19 Burst results for "Ken Barnes"

"ken barnes" Discussed on Parcast Presents

Parcast Presents

05:39 min | 5 months ago

"ken barnes" Discussed on Parcast Presents

"Decide which two fish to fry and which one to cut loose. It all came down to evidence by mid two, thousand, seven, Clark felt a grand jury already had more than enough grounds to indict both Marjorie and Ken both had unwittingly talk themselves into incrimination Marjorie through Kelly's notes and Ken through his own testimony. But while Clark felt, there was plenty of evidence against them. The US Attorney's office was more cautious. They wanted another witness. And so assistant US Attorney Marshall Piece Anini turned his attention to Floyd Stockton who had been released from prison in two thousand five. Piece any felt that the evidence against Floyd wasn't enough to indict him and even if they could floyd's involvement in the case, seemed less extensive than Marjorie and Kens. So out of the three, floyd was the perfect candidate for immunity. Floyd hit already provided details about the events of August twenty eighth two, thousand three but he seemed to be withholding information for fear of being indicted. So in mid two, thousand, seven piece and Nina decided offer floyd a queen for a day proffer this meant that floyd would be given one day to talk with at least partial immunity nothing floyd told them on that particular day could be directly used against him. His confessions could however be used to collect further evidence against him. On March Twenty, seven, th two, thousand, seven, Marshall Piece Anini, and agent Clark arrived the Grand Hyatt Hotel in Seattle where they met with Floyd and his lawyer over the next thirteen hours. Floyd gave them a full account of the events surrounding the bombing. He admitted to giving bill the idea for a bomb highest he told them that he himself had suggested the use of pizza delivery man in admitting his part in making the collar bomb. Floyd had arguably become an accessory to murder, and by the time they left Clark wanted to indict him after all. They hadn't promised full immunity. But they still needed floyd as a witness against Marjorie. If they refuse to protect him, they risked floyd recanting his statements rendering him useless as a witness and without his testimony the case against Marjorie Ken would be severely weakened. The investigators considered their options. And ultimately decided that Marjorie and Ken were more important suspects than floyd. So on June twenty, six, two, thousand, seven, Floyd Stockton testified before the grand jury with full immunity. Two weeks later on July ninth the grand jury finally secured indictments against Marjorie and Ken. They were charged with the same three felonies conspiracy to commit armed robbery aiding and abetting an armed bank robbery in a death and aiding and abetting the use of a destructive device in a crime of violence. Ken Barnes pleaded guilty to two of the three charges in return. The third charge was dropped and on December third two, thousand eight, a judge sentenced him to forty five years in prison for the fifty, five year old Ken it meant he'd probably be spending the rest of his life behind bars. Trial of Marjorie Diehl Armstrong, wouldn come to a close for almost two more years but on November first two, thousand ten, the jury announced their verdict guilty on all three charges Marjorie who passionately maintained her innocence until the bitter end was sentenced to life in prison. Over seven years had passed since Brian Wells death in the case had finally come to a conclusion. Agent Jerry Clark would later state that the crime couldn't be explained by any rationale because the two main conspirators Marjorie and Bill Rothstein were devoid of it. According to Clark Marjorie mental problems in narcissism head blinded her to the pitfalls, the plan and that bill didn't even care if they succeeded or failed. He knew he was dying. To him, it was all a game. He was willing to sacrifice anything even innocent lives. For the sake.

Floyd Stockton Marjorie Ken Marjorie Clark Marjorie Jerry Clark Floyd Marjorie Diehl Armstrong Marshall Piece Anini Ken Barnes Bill Rothstein US Attorney Grand Hyatt Hotel assistant US Attorney Seattle abetting Nina Kelly murder robbery
"ken barnes" Discussed on Parcast Presents

Parcast Presents

06:55 min | 5 months ago

"ken barnes" Discussed on Parcast Presents

"In the early afternoon of all twenty, eighth two, thousand, three, forty, six, year, old Brian Wells left Mama Mia pizzeria to deliver an order to upper peach street in Erie Pennsylvania. But this was no ordinary delivery. It was all part of a larger plan. Brian had instructions to head to a TV tower on street. When he got there, he would be fitted with a fake caller bomb and sent to rob the local PNC bank. When he arrived at the location though Brian was startled to discover that his co conspirators had rigged the caller with an active bomb. Dangling from the middle box at the bottom. The farce had taken a deadly to. Brian tried to run but his co conspirators, Robert Kennedy and Floyd Stockton tackled him to the ground. He struggled against their grip as the two masterminds behind the plot. Marjorie Diehl Armstrong and Bill Rothstein strapped the live bomb around his neck. Bill had made the bomb himself. It was connected to to sunbeam kitchen timers by an open circuit of wires and screws. When the timer reached the twelve o'clock position, the switch would close and the bomb would activate. A Green plastic lever snapped the two semi circular arms of the collar. In place unlocking, it would require the insertion of two keys into two of the four keyholes at the front of the caller. But Brian's cohorts wouldn't tell him how to unlock the bomb until after he had robbed the bank. In an instant. He went from being a willing participant to a hostage, and if he wanted to survive Brian had to do exactly what they said when the struggle was over bill walk to his man and retrieved a gun shaped like a cane, he handed it to Brian. Marjorie told him to use it if the tellers didn't believe he was armed with a real bomb. Then, she pulled a white t shirt out of her purse the Guess Jeans Logo was written across the front. It was an ironic taunt. This case would inevitably require guesswork or everyone involved. Then Marjorie reminded Brian of his defense if the police pulled him over, he was supposed to tell them that someone had forced him to wear the bomb threatening to kill him if he didn't rob the bank on their behalf. Oddly. The crew took their time and getting to the actual robbery. While Brian. Sat undoubtedly sick to his stomach with worry everyone else chow down on the pizza he had brought them. When they were finished, eating the crew tossed the insulated pizza bag into bill's car than Marjorie drove off her jeep taking another conspirator Ken Barnes whither. For some unknown reason they made a pitstop at the local media play. Perhaps they had time to kill or maybe Marjorie just wanted to buy a book which she did after browsing the store for fifteen minutes they were back on the road. Marjorie drove towards the Strip mall where the PNC bank was she parked in an elevated parking lot in front of an Eton Park restaurant directly across from the Strip mall entrance from here she and Ken could see everything they watched through binoculars as Brian passed by in his Geo Metro. Bill trailed close behind his mercury marquee. The two vehicles turned into the Strip. Mall Lot Bryan Park near the bank while bills stopped his car in front of the eye glass world store. And then at two, twenty, seven, pm Brian disappeared into the bank. The timer on the bomb had been started seven minutes before Brian entered the bank. As far as he knew, he had an hour until it detonated, but the screws, the mechanism interfered with timer. Shaving off three minutes. This meant that from the moment Brian Walk through the door, he only had fifty minutes left. Ryan strolled inside and casually made his way past the line of waiting customers to the chief teller. She told him to get in line and wait his turn but Brian knew he didn't have time for that. He handed the teller, his envelope. Right. Away her eyes went wide with recognition. She had worked in banking long enough to know that this was a demand note. Shaking she opened the envelope to find four pages covered in small handwriting. Receptionist, do not cause panic or many people will be killed. Sounding an alarm will interrupt this action and guarantee injuries and death involving authorities. At this point, we'll get the hostage and other people killed. Immediately, without causing alarm, you must contact the bank manager in private. The bomb hostage must accompany you bomb is expertly booby trapped and cannot be disarmed in time unless keys are found by following instructions immediately. The letter went on to demand two hundred and fifty thousand dollars. In. Unreasonably high amount of cash for any bank to have in its vault. It also explained how after he'd successfully obtained the Money Ryan could locate the keys to save his life. The final line was clear and certain. Act Now think later or you will die. It was signed the troubleshooters. The tellers is grew wide with disbelief. It was a long list of demands and she knew she wouldn't be able to meet them helplessly. She looked at Brian knowing he was also a victim of the situation. Brian Stared back at her expectantly. Then, he asked to speak to her manager. While the women's shuffled to her manager's office, Brian grabbed a dumb lollipop from the bowl and popped it in his mouth. When the teller returned, she told him her manager was out to lunch. He wouldn't be back for another half hour. Bryan was calm. But adamant, he told her he didn't have that kind of time. He needed the two hundred and fifty thousand dollars. To prove he was serious. He lifted his shirt. Revealing the bomb..

Brian Marjorie Diehl Armstrong Bill Rothstein Brian Wells Brian Walk PNC Ryan Erie Pennsylvania Strip mall Strip Bryan Park robbery Mama Mia Bryan Robert Kennedy Eton Park Ken Barnes Geo Metro
"ken barnes" Discussed on WORT 89.9 FM

WORT 89.9 FM

04:23 min | 5 months ago

"ken barnes" Discussed on WORT 89.9 FM

"It's a big white males. But are you saying that I don't stop? Just like thinking about you know that? With me. It's never bananas Go end of the red clay. Well. Holdout that Dr asked old time 10% standing at a mailbox on a woman way design. I'm going to miss my family. And I know bettors, then nails It's gonna be a long time before I travel down spread over Louisiana rendered. With Ken Barnes and country with my taken to city make money. Man, My tires ain't even smug off. Man made zigzag. And one lane raises rounds across three. That's when Song was 30 miles away, and I brought you and mama in and clean out. Go easy and rendered down with 10 bond with I'm going to take to the city so things My eyes ain't even slung off all the clothes. This is the mud Acres bluegrass special. You're listening to it on W. A. R T 89.9 FM listeners sponsored back porch. Community radio in Madison. Wisconsin..

"ken barnes" Discussed on The Horse Racing Radio Network Podcast

The Horse Racing Radio Network Podcast

12:45 min | 1 year ago

"ken barnes" Discussed on The Horse Racing Radio Network Podcast

"GONNA get there to stat. Salsa wild maximize has won the mile. What a way to come back to the equipment forum after that commercial break the Chadwell stallions. Yet they're pretty good. If you can't tell GonNa talk to Ken Barnes from Shad well here in just a moment. Bradford remind you that if you miss any portion of the show just had back to our website horse racing radio dot net and you can listen at your leisure. You can also do that. The apple podcasts. This dallying spotlight segment presented by red brand fence. So you just heard a few highlights. Those are just scratching the surface when you talk about the stallions at shed while and nobody knows them better than Kent Barnes and he is seen an awful lot of good stallions come through shadwell. He's getting ready to begin. How about this? His thirtieth breeding season as the stallion manager at Chadwell he started in Nineteen ninety-one and quite an honor to have him in studio with me here this morning. Kent Good Morning. My friend more than Mike. It is chilly out here today. I just assumed when you called me this week to come in on the program that we were flying down to Barbados disappointed. We're still stuck in Lexington. Yeah I'm hoping to be going to Barbados and a couple of weeks. I'm trying to put the pieces together on that. Yeah I guess I just had my timing awfully happy to be here yeah. It was about nineteen degrees. At least. That's what my car said when I was driving in. But I know there's people in Minnesota and North Dakota and places like that they're dealing with much colder now. How you think back thirty years of being the stallion manager here at Chadwell and being part of that team when you walked in there thirty years ago what do you remember about the first day. It was basically my first first day in Kentucky You know came down from Colorado born and raised out there and always got the blood horse and seeing the pictures but I was just overwhelmed. Just coming through those gates shad well seeing the beautiful landscaping The the architecture the Barnes and then very first horse that I got my hands on day one danger who was champion. Sprinter in Europe horse of the year over there just talked about horse crushes. He's probably my number one horse cross. He was just a outstanding horse to work with for his entire career. He just never did anything wrong. Easy to handle excellent fertility did job in the breeding shed and so he was just the first of many had a lot of Nice ones through the years over there and It's been a lot of fun. I've really enjoyed it. Did you ever see yourself? Being in. This position is still doing this job. Thirty years later at the same far never really thought about it. Yeah you know I. I was essentially a kid. I guess not not too far out of college I came down and it was kind of a dream come true and learned a lot over the years and never never really thought about how long. I would be there and it's gone by fast because it's been a fun job. You know anytime you can wake up and look at you not the horses that I do and the farm that I live on done work at all. Yes it's fun to go in in the morning and see those horses and watch their offspring watch the races in the afternoon and see the ones that you've read over the years. What is what's the best part about being part of that? Chadwell team. It's just a great team. The boss the owner is just outstanding. Gentlemen shake calm down has been the best employer I think anybody could ask for. He really takes care of his employees. Got The best benefits. I can imagine of any corporation in the world you know. And he's he's loyal to us were loyal to him and Yeah I've been there twenty nine years working on my thirtieth year and I'm still one of the young guy one of the new on the farm so that's always nice. Yeah yeah talking to Barnsley Stallion manager at Chadwell. We're going to talk about the current roster here for two thousand twenty in a minute but you mentioned days. Your are there other? I'm sure there are. Are there other horses that have stood out to you over the years? That for whatever reason you're never gonNA forget yeah one of them in particular. Swain. He's he's still on the farm fact he just turned twenty eight this week and eight twenty eight. Yeah he's at that time go. I know I can't believe it just seemed like yesterday. He was running over the photographers. But he's he's opened pensioner barn and he looks great. In fact I snapped a picture of him the other day. We put it on twitter and I think we had more likes of that than about anything else we've put on there. So he's he's one that I've got a big fondness for his. His sire. Of course was Nashwan. Who are stallion. Facilities named after Nashwan is born and raised on the farm Just prior to my arrival there so I was never around Nashwan so When swain came it was a kind of a nice a full circle to get him back. Another one I think is inventory because inventory was just a monster on the track you know unbeatable essentially Horse of the year here. He was horse of the year in South America as well. And he's Chad was all time leading money. Earner at the time he retired I believe he was fourth on the all-time money earning lists and that of course before the Pegasus and these big boosts but he was another one. That was a really fun horse to work around. Easy horse very kind and gentle. And he's currently back in Uruguay covering mares down there during the southern season but he will eventually retire and returned to Kentucky and go back up. He'll go in the barn up there with sway. When I think about inventory I think it was it was the Don Handicap where he clipped heels at the top of the stretch almost fell basically went to his knees recovered and then drew off. And I remember Larry. Combs was calling the race and his call was. How good is your and for whatever reason that is the moment that I remember when I think about inventory. Yeah exactly I mean you can look at it. His you know his biggest racist his biggest wins the the classic and Dubai World Cup. But truly if you go back and watches races that Don Handicap showed what good would a good horse he was because he really overcame adversity there and and and I remember watching it live and thinking he. He's lost it but he He came back and just jockey. Fernando was just completely splattered in mud head to toe to. Yeah so before. We talk about this dalliance. You were a little concerned. You might not be able to make it here. At this time on Saturday morning because with the breeding shed opening stallions could be breeding mares. This morning. I'm glad it worked out for you. And I'm glad you're sitting here with me and our Lexington studios can't but when you describe your position in your role as a stallion manager how do you do it. What's your what's your primary focus. What's your main your main responsibility. Yeah Stallion manager positions in Kentucky can kind of vary especially now with some of these farms with huge rosters? Some positions. A stallion manager may be more in charge of just selling seasons and that kind of stuff other farm Stein. Managers is strictly over the breeding shed and the health of the Stein. Were you know fairly small? Stein operation so I guess my position is kind of A. Do Everything Stein Manager. So first and foremost I am over the breathing shed every day. I'm in every single breeding. They're actually on the floor helping the guys in the breeding. Shed look at the samples. Check all the paperwork when the mayor's coming in that kind of stuff and do the overall health of the stallions scheduling vet work farrier work and that kind of stuff but also my position tales marketing and selling the stallion seasons meeting with the clients and the breeders to show them the stallions as well. Yeah Yeah can't with me here in studio all right. Let's talk about this year is roster. Kurban will start there. He's kind of the newcomer to the roster here for twenty twenty. Tell me a little bit about him. Curb on is our second son spikes town that we've added to the roster in the last few years and he's a he's a really nice horse he's probably best known in the US as the two time winner the Bernard Baroque Saratoga great to anyone. The last two years up there. He also ran second in the grade. One old forester on Derby weekend To a horse of the year bricks and mortar who just caught him at the at the line. They're going nine furlong so I think if it had been eight and seven eighths or something. We know what we were right there unfortunate. That horse came flying out of the clouds. Curb on also ran third to grade ones at keeneland he both in the maker's mark or the makers forty six mile in the spring and then the shadwell mile in the fall last year but prior to coming to the United States he was Started IN FRANCE. He won a bow starts as a two year. Old over there. At Shanti Deauville. Stay in training at three and four and one actually stakes at both three and four in France. He's a horse that ran every year from two to six. He made twenty two starts so he's a good example of soundness and durability which you know we like to see in our colts his damn a granddaughter of Dan's egg and cheese well was a stakes winner. In France a three year old she was brought over to the United States and she finished second in the Yellow Ribbon in California. And she's America who also made twenty one starts so again. This horse picked up some soundness from his From his damn side. And he's he's a real good individually typical of a lot of spite towns a good substance to them and I think he's going to be a a really nice. Cyrus dined prospect for the future. How many mares do you think he'll get in his first year? Well we're hopeful that we'll get a good book to them. We were standing very reasonably Stanford. Five thousand dollars which I think is you know for what the Horse earnt and the the racist tremendous value. Yeah you know. We're we're fairly conservative on our book. Numbers You know when I started years ago we were at the at the time we were only breeding fifty as your Which is unheard up today. We we had over three hundred applications year on his on the first year for our so. Now we've opened up the book a little bit more so You I would hope that we'd get on this horse in a fifty to seventy yet air range on them. Yeah for his first year. That would be pretty good. I know that a lot of time with Chad. While it's quality over quantity to trying to focus on the right mayors for the the right horse and incur bound is certainly one that appears extremely talented and go a lot of different directions on that front another one is Mohammed and this is a horse. I remember watching rundown Florida when he was just tearing it up and looked like he was just GonNa Roll Right Onto Kentucky and then ended up. Being injured guessing. Didn't make it there. But this is a horse that is ultra ultra talented. Yeah Mohammed and he was. He was very exciting for us at the farm when he went cure and had him as a two year old You know he's well from day one he was a two point two million dollar yearling and so there was always a lot of high hope for this horse and a lot of that was of course. his older brother had just won the Breeders Cup Juvenile New Year's Day he was by Asana tap out of a great mayor and You know when you spend a two point two million for a horse you know. He's got the looks. Yeah and so. He fortunately put everything together and he was You know a great two year old forest Karen had him up in New York. He won all three of his starts as a two year old including the ramps and and the Nashua then he took them to Florida's a three year old and he continued that winning streak in both the Holy Bull and the Fountain of Youth. At that point Early in the year he was actually number one on the Kentucky Derby List on on most people's yet us right he was everybody was talking about him and it was it was kind of east coast versus West Coast. Nyquist was out in California and Well it would have been fun to see right. Well Yeah and those two actually hooked up in the in the Florida Derby could Nyquist came out and unfortunately that day Mohammed didn't have as his game.

Kentucky Chadwell Lexington United States Kent Barnes Chad Mohammed Swain California Ken Barnes Barbados France Stein Bradford apple Stallion manager Mike shadwell
"ken barnes" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

As It Happens from CBC Radio

07:40 min | 1 year ago

"ken barnes" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

"I'm trying to winter and it's almost a little while chosen family family. Every second week we talk about art sexuality and identity with special guest usually queer but not always I completely struggle coming out to my parents as a comedian being in the entertainment industry for a Middle Eastern people is unheard of affecting change requires people to shake it up. Listen to chosen family wherever ever. You get your podcasts. What sign are you? By the way I'm an area. Of course I love it. It was supposed to be the fastest plane in the world and our the best defense against the Soviets instead the Arrow Arrow project became a very expensive pile of scrap metal after it was cancelled in Nineteen fifty-nine by then then Prime Minister Jonathan Baker. Mr Dean Baker also ordered the jets and all documents associated with them destroyed but thanks to a secret. Rescue mission led by Ken. Barnes the Arrow is being given a second life. Mr Barnes was a senior draughtsman working on the project when it was cancelled he smuggled out hundreds of blueprints and hid them for decades. Now they're on display. At the University of Saskatchewan's defend Baker candidate center Gord. Barnes is the son of Ken Barnes and has had the blueprints since his father's death in two thousand and five. We reached him in Regina. Good wasn't mean for you to see these blueprints which your father kept hidden for so many many years now on display for all to see well. It's quite special actually I think it's a good opportunity for people to see the blueprint. See The history the plane itself and come to their own conclusions about the debates it We'll probably go on forever while there are big debates because this is a moment in Canadian dating history. Wasn't it a moment when many people believe that Canada could have been on the international map with the aerospace technology. That this was this is our moment and and it was lost for so many different reasons. So what did the project working on the average our. What did it mean for your dad? All he he was so proud to be part of that team design team he had earlier in his career worked on the jet liner and the Lancaster he loved aviation loved his work. And I think that's now the reason that it's still a a really significant story in terms of Canadian history how how old were you. And the Arrow I went into the sky. Did you do for seeing it. Yes I do recall very clearly You know we lived in a Toba Coa so You know the plant was obviously out in molten. The airport Close by I can remember being in the backyard with friends and seeing the Arrow fly over at I was both six When it was actually cancelled I was six and a half years old and I can remember the disappointment at home and The concerns that came up. Fortunately my father was kept on by the company but many many people were out of work thousands of people right away and it was a very significant moment in history and difficult time for a lot of families but it must have been an immense thrill real to see that fight to see something that was considered the fastest jet in its class go across streaking across Ontario Sky. Oh it was send You know there were so many people in the immediate area that were connected to the project and So there was always slots discussion about the industry itself. But that particular plane and It was a very exciting time when when it started to be developed and then was flown in the area when the project whenever Arrow project was completely cancelled. Everything was destroyed. How did your father feel about that? Oh he was. He was distraught about it Terribly upset and very disappointed and Manage to Save the EH. Blueprints eight didn't sort of say them further any purpose other than to save history They actually kept them quite it Well hidden in a corner of the basement for years but you know after it was sorta irrelevant relative the technology and all the rest he did show show them to friends and people who were part of the industry who came over to visit the But that was many years later but at the time Prime Minister Jonathan Baker Baker cancelled this project. which had did you say? So many people from around the world were involved in it. It was just the coincidentally at the same time as intercontinental ballistic missiles. Missiles became a thing phenomenon and Mister Duke makers said the Arrow would have been ineffective and inoperative within a few short what years so everything was destroyed. All the parts everything to do with the arrows apparently completely extinguish. How how did your father managed to get the blueprints since out and saved in his base? I believe what happened. He was probably Leaving the plant and manage to get them in the trunk of his car. He get a fifty-seven shove. You know. I'm guessing they came out in the truck. Just a couple of little notes he. He's huddled out in his his shirt pocket. I mean there's there are hundreds of blueprints and beautifully done. Well they are. And that's part of the story to that I think is quite significant. Is that they were able to produce the Afro Errol and before that the jetliner and the Lancaster and it was at a time when for the most part people did not have the benefit of the sophisticated computer assisted design technology. Not that is available. Now I mean there was some testing that went on using computers and stuff like that but in terms of the actual drafting that was done with pencils On drafting board with slide rules and all the rest of it so you know it is really especial to to see them and for you're now the public to be able to see them and I'm glad this is evolved. The way it has. How do you think your father would feel about those blueprints? And he's he recruited it into basement now in Baker candidates. I'm not I'm not so sure. I think what he would appreciate. Is that people people here in western Canada now particularly see the story. I mean obviously large numbers of people in in the Toronto area and Antero were affected by the story but fewer in western Canada but having said that I continually run into people here in Regina and even in Saskatoon who had a connection to the story who were part of the story and A. I'm glad it's now something where people can see the blueprints but also so the other parts of the exhibit that the Baker Center has put together. They've done a very good job. I think Gordon it's love to hear Your Dad's story thank you thank you know Gord. Barnes is the son of Ken. Barnes a senior draughtsman of the avro Arrow jet plane project. who saved hundreds of blueprints? It's from that project which are now on display at the University of Saskatchewan's defend Baker Canada's center. We reached Gord Barnes in Regina.

Gord Barnes Prime Minister Jonathan Baker avro Arrow jet plane Prime Minister Jonathan Baker Mr Dean Baker Regina University of Saskatchewan Ken Lancaster Baker Canada Baker Center Baker Canada Ontario Sky Mister Duke jets Gordon
Milwaukee issues vaping-related health alert after 16 chemical pneumonia cases

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:51 sec | 1 year ago

Milwaukee issues vaping-related health alert after 16 chemical pneumonia cases

"More folks are ending up in the hospital in New York state from vaping health officials have put out a new tally of twenty five cases of vaping related illnesses at a month this as the city of Milwaukee is issued an urgent warning for folks to stop using all E. cigarette devices immediately here's correspondent Kenneth mode the alert comes after sixteen people who use E. cigarettes were hospitalized with chemical pneumonia patients range from teenagers to people in their thirties Ken Barnes this twenty six year old son Dylan is among them she says he had been baby for less than a year and almost died this month I don't think he was going to come out of it I thought that I was seeing my son last time this morning comes just days after officials in Illinois announced the first death believed to be related to the E. cigarette use the CDC is now investigating nearly two hundred cases of severe pulmonary illnesses linked to beeping in twenty two

Milwaukee Ken Barnes Dylan Illinois CDC New York Kenneth Twenty Six Year
Stop vaping and e-cigarette use ‘immediately,’ city health officials warn

WBZ Morning News

01:00 min | 1 year ago

Stop vaping and e-cigarette use ‘immediately,’ city health officials warn

"Well with the kids back in school or about to go back to school and vaping is a big topic in almost every state in the nation the city of Milwaukee is taking a stand ABC's Kenneth Moton says health officials are out with an urgent warning stop using E. cigarette devices immediately or comes after sixteen people who use E. cigarettes were hospitalized with chemical pneumonia patients range from teenagers to people in their thirties Ken Barnes this twenty six year old son Dylan is among she says he had been baby for less than a year and almost died this month I don't think he was gonna come out at I thought that I was seeing my son the last time this morning comes just days after officials in Illinois announced the first death believed to be related to the E. cigarette use the CDC is now investigating nearly two hundred cases of severe pulmonary illnesses linked to beeping in twenty two states those patients in Milwaukee each reported using vape products or marijuana oils in the weeks and months prior to being checked into the

Milwaukee ABC Kenneth Moton Ken Barnes Dylan Illinois CDC Marijuana Twenty Six Year
"ken barnes" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

01:37 min | 1 year ago

"ken barnes" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"Food water and gasoline twenty eleven this is from the fourth one with doctors so we left twice and we stayed twice so we're trying to properly models have a category three Dorian making landfall Monday morning between Mel born at west palm Jim Ryan ABC news the urgent warning in Milwaukee stop Peiping now maybe sees can of mountain says city officials are making the call after people are getting sick across the state dealer comes after sixteen people who use E. cigarettes were hospitalized with chemical pneumonia Pacers range from teenagers to people in their thirties Ken Barnes this twenty six year old son Dylan is among them she says he had been baby for less than a year and almost died this month I don't think he was gonna come out I thought that I was seeing my son last time this morning comes just days after officials in Illinois announced the first death believed to be related to the E. cigarette use federal officials say around two hundred cases of lung disease could be linked to vaping real appears to have a submarine capable of launching a nuclear missile that according to new satellite images ABC chief global affairs correspondent Martha Raddatz we thought they might have denuclearize you're at least taken a few steps toward denuclearization after the Singapore some at the Hanoi summit as we all know didn't go so well but even this time in this atmosphere where they're supposed to be scaling back if they continue on this track it's just one more bad sign the FBI is now offering a twenty thousand dollar reward for a couple wanted for murder Blaine and Susan Barksdale of been on the run since Monday after escaping custody in Utah they were being taken to Arizona you're listening to ABC news and I.

FBI ABC murder Hanoi Jim Ryan ABC Arizona Utah Susan Barksdale Blaine Dorian Singapore Martha Raddatz Illinois Dylan Ken Barnes Peiping Milwaukee Mel twenty thousand dollar
"ken barnes" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

06:51 min | 1 year ago

"ken barnes" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"What about percent onboard John begins with the news that a three point one K. became very happy to have in studio with me yeah my friend can Barnes who is the executive director of citizens against lawsuit abuse we're here to talk about an assembly bail now you gotta you gotta stay engaged here because this is something where you might tend to read at that I I think contrary to it so what its purpose says when you first learned about this is assembly bill fifty one Calle let you explain kind of what the parameters are has to do with that with arbitration in employment arrangements and the state of California yes the one of the things arbitration is not the sexy political topic of Friday right but it's the one thing that keeps small businesses in business in short with most companies when you go to work for them they often have an agreement that you sign Hey here's the offer for a job I'm going to pay you X. amount of money and if we should have a dispute that arises when you during a separation or some other thing here the terms of how will will fix this this arbitration if the impartial mediator aside what this bill does is get rid of that so if you have a dispute at work you've got a file a lawsuit and and as I think about it the it in my experience in Sacramento county right now in in this area the the most densely populated county you're looking at about three years to get to this and get a court room for civil litigation it may be longer than that well you know it is so so what would the impact on the on the judicial system is just to it unto itself as it is insane and and the any hope for getting timely resolution to a challenger conflict is just on the card yeah you know it one of the things this real fascinating that it's sponsored by simply women learning because all this from San Diego and when you look at the the Calvary Democratic Party platform it's it talks about justice delayed is justice denied and what are getting rid of arbitration does is delay justice for persons all across rumor everything's not not frivolous are meritless ready there's legitimate claims but no one's going to get hurt and then the other thing that this does shockingly it allows for a new set of class action lawsuits and the reason why is there is no money for a plaintiff's attorney involve the help one person out but if you can sue on behalf of three four hundred people everyone whose work free for the previous four years now there's a lot of cash there and the only incentive there is a settling get cast and that's what this bill does yeah I'm looking at some of the spin this being put on this the the background as described by the proponents of AB fifty one says workers have long understood the when the boss breaks the law with his wage that discrimination or sexual harassment they should have the right to stand together and seek justice in the courts the employers employees should have that companies have figured out a way around that today's employers are increasingly using a method known as forced arbitration a to require workers to waive their rights as a condition of getting or keeping a job first of all the the the right to get a job is does not force you have to work there exactly that's what we're here at four with an inalienable right to pursue happiness not without you haven't you should they have a right to to pursue a job but not to have it not to be given it they say these documents generally prohibit a worker from filing claims to a state agency or court and require that any potential claim to be submitted to the employers hand picked arbitrator I respond that it's a lot of load so what happens is every every other year this bill gets introduce and they come up with a new set of reasoning now mind you governor brown V. took dissing twice twenty fifteen two thousand eighteen and the and the reason he vetoed it I think is important because it's prohibited by federal law is that the US Supreme Court or not is the Supreme Court in a an opinion written by justice Elena Kagan yeah I was appointed by president Obama said you can't do this you cannot dictate what you know the agreement between employee employer and so what happens with what's laid out there what they're talking about is let's let's strip through it this is a way to get two additional class action lawsuits so if you have a challenge which you're able to do let's say there's a hundred people work at work where you work you can see on behalf of yourself and everybody quote similarly situated right so you're talking like several hundred people and then everybody has a claim the employer cannot under any circumstances fight this thing was they've got two three four hundred thousand dollars so what do they do they settle it run for and and then the each individual person class still get like a hundred and twenty dollars and then the you know turns walkway with three hundred four hundred thousand dollars that's what this is about and the rest of it you know whether they're saying that you know because of me to we've got to protect victims of sexual assault no you last time you said it was you know to protect low wage workers and next time when it comes around if this gets veto hopefully they'll say you know it's for the children because that's usually the last thing that allowed him in all of this what this comes out to as well arbitration is a sound sexy this leads to job loss you can't extract billions and billions of dollars out of the small employers and then not expect the negative consequences absolutely true and I think with their their it it's well known that their systems in place to deal with I improper conduct on the part of employers it should not be tolerated nobody wants to see that tolerated that any reasonable person wants to see consequences brought to bear that's not the that's not the issue here everything here is already against the law right there there's the private Attorney General like we've talked about this before it it's heavily abuse but it's called the sue your boss law that's still hot in a California so to add additional things are already covered in the at and the labor code and then on top of this to add these things violations be misdemeanors now you've got a crime hanging over your head I mean that's that's where you're really getting out of control imagine you in your old job imagine having to jail is somebody on a a labor employment argument over there wait staff or something goofy like that its absurdity when there is a risk of a potential resolution that could be very simply access to an and reasonably I think resolution income I got more questions for you in terms of what the what your concerns are how likely this is to to get it through the legislature my sense is a problem we will go through the legislation the big mystery is the question is what would the new governor deal with that and then of course the course of action if that that that's the case of a sign into law we have to click breaking take care of other business we right back with more conversation with Ken Barnes something you really need to know about the state which has by the way year after year after year been rated as the fiftieth best state in the union to do business turned around as the worst day of the year to do business if you want to have people employed or you want to have growth and productivity one I have a robust business opportunity and climate here I think we need to be sensitive to these things what's more conversation coming up.

John Barnes executive director three hundred four hundred tho two three four hundred thousan twenty dollars three years four years one K
"ken barnes" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

04:06 min | 1 year ago

"ken barnes" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Ken. You're on the air. Yes Hi my name's Ken Barnes Nsen. I just wanted to chime in because I was the trial attorney for the Civil Rights Division. It's just department when he sued the city of Yonkers New York fourth largest city New York over exactly the same thing and what we alleged was that the city itself was liable for housing segregation in the city that occurred because the city chose to Put v Seventy eight hundred units of public and subsidized housing while within one square mile and the city chose to reject a thousands and thousands of propose units that were proposed all over the city and mostly white neighborhoods which would have led to more desegregation so the city's policies where where liable for <hes> the segregation that occurred and I don't know if that's exactly the facts of today's New York City <hes> but there aren't that many lily white neighborhoods there that I know of anyway in New York City but the city's choice of where to place the the subsidized housing <hes> affects what kind of you know where people are GonNa move in yonkers just like in New York City now the housing units were built in the minority neighborhoods and they said well oh where knocking down minority old <hes> bad housing in order to build these units and so the minorities who lived in those areas are entitled Relocation Act to move back into those areas but you alluded earlier earlier to the idea that <hes> folks are applying for these things as if they really WANNA move back to a segregated <hes> maybe less well-off neighborhood and that isn't necessarily the case they want housing can't afford to live in new. You're kidding so that's where you built the unit. That's where they wanna most right <hes> so so can just just for for people including myself who don't know what the outcome of this case against the deejays case against the city of Yonkers was briefly. How did that case conclude well? It's interesting. It was the first join housing in school desegregation case we won in a landmark opinion in the district Corey was upheld in court of Appeals. The city tried to not comply with <hes> with orders of remedy and the Supreme Court upheld contempt citations for the city officials just as a reminder mayor and <hes> and people who are now working for New York so yes we won and <hes> indeed when units were built in any white neighborhood as a result of this plus it it was very interesting because the white neighbors really were objecting to it both pre lawsuit and after and they were afraid that people who moved lived in there would be minority in poor and not good neighbors but it turned out that they got along well once they were able to test the waters and meet each other and see that they're real human beings just like me you and <hes> it was really the <hes> very salutary thing not nearly enough units with bill would like anymore but it worked out well well and that that problem of not enough units still persist to this day but Ken thank you so much for your call. Now we have been focusing on New York <hes> for for <hes> the first part of the show but this issue is actually br one felt broadly in many cities across the country a little in the little bit we'll hear from Louisville Kentucky but for example in California San Francisco adopted a local community preference program in two thousand fifteen and in this clip. You're GonNa hear San Francisco resident. Mario Watts sharing how that policy helped him secure an apartment in the very neighborhood where he grew up and then we're here. We'll here in this clip <hes> San. Francisco's mayor London brain. Here's what's I I moved into my new home of this year. February twenty fifth of twenty nine hundred my son and I happened to have great lottery numbers because of the makers of preference. We're winding moving into this lovely..

New York City Ken Barnes Nsen yonkers Yonkers New York Civil Rights Division San Francisco Ken. trial attorney court of Appeals Mario Watts Corey San Supreme Court Louisville Kentucky California one square mile twenty fifth
"ken barnes" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

11:00 min | 1 year ago

"ken barnes" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Morning. It was going to be needle and Linda fairstein I watched last night when they see us on Netflix these special about the central park, five something that always working with the police department back then was involved in those listen before we get to that limited did not make it in today. Jill told us what the situation was, but you're the only person to actually speak to Linda, so what happened. And why is she not here this morning? I let me give you a little basis about Linda fair, Steve, Linda fairstein was head of sex for Manhattan, DA squad. She handled thousands of cases including the infamous none rape case that when they broke into the convent these pieces of garbage a beat this none up. They raped sodomized the cough twenty-seven crosses stuck a broom of Jinan left for dead. Two punks. She was able to prosecute Tom collar and I call one guy in Chicago one in New York. Yeah. And then the guy I blacked out. With the one guy he says something about my mother or something I don't remember but supposedly drug broken. I don't remember that. But in, in reality, my point is that she's a was a is a great prosecutor. She's being Drake. Drew a lot of people don't realize I talked to her before. I mean Linda fairstein right now is a woman bright near nervous breakdown. She's under police guard death threats against she was advised by a lawyer do not do any media, and all that this woman is living for doing the right thing for being a prosecuted. Now, all of a sudden, when you look at the twenty twenty piece that they had I got a little information about that one. The cops that were involved including detective, captain, Sal Blando. He was support this was supposed to be a twenty twenty two showed able guilty. And then all of a sudden it was reversed around gave him. He was off about two hours testifying on twenty twenty game about two minutes on the show might she. And one of my ex was wanted to detect. That handle it. And what, what had happened was? They took it, and they reversed it and everyone here doesn't understand something about this. Okay. I wasn't on the job that I was retired. It was nineteen eighty nine okay in reality during that time you didn't wanna step into central park dad, what they call Wilding these groups of kids little children. That's what they wanted betrayed them on the Netflix little kitty. That's how they did wanna know some, there was a guy that was hit with by them with a lead pipe in his head people arrived on their bicycles to testimony parents, one guy, why they said, oh, I was just hold her down. There was another one at testified hours playing with a breast might point is right now I challenge to Manhattan DA's office right now Sivan's to clear this up once and for all you have thing called touch DNA day didn't have back then. Right now, if the evidence left in this case, I'd like to see them bring that up and see we got evidence of touch DNA on any of that evidence. With that giaga fact that matters. They weren't little boys there picking flowers and look, the squirrels at central they were out there Wilding now eight million dollars. And now portrayed this destroy a woman like this who gave a whole career to protect people and destroy. And the way they throw little into windows in there with the Netflix thing. Oh, you put words into her what was the remark that was made? The birdie, one of the remarks was go up into the project and the rest every little thug. You can find or something like that. They put those now these these hit shots. Everybody jumping on board. I love to watch CBS this morning. We Gayle king. Everybody kissed, attacked pylon like these innocent, little children that were in the park, and we'll grab by the cops, a confession will beat out. That's bull crap. They were Robin people. Tell guy got hit with a lead pipe that nothing really happened. And they were rob day. Knocked people of bikes. And that testimony with they put themselves on the seat. Then is raise guy obviously he came and left his DNA possibly with them or after the fact might point is right now they were not innocent. Five Darren central and I challenged the DA's once you clear it up from now once and for all we got touch DNA now. Let's look over the evidence. Let's see any of these young boys had nothing to do if any of their DNA pops up on that. What, what, what would hurt? What would that her at the evidence look into it? The one you mentioned Corey wise, he has one incontrovertible fact when he was at the scene. He told the cops that the, the unknown guy turned out to be that he stole the woman cell phone at that point. Nobody had known about a cell phone. She was in a coma for eleven. They didn't find out about a cellphone until after she was has. Girlfriend, he said that she was only I should say down walkman, not a cell phone walk right down. He didn't do anything. He testified his girlfriend, testified to the fact he told he was just holder down. He didn't rape. My point is this days. Lord, no little innocent kids nowadays, heroes eight million dollars, each one more money, and what's the real destructive structured here is the destruction of lender. Fasting a DA. There was no reason in the world to grab people who had nothing to do with that. And the only thing is also why a fight with the, the other one, the UCF Spanish guy. Oh, oh, no. That's tannin Spanish guy was in jail what race rain. They had a fight. My problem is, and I just before I came on right now, I have a friend who's wanted to tech involved in that case. And he said, very, very simple. He was raised. Was either with them came prior after the fact, and that was the fact that day were there they were vol with our bodies were next. And I challenged the DA's office one you clear it up XIV is. 'cause you gotta DA then all of a sudden that other DA what was name when after. Federer listen, federal DA fares. She's a judge now or something a long story short. They went after Linda fairstein. It was a direct attack against, they don't like cut novels. Yes. She writes novels, and everyone's pissed off. In Linda, fifty you don't take a person's reputation and destroy like that she served this city very, very well now she's being Dray. She's on the police God. She death threats against this is a woman that gave a whole life to prosecute people that was a victim of that were were prosecuting people that effectively a word sex crimes against people. I'm just so upset about because I thought she was going to be here, and honestly I listen to, but you got on the stand, some this woman if she doesn't have a nervous breakdown. Maybe that be beat people be happy to this. A lot of people that are in our business. We've always leave death threats I received a ton bony got a couple obviously, the Rutgers people especially in her position as a that happens all the time. So my question to you is does she not realize that is something here that you think is maybe more serious than the usual quantum Pote death threats people in opposition may get. Well, you got to remember now, if you watch Netflix series on TV all of a sudden, they portray these little boys that did nothing wrong. They were, but they were railroaded on the people that watched that they believe every aspect of that series that was one. Then the twenty twenty thing, but was on. And then that other Kami era burns, Ken Barnes, what he did is act. Right. But my point is right now you have people that sit in this saying that I would say the same two percent black, and I would save if I'm sitting watching TV how did those scumbag cops railroad these poor children into that's horrible. And you know they could be. An anger that, that that's Burkey late Nair people get crazy. People could do thing is this, if they had nothing to do with this. I would be the first one to defend them right now of getting information now my challenge again here on your radio. I've never done. This before is to Manhattan DA's office, look at the evidence that was a gathered upon that woman being raped and beaten at that time the Java she was in the hospital. Remember about a month in the head with beaten viciously? Let's see if there's any other day challenges, I've is maybe the put this bet. You don't Bloomberg nuit. That's why you didn't want to cut out big bird no-balls. Big bird with his fever lady with the fifty million does everybody money. All of a sudden, he oh, just give the money away, I this up like three hundred fifty million dollars a year on his suit against the city. Gets all of this is just. Getting the money let it go away. Bullcrap, these kids had nothing to do it. Upbeat. The first one to defend the young men, if they had nothing to do show me evidence show, me that this, no DNA touch touch DNA Bernie. Do we just broke that big case in Kentucky triple Marta? I challenged DA's off PTO show. You real show, the reality of life showed it the right will be wronged, or the wrong will be either exonerate or right. I. If they don't have dead DNA. We haven't to agree with say that I agree with you. I think those kids guilty. I was nauseous watching that movie on Netflix last night from the very beginning when they saw one of these little kids sitting with his dad at a kitchen table talking about the Knicks ever really happened. Anyway. One top podcast, great every single week who's on this week? Well this week we're going to have we tried to get Charlie gas Perino on FOX woodland, come on. Is that right? Guys a competitor to FOX. We're gonna have a surprise guest last. We had every is going to be on. Podcasts at opened up yesterday. Sean Avery was great. We're gonna have a little surprise guest. But the reality is going to be we don't have window on it. You know, she's been told by lawyers, she can't. And I apologize to you listening audience to everybody out there. I try to get our in begged to the coming here. And she just said, bow police understand, and I do on this and you know what, again, the challenge from your show and make it make the news. Let's look at the evidence, let's see if there's any DNA because we didn't have a nineteen Eighty-nine what we have today. Check, you don't have their evidence..

Linda fairstein Netflix Linda rape DA Wilding Linda fair prosecutor Jinan Jill Tom collar Gayle king Sean Avery Chicago CBS Manhattan Sal Blando Sivan twenty twenty
"ken barnes" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

06:35 min | 2 years ago

"ken barnes" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"Depend on NewsRadio. KFB? Welcome back nature staying on board. John mcginnis with you also in studio Ken Barnes who is the executive director of citizens against lawsuit abuse. And I do want to underscore the fact that you are you're you believe in the judicial system as the place for people to resolve conflict and differences, but Lutely, but you recognize the fact that there are areas of abuse, and it occurs to me that I look at some of the every now, and then I'll get an article on a just an enormous jury award. And I'll thank okay. This is this has got to be. There's gotta be more to it. You start looking at it. You realize this is a case where somebody engaged in horrific misconduct that contributed to the demise or the the permanent compromise of a person's life. That's that's one thing. And and so it's not just the idea of going after Justice in in grand form, but you talk about the ongoing abuses, the nickel and dime business that that it really it makes it a cottage industry of sorts. And you've got a couple areas in particular that you want to address tell us about it. Well, you know, one of the cottage industries is in labor law. And so a lot of people know we mentioned a bit earlier Pago is the short version of it. And so I'll give you a great example here north highlands. There was a place called events, call center technologies fever called there in the news last spring because they close up they were going to have a thousand employees. They went down to five hundred and say we're heading now. So I pulled up sure enough they've had a couple of Pago suits one of them. It employees claimed they weren't paid overtime for the second set of takes computer to shut down after they log off from work. And this thing, you know, so rolls up into a multi-million dollar settlement. What happens each employer will get like somewhere between eighty and one hundred dollars an attorney gets somewhere between four hundred thousand five hundred thousand dollars. That's not what that law was as I. Absolutely. And so would you end up Creedon robotic situations on what I've always said two persons is you don't want to micromanage every sixty to ninety seconds of an employee's life. No more than they wanted management. And so we don't allow that type of flexibility. They even see the United farm workers got hit with a couple of million dollars suit over in Monterey by their workers on the same thing. So it's it's like it's hitting everyone from nonprofits to mid sized companies to a little restaurants with thirty five employees. You can get exposed to and a half three million dollars on a policy, and I can tell you from the perspective of somebody who has employed thousands of people. The there is typically given taken those scenarios so for every thirty. Seconds ninety seconds. Couple of minutes that somebody perhaps his waiting for a computer to fire upper cool down as the case may be. There are occasions when there's an unexpected tardiness for whatever reason in is forgiven. And so the ability for human beings to to manage those events, and and and work out a solution. That's satisfactory to everybody has got to be a part of it, and it occurs to me that I I think what you're pointing out. Very very well is the fact that you've got people who are empowered by virtue of their their bark hard to line their own pockets without really having any regard for the clients that they that they state or claim to to represent and protect what we want. We say that we want flexibility for families. And I think about this Bakersfield company who he ended up in a seven million dollar Pago litigation over allowing his workers to take their breaks and lunches on their own schedule because they're adults are one of them would leave early to go to like their kids. Soccer match. And there was like, oh, well, you legally left them take their break at the end of the day to wrap up early. And it's like that's just regular real life. We have to allow California law to have that flexibility. I mean as an employer at someone with people. Hey, you know, I want them to fill like they're not a robot that they can do what they what they feel like is in their best interests to get their work done take care of their families. I'm not gonna dock you because oh, you took an extra forty five minutes because you're picking up your mom to take her to a hospital. That's the kind of thing where we have these laws. They're not allowed for that. And so they're so strict, but the only thing in there, those one person has benefits, and that are the the the unethical travelers out there just breaking the backs of these these small business owners in it's heartbreaking, the they do that with prop sixty five. They look for somebody to skew somehow all the chemicals listed, right? Is if you know somebody with a wine bar is is some chemical expert, right? And knows the parts per billion of everything that comes through their source. So that's the kind of thing like that. That's that's the. The essence of abuse. I. Yeah. So wh- what's your journey? How do you? How do you accomplish this through persuading the legislature? I'm hopeful. I know some people are like there's no hope in the legislature. I guess I'm the eternal optimist. But you know, we we have a new incoming governor who's business owner who's got a couple of lawsuits, we have some legislators that also come from business owning background. And so we'll we'll see where it goes it that's fresh start new beginning. And it would certainly be nice. And of course, every survey you see in terms of chambers of commerce and business enterprise. The the the the state of California, the I think God's greatest work in terms of the beautiful state comes in dead last in terms of business friendly environment. So if you want to address some of that and encourage people who are entrepreneurs who are inclined to to really sacrificed their own capital their own theirselves. To to grow business. I think that's got to be part of what's considered and common sense. And reasonableness has got to be a part of what drives these decisions. So I plugged you for what you're doing. I think I'd like to have it. It's a great state look outside. Sunshine out there. Stolen the mountains. It's it's absolutely spectacular. So we need to I think in terms of public policy and governance, we need to to match the the natural beauty of the with that. And I applaud you for what you're doing. I think this is it I do think it's an uphill battle. But you're you're geared up for it. You're the guy for your well educated. You got the you've got the energy and enthusiasm and appreciate very much Ken Barnes. Ladies and gentlemen. Thank you so much. We'll have you back again. Appreciate your time. That's it for me as you can tell by the sound of music but stick around because you got the lovely and talented kid. You gotta has been charming. Mike Hagerty, coming up next with the afternoon news..

Ken Barnes California legislature John mcginnis Lutely Mike Hagerty Soccer executive director business owner attorney Bakersfield United farm Monterey ninety seconds four hundred thousand five hun three million dollars seven million dollar one hundred dollars forty five minutes
"ken barnes" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

03:04 min | 2 years ago

"ken barnes" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"We check in with the mayor of a town that no longer exists will paradise rebuild. Join Dan Mitchelson in me morning. The case became morning news. Welcome back nature saying, I'm bored. John mcginnis with your NewsRadio UK shifting gears here. Very happy to have in studio. Ken Barnes, who is the executive director. I believe now with with Keller is that correct? That's correct citizens against lawn lawsuit abuse in California, and California has been named the nation's worst judicial hellhole reading in the literature fortunate ranking. Yeah. That's that's not a wonderful place to be. So so what's what's your observation? What's your mission? What's your goal? What citizens against lawsuit abuse? And thanks for having me on sheriff old habits. You know, our goal is just to try to bring a Boyce to some of these smaller businesses who really get crushed under some of these these lawsuits, they really they're just the shakedown lawsuits. The hit him with claim of say like eighty ninety thousand dollars. You had to decide do you? Try to come up with one hundred and fifty thousand dollars to fight it improve yourself, right or do you write somebody a check for forty thousand dollars in settle it and try to move on with your business, and that's what we're trying to work against. Yeah. In fact, there's even a theory in lawsuits against public agencies that even if the person who has the authority to to resolve to settle the suit has the ability to do so at a cost less than what it would take to successfully defended. And they they declined to do. So that the tax payers can actually hold them liable for that. So I mean, there's an incredible motive to to resolve cases. But I think it's sometimes it's appropriate. And in many cases, it works just fine. And it's the right course of action to take to actually stand oppose fight, it defend the case to avoid the the potential limit minimize the potential of becoming a deep pocket haven for people looking for for easy opportunities to cash in. But I gotta ask you this. We're when it comes to people who have conflicts, we want them to address or resolve those conflicts in court. Do we not what we want them to be able to get to Justice and give you a great example persons often say what about arbitration, and an example, I'll use this. Well, you want arbitration with like a mobile phone Bill. Right. So let's say AT and T something's happened with Verizon. Your phone's not working, right? You just want to get your phone working. You'll want to have to follow a lawsuit. Go put somebody on retainer for ten twelve thousand dollars and start the process. And so that's what we have California's become this area of just great litigation. Like whenever something happens. Follow suits, like my my wife says a longtime attorney she grew up in Indiana. She jokes, you know, sometimes things just happen. Right. It wasn't someone's fault. Right. But in California, unfortunately, things have designed often the push to a lawsuit in and worse yet there's attorneys who just use it as like bounty hunting, and they go around and just look at work, and I extract cash..

California Dan Mitchelson Boyce John mcginnis NewsRadio UK Ken Barnes Keller AT executive director Indiana Verizon attorney eighty ninety thousand dollars ten twelve thousand dollars fifty thousand dollars forty thousand dollars
"ken barnes" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

03:47 min | 2 years ago

"ken barnes" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"To display a list of chemicals found in products or face up to a two thousand. Five, hundred, a day violation trial lawyers statewide expected to soon. Start, trolling for, clients now, boy and this could lead to, the old shakedown lawsuits second. Of course cost jobs and we very difficult for businesses particularly smaller ones to endure we'll be talking after the news to Ken Barnes executive. Director of citizens against lawsuit abuse Calla, about all this to let our listeners know normally, we're behind stories of shake. Him lawsuits going way back to the Trevor law group longtime listeners of our show they remember that one where they were shaking down a small businesses they go after and they tried to find little health violations and then go after the law for the businesses by telling me if you don't pay up this much It's going to, be much worse for, you and of course everyone else knows. About the Americans with disability lawsuits once again these unscrupulous lawyers and, there's way too many of them the trial lawyer business who went after small, businesses for, small problems in bathrooms. And things like that so they can also shake them down a quick hit for money I mean you could send down thousands of these and if only a few respond you're able to. Cash, in, a few thousand each one you know you made. A, nice hit, then send, out a couple of thousand more, and see if because not. Everybody will respond and they can't chase after everybody can sue them it just hoping to get some people snagged up in this and it's. The old question of a scam so, we'll talk about that after the news at four, thirty the latest on the. Wonders of California prison reform everybody remembers prop forty seven prop fifty seven and of course the prisoner dumping Bill we won't be able to do anything about all three of those at least to make some big changes to them and Until November of twenty twenty so in the meantime nearly four years since prop forty seven. Past and that's the one that reduced number of felonies misdemeanors drug offenses and of course infamously shoplifting by. Reducing the actual dollar amount of what you steal the Fresno, police chief Jerry Dyer is gonna come on the, show tomorrow to talk, about this more in, depth but he decided to speak about. Just how horrific this is from his perspective in law enforcement so, let's listen to what he said about prop forty seven One, no We're seeing a spike in. Theft tonight chief, Jerry jar giving us a glimpse into what needs to happen to change. The trend Casey twenty fours Alexander in the newsroom tonight outside you sat down with the chief today and he says that we can fight crime at the. Ballot, box, yeah, evidence, Stephanie yes governor. Jerry Brown you might remember extending the life of, prop forty seven. Last November it won't expire until twenty. Twenty two now in sitting down, with chief, Jerry Dyer he, tells, me yes, prop forty seven playing a leading role in what he sees day in and. Day out we had one individual that we've arrested eighty three times. Since, proposition forty seven. Pass All of these, for petty thefts eighty three times chief Jerry Dyer will never shy away from his feelings about prop. Forty seven during a time where there's eighteen fewer murders in the city compared to. Last. Year Dyer is seeing a spike in thefts he says it's happening every day that's their job that's their. Career and people are emboldened to do. That they know, that the consequences aren't there from petty thefts too high end robberies in..

Jerry Dyer twenty twenty Jerry Brown Theft Jerry jar Ken Barnes Fresno California Calla shoplifting Director executive Stephanie Bill Casey Alexander four years
"ken barnes" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

02:18 min | 2 years ago

"ken barnes" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"Did we lose jerry okay we still have that on the line now yeah okay i think we lost jerry we we we lost jerry but we still had all right ed so you don't think anything else will come come of the case out of this docu series well it doesn't like it it would be very difficult i think for them the brief in the case and then with with jessica hoop sixteen wild fascinating it does kinda run up against the pretty solid evidence so we'll see i mean you never know but i mean marjorie neil armstrong's bed ken barnes is in prison you know point stocking up an immunity deal so it seems like it's pretty wrapped up but you know you never know so and i guess we have jerry bacteria the question was your relied on to come up with what's next in cases what's going through your head is this whole bizarre situation unfolds i know like i said before we've never seen anything like this no we never deer in you know to have it on film and in watched over and over and so it became a fascination and it was really raised to you know fbi major case which is rare in the your major case number tools three and it just had so much complexity to it and and we didn't know if it was international we didn't know if it was domestic we didn't belts it was just a local group and as it turned out it was just a local group of misfits intellectual fractured intellectuals as they called themselves that got together and came up with this crazy plot that's a great fractured intellectuals indeed we appreciate your time gentlemen thank you so much work in our listeners get a hold of the book can get it on you know more sandy bookstore and then on amazon and this book you know pizza bomber and then there's another book about marjorie armstrong called mania and monitoring you armstrong just about her so we hope that helps people fill in the gaps i would imagine you have a lot of material on it thank you for your time gentlemen we appreciate we.

jerry marjorie neil armstrong ken barnes fbi amazon marjorie armstrong armstrong
"ken barnes" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:24 min | 2 years ago

"ken barnes" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"And we are talking with former special agent f b former fbi special agent jerry clark welcome back jerry thank you marie so and so just to work we have full lines so we're gonna go to callers and other callers six one seven two five four ten thirty we're gonna get it get you in with the questions for jerry but we wrapped up the last segment jerry and you made an excellent point you know anyone who says a bank robbers not violent is is really telling some tall tales and i wanted with that before we get back to the callers i wanted you to give a little bit more of the pizza bomber case and reveal you know who was the the criminal mind behind this major this major case tool three was actually done by a group of individuals that called themselves the fractured intellectual and there were seven of them total that had been involved in this scheme and what did it turned out to be was an individual female named marjorie diehl armstrong came from a family as as only child with her dad having about two million dollars and she wanted it and she wanted it now so she thought the best way to get it was to have him killed so she went to one of her friends and said can you kill my father and he said well i can kill your father but i need two hundred and fifty thousand dollars down she said well where am i going to get that she said oh let's rob the bank so their whole plan in this caller bomb pizza bomber robbery was to rob the bank to pay ken barnes to kill her father to get the two million that they could split and so it boil down to greed obviously for this case so that is that's the bottom line rate and she was a smart woman right you know maybe she could've worked in earn some money on her own as wasn't that she was without resources correcting very bright valedictorian of her high school class multiple degrees bachelor's degree master's degree very intelligent woman had some issues with some bipolar disorder but and some certainly some personality disorders but she got with this group of people and and next thing you know she was had death all around her she actually had four different males that died around her in some fashion three of which she was definitely responsible for and.

fbi jerry clark marjorie diehl armstrong robbery ken barnes marie fifty thousand dollars two million dollars
"ken barnes" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"ken barnes" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Mute happen it would seem to me a while in the field that's something that should be looked at administratively after the fact you know overall i think this is going to you know how this plays out will be how transparent the law enforcement is with this to date i think they've been pretty excellent with it there's obviously a lot of questions to be to be answered and you know there's something that maybe it's uncomfortable to talk about but you also have to make sure that police officers go home to and so it's hard to maybe just past a snap judgment by saying hey look i i saw a couple of little over at video and so you did something wrong and it's hard to say that sometimes particularly when you experience with them has been so ugly but again this is not a this is not some situation where they hunted someone down or someone was sitting in their backyard having a soft drink cops walk in shoot them dead and i think to to market it as at two portrayed as sort of instance that's that's also unfair to to the police department and doesn't really do anything to try to heal this rift between the community and those that that are policing us can let me make sure i end with anita anita what's next in this investigation the department was run but what the community wants now is accountability that next step you're showing us the information what are you going to do with it anita cherie is senior writer on race immigration and social justice for the sacramento bee and ken barnes public affairs consultant from sacramento anita ken thank you both so much for joining me to talk about the shooting death of stefan clark.

anita cherie writer consultant anita ken stefan clark sacramento ken barnes
"ken barnes" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:19 min | 3 years ago

"ken barnes" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Anita cherie is the senior writer on race immigration and social justice for the sacramento bee she joins me now along with ken barnes a public affairs consultant who grew up in sacramento and lives there now anita can thank you both for joining me today thank you ties to be here anita let me start with you you've seen the body cam footage along with the rest of sacramento now you've seen the video from the helicopter and heard the nine one one calls what stands out to you viewing all of these pieces of information together there's a couple of things actually that i think are important about the video i it's released three days after the event happened and i do think that's something that needs to be pointed out that is the result of a the killing of an unarmed mentally ill black man named joseph man that happened in two thousand sixteen in sacramento and led to both the new police chief in a series of reforms one of those reforms being that video critical incidents has to be released within thirty days but this chief has made an unprecedented effort to get it out there even faster so i do think the department deserves credit for putting this video out so very quickly the video itself obviously is an incredibly disturbing it happened so fast and it's so chaotic and you do see the officers shooting within seconds of encountering stefan the third thing i think is we cannot underestimate the importance of is that in the aftermath of the shooting what appears to be a sergeant our supervisor coming to the scene tells the officers to mute their mics and that is to me a total by elation of the spirit of our reforms if not the letter of them and it might be a violation of the letter of them as well we'll talk more about those reforms in the history going back to the shooting that you described in two thousand sixteen anita talk just for a moment please about stefan clark what do we know about him we know that stefan was living with his grandparents and some siblings in neighborhood called meadow view it's an area in south sacramento that historically is working class neighborhood berry ethnically diverse and has always had a.

Anita cherie writer ken barnes consultant sacramento joseph man supervisor stefan clark thirty days three days
"ken barnes" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"ken barnes" Discussed on The Takeaway

"Anita ship free is the senior writer on race immigration and social justice for the sacramento bee she joins me now along with ken barnes a public affairs consultant who grew up in sacramento and lives there now anita ken thank you both for joining me today thank you nice to be here anita let me start with you you've seen the body cam footage along with the rest of sacramento now you've seen the video from the helicopter and heard the nine one one calls what stands out to you viewing all of these pieces of information together there's a couple of things actually that i think are important about the video i it's released three days after the event happened and i do think that's something that needs to be pointed out that is the result of a the killing of an on armed mentally ill black man named joseph man that happened in two thousand sixteen in sacramento and led to both the new police chief in a series of reforms one of those reforms being that video and critic incidents has to be released within thirty days but this chief has made an unprecedented effort to get it out there even faster so i do think the department deserves credit for putting this video out so very quickly the video itself obviously is an incredibly disturbing it happened so fast and it's so chaotic and you do see the officers shooting within seconds of encountering stefan the third thing i think is we cannot underestimate the importance of is that in the aftermath of the shooting what appears to be a sergeant or a supervisor coming to the scene tells the officers to mute their mics and that is to me a total violation of the spirit of our reforms if not the letter of them and it might be a violation of the letter of them as well we'll talk more about those reforms in the history going back to the shooting that you described in two thousand sixteen anita talk just for a moment please about stefan clark what do we know about him.

writer ken barnes consultant sacramento anita ken joseph man supervisor stefan clark thirty days three days