it's a statement of fact act because just before we turned on our recording equipment here you're saying you're working on seven films rise now. How do you work on seven films well. That's because as you have a game plan shorts out of sorts of the game ten year plan yeah yeah and <hes> because that's the only way you could possibly do all the work that is required as you say seamlessly record. I mean effortlessly in the end result to the viewer lot of effort goes in none of it shows and that's the point of any work of art <hes> but how did you acquire the sense that this was the way to go. Well well first of all. Let's put an asterisk next to businessmen because i've spent my entire professional life in public television. I've never saw investors your lousy business <music> i exactly underwriters right and so that's been a difficult task because if i would just shifted over to premium cable or now a streaming service i'd have an unlimited emited supply of money but there'd be a suit somewhere or turtleneck somewhere that would be deciding everything and that doesn't happen in public broadcasting and that's a really good thing and i'm able to do the work and in fact each film is the directors cut and if you don't like another way of putting this if you don't like a particular film. It's all my default so what i've done is i've lived in rural new hampshire since i moved up there with an uncut brooklyn bridge and stayed there because the amount the labor intensive nature of what we do and the expense of that of that means that we want to give bang for the buck. We don't need a big overhead. That new york would where l. a. would necessitate. We just want to focus on the work. We're doing we've created a wonderful community of people and i have four different producing groups so for examine dayton dayton duncan and julie dunphy. We've just spent eight years on country music but they're eight years on it. Solid i've been moving to lynn novick and sarah bought sign on the vietnam more i've been moving to sarah burns and david mcmahon for jackie robinson and before that the central park five and before a country music it was the dust bowl and before the vietnam it was prohibition so all of that and and another <hes> the roosevelt's was a producing team led by my principal editor <hes> paul barnes and we had done other things things before that on jack johnson elizabeth cady stanton so if you've got them all going. I don't if if if a producer is uncomfortable with the interview process i'll do all of them. If have a producer is good at it and wants to do it. I'll let them do you know. Ninety percent of them are thirty percent. I did thirty percent of country music and the seventy percent dayton and juliana dan. I'm perfectly happy but i don't miss screening and i don't miss an editing session and i make the final decisions about that and then i'm part of his evangelical road trip promoting the film so their mind and their economies to scale to different things so a lot of it is raising money. These are all zero sum games. There's no we're not permitted by. The government sources the government money to work in <hes> contingencies <hes> or profit margin. I've got paid a salary as an executive producer slash director actor and if the money runs out its comes outta my thing unless i'm able to raise more money and we get it from a corporate underwriter bank of america we get it from large foundations sion's like the pew charitable trust and the arthur vining davis foundations <hes> we get it from government. Granting agencies like the corporation for public broadcasting the national endowment for the arts. It's and we started an organization. Organization was started called the better angels society named after lincoln's first inaugural address aware we find individuals of wealth and small off private family foundation and those are the four legs of the stool. I spent a lot of time out there collecting that money and reinventing the wheel each time but were then allowed. What do you know if somebody's wide you h._b._o. They give you thirty million dollars in a second to vietnam and i said yeah but they wouldn't give me ten years to do it and that's what we needed to do it right or they. They wouldn't give me eight years on country music. They say okay. Here's your money. We get it with the rights and all the stuff and that's why it's so expensive and you got seven beatles songs in vietnam and seven bob dylan. We get got it. We got it but we need it in two and a half years and i i can't tie my shoe half years. I'm gonna go back because you said a name that is important sarah yeah <hes>. Do you remember what year you to met well. I know that you're thirty three years old and i remember the we we just put a short version of this <hes>. Our family knows cannon his family because we all attend the telluride film festival every year every year. I'll the labor day weekend in the glorious rocky mountains and that's how we met and that's how we continue can you to have an annual reunion. Yes and what i can date specifically is that you jesse your it is and your daughter daughter lily and <hes> candice bergen and louis miles daughter chloe right all were ten years old right when you sold lemonade <hes> behalf of the festival not for your own a prophet so for their all ten year olds and <hes> lilley was born in eighty six. I was just so so oh that would have been <hes> you know either. The eighty-seven probably i mean ninety seven <hes> that we're doing that. We i came in eighty five for the first time with huey long long. I came five years later in nineteen ninety and i have never not come this will be my thirty fifth straight year and i always see them walton's there and <hes> it's always as you you say it feels like a a huge family. Reunion people who love film full stop period wherever it comes from doesn't have to be hollywood it can be from iran or nigeria goria or china or wherever it is. We're interested in in good filmmaking. It can be from the past silent film animated film. It can be a documentary <hes> a dramatic film. It doesn't matter and and it is the best festival in the world because it's curated and you don't know what they're serving. As i going to a restaurant you just no the cook is good and you'll eat whatever they'll they'll bring you and so unlike any other festival on earth is this it's hard to get to. It's a supreme act of faith you arrive arrive and when the festival starts friday morning it's maybe the night before you have an inkling of what they're gonna show and there's something incredibly liberating about the of the spirit sure it <hes> of going into one of the most beautiful spots in all of america and the tension of saying you look up at the mountains over going into a dark room to do the great sacred the act of cinema which is a communion in the dark with strangers and and drink up art and that's where we found our love for each other is because we realize as we belong to that same family that just loves that indeed we do but jesse's now talking about through that continuity of years. This is is what's. I don't know that i've ever really talked film with you. In my lifetime i know could we talk family and we thought how are your girls and how are you doing and all all of that and so this is. It's actually kind of funny. I don't think i've ever really spoken to you in any kind of depth for sure about films normally we're all just hugging and enjoying each other's company so one of my four daughters my mazing just hang on a second i will tell you growing up with his girls was one of the most depressing being part of me because they never went through awkward. Stages were always beautiful so smart and just always very driven very driven event. They're g- they're great in my my oldest one's great els have turned out well and made me. Just you know a joyous grandma but one of the interesting thing is that my oldest sarah <hes> graduated from yale and i thought she was going to go to law school and instead she wanted to write a book about the subject of her senior thesis which had been focused focused on the five boys than boys black and hispanic who are falsely accused in the central park jogger case and no one had ever asked a question of them who are are you who what do you like and so she did and earned the trust of at least three of them and she said i want to write a book and i said that's great sweetie so i was her editor in the first few pages. I'm marking it up with lots of emanations. If lillie who was i think at that time a better writer had had said you know if i had mark page. We'd have a big huge fight but sir looked at it and said thanks dad by page four. She was beginning to find our voice but by page four. I said this is a film and <hes> i turned to my son in law her soon to be husband and said we need to make a film the three of us which we did. Which is you know been responsible support for bill de blasio the current mayor of new york of settling the lawsuit and giving the central park five <hes> some modest <hes> recompense pence for the lost years of the course that the coerced confessions <hes> gave to them the immediately said as soon as anderson what happened we didn't do it and what's is problematic about that is once you're convicted and sentenced when you arrive at parole and if you're still saying you didn't do it which they maintained to the end could if they'd said yeah we did it. We feel bad about it. They would have gotten out a lot but they refuse to and it was only the actual rapist who came forward as he was leaving and said look. I'm the guy who did it. You know and <hes> it's an amazing mazing story and then i think she got the bug and so we've segue into to <hes> jackie robinson who are now working on one mohammed ali and they've done one on their own the executive the producer on a public housing focusing on a particularly gruesome place in atlanta. That's been transformed into a wonderful place and all of the problems holmes attended in the history of that and they're going on to do other things with us together and that's one of the producing lines really nice day to work and we never had a fight. He's so funny. We'd have the dynamic where sometimes it would be the people with filmmaking experience dave in me who'd like gang up on but say no sarah or sometimes it would be the two young some people more often than not going dad you know like that and you go okay or or sometimes it might be daughter in and father who who had something and say no dave and and it just it was this loving and it's true and all that new i have this rule. There's no yelling you know. This is not brain surgery. He i guess i guess in brain brain surgery you cannot yell at somebody gives doesn't give you the right thing but it's not brain surgery and if you treat people that way you might be able to perform open heart surgery that is to say tolstoy said that art is the transfer of emotion from one person to the other and that's what we look for in our film in fact vince gill in our last episode said at the end of of the day all i've ever wanted out of music is to be moved and that he was speaking for me. I thought all i've ever wanted as filmmakers to move somebody and i i moved myself by the story and what's a country song but a three minute story <hes> just like rap. Just like rap will look at little nasdaq's. There's a whole big sur and cry and every reporter wants to interviews about the dynamics and the dialectic and the binary thing of isn't it bad bill barn wooden list him in this. I said it doesn't matter. It's the number one song nobody ever get. Everybody's you know when when when when ray charles you've had a chance in his distinguished career to make an album on his own terms nine hundred sixty two you know what he put out modern sounds in country and western music ed hank williams song. He took don gibson song..

vietnam sarah burns producer leonard jesse new york dayton america jackie robinson iowa editor new hampshire little don gibson arthur vining davis foundation ray charles elizabeth cady stanton dayton duncan vince gill lynn novick bob dylan
"ken burns" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

Maltin On Movies

11:32 min | 1 year ago

"ken burns" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

"Sir. Carol reed read after my mom died <hes> where i'd never seen him cry. That film was what i wanted to do at age twelve because i could see that if it gave my dad the safe if emotional haven to express himself in a way he hadn't when she was sick or when she died at the funeral i wanted to be in that business and that meant because of the tutorial he was giving me that i was going to be john ford howard hawks alfred hitchcock whatever it was and that i would become a feature filmmaker when i went to hampshire college college and people were trying to talk to me about the power of what is and what was in photography i took cinematic interest in how you might animate an old photograph graf and so i brought with me the undrained feature filmmaker that i was seeing that i was abandoning idea that a still photograph was not something to hold it arm's length until you got to some footage and better yet you had somebody explaining but it was <hes> a facsimile of reality so that picture those those those <hes> that was arrested moment of something was real so i realized i was again john ford. I had a master shot that also meant that had a long shot. I had a medium shot eddie close up. I hit a tilt at a pan. I had to reveal an insert detail and so you tell a story i mean if you're tilting along a body lying horizontally and you pass by by some six guns on face and come up to a dead confederate soldier at devil's den in gettysburg. That's a whole story in and of itself or you're looking at a <hes> a picture of a a young young boy <hes> and you're just wondering who this innocent thing as you go down and he's got to six guns stuffed into his waistband. You are telling a great story so my idea was that these still photographs lacking motion actually can be given motion and emotion <hes> with a kinesthetic aesthetic exercise of moving camera around and so that's what i've been doing to try to wake the dead and it's also saying there's an oral dimension to this that is to say are those troops tramping. Are those cannon firing back. Bat cracking is the crowd cheering are the ice cubes in the glass on the bar at the jazz club kling kling around so you're listening at the same time you're looking and imagining a world inside still photograph and if you do that then you're extending ending to your audience what all of movies are about which is the suspension of belief and you make it real. I mean i remember my first film called brooklyn bridge bridge. I had a i had a premiere at the brooklyn museum. I had to come with an open up. The folding chairs run the kodak pageant camera on a av cart in its casing the speaker was built in and had speaker wire down to the tripod. <hes> you know <hes> screen that you heard your father swear for the first time trying to get open and then afterwards they the the woman i thought insult me by saying. Would you like to go up and answer questions. I'm thinking what the nerve of this woman. I worked for five years in the film and she wants me to go up and answer questions. I just made this film so i can okay and then discovered instantaneously. I love it but the second question is little old lady in the audience she says where did you get those motion. Pictures of the building of the brooklyn bridge is it ma'am it was built between eighteen sixty nine and eighteen eighty three before the advent of motion pictures. Maybe you mean the paper clint collection from the library of congress. Thomas edited edison mounted camera on the front of the trains that used to go back and forth real trains not not subways but real trains back and forth between termini in brooklyn and manhattan. She goes no no no. I'm talking about the scouse those boats barges that brought the granite and they were lifted up by the by the men and all of that stuff and i said ma'am those are still photographs and she goes no they weren't in that moment. I went you've won shut up and so i just went to the next question because that's what we wanted to do. We wanted to animate and suspend the the the belief that this was a still photograph. We had the sound of the goals we had the distant wetted down shots of construction workers yelling and screaming. We had hammers hammers in the distance. We had the toy <hes> taught sound of all hoist pulling up hemp rope. You know we had the sound of a of a primitive air compressor that is trying to push the air out of the caissons where they were undermining the river all of that for her meant that she was looking at a motion picture and that's my first film and i went okay this works and your first conquest the first conquest yes and then and the and the first answer to a question <hes> so the film tom i think was broadcast in the spring may twenty four th which is the birthday of the opening of the brooklyn bridge in eighty two which would have been the ninety ninth birthday of the brooklyn bridge in of course the next here was the big hundred year celebration. Everybody thought you're so prescient and i said he started this thing. In seventy five. I looked twelve twelve years old. I go in to try to get a a thousand bucks from somebody and they said this child is trying to sell me the brooklyn bridge. No slam the door and i used to keep to binders. I swear to do binders each of them. You know three three or four inches thick of all the rejections for that one. He just found a folder of rejection letters that he kept yes from the saturday evening post. That's a keepsake well. You're still around and they aren't yeah that is wild. You know it was into what what's what's happened is over the time it's been you know mimicked which is wonderful. Steve jobs called me in in two thousand and two in next month january two thousand three every mac computers computer's going to have this ability to pan and zoom between your photographs. You can add music and i said oh that's cool. I'm not i'm kind of a <hes> a luddite and he said and and we'd like to to use the the working title. I said what's that and he goes. Ken burns effect. I said i don't do commercial endorsements ngos. What so we go back into his office. We talk for a long time and developed a friendship that lasted did for the rest of his life but i just don't feel comfortable <hes> with that but if you were at the end of the day i think with some prompting from him he ended up giving us several hundred thousand dollars or apple did over the next several years several hundred thousand dollars of hardware and software which a couple fell off the truck for our office but all the rest went went to <hes> <hes> nonprofits schools that could use a final cut pro couldn't afford it <hes> other people nonprofits that could use computer equipment the hardware and and i i it's it's given me some plausible deniability and it's really fun when people come up and say you saved my bar mitzvah dr european vacation you know when my mom's uh-huh memorial services happened. I screamed. I'm learning how to do very basic editing for us and my husband and i are sitting there and my best friend was showing me different things and she hits a button this is this is an eye movie. Ken ken burns effect and i do the dog that why what what happened. I'd never seen it before. A lot of people come up to me isn't been since january two thousand three but people come up to me see you're. The guy had no idea about documentaries. One poor little oh kitten kansas city came up to me once and he looked at me and he said he said you did lois and clark and did lewis and clark and the the drop in his face could been more than six years old. He thought he was dealing with the guy who made his favorite. You know remember remember when lewis and clark was on. I was told when i was a kid that an educated person is someone who knows everything about something and something about everything and by that standard you're the most educated guy i've ever met but you also have on top the curiosity yes and beyond that a gift and the gift of storytelling and <hes> do you know where that came from. I mean well. I had a good pedigree talked about. We'll tell about you know. After the fact when we finish a film we can talk about the sociology and the history and all that sort of stuff but the word history is mostly made up of the word story plus high a welcoming and but we're storytellers we just wanted to his master complex and you know something like country entry music or something like the vietnam war or the roosevelt is sort of a complex <hes> russian novel of multigenerational story of primary and secondary and tertiary characters that that you know we labor literally for years in the editing room to sort of make these complicated and seemingly seamless stories so we're very much interested in stories. I don't know leonard. I had an instant where i had a crisis in the early nineties and my late father in law was a a psychologist and i said i seem to be keeping my mother alive and he said what do you mean and i knew he already knew the answer to whatever it was and i said well she died on april twenty eighth and that that ever since i was a boy that date has approached but i've never been present for it and it's receded and i've been aware that i missed it and he goes. I bet you blew out your birthday candles wishing. She come back alive every birthday and i said yeah. How'd you know she goes. He goes into adulthood and i go yeah out. He known them now now. Flushing with embarrassment he says look what you do for a living you wake the dead. He made abraham lincoln jackie robinson. Come alive. Who do you think you're really trying to wake up and then it and then all of a sudden you realize there was this it sounds dime stores psychology but was coming from a reputable shrink. You know there is this <music> underlying sense that the past is not passed <hes> but present is faulkner suggested that we are too hung up on the idea of history repeating itself it never has or that were condemned to repeat what we don't remember doesn't work that way. What's really clear is that ecclesiastical asti the old testament says what has been will be again what has been done will be done again. There's nothing new under the sun which suggests that human nature never changes unfortunately and that human nature stat that human nature filled with greed and generosity and puritanism sometimes within the same person not between groups superimposes itself over the relative chaos of human events and you can perceive patterns and themes and motifs mark twain is supposed to have said history doesn't repeat itself but it rhymes and i haven't done a project ever where i haven't finished it attending. I promise you entirely to the story and the mastery of the story in that moment and then lifted my head up and realize oh my god. It's talking about today too so when the when the vietnam war series came out in the summer or of two thousand seventeen <hes> you know where we'd been you know what had happened in january of seventeen in terms of the inauguration of a new administration. I said what if i told you that i had been working for ten and a half years about mass demonstrations taking place all across the country against the current administration about a white house in disarray obsessed i with leaks about a president certain the presses making up stories about him lying about a symmetrical warfare that confounds the mighty mite of the u._s. Military about huge huge big document drops of stolen classified material into the public sphere that destabilizes the political equation and accusations that a political party.

brooklyn bridge brooklyn bridge bridge john ford brooklyn museum Carol reed eddie gettysburg Ken burns kodak clark congress mark twain alfred hitchcock hampshire college college graf Steve jobs Ken ken president
"ken burns" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

Maltin On Movies

11:04 min | 1 year ago

"ken burns" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

"Hi everybody. I'm leonard maltin. I'm jesse milton. We're doing maltin on movies today. From from the wells fargo theatre at the autry museum of the american west and this is a place has deep meaning to me because i wife and i got to know gene autry and his wife jackie and joanne and monte hale and they're the people who built this museum. We watched it go up and it's a thrill to be here all the more so because our guest today is ken burns ken burns who was just produced a magnificent eight part series for p._b._s. called country music and you're gonna love it. It's all i can say you're going to love it. It's beautiful. It's really beautiful. I always laugh people people you say to them. What kind of music did you like. I like everything except opera in country. It's it's the go-to answer which is ridiculous. It's completely ridiculous. You know i i think what's happened is bad country music unlike most of the other forms has been segregated out of <hes> convenience and commerce into some <hes> you know silo where in fact it is like an atom in a molecule <hes> part of all american music. It's attached to jazz and the blues. It's attached to the rhythm men blues. It's attached to every single form of music and it is in fact one of the parents of rock and roll one of the significant parents one of things we learn doing this is is that <hes> every single one of the beatles their entrance into their interest in music was not <hes> you know working class british song. It was country music. Thank you know <hes> in fact <hes> ringo starr accredited gene autry as his single greatest influence in getting in you know and paul mccartney heartening liked <hes> the ballads of marty robbins and of course jon is going to like <hes> hank williams and and george was interested arrested chet atkins and his django reinhardt. That's jazz players guitar style so what you have is. This thing that is much much bigger than we think we narrow it down and say it's one thing when it's never been one thing it's always been many things and we meet people who came into our editing room of the last few years and instead you know huge fans of country music and left going. I had no idea i thought i knew about it now. I'm learning things people who'd say i really don't know about country music and then they'd say after watching the film you know i didn't realize how much about country music i knew how much of the songs of country music i loved then there are people who didn't like it and i had a friend and dear friend who came in and said canyon. I love everything down but country music shakes his head after a four day screening where we're doing an episode in the morning episode and the afternoon lots of blah blah and all that he was in a puddle sobbing. He's now comes back. He apologizes every time he sees me. Buys buys country music. You tell me now i'm going after the leuven brothers you know a passing reference of a great country duet brother harmonies in the forties and fifties that have been very influential among people in the know but that's awesome country music starts off as at least two different kinds of music and then goes after every other kind so it it is this. I'm never say you don't like it is to almost say i don't you don't make music yeah. Did you one logistical question. Did you know going in or when did you. When did you know that it was gonna take eight to our our segments to try to tell the story. Well you know <hes> first of all. I was a child of rock and roll and are in be done jazz because it wasn't something i knew about. I wanted to explore explore new territory my writer and co producer <hes> dayton dunkin knew a little bit more and kind of had a love hate relationship with with country fell out. Emmylou brought him back in fell out. Somebody else brought him back in julie dunphy. The other producer with me on the director is the is it knew very very little but so all us it was just this is being washed over by this one thing so what we do leonard is is we do things really differently. Which is we don't have a set research period followed led by a set shooting period out of <hes> scripting period out of which you've produced descript written in stone down from mount sinai which informs the shooting in the editing bumped done. We never stop researching and we never stop editing so we're out shooting the interviews without a script. We're not going to someone as many of my colleagues do and say hey. Can you get me to from paragraph to paragraph three on page six of episode seven so what happens is it becomes more organic as much as we're imposing what we're discovering on the material. The material is telling us what it needs. The stories that are fantastic from these interviews are driving how we're looking for still photographs or where we might be going for footage and that is a much more more organic. It's us a timely process. It's not just eight and a half eight episodes in sixteen and a half hours is eight years of work but it's all of our films are like that then require that kind of care and feeding. We also clearly in a country music. Don't add the music at the end but all the films the music is there and recorded as we begin editing because music music which is the art of the invisible has wint marcellus says in this film on country music is also the fastest art form. So why would you wait and do it as an afterthought. I thought everyone knows what it's like to turn down the volume on a on a horror film as as teenagers internet gown walking across the upstairs landing to the bathroom and you're going don't go other turn off the soundtrack and it's no longer as scary as as the situation warrants but if music is baked in as if it has the same significance as the still photographs the talking talking heads the sound effects the the motion pictures then that equal parody permits music to really live and so in all of our films which is unusual for documentary feel say oh where did that music come from the themed to the civil war of you know what what was that about so we do it that way in leading the material talk to us it then tells us we sort of win in thought six episodes in the last big series that date and i had worked on the national parks episodes but we sort of thought going it was seven and then early on we just wants the script is done and we go over two or three drafts just as words on the paper and and and then we do what's called a blind assembly. I'm the scratch generator we go in. We don't put any scratch so scratch. Narrator is the guy you're not gonna use. I'm the temporary guy cheap. I'm i i do it. Yes yes so venue not computer. I'm peter coyote store a ninety eight percent of the way through so you know if we change an to with oh i go reread that sense or that paragraph or that whole block of page and so we're we're listening to be without any pictures and if they're talking has they've all got jump cuts in it and we begin to see it's telling us what the shape of the story is in very early on in the blind assemblies. It was clear that <hes> one of our episodes was really going to be two when it was going to have to borrow from the next episode and split itself in half and we're going to have to figure out how gotta do ending for that. I won a new beginning for the other one and a new ending for the other one and then a new beginning for the one that used to have a good beginning and it's a pretty complicated moving goalposts post but that happens in almost every film so organically to answer your question in a brief nine part answer <hes> organically that we we volvo all of the material dictates and then after the blind assembly you start adding pictures and you begin to see in point of fact how these stories are going and what you have to do i mean filmmaking to the outsiders seems to be an additive process. You'd think that you're building a film. It's really subtractive particularly documentary. I live in new hampshire. We all live in new hampshire dayton eight and julie and i and we make maple syrup there and it takes forty gallons of sap to make one gallon of maple syrup and so the cutting room floor is not filled with stuff stuff that doesn't work. It's wonderful stuff is just great it just as in the movie amadeus walk to many notes. I'm out of breath and you did all the talking. I i am thinking though because you said this to me yesterday specifically about photos house and how you use photos and that it's something you've never seen anything quite like you're known for this. Yes of course in the civil warrior. I <hes> magnum opus <hes> really established what people have come to expect as your style or your approach but you will take a photograph whether its matthew brady photograph or a or a family scrapbook photo and <hes> you i will tell us where to look you start in one spot so that we can take in what you want to see most significantly and then pull out or pan out or move over and show us the the larger picked literally the larger picture and you also do that with with a a lot of the stock footage. I'm thinking about the roosevelt's another great series you did where you'll use a vintage newsreel footage and you'll linger on it. Yes you'll linger longer than most documentarian lynnwood. They're just happy to have a snippet to show you to establish tabesh a place a time a location <hes> you'll take the time to let us really examine that footage so so an has more resonance because of that absolutely all meaning crews and duration the relationships you care most about the the work your proudest of has benefited did from your sustained attention and that cruise imperceptibly layers pearl i mean we we can physiologically as you know by the dynamics of persistence since a vision perceive these twenty four still photographs as as as in motion in motion picture but but the physiological perception does not in any way way extend to meaning meaning comes in duration and so for example the in our film in world war two that very very famous shot of the photographer on the beach at normandy looking back doc and there is an american dropping in at the edge of this surf well that's been on the top the sh- mortgage board of the tables at the national archives we asked them what did that originally come from where the original camera rolls and could we get the negative and could we see it so we found out that this one shot had been in some early newsreel and then that had been it and that's what people used but we found if it was you know a foot and a half long that piece of film we found about five or six feet and in it two more americans drop and that just exponentially compounds the meaning of it and that's what is you know <hes> you know an exaggerated example of what's going on so my dad was a cultural anthropologist but an amateur still photographer all of my teachers at hampshire college in amherst massachusetts were we're social documentary still photographers who kind of dabbled in filmmaking and certainly documentary filmmaking. I decide when i see my dad crying at odd man out by sir..

gene autry leonard maltin new hampshire julie dunphy producer jesse milton leuven autry museum wells fargo theatre monte hale mount sinai peter coyote hampshire college volvo paul mccartney wint marcellus matthew brady roosevelt marty robbins hank williams
Gossip Girl Vet Penn Badgley's New Netflix Show Looks Creepy

Lori and Julia

01:44 min | 3 years ago

Gossip Girl Vet Penn Badgley's New Netflix Show Looks Creepy

"Seeing. Panna badgley from gossip girl around doing some rounds. And he's got a new show called you and lifetime like Sunday night. So yeah, it's an interesting show. It starts off like it's going to be sort of a hallmark channel rom com. You know, sweet little drama. Bookstore clerk and hot girl. Meet cute between the child. Okay. And then you find out that the guy is a creep. He's a soccer and it gets really freaky. Pretty fast. And I don't I watched the first episode. And I thought this is interesting and he's really good. And so she I can't think of her name. But. And I don't know where it's going to go with getting renewed for second season. But he's like a scary like wholesome soccer. So and and it's toltar- hits perspective is he he's talking directly to the audience. So it's very different swing than we're used to seeing on lifetime channel. And I think people who like to be scared by you know, realistic situations. The deals with the tech world, right? Doc once you get into people's computers. And so it's definitely for the modern age and the performances are really good again. I don't know if I wanna watch ten hours of it. But I certainly was hypnotized by the first hour, and I'm gonna watch more than all,

Kevin Spacey DAN Neal Justin Soccer Lebron James AMC Star Tribune Minneapolis Neil Buffy Amsterdam NBC HBO George Clooney Christopher Casson Jane Fonda Ken Burns Chris Couple New Amsterdam Amsterdam Oscar De Niro
Dr Charles Snyder, US and Robert Fuller discussed on The Best of Investing with Edward Brown

The Best of Investing with Edward Brown

02:03 min | 3 years ago

Dr Charles Snyder, US and Robert Fuller discussed on The Best of Investing with Edward Brown

"Of. Snarled streets and stranded riders in Barcelona we got a report from correspondent Rhonda rock stra taxi, drivers in the popular Spanish tourist destination continued their strike protesting ride hailing apps like Uber and camouflage hundreds of hacks Proctor cabs in the middle of the ground via Saturday were some drivers spent. The night in their vehicles war intense the strike started Wednesday for judge decided to suspend the need for additional. Authorization, for ride hailing companies to operate meanwhile Uber. And suspended services after, taxi supporters assaulted several of their drivers Rhonda rockstar reporting the death toll from a strong earthquake that struck Indonesia's popular tourist island of Lombok today has risen to fourteen with one hundred sixty people hurt the quake damaged more than one thousand, houses and was felt in nearby Bali but no damage or casualties were reported their. News and analysis, at townhall dot com I'm Michael Harrington The US now has the highest maternal mortality rate of. Any developed nation Dr Charles Snyder and tells us about efforts to improve. Care after delivery US women are waiting until later life to have children in this may explain the paradox of more complications in pregnancy. Despite obstetric care, the American culture obstetrics gynecology is calling health insurers to support routine maternal ongoing care after birth rather than. Warm isolated visit this is Dr Charles Snyder reporting from Washington. Today of Sunday July the twenty ninth and it's a birthday for, some notable people, including, former Senator, Nancy Kassebaum Baker She's eighty, six, years old Actor Robert fuller. Turns eighty five former. Senator Elizabeth. Dole is eighty two Acura David Warner has seventy seven, candles on, his, birthday cake rock musician Neal doughty of. REO speedwagon seventy-two documentary maker Ken burns sixty five more on these. Stories at townhall dot com As your car Tune.

Dr Charles Snyder United States Robert Fuller Rhonda Rock Rhonda Rockstar Ken Burns Senator Elizabeth David Warner Neal Doughty Barcelona Senator Acura Nancy Kassebaum Baker Michael Harrington Indonesia Dole Bali Washington