35 Burst results for "Kelsey Snell"

McConnell says Trump's Supreme Court nominee will receive a Senate vote

Weekend Edition Saturday

01:10 min | 6 d ago

McConnell says Trump's Supreme Court nominee will receive a Senate vote

"Fly from NPR news. I'm Giles Snyder. Several Republican senators are lining up in support of Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is plan to vote on the nominee to replace Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. NPR's Kelsey Snell reports. McConnell has not given a timeline for replacing Ginsberg, who died yesterday from complications of cancer majority leader McConnell hasn't said if he plans to hold a vote on an eventual nominee before the election in November. Much of the timing will depend on how quickly President Trump announces his pick. Supreme Court nominees undergo a lengthy process before an eventual vote on the Senate floor. Typically that involves one on one meetings with senators completing a lengthy questionnaire and extensive background checks all before public hearings and a vote in the Senate Judiciary Committee. McConnell says Republicans were elected on a promise to fill federal court vacancies. Republicans have overseen a broad reshaping of the federal bench in recent years, approving more than 200 of President Trump's judicial nominees. Kelsey Snell. NPR NEWS Washington Top Democrats say Senator McConnell set a historical precedent when he refused to allow a vote in

Senator Mcconnell Kelsey Snell Supreme Court NPR President Trump Senate Majority Senate Judiciary Committee Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg Senate Giles Snyder Ginsberg Washington
"kelsey snell" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:36 min | Last week

"kelsey snell" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Wednesday. Alabama Governor Kyiv is urging Alabamians to seek safer grounds as soon as possible, especially for those living south of about 10 and in low lying areas. I urge you in the strongest way possible to evacuated conditions permit and seek shelter. Elsewhere as possible. Today, the storm's outer bands are already hitting the coast President Donald Trump has already declared an emergency of parts of Alabama, Mississippi and Louisiana. For NPR News. I'm standin gold in Tuscaloosa, Alabama. Speaker of the House. Nancy Pelosi, is promising. The House will remain in session until Americans can be sure of a new round of covert relief. NPR's Kelsey Snow reports. Speaker Pelosi says Democrats agreed this morning to forgo on upcoming recess ahead of the November election in order to negotiate Corona virus aid. We are committed to staying here until we have an agreement. An agreement that meets the needs of the American people. Pelosi has rejected calls to fund individual covert 19 related programs, She says thie economic and public health needs are too vast and the larger package is necessary. Some Democrats worry they must pass fresh legislation ahead of the election. Republicans want to approve programs that already have bipartisan support like a popular small business loan program, rather than continuing to fight over bigger elements like funding for state and local governments. Kelsey Snell. NPR NEWS Washington, The top spokesman at the Department of Health and Human Services tells NPR that he did, in fact, say on Facebook live on Sunday that quote Should President Trump be elected? If you carry guns by ammunition, because it's going to be hard to get. Michael Caputo said He was not speaking in his official capacity. But as someone who had been physically threatened when he was at home with his Children, he says he's been under a lot of pressure. Wall Street the Dow up 99. This is NPR. And this is W. N. Y. C in New York. I'm Rebecca Ibarra. New York City's Department of Corrections says it's adjusting courthouse meeting rooms after attorneys complained it's impossible for them and their clients to practice social distancing. W. N. Y. C is Beth for take explains when defendants are brought to court from jail to meet their attorneys, they sit in tiny space is run by the Department of Correction where it's impossible to stay. 6 FT Apart. Some of these rooms have Plexi glass with a large hole. So the two sides Khun talk in Manhattan Criminal Court attorney Glenn Hardy says there's just a wire mesh barrier and that an angry client spit on him recently. They called AMs They took me to the hospital and spend about.

NPR Speaker Pelosi NPR News Alabama Donald Trump New York City President Michael Caputo Kelsey Snell Alabamians W. N. Y. C Department of Health and Human Kelsey Snow Kyiv Rebecca Ibarra Tuscaloosa Khun Manhattan Criminal Court
Lawmakers Tackle Spending Deadline, Look to Revive Coronavirus Aid Talks

Morning Edition

00:53 sec | 2 weeks ago

Lawmakers Tackle Spending Deadline, Look to Revive Coronavirus Aid Talks

"Week ahead of a September 30th deadline to avoid a government shutdown. NPR's Kelsey Snell reports lawmakers air hoping to reach a spending agreement With or without additional Corona virus relief. Lawmakers and members of the Trump Administration agreed that they want to avoid a government shutdown when the fiscal year ends on September 30th. That likely means that they'll have to pass a short term extension of government funding at current spending levels. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Treasury secretary of Steven Mnuchin have already agreed on that goal and that they should approve the funding without any additional policy writers. But the duration of that extension is still up in the air. As our talks over additional Corona virus aid negotiations over that funding have been there to stand. Still for weeks. Democrats have said that they're willing to drop the requested $2 trillion, but Republicans say a much smaller figure is in order. Kelsey Snell NPR NEWS

Kelsey Snell NPR Trump Administration Nancy Pelosi Steven Mnuchin
Rep. John Lewis Makes Final Stop in Atlanta

Morning Edition

24:00 min | 2 months ago

Rep. John Lewis Makes Final Stop in Atlanta

"Rights activist and icon who became a moral force in the United States. Congress will be laid to rest. Today. He's been celebrated in a series of memorials this week and this past Sunday, he received a hero's sendoff in his native state of Alabama. And on Monday, Congressman Lewis was honored in Washington, DC It was an emotional Ceremony with lawmakers. His colleagues Speaker of the House, Nancy Pelosi, played a portion of a speech that Lewis gave to graduates at Emory University in 2014. As young people. You must understand that there are forces that would take us back to another period. But you must know that would mark warned by way made too much progress and we're going to make you some step back. Some delays some disappointment, but you must never give up. I give in. You must keep the faith and keep so eyes on the prize. That is so calling. That is your mission That is tomorrow. Obligation that is oh, man. They get out there and do it getting away. Lewis lay in state in the Capitol Rotunda following the ceremony, making him the first black lawmaker to receive that honor. And today, Congressman Lewis comes home to Atlanta, Georgia. The funeral service is being held at the historic Ebeneezer Baptist Church, where the Reverend Martin Luther King Jr was once co pastor and joining us Now is Emma Hurt. She's a reporter with our member station W. A. B in Atlanta, and she joins us live from outside of Ebeneezer Baptist and Emma describe what it's like there where you are right now. Hi, Emma. Can you hear me? Emma will be joining us shortly. She is outside of Ebenezer Baptist Church. Now let's go to Debbie Elliot. We'll check back in with Emma. And just a few moments. Hi, Debbie. How are you? I am good. I know that you spent a lot of time in Alabama over the weekend. There were several memorials and services. It was quite a scene. Right. You know, I think the thing that stands out the most was was when he was in Selma and his casket was on this horse drawn carriage. And it crossed the Edmund Pettus Bridge, of course, that iconic place where he was met with state troopers and sheriff's deputies who beat him up in a peaceful march for voting rights. Back in 1965 and people had come to sort of witness him make that Symbolic final crossing. Yeah, you've been You've known the congressman for for many years. You spoke with him back in 2015 at that. Edmund Pettus Bridge. Tell us about that. Yes. So this was in advance of 50th anniversary celebrations marking You know, 50 years since the Voting Rights Act passed because of that horrible incident on that bridge. The nation in the world really became aware of the brutality against African Americans who were pushing for equality in the American South. And so I met him there. We stood at the foot of the bridge, and we had a conversation about what it was like back then. And let's listen to a little bit, and he describes what happened on that came before. Beating us. Shrimping with horses. Releasing the tick and I was getting here. A state trooper with the night stick. My legs went from under me. I thought I was going to die. I thought I saw death. He thought he saw death, You know, and this was a moment where he had been that the the sheriff's deputy in the state troopers told them you have to turn back. We're not going to let you march to Montgomery. And they asked to kneel in prayer and as they went to kneel in prayer before they were going to turn back and go back to their churches. They were told. The meeting started. Tell me what's so powerful about that moment in history is that it was it was. It was a time where people were able to see for the first time the brutality. Those images were so powerful. It was labeled bloody Sunday and it sped up the passages you said of the 1965 Voting Rights Act. Debbie will will come back to you a little later to talk more about that. That's NPR's Debbie Elliot. We now have with us in the hurt. She is a reporter with our member station W. Abe in Atlanta, and she's outside of Ebeneezer Baptist Church where services will be held today. And Emma describe for us what it's like for you out there right now what you're seeing. Okay. Hi, Emma. This is Tanya. Can you hear me? Hi. Yeah. Can you hear me? I can I know that. It's It's quite a crowd. Okay? Can you tell us a bit about what you're seeing out there? I'm seeing I'd say about 200 people out here and we've kind of got to groups. We've got the people that are starting to gather at the Jumbotron, which has been set up right outside the church. I'm waiting to watch the service live there. And then we've got a crowd of people who are who are welcoming people as they arrive, welcoming the VIPs on presidential watch. Right now, I would say, waiting waiting for the three former presidents who are going to attend today and speak and the mood here is is really. I mean, it's it's serious, but it's also so joyful. It's about singing, and the stories that people have been telling me are just really powerful stories of how much Congressman Lewis meant to them. How much his message means to them in this time. And how much they want their Children and their grandchildren to make sure to remember him and what he stood for. What's really powerful, a swell about his home state of of his home state of Georgia and the city of Atlanta. Is that so many people felt like they knew him because they met him. You're hearing all of those stories from folks, I'm sure their interactions with him. Ebeneezer Baptist has so much history is I mentioned earlier, Martin looking Junior was a co pastor their share with us the significance of that church. Well, this was this was more Luther King Juniors from church. He grew up in it and was pastor as you said. It was also John Lewis's Home Church, where his wife's funeral was held in 2013. And it's really special. I think for these two figures overlap in this In this part of Atlanta to on Auburn Avenue, which is really the centre of Black Atlanta life, and some would argue the center of the Civil Rights movement and the two figures. I mean yesterday what was so powerful about Congressman Lewis lying in state in the Capitol in Georgia was that this was an honor denied to Dr King when he died. So I spoke to people who said I'm here because of all the people like Dr King who were denied that honor. And here we are giving Congressman Lewis most them may be the most honor. That we can right now. Sure, Let's listen to some of those folks that you spoke with you. It was amazing. It was amazing. All people on the young people. A lot of my friends has passed away. But I remember him from there. So that's why you mentioned This church being in the Hart. I just want to tell you that was Patricia Spicer, who's here, and she was talking about seeing Congressman Lewis speak at the 1963 march on Washington and that that's why his words were so powerful then and grabbed her then and she had to come today. The body of John Lewis was brought to Atlanta yesterday, and as you mentioned, it passed a number of important landmarks in the city. Walk us through. Some of those final landmarks that this journey to finally to Ebeneezer Baptist Church. There were there were quite a few stops because, as you said, Congressman Lewis has been such a presence in his district for, you know, 30 plus years. There was a pause at the Rainbow Crosswalk in Midtown, which you know, celebrates LGBT Q. The LGBTQ community here they passed by his downtown congressional office and a major street here that was renamed after him in the John Lewis Freedom Parkway on DH. It was there was also a big stop at a mural that you, Khun see driving down the interstate that runs through Atlanta. It has a picture of John Lewis and the words hero and, you know, it was really powerful. Tio. Watch him land for the last time in Atlanta and to watch him, you know, make his his final journey around the city. That's Emma hurt. She's a reporter with our member station. W. A. B in Atlanta. Thank you so much. Thank you. We're going to bring in another voice to our conversation. Remembering today the life and legacy of Congressman John Lewis Bishop Leah Daughtry is with us. Now. She's a political organizer and strategist. She ran. The Democratic National Convention is in 2008 in 2016 and she is the presiding prelate of the House of the Lord Churches. And there is perhaps no one better to talk about the intersection of faith in politics in this moment, which is what's so much of John Lewis's life really represents Bishop. Doctor. Thank you for being here. Good morning to you. And thank you very much from including this conversation. I guess I would just start by asking where your thoughts are this morning. Oh, you know, in the it's Ah, it's a powerful day. In the African American tradition. We call this the services home going And so they are mix of sorrow and sadness, but also great joy, particularly when it's someone like Mr Lewis, who has lived his life in such an exemplary way and in keeping with the principles of his faith that we know that he And our tradition. He's going home to be with the creator. And so we rejoice in bed and in the deeply held idea that we will see him again. So the mix of emotions on and I'm looking forward to the servants and being able to worship with those who have gathered To celebrate his life. The the word and his faith came before politics, did it. Not that was with what guided him first? Yes, yes, And I think that's so instructive for all of us who are people of faith. He was deeply guided by the principles of the face that he held so deeply and so closely and though that is what informed him and informed his action. Informed his decision to get involved in the civil rights movement on then to pursue a career in electoral politics. It's because of the ideals of of of our faith of our share faith that God intends for all of us. To live a full and abundant life. It holds us equally ah, in God's eyes and ah, divinely created and therefore in endowed with these Possibilities of being hole and equal. And then we have an obligation to pursue of society that sees us as God. And so for John Lewis that meant getting involved in the civil rights movement. That meant going on the bus boycotts being part of the leadership because it was he was pursuing the principal's off his face. And then in his later life, Of course, he came to Congress again, seeking ways to create a just society, a beloved community that treats all of its citizens equally. That has got had intended them to be he. It was almost a joke near the end of his life. How often he was asked to talk about preaching to chickens as a child on how readily he wanted to share that story, right? It was, he just he reveled in it of the idea of Off the joy he had as a very young man. I mean, eight years old, even sharing what he believed to be the most important important message there, Wass and and it helped him. Negotiate through through Washington. It helped him find ways to communicate with people with whom he disagreed. This's a very important part of his legacy is enough. It is it is, you know it and it tells you how deeply held his faith was. You know in these days, particularly when people are chasing followers, and ah likes and so forth on social Media network to think of this young man who who so loved his face. It was so impassioned by that any audience any Opportunity. He had to share his fate. Even with the chickens, Wass and was a chance to home his craft was a chance to get his ideas out was a chance. The tests, cadences and rhythms of words was a chance to share was the chickens and with those around the pick of the air, the grass the field how passionate he was about things that he believed and then bringing those ideals to Congress and understanding again. The people I help The idea of our faith that God has created a so equal And so if this idea that you don't have to be just like me to be just like me, there's something we have in common with each other. And if we can just talk if we can just be in conversation, we can see each other perhaps here because we may not still agree, but at least The tendency to demonize the unknown goes away lesson diminishes in the conversation. And who could refuse the conversation with Mr Lewis, who could refuse to just sit and talk and listen, and he was as good a listener. As he Waas a conversationalist. So you know, I think the Congress was richer for having him there on the Congress was Richard that his colleagues were Richard for just being able to be in conversation with someone who has deeply held ideal of deeply held conviction and experience. We should point out. Three former presidents are expected to get the memorial today. Bill Clinton. Barack Obama and and George W. Bush. I mean, just exemplifying the way that he he was very firm about what he believed and believed in his party, but he would work with Republicans if it meant Getting getting through the legislation he thought was most important. That's right. I mean, red and blue. These sorts of lines. These artificial divisions that we create among ourselves to categorize each other didn't really existed. Mr Lewis's lexicon. It was all about the humanity of people, and so has admit moving communities forward if admits Getting everybody the rights they deserve. Then he was willing to have the conversation. He was willing to be engaged and involved. And we see that in the folks that are going to speak today that are going to be present today at the tone and the tenor of the service, which he himself Designed. He spoke to his his closest staff. A. Stephen knew his time was shortening and said, who he wanted to be there. And what's the one of the elements of the club is to be what we see. Today is of Mr Lewis's own crafted bishop. Doctor, Can I ask one quick question if you were involved in the ceremony today, Realism putting you on the spot. But is there scripture that you think represents this moment, something you can point to that that carries the weight of history with it, but also Is about hope is about the future. You know, The thing that comes to mind for me is the passage and Hebrews. There's a chapter the faith chapter. We call it. Chapter 11 that talks about all the icons of our faith. Abraham and Sarah and getting and so forth on a long litany and in the middle of verse 13 says these all died in the faith, not having received the promises. But having seen them afar off, and for me that speaks of the hope. That was Mr Lewis's life. He stood on the shoulders of those who went before who didn't see freedom who didn't think the achievement of our civil rights. He followed them and he lived his life in such a way that he advanced the faith. He advance the causes, but he didn't see all of the achievement. And now we come behind him on continue his legacy. So he believed he held these convictions didn't scenes didn't see everything he fought for comes repair, But he still believed he still continue fighting. And henceforth Scripture goes on to say there was laid up for me A crown of righteousness was the Lord. That right? Justo shall give me on that day. And not to me only bought to all those who love disappearing. And so we look forward to seeing the two of us again in the future. Bishop Leah Daughtry. Thank you so much for sharing your reflections with us on this day. Thank you. Yes, very powerful. Let's go now to NPR. Congressional correspondent Kelsey Snell and NPR's senior editor and correspondent on the Washington desk. Ron Elving. Hey, guys. Kelsey. Good morning. We've heard so many powerful tributes from people throughout the country and the world. But But Louis is home state of Georgia. His presence and work had an especially profound. Meaning for his home state of Georgia for his district. Tell us a little bit more about his time there. You know, I am reminded of a couple of really, really standout moments of. I think one of the things that I think about a lot right now is the tribute that that they delivered for Johnny Isakson, who was a Republican senator. Of from Georgia, who retired last year, and in 2019 it was in November. So just just so a bit ago, Johnny Isakson was being was being honored and John Lewis Delivered this speech explaining how they could work together and and how there was an opportunity for anybody to find spaces where they agreed. And then, at the end of his speech, he walked across the Isaacson, who was in bad health and who had had trouble with his spine and said I will come to you brother and walked over and gave him a hug. That was really very much representative of the way. That John Lewis approached, you know, working on problems was what he wanted there to be bipartisanship. He wanted to be the person who came across, walked across and shake somebody's hand gave them a hug and said We can get something done here. He was also the kind of person who, whenever you saw him in the capital. There would be some person some tourist or a constituent who wanted to come and talk to him, and there was always had the time he had the time to tell his story had the time to talk to people about their story. He was extremely generous with his time and his constituents were known to come up to the capital and spent time directly with him. There was never a moment when it team like he was bigger than anybody else. Yeah, it's been Ah, so enriching and so fun over the last week to hear how so many people that I personally no have have met John Lewis, whether it's in Washington whether it's in Atlanta. New York Across the country. People have had a chance to meet him, but also have these intimate one on one conversations with him A CZ. We've learned he never turned anyone away. He was always willing to stop and have those conversations. One of the things that jumps out to me was a story about Congressman Lewis. When Hey, was in his district and he would spend a day doing a job in the district so even way back in the seventies, he would do things like drive a ups truck for a day to get a sense of what his constituents were up against. That is something that so many people feel is that he was of the people. Absolutely, and a lot of members of Congress that I speak to say they learned from that approach. They learned from John Lewis not just from the work that he did in civil rights, but the way he had a relationship with his constituents the way that he continued to speak about issues that meant something to him and then became active in them. I am reminded of the sit in on the House floor. On gun violence. He led House Democrats in a sit in and following. I believe the pulse shooting and they said that this was not a time when they could leave, and then he wanted to be the person who, you know who did the good trouble that he always talks about. He did not want to just be a person talking about it. He wanted to be a person involved in it. And you know so many members of Congress on Democrats and Republicans who felt inspired by that personal connection to his beliefs. The service eyes expected to begin shortly, and about 10 5 or 10 minutes. Ron, I'd love to go through with you what we can expect for today's service. But I want to talk first about Lewis's time as a civil rights activist, part of the movement back in the sixties. We expect to hear a lot about that today during the service, right? Yes, indeed, his life traced if you will, the trajectory of the African American experience over the last 70 80 years in American history. He was one of the group sometimes referred to as the Big Six, of course, beginning with Martin Luther King, whose name will be invoked. Many times today, but also Whitney Young of the National Urban League. Roy Wilkins of the CP. James Farmer of the Congress of regular Racial Equality and a Philip Randolph from the Pullman Porters Union. They were in many respects the Giants. Of the civil rights movement, as it took shape after World War two and rose in the fifties and sixties. Of course, John Lewis was there for most, all of it. He was part of the citizens at lunch counters in Nashville. He was one of the original 13 Freedom riders in 1961 integrating bus travel in the south. He was the youngest speaker on that day in 1963 when the march on Washington for jobs and justice featured Martin Luther King's I have a Dream speech. John Lewis spoke that day was the youngest speaker. He's the last person surviving from the speakers Dyas that day. And then, of course, the 1965 moment we have referenced Many times his beating on the Pettus Bridge. And, of course, his career in Congress, As Kelsey has described and then his links to the Black lives matter movement, which he paid tribute to In death as his cortege was coming to the capital earlier this week and paused on black lives matter Plaza in front of the White House to pay tribute to the movement and the people who are carrying forward his ideals today. Yes, And as we

Congressman Lewis Atlanta Congress Emma Hurt Martin Luther King Jr Washington Civil Rights Movement Debbie Elliot Ebeneezer Baptist Church Georgia Reporter Congressman Alabama Kelsey Snell John Lewis Bishop Leah Daughtr W. A. B John Lewis
Trump’s National Security Adviser Tests Positive for Coronavirus

Fresh Air

00:26 sec | 2 months ago

Trump’s National Security Adviser Tests Positive for Coronavirus

"President Trump's National security adviser Robert O'Brien has Cove in 19. NPR's Kelsey Snell has more O'Brien is the most senior White House official to get the virus and he is quite close to Trump and this is the latest in a number of known cases in the Trump or but you may remember back in May. Katie Miller, the spokeswoman for Vice President, Mike Pence, also tested positive, and we've also seen military aides and members of the campaign. Advanced Team test

President Trump Robert O'brien Vice President Mike Pence Kelsey Snell Katie Miller White House NPR Cove Official
Atlanta - Georgia Rep. John Lewis remembered for legacy of ‘good trouble’

Weekend Edition Saturday

01:01 min | 2 months ago

Atlanta - Georgia Rep. John Lewis remembered for legacy of ‘good trouble’

"Of the best known voices of the American Civil Rights movement has died. John Lewis had pancreatic cancer. He was 80 years old, NPR's Kelsey Snell, reports of Georgia congressman will be remembered as a guiding voice for Democrats. By the time John Lewis came to Washington in 1987 the congressman from Atlanta was already a national figure. He was a leading civil rights advocate in the 19 sixties, joining Dr Martin Luther King Jr as a speaker at the 1963 March on Washington. Two years later, he faced the Alabama state police on Bloody Sunday as marchers crossed the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Alabama. They came toward us beating us. The bull whips. Nightsticks. Driven us with horses. And releasing the tear gas. Lewis's congressional career was defined by his passionate oratory and willingness to cause what he called good trouble to advance causes, including civil rights, healthcare and gun control. Kelsey Snell. NPR NEWS Washington mayor

John Lewis Kelsey Snell American Civil Rights Washington Congressman Dr Martin Luther King Jr Edmund Pettus Bridge Pancreatic Cancer NPR Alabama Selma Atlanta Georgia
"kelsey snell" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:36 min | 3 months ago

"kelsey snell" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Next live from NPR news I'm korva Coleman the trump administration is asking the Supreme Court to overturn the affordable Care Act NPR's Amy held reports the move could take away coverage from more than twenty million Americans just before midnight deadline the trump administration joined a challenge to the affordable Care Act brought on by Republican officials in more than a dozen states in an eighty page brief the Solicitor General argues the decade old ACA should be struck down because Congress has already removed the individual mandate tax penalty rendering the rest of the law unconstitutional it comes as nearly a half million Americans have turned to the ACA after losing jobs and coverage in the economic downturn in a statement house speaker Nancy Pelosi called the effort to dismantle the ACA during the coronavirus crisis an act of unfathomable cruelty Amy held NPR news the centers for disease control and prevention says there are likely more than twenty million people in the U. S. who have been infected with a corona virus the number of infections is surging in more than half of US states especially in the south and west one of the states seeing a sharp rise in virus infections East Texas Dr Cedric dark is an emergency room physician affiliated with Baylor college of medicine in Houston he told NPR's morning edition that many more people are seeking care I've seen patients that have been in the E. R. S. waiting for over twenty four hours trying to find a place for them a bed for them that has isolation capacity to handle cold and that just doesn't happen and as the numbers will show you the doctor can see in and around the Texas Medical Center has started to grow exponentially over the past couple of weeks Texas governor Greg Abbott has put a ban on elective surgeries in several Texas counties to free up hospital bands the house has voted to approve a sweeping police overhaul bill written by Democrats and peers Kelsey Snell reports talks over police reform are at a stalemate because Republicans in the Senate have refused to take up the house bill the legislation would end of qualified immunity mandate data collection on the use of force and create a national registry of police misconduct would also banned chokehold and restraint similar to the one used in the killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis congressional black caucus chairwoman Karen bass says the legislation meets the demand to end racial injustice and police say the world is witnessing the birth of a new movement in our country this movement has now spread to many nations around the world with thousands marching to register their horror at hearing the cry I can't breathe the legislation is backed by civil rights social justice and labor organizations Republicans say the bill is a non starter in the Senate Kelsey Snell NPR news Washington this is NPR news the federal reserve is directing banks to hold off on buying back their own stock they're also being told to camp in dividend payments the fed says this is to help prevent a worst case financial scenario stemming from the pandemic in that situation more than thirty of the nation's biggest banks could lose about seven hundred billion dollars the fed is checking to see how well banks can respond to economic situations a psychiatric hospital in New York state is treating patients who have tested positive for the corona virus but have no symptoms from member station W. X. X. I know well Evans reports the facility also treats their mental health doctor Kevin Brazil oversees the unit at the university of Rochester Medical Center what we're trying to do is prevent anyone who may be covered positive from inadvertently spreading the virus to other people in psychiatric hospitalization patients interact with each other it's part of the therapy but in that environment the corona virus could easily spread so if a patient tests positive on arrival and is a symptomatic they are sent to this unit nine people have been treated so far if the patient starts to present cove in nineteen symptoms there's a liaison team of medical staff ready to assist Brazil says that's key because people with severe mental illness often fear of the medical system for NPR news I'm no well Evans and Rochester New York meanwhile vice president pence and members of the White House coronavirus task force will hold a press conference today president trump is not currently scheduled.

NPR korva Coleman
Lawmakers hold hearing on police brutality and racism in America

Here & Now

05:21 min | 3 months ago

Lawmakers hold hearing on police brutality and racism in America

"Today today the the house house judiciary judiciary committee committee is is hearing hearing testimony testimony on on police police brutality brutality and and racial racial profiling profiling it's it's the the same same week week that that house house Democrats Democrats introduced introduced sweeping reforms like banning police chokehold ending no knock warrants for drug searches and forcing states to collect data on police misconduct felonious Florida brother of George Floyd who died under the knee of a Minneapolis police officer a death that touched off international outrage spoke at today's hearing when you watch a big brother who looked up to for your whole life dia di bigger boys mom I'm here to ask you to make it stop stop the pain stop was the entire Joe was called by him and he was like no it please listen to the crowd I'm making to you now to the calls about family and the callers rang out the streets across the world well borrow backgrounds genders and races have come together to demand change NPR congressional correspondent Kelsey Snell joins us now Kelsey of Fulham's Floyd very powerful broke down in tears and just one of several witnesses today most call by Democrats so what else did you hear I think that I we heard one of the more moving moments from Floyd's testimony there he he was very clearly emotional after having the funeral was just yesterday I think one of the theme that we heard across the witnesses from both parties is that there was an acknowledgement that the catheter Floyd was wrong and horrifying and that reforms are necessary but there was not a lot of agreement or commitment about the right way to go about seeking those reforms I I will say that it was very interesting also to listen to one of the Republican witnesses her her brother was a federal officer who died it near the end the protests in Oakland California and she said that she empathized with the family of George Ford and she called for the same kind of justice for her brother she was called by Republican she's a former Republican congressional candidate in California so there was it there was shared horror on at the death of George Floyd but that that this is not yet quite at a point where there's an agreement about what to do about the striking to see a Democrats and Republicans have different lists of possible law enforcement reform you put them next to each other they're they're different and as we heard from Tonya Democrats have on their list banning chokeholds Republicans don't his representative Karen bass a Democrat talking about national standards for police it should never be that you can do a chokehold in one city and not in another there should be basic standards there should be basic accreditation there should be continuing education just as there are in so many other professions tells you what else are Democrats proposing while Democrats have off of a very extensive bill they're talking at a bedside from just the typical day want to ban what is known as qualified immunity it gives it is being used by police officers to to said that they would be immune from from from trials essentially from civil prosecutions I loved it that is something that has been controversial I will say that the the issue of chill cold has not been completely litigated between Democrats and Republicans there is some openness among Republicans to consider a ban but there are also talking about de escalation ways to lessen potential for choke holds that there there's a feeling among Republicans that they do not want to constrain the local police so what is possible here and something that the Republicans staff has raised with me is that there's a possibility that outside of the building across have proposed there could be additional separate bipartisan negotiations and talks we do know that Republicans in the center working on their own proposals which we may see in the coming days well and it could be said that Republicans are using calls to de fund police as evidence the Democrats are weak on crime here's the Judiciary Committee ranking member the Republican Jim Jordan it is pure insanity to defund the police and the fact that my Democrat colleagues won't speak out against this crazy policy it's just that frightening well having to speak to a representative Jordan tomorrow but meanwhile Democrats have spoken out against you de funding the police is something protesters are calling for representative bass called it a distraction senator Joe Manchin of West Virginia so the idea is crazy of so where does this debate go are they just talking past each other well it is interesting to watch Democrats figure out how to respond to these demands from their base it is not uncommon for either party to be trapped in a situation where the activists portion of their bases calling for something more extreme than the establishment partial portions of the party you're willing to get behind by and large elected Democrats in Congress are not in favor of the concept of de funding the police they say actually attempting to rewrite a little bit of what that means we've heard some some Democrats say when they hear D. fund they hear reform and that they that they think that the real intention here is to change the way the police interact with the communities that they serve NPR congressional correspondent Kelsey Snell thank you so much thank you

House House Judiciary Judiciar
House Judiciary Committee holds hearing on racial profiling and police brutality

Morning Edition

00:49 sec | 3 months ago

House Judiciary Committee holds hearing on racial profiling and police brutality

"House Judiciary Committee is set to hear testimony this hour on racial profiling and police brutality and here's Kelsey Snell reports the hearing is part of house Democrats attempts to pass sweeping police reforms by the end of this month Democrats a cold felonious Floyd the brother of George Floyd whose killing sparked protests across the country over police brutality the lengthy witness list includes Sherilyn Eiffel the president of the N. double ACP legal defense fund an expert on policing in the U. S. Republicans have called three witnesses including Dan Bongino a conservative commentator and former law enforcement officer in the Senate Republican leaders have tapped him Scott the only black Republican in the Senate to lead an effort to draft their own set of reforms White House chief of staff mark meadows told reporters he's hopeful proposals will be completed sooner rather than later

House Judiciary Committee Kelsey Snell George Floyd Sherilyn Eiffel President Trump Dan Bongino Officer Senate Democrats Scott White House Chief Of Staff Mark Meadows
White House and Democrats Near Deal on Aid for Small Businesses

Morning Edition

04:19 min | 5 months ago

White House and Democrats Near Deal on Aid for Small Businesses

"Morning the White House and congressional leaders are working on a new wave of coronavirus relief funding it's to help replenish the small business loan program that ran out of money in less than two weeks house speaker Nancy Pelosi said on ABC news yesterday that an agreement is close everything we've done at three bills in March for all bipartisan the central package will be too and the and the businesses will have the money in a timely fashion NPR congressional reporter Kelsey Snell has been following this one Hey Kelsey hi there good morning so the bill that's being discussed now with speaker Pelosi there just called an interim package four hundred and fifty billion dollars who's that money for well treasury secretary Steve Mnuchin said over the weekend that they were narrowing in on a deal that would include around three hundred billion dollars in additional money for the forgivable small business loans that's the paycheck protection program no the original three hundred and fifty billion dollars that they approved ran out in less than two weeks even with that rocky rollout and all those delays that we've heard about now there's also an additional fifty billion dollars for small business disaster loans seventy five billion dollars in emergency funding for hospitals I'm told that the last bit of negotiating over the weekend focused on around twenty five billion dollars for testing there's some questions about how that would roll out where that money would go what kind of restrictions Michael along with it and you know treasury secretary Steve Mnuchin says this could all be done early this week you know he mentioned over the weekend the possibility of a vote today in run it but we haven't even seen a bill yet so I would caution that that is possible but unlikely at this moment okay still so speedy it kills you know that you were reporting that the national governors association wants Congress to approve like five hundred billion dollars in direct aid to states so does this bill have any money for state and local governments it does not and I think that's really interesting here there is none of that money and five hundred billion dollars is a lot of money and primarily what they were talking about there was that the governor is worried that the stay at home orders and all of the additional response that isn't just involved with you know getting testing out there and making sure that people's needs are met they're worried that all of those changes to the economy are really negatively affecting their budget now it is important that this is something that Democrats wanted in this package but it not being there maybe the strongest evidence yet that there's another larger package to calm you know just a couple weeks ago the federal government injected two trillion dollars into the economy now another four hundred and fifty billion possibly you just said more to come what is all this spending tell us about what state we're in right now yeah they give you a little bit of a picture of the way the Congress is thinking about this money the staff I talked to over the weekend call this latest pot of money more of a gap filler actual new packages money and that's the moment where in nearly half a trillion dollars is a gap filler I know that can feel really hard to put your head around and to get contacts but this number we're talking about a gap filler number is more than half of the entire first bank bailout bill of two thousand eight now this talk about a fourth package would mean depending on who you talk to possibly include more stimulus last rescue so maybe infrastructure spending or some other way to get people spending money and back into the economy a good way to think about is look back to two thousand eight in two thousand nine Congress did that original bank bailout called harp at the end of George W. bush's last term and then a few months later president Obama work with Congress on an even bigger stimulus bill and it's possible that these additional pieces of legislation could follow that model Kelsey let's see there is an agreement this week do you know how the members of Congress will vote that is a really good question we know that they're both out of Washington until may fourth to send no Tim insure social distancing and leaders have indicated that Congress needs to act quickly on something members will get twenty four hours notice the house Majority Leader told members they could vote as early as Wednesday but getting members back to Washington is really difficult so there's talk about a proxy voting proposal which is supported by house speaker Pelosi still really very interesting to watch how Congress figures out how to vote in this time of coronavirus NPR's Kelsey Snell thanks Kelsey

White House
"kelsey snell" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:39 min | 5 months ago

"kelsey snell" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The next aid package and pairs Kelsey Snell looks back at the last time lawmakers were called to help rescue an economy in free fall it's fall two thousand eight and the economy is collapsing breaking news here stocks all around the world are tanking because of the crisis on Wall Street the Dow tumbled more than five hundred points after two pillars of the street tumbled over the weekend Congress has a response on how and quickly it passed a seven hundred billion dollar bank bailout with broad bipartisan support but that vote and the years of economic legislation that followed caused long term political consequences Eric cantor a former top Republican leader in the house helped write that bill he vividly remembers his reaction the day the chairman of the federal reserve tried to explain the depth of the crisis what do you meet the banking system would collapse would work and one of the responses was Welsh your constituents can wake up tomorrow morning and go to the ATM cash the sudden onset and depth of the crisis than mere the fears in Congress today the collapse a decade ago started with big banks and so did the bailout this public health crisis is much bigger and much more broadly felt but these two crises share an unprecedented demand on Congress to figure out how to help like the two trillion dollar relief package Congress passed last month the first attempt in two thousand eight wasn't enough to fix the economy Democrats took control of Congress three months later and immediately got to work on a massive stimulus with the newly elected president Obama the scale of the problem and the urgency required us to you do a lot of different things at once on the federal government actually has a limited number of ways to get out resources to people quickly that's Tom Perriello a former democratic congressman from Virginia doing things fast doesn't come naturally to Congress economists warn the country was on the precipice of a depression so Congress rosh and by the time the seven hundred and eighty seven billion dollars stimulus was done they had to pass it without a single Republican vote show the normal legislative process the Norcross is holding hearings just wasn't possible that's Phil Schiller he was president Obama's director of legislative affairs in the rush some members voted without even reading the bill and then they shifted to reforming the nation's health care system Congress was forced to move quickly but it took time for all of the changes to show up for most people one of the fundamental problems with the economy generate current time they were deep seated problems it was going to take awhile Schiller says jobs did come back in the recovery lasted basically until last month but politics moved faster hello lost a seat after one term in a massive wave election in twenty ten Democrats lost sixty three seats and control of the house Kantor's bank bailout vote which he defense today it was used against him when he lost a primary challenge in twenty fourteen says responding to the media crisis was more important than the political fallout the most important thing is to know whatever happens in the next election that you did what was right that you stepped up and use the power you have in Congress to try to help people there's no way to know when the damage from the virus will fade but Congress will learn if their actions went far enough when the country votes in November Kelsey Snell NPR news Washington this is NPR news it was the San Mateo bridge.

Kelsey Snell
"kelsey snell" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:40 min | 5 months ago

"kelsey snell" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The next aid package and pairs Kelsey Snell looks back at the last time lawmakers were called to help rescue an economy in free fall it's fall two thousand eight and the economy is collapsing breaking news here stocks all around the world are tanking because of the crisis on Wall Street the Dow tumbled more than five hundred points after two pillars of the street totaled over the weekend Congress has a response on how and quickly it passed a seven hundred billion dollar bank bailout with broad bipartisan support but that vote and the years of economic legislation that followed caused long term political consequences Eric cantor a former top Republican leader in the house helped write that bill he vividly remembers his reaction the day the chairman of the federal reserve tried to explain the depth of the crisis what do you meet the banking system would collapse would work and one of the responses was Welsh your constituents can wake up tomorrow morning and go to the ATM cash the sudden onset and depth of the crisis than mere the fears in Congress today the collapse a decade ago started with big banks and so did the bailout this public health crisis is much bigger and much more broadly felt but these two crises share an unprecedented demand on Congress to figure out how to help like the two trillion dollars in relief package Congress passed last month the first attempt in two thousand eight wasn't enough to fix the economy Democrats took control of Congress three months later and immediately got to work on a massive stimulus with a newly elected president Obama the scale of the problem in the urgency required us to you do a lot of different things at once the federal government actually has a limited number of ways to get out resources to people quickly that's Tom Perriello a former democratic congressman from Virginia doing things fast doesn't come naturally to Congress economists warn the country was on the precipice of a depression so Congress rosh and by the time the seven hundred and eighty seven billion dollars stimulus was done they had to pass it without a single Republican vote show the normal legislative process the norm prices holding hearings just wasn't possible that's Phil Schiller he was president Obama's director of legislative affairs in the rush some members voted without even reading the bill and then they shifted to reforming the nation's health care system Congress was forced to move quickly but it took time for all of the changes to show up for most people one of the fundamental problems with the economy generate corporate time they were deep seated problems it was going to take awhile Schiller says jobs did come back in the recovery lasted basically until last month but politics moved faster hello lost a seat after one term in a massive wave election in twenty ten Democrats lost sixty three seats and control of the house Kantor's bank bailout vote which he defense today it was used against him when he lost a primary challenge in twenty fourteen Perry Ellis says responding to the media crisis was more important than the political fallout the most important thing is to know whatever happens in the next election but you did what was right that you stepped up and use the power you have in Congress to try to help people there's no way to know when the damage from the virus will fade the Congress will learn if their actions went far enough when the country votes in November Kelsey Snell NPR news Washington this is NPR news from ferry boats to bridges.

Kelsey Snell
Timing of Trump Impeachment Trial in Limbo as Pelosi Holds Out for Assurances

NPR News Now

00:55 sec | 10 months ago

Timing of Trump Impeachment Trial in Limbo as Pelosi Holds Out for Assurances

"House Speaker. Nancy Pelosi says she plans to send articles of impeachment to the US Senate once Republican leaders outlined the process for a trial. NPR's Kelsey Snell reports policy must send the articles and Ney members to represent the house in in order for a Senate impeachment trial to begin. Pelosi says she wants to see a fair process and what Republicans have planned before she sends them articles of impeachment of president. Trump Trump Pelosi also took a jab at Senate Majority Leader Mitch. McConnell who has rejected a call from Democrats to agree on a list of witnesses for the trial our founders when they wrote the the constitution they suspected that there could be a real president. I don't think they suspected that. We have rolled president and a rogue leader in the Senate at at the same time. Republicans have criticized Pelosi for dragging out the process and withholding the articles of impeachment. Pelosi says she does not care what. Republicans say

Trump Trump Pelosi Us Senate President Trump Senate Majority Kelsey Snell NPR NEY Mcconnell Mitch
"kelsey snell" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:32 min | 1 year ago

"kelsey snell" Discussed on KCRW

"Congressional reporter kelsey snell has been following the negotiations she joins us now from capitol hill and kelsey let's just start with where things stand on the border funding more generally well talks are actively ongoing with an effort to try to get something passed by the end of the week so the senate passed one bill the house passed another and now they want to reach an agreement before the week is over nearly everybody on capitol hill grease that there is a crisis and that the agencies are going to run out of cash that is not a question the question is how are they going to reconcile these two only slightly different bills if everyone says they want to make sure the money's approved what are the obstacles the bill that the house passed has a lot more requirements and restrictions than what the senate approved and that's really what it comes down to progressives members of the hispanic caucus in the house push for that bill to require agencies to set minimum standards for karen detention facilities for talking about things like nutrition and hygiene and basic medical care they also want caps on how long unaccompanied children can stay in shelters and they want those standards of care to be uniform for government contractors and they want there to be some way to hold these companies accountable if they don't follow through now the senate doesn't have any of that what they do have is one hundred forty five million dollars for the department of defense and house democrats really really don't like that part house and the senate up being on the same page not unusual but what happens next well house speaker pelosi called president trump as we heard the president say there and it was right before we left for the twenty summit in japan and she wanted to make sure that they could do some negotiating and reach a middle ground even though he's not going to be here in the country i caught up with her today and she said the house and the senate are just doing their jobs and a compromise is possible they have their bill three affect best will protests are bill we have they would respect that and there's some improvements that we think of camping reconciled now that's not as black and white as we've heard in previous negotiations where the house senator pretty far apart and senate minority leader chuck schumer told some reporters to pelosi is asking specifically for the final bill to include checks on the department of homeland security and child related policies we don't know much more than that it is important to note the policy didn't completely reject the senate bill she just says that hers is better any chance they're going to find a way to agree on something before they all leave town for the july fourth holiday well aides tell me that they are very serious about getting this done and it's to be clear if there's a lot of pressure to do something and serious consequences if they fail and the senate has a strong hand in the negotiations are bill was bipartisan pass eighty four to eight which is really a very powerful vote this all suggests that the house could pass me the senate bill if pelosi was willing to let that happen or they could reach some sort of kind of narrow agreement that would allow both sides to declare some sort of victory and go home at the end of this week and tell their constituents that they took their actions to know get the money to the border that's n._p._r.'s kelsey snell kelsey thank you thank you You're listening.

kelsey snell reporter one hundred forty five million
GOP senators push back on Trump tariffs on Mexico

All Things Considered

00:51 sec | 1 year ago

GOP senators push back on Trump tariffs on Mexico

"Senate Republicans say they hope President Trump will reconsider his plan to Levy of five percent tariff on all goods imported from Mexico starting next week MPR's Kelsey Snell reports. GOP Senator shared their concerns with the White House officials at a weekly lunch, a growing number of Senate Republicans are expressing serious concerns about Trump's plan to use the tariffs to try to force Mexico to beef up its own immigration enforcement. Senate majority leader, Mitch McConnell told reporters that the Senate GOP position on tariffs was clear. Well, there's not much support in my conference for tariffs. That's for sure. Several Republican senators say the Senate cooed moved to block the tariffs, if they go into effect a hypothetical that McConnell wants to avoid what I'm telling you is we're hoping that doesn't happen. There is widespread worry among lawmakers in both parties about the economic impacts of the potential

Senate Mitch Mcconnell GOP Donald Trump Mexico Kelsey Snell Levy Senator White House President Trump Five Percent
"kelsey snell" Discussed on The 11th Hour with Brian Williams

The 11th Hour with Brian Williams

03:22 min | 1 year ago

"kelsey snell" Discussed on The 11th Hour with Brian Williams

"And so I thank our front, four for being up to the challenge and staying with us Kimberly. Atkins Kelsey Snell, Robert Costa, Jeremy, bash our, thanks coming up for us here. Nancy Pelosi says Trump is gunning for Trump says he doesn't want it more on the intensifying fight over the I word when we come back. The relationship let's call it between the president and the speaker of the house, never close really not close now. And B C news quoting Nancy Pelosi and a meeting with her democratic colleagues saying President Trump wants to be impeached and said Trump's actions were, quote villainous, this after noon. Peter Alexander ass. President Trump about Pelosi's remarks. Versus to confirmed. Some details relates Nancy Pelosi. She says that you want to be impeached. Do you want to be beached? East. Wants to be impeached. The president again, attacked Democrats for investigating him one day after a second federal judge ruled Trump's financial statements can indeed be given over to congress. They don't feel they can win the election. So they're trying to do the thousand stamps, keep stabbing, let's have a financial. Let's at of you. Look for forty million dollars, I would think seriously that Bob Muller and his group of eighteen killers have gone over my taxes. They've gone over my financial statements to a level that nobody has gone over them before. And they were not discussed even they weren't even discussed brought up have great statements, by the way, that was not an episode of the rifleman today. He was meeting with a group of visiting farmers. We never explained the backdrop also tonight politico is reporting that Democrats are readying a strategy shift, quote after returning from a week long Memorial Day, recess Democrats. Envision a wave of hearings on the substance of the Muller report. With us. For more on all of this Tim O'Brien executive editor of Bloomberg opinion, happens to be the author of Trump nation. The art of being the Donald also back with us. Eugene Robinson Pulitzer prize winning columnist for the Washington Post and because you are, and because you've written this today. I read you your own writing back to you, Jean. I don't think Pelosi strategy of resisting a formal impeachment inquiry can last forever. But I have to admit it's working, she looks like a responsible public servant trying her best to serve the public interest. He looks panicked desperate out of control and concerned only as usual with self interest. I guess there are two ways of looking at this, gene. She may be winning on strategy. What's doing the nation's business? However, what's getting done? Well, nothing nothing and their stuff that has to get done. The president said yesterday, I'm not going to work with the Democrats. Well, we need a budget. We need to raise the debt ceiling. The president would like to get his trade pact with Canada and Mexico past you need the house of representatives for all of those things, infrastructure, this was infrastructure weak, and yet again and yet again, we have no hint of an infrastructure Bill and you know what bridge is gonna fall down trains..

President Trump Nancy Pelosi president Bob Muller Kelsey Snell Kimberly Robert Costa Pulitzer prize Tim O'Brien Peter Alexander Eugene Robinson congress Jean politico Washington Post Bloomberg Donald executive editor
"kelsey snell" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:38 min | 1 year ago

"kelsey snell" Discussed on KCRW

"Senate majority leader Mitch McConnell is raising questions about the possibility of President Trump. Nominating Herman Cain to the board of the Federal Reserve. Here's NPR's. Kelsey Snell McConnell says he's waiting to see who President Trump will officially nominate before weighing in on a specific candidate. But he did acknowledge that former Republican presidential candidate Herman Cain, could pose a challenge to obviously critical components to making a nominated one is the background check on the other is likelihood of confirm ability, and as you know, some of. A member of expressed concern about the nomination. Kane. A former pizza company CEO touted controversial economic policies during the twenty twelve GOP primary and was accused of sexual misconduct allegations. He denies several GOP senators have questioned his credentials. Kelsey Snell NPR news, the capitol bombing in Pakistan today has killed at least sixteen people. The explosion in an open air market in Quetta, also wounded more than thirty others has been no immediate claim of responsibility. A strong earthquake shaking parts of Indonesia today. The US Geological Survey says the quake had a magnitude of six point eight it struck the island of Sulawesi. There are no immediate reports of damage or injuries. There are concerns though about possible. Sue NAMI, I'm Dave Mattingly. NPR news in Washington. And on this Friday, I'm Cheri Glazer. And you are listening to KCRW good to have your hair CHP. Emergency crews dealing with a wreck.

Herman Cain Kelsey Snell McConnell President Trump GOP Mitch McConnell Kelsey Snell NPR Kane US Cheri Glazer Federal Reserve Senate Quetta Sue NAMI CEO Sulawesi Indonesia Dave Mattingly
Jussie Smollett Returns to 'Empire' Set After Posting Bail

Hope in the Night

00:54 sec | 1 year ago

Jussie Smollett Returns to 'Empire' Set After Posting Bail

"Empire actor Jesse small. Let's been released from jail in Chicago after posting bond and return to the set of his TV show, the actor stands accused of staging a hoax attack on himself is filmed in Chicago. Assistant state's attorney recent Lanier says specific instructions were given to two brothers defendant small at also included that he wanted. Oh, let's place a rope around his neck, pour gasoline on him and yell. This is mega country. Linear says small let misled people into thinking the attackers were white investigation shifted from a hate crime to disorderly conduct police superintendent Eddie Johnson says smollet was upset with his salary. Why would anyone especially an African American man? Use the symbolism of a news to make false accusations. Kelsey snell. Let's attorneys say the allegations are outrageous. Inconsistent with his

Kelsey Snell Jesse Small Chicago Attorney Lanier Eddie Johnson Superintendent Smollet
"kelsey snell" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:11 min | 1 year ago

"kelsey snell" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Live from NPR news in Washington, I'm Lakshmi Singh. The United States could be hurled into another partial government shutdown at the end of the week. If there is not a compromise soon. NPR's Kelsey Snell says congressional negotiators have resumed their talks on a border security spending package. Top congressional negotiators hope to move past a weekend stalemate on a spending package for border security during the afternoon session. Lawmakers were optimistic about a deal heading into the weekend. But talks broke down on Saturday. Democrats said they could not overcome a disagreement over funding for additional immigration detention beds. Democrats have been willing to agree to some new beds to accommodate already overflowing immigration detention centers, but they want a cap on that expansion. Republicans say the beds are unnecessary trade off in the effort to enforce existing immigration laws. Lawmakers have until the end of the day Friday to pass a border spending agreement to avert another partial government shutdown Kelsey. Snell, NPR news, Washington. The embattled governor Virginia says he is not resigning. Ralph Northam has been under pressure from Republicans and members of his own party to step down after revelations that he wore black face in nineteen Eighty-four. He tells CBS that he's confident he still the best person to lead the Commonwealth. He has also stopped short of saying that Lieutenant governor, Justin. Fairfax should resign after two women accused him of sexual assault. Nor them says he supports an investigation and this morning is state lawmaker who threatened to begin impeachment proceedings on Fairfax decided to hold off for now. The NFL's Cleveland Browns have signed controversial running back Kareem hunt. NPR's Tom Goldman says a twenty three year old was released by his former team late last year after a video merge that appear to show him shoving and kicking. A woman. Cleveland is giving Kareem hunt. A second chance for two main reasons Browns general manager, John Dorsey says hunt has taken full responsibility for his actions, and he's undergoing and committed to necessary professional treatment hunt was the NFL's leading rusher as a rookie for the Kansas City Chiefs in two thousand seventeen but his promising career was derailed after the video surfaced costing him job. He wasn't charged following the incident hunt says he's grateful. The Browns are giving him the opportunity to earn their trust hunt. Also is accused of punching a man in the face last summer. He's not eligible to play until the NFL finishes investigating both incidents. He still faces a possible multi game suspension by the league, Tom. Goldman NPR news teachers are on. Strike in Denver labor talks with school administrators have collapsed leading to the latest in a series of strikes stage by teachers over the past twelve months across the United States before the close. The Dow was down fifty three points at twenty five thousand fifty three. The NASDAQ was up nine points at seventy three o seven and the S and P five hundred is up two points to twenty seven zero nine this is NPR news. And you're listening to WNYC in New York. I'm Jamie Floyd as people get started on their taxes. New York governor Andrew Cuomo is taking his complaints about the recent federal tax code overhaul to the White House. Cuomo plans to meet with President Trump tomorrow to discuss a provision that sharply limits federal deductions for state and local taxes Cuomo told reporters that as it stands the tax overhaul has unfairly affected wealthy democratic majority states, like New York, and California it has. Redistributed wealth in this nation. From democratic states from so-called blue states to red states. Cuomo says he hopes to deduction limit might be repealed now that Democrats control the house of representatives. But it would still have to pass the Republican controlled Senate and be signed by President Trump at city hall today. Public housing advocates protested mayor Bill de Blasios proposal to sell sixty two thousand Niger apartments to private real estate interests. Denise Harris is a resident of Nitras Richmond terrace houses in Staten Island..

Kelsey Snell NPR Andrew Cuomo Kareem hunt NFL United States Cleveland Browns Tom Goldman Ralph Northam President Trump Washington Fairfax Lakshmi Singh New York White House Cleveland Bill de Blasios Virginia
"kelsey snell" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:23 min | 1 year ago

"kelsey snell" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Won't hold back. They want and they sent me here to be aggressive to get it. It will be up to Cummings to overcome that divide. If he wants the committee to be more than a partisan sideshow. Kelsey Snell, NPR news the capitol. Now an update to a story we brought you last week. I spoke with an undocumented immigrant named Victorino Morales. She used to work as a housekeeper at a Trump golf club in New Jersey. She described how supervisors and staff at the club helped her get fraudulent papers a or says this seven, okay, you're not any. They knew that. I didn't have documents and the supervisor. George took my ID photo in the laundry room and a cousin of his took me to a place to get fake documents. He told me that I had to pay for them. And I said sorry, but I don't have money to pay for that. He told me not to worry about it that he would cover it, and I could pay it back. She I told her story publicly in the New York Times in December. And by the time I spoke with her last week. The Trump organization had begun to crack down more widely on undocumented workers. Attorney Audubon Romero told me he's representing about a dozen immigrants who were recently fired from two different Trump properties. The workers are the victims the employers recruited them brought them into the organization told them to go purchase fraudulent documents. It is not illegal to work in the United States. But it is illegal when you knowingly hire undocumented immigrants now, the Washington Post reports that the purge of undocumented workers from Trump properties has spread reporter, David Farren. Fold is here with the latest either. Hey, how widespread is this? Now, what are the latest numbers that you have what we know? So far is that there have been undocumented workers fired from five different Trump golf clubs all in New York. New York state of New Jersey, and that's a total of eighteen fired them at some that much. But remember golf courses in the wintertime are operating on a pretty skeleton staff, what kind of jobs, do these people do how long do they work there? Some of them and work there for eighteen years fifteen years. It's a mixture of folks who worked in landscaping folks who works in maintenance and the female workers have generally been, housekeeping, employees. I understand you spoke with Eric Trump. The president's son who helps run the day to day operations of the Trump organization. Tell us about that conversation. You had he and I went back and forth a couple of days ago about this. And so we learned from him about a couple of clubs where we didn't know have been firings. Pine hill. The of course, Trump has a ten Philadelphia colts, neck golf course near the jersey shore, plus three we already knew about a New York. New Jersey still this is a small fraction of the total properties that the Trump organization runs in the United States. Do you expect this to spread still further? It's really hard to know. So the Trump organization has said that. They are now doing a companywide purge a company wide review of these employees documents the documents that they're reviewing and they're using as the basis for firing. These folks these the documents that they gave when they were hired. What's unclear to me now is how many of them were doing any kind of extra immigration checks before this only a few of these properties were enrolled in e-verify, the federal government's sort of voluntary extra check system from employers. You want to check their employees an extra step and a few others. Eric Trump says a few he won't specify the number. We're using a third party HR vendor to do the same thing. But I don't really know the universe of clubs at weren't really checking immigration before. So it's hard for me to know, how many more will fire people. Now, I want to ask about a phrase you use in your latest story on the subject, you say, the Trump organization previously had paid little attention to their immigration status. We just heard Victorino Morales describe supervisors actively helping her procure fake documents. So at least on her case seems they paid a lot of attention to our immigration status. Is it your sense that the Trump organization more often turned a blind? And I or actively worked to keep documented employees on the payroll. Well, we've heard from workers both indications there's some people who said, look, I gave them a document fifteen years ago, and I bought on the street in queens, and they took it and didn't ask any questions they came to the Trump golf course sort of with the understanding that this was a place that didn't ask questions. But as you said there have been a few other examples where the Trump organization supervisor. So not Eric Trump personally, but the people who worked for him down at the golf club and supervise these workers where those people would either the workers have said, they either help them procure documents and one case at the Trump, Westchester golf club north of New York City. There was a guy who said look, I brought them fake document. And the supervisor said this is bad fake, go get a better one. He went to queen's came back and brought another fake the person said no this is fake. It's still not good enough. Go get a better fake finally comes back from queens with a third fake document. And the supervisor at Trump Westchester says. Okay. This fake is good enough to all those things seem to indicate a pretty high level.

Trump Eric Trump Trump Westchester supervisor New Jersey Victorino Morales New York City United States New York Times Kelsey Snell NPR Cummings queens Pine hill golf Washington Post New York George Audubon Romero president
"kelsey snell" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

05:54 min | 1 year ago

"kelsey snell" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"This is ninety point three k acu. This is all things considered from NPR news. I'm Mary Louise Kelley, and I'm Audie Cornish. Today is the thirty four th day of the longest government shutdown in history. And on Capitol Hill, the Senate took their very first votes on bills to reopen the government. That's right. One Bill backed by President Trump would have reopened the government and exchange for five point seven billion dollars for a border wall. The other Bill backed by Democrats would have opened the government. I short time to keep talking about the border now both of these bills failed. But taking the step of voting seem to shake up negotiations that have been stalled for weeks. Senate majority leader Mitch McConnell and minority leader Chuck Schumer went immediately into a meeting to discuss an alternative path forward one that could reopen the government and give lawmakers few more weeks to work out the details. NPR's congressional reporter Kelsey Snell joins us now from Capitol Hill, and Kelsey can you give us a sense of whether this new development is a sign of real progress. Well, it's kind of hard to tell at this point because things came together really quickly. After those two votes failed a group of about eighteen senators from both parties almost evenly split went to the Senate floor, and they started talking about a plan for three weeks spending Bill to reopen. The government just to let the talks continue and South Carolina, Republican Lindsey Graham was one of them. He said he'd already brought the idea to President Trump and Graham said congress needs to agree to give Trump a clear parameters for talking about border security and spending. Here's what he said, you're not giving President Trump a bunch of money to do anything. He wants to do with. He's got to spend it on a plan that the professionals have come up with. And he said Democrats would get some things they want to. You aren't eight hundred million dollars for refugee assistance. She'll get it. We all need more judges two hundred and fifty more border patrol agents on the border would be good for us all our leaders responding to this idea. Well, as you said McConnell and Schumer went and had a meeting about it right after the votes, and they talked about the possibilities. And by the time it was over Schumer came out. And he was smiling. He told all those reporters that they were continuing to talk, but it's really hard to tell right now. How far those talks will go in part because the president followed up by saying he needs a down payment on the wall before he can agree. And that's something we know Democrats have rejected so far the impression has been that the Senate has been completely taking a back seat in these talks. But now, it seems clearly the majority leader is engaged. Do we know what sparked this uptick and talks people on the hill are getting incredibly irritated? They want a deal, and they every time they hear from constituents or they turn on the television. There's a new story about the impact of this shut down on people who are voting for them and people who are hurting Ohio. Publican Rob Portman told many of us reporters that there shouldn't be so hard in that. There's actually a deal to be had shutdowns are always stupid this book, particularly stupid one. Because the underlying problem is one we can resolve we're not that far. This is not healthcare. He also said this isn't abortion. This is a kind of social issue that divides the two parties it is a conversation about border security, which in the abstract is something that both parties agree on. And that's kind of been the feeling from both parties are House Democrats sharing that same frustration. Yeah. They have passed several bills that also in the same message that they want to reopen the government first and then talk about border security later and the past another one this week. They're getting really annoyed with the White House to because essentially, they're calling the Whitehouse callous. They're really upset about some comments in particular that were made today by commerce secretary Wilbur Ross he was talking on CNBC and seemed to downplay the seriousness of the impact of the shutdown on workers. Here's what he said. I don't really quite understand why because the obligations that they would undertake saying. Borrowing from the Bank or credit union or unaffected federally guaranteed. So the thirty days of pay that some people will be out. There's no real reason why they shouldn't be able to get a loan against it. And we've been focused on the Senate, but House Democrats are they offering anything new and herbs negotiations behind the scenes speaker Nancy Pelosi is working on a new proposal that will detail all of the border security spending. They would be willing to do once the government reopens now that's important part. Right. Once the government reopens, and what I'm told is that all together the money. They're talking about proposing could meet or exceed the president's demand for five point seven billion dollars for a border wall. It just wouldn't be spent on the border wall. It would be spent on other types of border security, which Democrats say they're gladly would support. That's NPR's. Kelsey snell. Kelsey, thank you. Thank you. For government workers who aren't getting paid the shutdown feels more dire every week every day. Savings dry up the bills. Keep coming in the small town of oakdale Louisiana working at the federal prison was a ticket to financial security good salary. Good benefits. Now, the people with those jobs are making extreme decisions about how to keep their families afloat. Our co host Ari Shapiro traveled to oakdale to meet some of them. If Louisiana is a boot oakdale is the ankle smack in the middle of the state more than three hours drive from New Orleans or Houston. The typical family in oakdale makes about thirty thousand dollars a year. People at the prison earn thousands more than that from day one. So these were the jobs people were excited to get in. All of my years are never thought that America couldn't pay their workers. Corey Trammell is one of the local union leaders at the federal Correctional Institution. I've thought of a whole lot that could go wrong in a prison setting, but never to have an employee. Look me in the eyes entail me I cannot afford childcare. I cannot afford gas. To get to work. I can't afford my mortgage. How do you answer something like that the union arranged for us to meet some of the workers in town who are most affected by the shutdown corrections officers case managers secretaries we sat down with them at the burger in a local.

Senate President Trump Kelsey Snell Chuck Schumer NPR president oakdale Mitch McConnell Audie Cornish Mary Louise Kelley Lindsey Graham Rob Portman oakdale Louisiana Trump South Carolina Bill White House
U.S. backing of Venezuelan opposition comes with risks

All Things Considered

00:41 sec | 1 year ago

U.S. backing of Venezuelan opposition comes with risks

"New York advocacy group. He says his family scattered around the world because of authoritarian President Nicolas Madura rose regime. We have some family members in the United States is paving. Chile Argentina Colombia. No, we all feel that this moment will be key to that dream of like getting back together. My daughter was reelected in a vote that was widely seen as rigged. And as you've been hearing Venezuelan opposition leader one Guido was has declared himself the interim president this week. Our coverage of the situation in Venezuela continues after news headlines, New York City health officials are pushing members of the public to cut sugary drinks from their diets a new ad campaign. Pointing out that the not so sweet effects that can come from soda, sports drinks and fruit punch can be detrimental to your health and WNYC today city health Commissioner oaks IRAs Barbaro said that the list of health risks starts with cavities and obesity. And then the dominoes start falling in terms of increase risks for diabetes, heart disease, and the the contributions that those conditions have to ultimately things like cancer. The health department says New Yorkers have been drinking fewer sugary drinks since two thousand seven but about one in four adults and one in three high school. Students still drink one per day. And the MTA board is delaying its vote on possible fair and toll increases until next month at its meeting today. A board member said the agency needs more time to consider options the MTA had planned and approximately five percent fare hike to go into effect in March. It's unclear whether that will happen for every month that postpones the fare hike. Transit officials say they lose thirty million dollars. Currently fifty six degrees raining in central park at four zero six support for NPR comes from creative planning an independent wealth management firm whose advisors are fiduciaries legally bound to act in their clients. Best interests, more, creative, planning dot com slash NPR, wealth management redefined. It's all things considered from NPR news. I'm Audie Cornish. And I'm Mary Louise Kelley today is the thirty four stay of the longest government shutdown in history and in congress. The Senate took their very first votes on bills to reopen. The government one Bill backed by President Trump would have reopened the government in exchange for five point seven billion for a border wall. The other backed by Democrats would have opened the government for a short time to continue talks about the border both bills failed as everyday people across the country are coping with the shutdowns of fact like in Huntsville, Alabama where the greater Huntsville humane society gave free food to more than one hundred pets for Lord furloughed workers yesterday. Some people asked for a month supply and at the Salt Lake City international airport where the Utah food Bank set up donation bins outside TSA checkpoints for workers a room. There has been cleared to hold the items. NPR's congressional reporter Kelsey Snell has been following the politics of the shutdown. She joins us now from Capitol Hill and Kelsey as we've talked about for the last thirty plus days, roughly, eight hundred thousand federal workers will miss a paycheck. What is congress finally doing about this in short and they're not doing anything right now? Both Senate bills needed sixty votes. And both of them came up short six Republicans voted for the Democrats Bill and only one democrat Joe Manchin of West Virginia voted for the president's plan. Now, there's a lot of support for just opening the government, but we're in the same places we've been for weeks, nobody in the capital want the shutdown to last, but they simply can't figure out how to pass something that Democrats support and the president will sign so it's starting to feel like the same thing over and over the perception has been that Senate majority leader Mitch McConnell was on the sidelines throughout all of this. And now the Senate is engaged, right? Or congressional Republicans feeling pressure to end the shutdown. It would be an understatement to say that people are getting irritated. They just simply want a deal. I was talking to a lot of people including Republicans, and I think one person. Who described it, really? Well, was Ohio Republican Rob Portman? He told us that there shouldn't be so hard to get a deal. And there is a deal to be had. Here's what he said. Shutdowns are always stupid. This is one because the underlying problem is one we can't resolve we're not that far. This is not healthcare. He went on to say, it's not abortion. It's not one of these big social issues that people are used to fighting about. But they just can't get there. And, you know, Senate Democrats are pretty angry to this whole place is kind of a tinderbox. And there was this big fight on the floor between Michael Bennet from Colorado, a democrat and Senator Ted Cruz Republican from Texas and cut reheated. Here's what he said. How ludicrous it

Senate Rob Portman NPR President Nicolas Madura Congress MTA Kelsey Snell Chile Argentina Colombia President Trump Huntsville United States Interim President Diabetes New York Audie Cornish New York City Venezuela
"kelsey snell" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

01:42 min | 1 year ago

"kelsey snell" Discussed on Here & Now

"I'm Lisa Mullins. I'm Robin young. It's here now and the one hundred sixteenth class of congress is being sworn in today. It includes record numbers of women, including for the first time native, American and Muslim women and democratically controlled house of representatives. They all hit the ground running in the middle of a government shutdown. We're joined by NPR congressional reporter Kelsey Snell, and Kelsey you've covered congress for a while. Just your thoughts on this day. Well, it's really interesting to watch a really big and robust off freshman class. Come in. This is the largest that we have seen in many years, and it's also the most diverse, but I think it's really interesting to point out that while this freshman class is very diverse. It does. Can't really change the overall a aspect of the fact that is really still predominantly white and male. So this is a changing congress, but a slowly changing congress that he'd sounds as if if you scan the the rooms you can see the difference. Yeah. Particularly for Democrats. They have made a strong effort to recruit more diverse candidates. So you'll notice a larger change on the democratic side of the I'll well the house, which the Democrats now control gets to work immediately. After being sworn in. There's a short term measure. They're putting forward that would fund most of the government for another month while a longer term solution on border funding and homeland security can be debated. Here's incoming house majority leader, Steny Hoyer, he spoke on morning edition, those bills gives us another four weeks with government open with government serving the American people with the federal employees not traumatized by thinking. They're not going to get a paycheck and not be able to make them mortgage payment of the car payment or the kids college payment. We think that's the right thing to do for our federal employees..

congress Kelsey Snell Lisa Mullins Steny Hoyer Robin young NPR reporter four weeks
No signs of a deal to end partial government shutdown

All Things Considered

03:20 min | 1 year ago

No signs of a deal to end partial government shutdown

"Things if they can't pay their bills and gave them these draft letters that they could send to creditors and landlords to try to explain that. They can't maybe meet their financial help legations. That's kind of where things stand managing the problem. Not expecting a solution. You know, it's really interesting that this is not a local to DC problem about eighty five percent of federal workers that aren't in the military or working for the postal service work outside of DC. So this is a nationwide situation. There was this. Meeting in the White House that we all remember where Nancy Pelosi and Chuck Schumer met with President Trump and President Trump said he would gladly take the blame for any shutdown today. He's blaming Democrats for the shutdown. Tell us about how he is framing framing it as being about Democrats not wanting border security. He tweeted that Democrats have finally realized that we desperately need border security in a wall in the southern border. They need to stop drugs. He said do the Dem's realize that most of the people not getting paid or Democrats. He says without any evidence. And they Democrats say they do support money on the for border security, just not for the wall. So they're not even speaking the same language here. You said that this fight seems to be coming down to politics rather than policy tells about the politics of this. The president has always said he thinks immigration is a winning issue for him. Does that still seem to be the case not only does he seem to think it's a winning issue? He seems to be fundraising off of it. The Trump campaign put out tweets and text messages today asking people to donate to become a quote official build the wall member and this is happening. The administration is under fire as a second child died in US custody at the border and Democrats are calling his policies immoral. They're framing this as a as a moral question. It's beyond politics for Democrats. And that makes it much harder for them to move off of it when they've taken it on as central part of their governing theory under ideological theory and just a few weeks until we'll take control of the house. Yes. And we don't expect any action in the congress until NPR congressional reporter Kelsey Snell. Thank you. Thank you. This week. We're hearing about people who died in two thousand eighteen their obituaries didn't dominate headlines, but told fascinating stories are subject today, a Delaware man, whose death notice has all the elements of an action thriller,

President Trump DC White House Nancy Pelosi Delaware Chuck Schumer United States Kelsey Snell Congress Reporter Official Eighty Five Percent
"kelsey snell" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:46 min | 1 year ago

"kelsey snell" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Of what their responsibilities are and what their liabilities are. There's additional pressure because more than half a dozen members have resigned or have been accused of sexual misconduct in the past year, alone, California, congresswoman, Jackie speier has helped lead the negotiations for Democrats in the house. And she says the two sides agree on major things like providing legal representation for accusers in launching mandatory training for staff and members were changing the dynamic so dramatically and protecting the staffers on Capitol Hill for the first time in a meaningful way. House minority leader Nancy Pelosi says she realizes the final Bill might fall short. But she says the house can fill in the gaps leader we then can pass bills ourselves at half. And would put some pressure on the Senate to do the same. That's not good enough. For many advocates in harassment victims greens, attorney less alderman. Says he worries that some in congress will just declare victory and move on. I think people are going to lose the will to take on the big changes. And they'll also lose the public pressure to do. So green says she's worried that congress won't do enough, particularly when it comes to making sure that a person making the accusations has control over how much information is made public. But she's glad that congress realizes the system that they have. Now, isn't right and isn't fair I wouldn't be able to sleep at night knowing that there was another staffer out there. He was also dealing with us lawmakers say they hope a compromise can pass on the next few weeks to make sure that a new law is in place before the new congress takes office in January. Kelsey snell. NPR news, Washington. You're listening.

congress Nancy Pelosi Jackie speier Kelsey snell NPR harassment Senate California attorney us green Washington
Tim Scott announces opposition to controversial judicial nominee

All Things Considered

03:10 min | 1 year ago

Tim Scott announces opposition to controversial judicial nominee

"Republican Tim Scott says he will vote to block when a President Trump's picks for the federal bench. Democrats and activists say Thomas far was engaged in voter suppression of African Americans they have aggressively opposed his nomination to be district judge in North Carolina. Scott's opposition is a blow to Republicans who have made it a priority to approve Trump's judicial nominees. NPR? Congressional reporter Kelsey Snell is following all this from Capitol Hill, and Kelsey is it this issue of alleged voter suppression. That is informing Senator Scott's position it certainly appears that way. And Scott says that it is the thing that has been driving him. So for some context far has been accused by opponents of working to undermine voting rights for African American citizens. The issue Scott sites specifically goes back to FARs work on multiple campaigns for former North Carolina. Senator Jesse Helms Helms, a Republican was accused of using a program called ballot security to intimidate black voters, Scott he said he made up his mind after reviewing a nineteen Ninety-one department of Justice memo that detailed FARs work on that program. Scott also told reporters yesterday that he was reviewing that very memo in the middle of a procedural vote on the nomination for far. And this isn't the only time far has been accused of working to suppress African American votes. His opponents also point to a law far back that the courts have called the most aggressive Atari most restrictive voting law in North Carolina has seen since the era of Jim crow. Well know, what does this mean for FARs nomination? Is there any way his nomination can advance? Now that Senator Scott is saying he's going to vote. No, well, it effectively ends the nomination for this year. Arizona Senator Jeff flake told reporters today that he has serious concerns about far and he would vote against a final confirmation. Meaning that there wouldn't be enough Republican votes. Even if vice president Pence tried to come in and break a tie. What's really interesting here about flake is that he's already voting against President Trump's nominees is a kind of protest. So he's been trying to force Republican leaders to allow a vote on a Bill to protect special counsel. Rob sorry, special counsel, Robert Muller. And so he was already going to vote against the nomination. He's saying now, though, he has many reasons to oppose far. Okay. So even though the Muller nomination is unrelated this using leverage crazy things about congress things kind of blend together, though, Trump could renominate far next year when there will be more Republicans in the Senate, although he may still not get a vote in his favor from Senator Scott because Scott, again, also a Republican has opposed his one of his nominees before. Oh, yeah. An earlier this summer Scott told Senate Republicans that he would oppose another nominee. Ryan bounds who is up for a circuit court position. But that nomination was withdrawn before Scott could ever wind up voting against him. Now, he said for days that he was undecided about foreign particular. So there were people who thought that maybe Scott. Was gettable. But this is a pretty significant blow for Trump, and there are many many more nominees to come. So it's possible that they could rebound from this and Republicans could still continue down their path of approving many, many judges Kelsey Snell reporting from Capitol

Senator Scott President Trump Senator Jesse Helms Helms North Carolina Senator Jeff Flake Kelsey Snell Robert Muller NPR Vice President ROB Thomas Special Counsel Kelsey
McConnell Vows Congressional Response To 'Abhorrent' Khashoggi Slaying

All Things Considered

00:48 sec | 1 year ago

McConnell Vows Congressional Response To 'Abhorrent' Khashoggi Slaying

"Senate majority leader Mitch McConnell is denouncing the role Saudi Arabia played in the killing of Washington Post journalist, Jamal kashogi NPR's. Kelsey Snell reports the Senate is debating appropriate actions McConnell says the Senate is looking for a way to respond following reports that the CIA has concluded that Saudi Arabia's crown prince Mohammad bin Salman approved the killing of kashogi what obviously happened as. Basically certified by the CIA is completely abhorrent. Do everything. The United States house, dear and stands for in the world. President Trump has disputed that the CIA has reached those conclusions Defense Secretary James Mattis and secretary of state Mike Pompeo will brief senators on the situation on

CIA Saudi Arabia Senate Mitch Mcconnell Prince Mohammad Bin Salman Jamal Kashogi Npr Kelsey Snell Mike Pompeo James Mattis President Trump Washington Post United States
Democrats and Republicans in Senate elect new leaders

All Things Considered

00:40 sec | 2 years ago

Democrats and Republicans in Senate elect new leaders

"Included Florida governor Rick Scott despite the ongoing recount in that race. Both Scott a Republican and the current Senator Democrat Bill Nelson are in Washington talking about plans for next year. Even though it's still unclear which one of them will be Senator Kelsey Snell NPR news, the capitol stocks posted their fifth consecutive session. Lost today. Is traders pushed up bond prices and tech sector. Stocks continued to founder all three of the major US stock market indices were lower. The Dow down one hundred five points to twenty five thousand eighty the NASDAQ closed down sixty four points, the S and P five hundred was down twenty points today. You're listening to NPR and you're listening to KCRW good

Rick Scott Senator Kelsey Snell Senator NPR Bill Nelson Florida Washington United States Founder
Senate investigators asked Kavanaugh about 2 new claims of sexual assault

Morning Edition

04:13 min | 2 years ago

Senate investigators asked Kavanaugh about 2 new claims of sexual assault

"Blasi Ford and Brad Kavanagh have yet to speak, but we do know some of what the supreme court nominee and the professor who accused him of sexual assault decades ago plan to say they testify today before the Senate Judiciary committee and the committee has released their opening statements along with other results of the committee's on investigation. NPR's Kelsey Snell has been reading and she's on the line. Kelsey good morning. So so I read the statement by Christine Blasi Ford, and there there's no new information necessarily because she told her story to the Washington Post, but it feels different to see it in her own written words, and she will speak first in this statement that she gives we'll be the the written version of the statement is likely to be what she reads when she first is introduced and in it. She says that she doesn't want to be there that she is terrified. But that she thinks it is her civic duty to appear. She also says she wishes she remembers more about the details of that night. She's talking about things like how she got to the party or where it took place. But she says she doesn't have all those answers. And it doesn't remember she as much as she would like to. But she says the details that compelled her to speak up are seared into her memory and haunt her as an adult. It's a very forceful direct statement that lasts about eight pages and the details she's referring to that are seared in her memory are of being locked in a room with two men and one of. The men attacking her the other jumping on her at one point. And then the primary attacker. She describes his bread Kavanagh. That's right and Cavanaugh has had an opportunity in his own written statement to expand on his own denial that any such thing ever happened. What is he saying it actually very familiar to what people have heard from him in statements released by the White House? And in the interview he did on Fox News. He says that he didn't do it. He strongly denies it yet again. And he says that there's been a frenzy to derail his nomination and that he won't back down. He says sexual assault is deplorable illegal and against his religious beliefs says women should be heard. But he says that he also is not going to be politically pressured him either as judge or in this case, we also have a transcript here. Thanks to the committee of the interview that the committee itself or an interview that the committee conducted with Brett Cavanaugh, not just about Christine Blasi Ford. But about another woman who has accused him. He's asked. A you know, Debra Ramirez. He says I do when did you meet her? I knew are in college. We were friendly not friends, but friendly he's then asked repeatedly about a party at which Ramirez says that that that the cavenaugh exposed himself, and he says what he has no memory of any such event. Right. He denies again that he has memory of that or that he did anything on toward or illegal. Now, I have to say that this is part of a flood of information that started coming out yesterday less than twenty four hours before the hearing and included testimony and all kinds of new documentation from both the committee and from other sources and right now the waters are getting kind of money, and there are a lot of questions about you know, what what what is true who will be asked about what? And a lot of. This is expected to come particularly in the questioning of Ford asking her if it's possible that she remembered something incorrectly as a possible that she. And that her memory failed her while the Senate investigators think they have information that goes right to that. There are we should mention last minute further investigations against Cavanaugh. We don't necessarily have names places or or other details, but we also have a couple of men who stepped forward to suggest their own guilt. What do they say? Yeah. They're two men who raise the idea that it could have been them. I this is all as part of a broader released of information that is very it is offering a broad range of different ways that this could be interpreted. And we don't have very many details about who these men are what they were told no really good way to assess the veracity of their claims, we've reached out to Republicans and Democrats we were reporting all night on this. But we are still looking for more information and

Christine Blasi Ford Brett Cavanaugh Senate Judiciary Committee Kelsey Snell Debra Ramirez Assault Brad Kavanagh Washington Post NPR Professor Fox News White House Senate Twenty Four Hours
Senate Judiciary Committee, Christine Blasi Ford and NPR discussed on Morning Edition

Morning Edition

00:19 sec | 2 years ago

Senate Judiciary Committee, Christine Blasi Ford and NPR discussed on Morning Edition

"Live from NPR news in Washington, I'm korva Coleman. The Senate Judiciary committee will hear testimony today from supreme court nominee Brett Cavanaugh and Christine Blasi Ford. The woman who is accusing him of sexually assaulting her more than thirty years ago. NPR's Kelsey Snell

Senate Judiciary Committee Christine Blasi Ford NPR Brett Cavanaugh Kelsey Snell Supreme Court Korva Coleman Washington Thirty Years
"kelsey snell" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:37 min | 2 years ago

"kelsey snell" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Live from NPR news in Washington I'm Shay Stevens fewer than half the immigrant children separated from their parents at, the southern US border are back with their families as ordered. By a federal, judge from member station, k. q. e. d. in San Francisco Alex Emslie has more authorities are working against the Thursday deadline to return more. Than twenty five hundred migrant children to their families the government says more than eleven hundred children have so far. Been reunified or otherwise discharged three federal agencies involved in the case did not respond to questions about how cases are. Being resolved short of reconnecting, children with their parents adults connected to four hundred sixty three children are not, in the US. And may have been deported without their children deportations, of parents have been on hold since a federal judge in California issued a temporary restraining order last week but government attorneys. Are expected to soon file arguments that those deportations should resume For NPR news I'm Alex Emslie in. San Francisco West Virginia democratic Senator Joe Manchin is the first democrat to publicly schedule a meeting with supreme court nominee Brad Kavanagh NPR's Kelsey Snell reports the Democrats are still pushing for more information about Kavanagh's legal career, Manton is expected to meet with Kevin on Monday according to aides Manton is considered to be one of the most endangered Senate. Democrats up for reelection this year he's running in a state that President Trump won by nearly double digits so far nearly two, dozen Republicans have met with Trump's nominee to replace retiring Justice. Anthony Kennedy other, Democrats are mostly holding, off on meeting Cavanaugh until they have more information Senate minority leader Chuck Schumer is pressuring Republicans to release a trove. Of emails documents and drafts related to his public career Schumer says he won't meet with the nominee until there. Is an agreement for those to be released Kelsey Snell NPR news the capitol I'm great, government spokesman, says at least twenty people are dead in one hundred others injured as towns. Near, the, Greek, capital, or, engulfed in. Two massive forest fires Joanna kakissis reports from Athens Greece is seeking. International help to contain the flames being fueled by. Gale force winds. To visitors near the Acropolis the mass of smoke looks like a huge glowing storm clouds high. Winds are whipping the planes and smoke from the seaside town of Connecticut. About thirty five miles west of the Greek capital forcing thirties to close off highways. To commuters. Residents wearing surgical masks to guard against smoking relation told Greek TV reporters they..

US Alex Emslie Chuck Schumer Manton Kelsey Snell San Francisco Brad Kavanagh President Trump Senator Joe Manchin Shay Stevens Senate Washington Anthony Kennedy California West Virginia Joanna kakissis Athens Greece Cavanaugh Connecticut
"kelsey snell" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:09 min | 2 years ago

"kelsey snell" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I'm David Greene in Culver City California good. Morning the White House has spent much of this week trying, to clarify the president's stance on Russian interference in US elections this morning the president. Is trying to change the conversation he has tweeted the Democrats want to abolish ice that the, fake news media wants to push confrontation with Russia and that he's got a big jobs meeting coming. Up today, all of this comes at a crucial time the peak of summer, campaign season ahead of the November elections, and joining us now is Kelsey Snell who covers congress for NPR kill, stay there so the president is trying to. Blame the fake news media for winning a confrontation with Russia but aren't there members of both parties on Capitol Hill who are actually pushing a confrontation with Russia even today standing up to Russia is very much, on the minds of congress and, this is not a partisan issue all the pieces of legislation and resolutions that deal with Russia right now. Particularly in the Senate have Republican. Co sponsors later Today. We're expecting Senator Jeff flake of Arizona and Chris coons a democrat from. Delaware. To offer. A resolution to back the US intelligence community and ask for hearings on the president's meeting with Russian President Vladimir Putin. Now we, don't know that this is actually going to. Get approved it, would only take one Senator to object to it for this not to pass but this is definitely a bipartisan effort and that's in addition to other bills. That are out there that would bipartisan bills. To make more sanctions available to congress to put on Russia, if there's interference in a future election okay so a lot of concern about Russian. Election appearance on the hill even as the president seems to be trying to change the conversation, is saying the Democrats have a quote death wish by wanting to abolish ice he said this should. Cost them, heavily in the midterms you have Republicans overwhelmingly passing this Bill supporting, what can you tell me what the, back story is to all of this yeah yesterday the house passed this, resolution is non-binding and it just basically says that Support ice and the agents had ice Democrats largely didn't vote on this Bill they voted present which means. They're sitting, out voting yes or no and it was, kind of, a political move by Republicans. To embarrass Democrats who have a wing of their party who wants to abolish ice party is a whole doesn't have a position on this but the president tweeting this kind of proves the point that Republicans. Were, trying to make that they can make hay out of this. Portion of the Democratic Party moving further to the left and they think it helps, them in elections so help me understand, what the party wants to talk about right now on the hill they they wanna do things to confront Russia but it's been a tough week for the president are Republicans ready to. Just. Change the subject and then get away from Russia's quickly as they, can well in the Senate they absolutely want to change the subject back to Brett Cavanaugh who is in the process of having meetings for his, confirmation to, be on the supreme court and in the. House they want to talk about how, successful, their tax cuts were and how good jobs the job growth numbers are I? Mean, they don't want to. Be talking about Russia but frankly there are enough Republic In the Senate and in the house who are concerned about Russian meddling in the election, and it's going to be much harder for them to avoid it if the president keeps bringing it up and. These confrontations, continue alright NPR's Kelsey Snell who covers congress, for us, Kelsey thanks as always Thank you.

Russia president congress Kelsey Snell David Greene Senate US NPR Senator Jeff flake Democratic Party Culver City California White House Vladimir Putin Delaware Senator Chris coons Arizona
"kelsey snell" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

01:35 min | 2 years ago

"kelsey snell" Discussed on Here & Now

"From npr and wbz i'm robin young i'm jeremy hobson it's here and now president trump tweeted today that his meeting with russian president vladimir putin was even better than his meeting with nato he's defending himself against criticism from the left and the right over his performance at yesterday's joint press conference with putin where trump discredited us intelligence agency conclusions that russia interfered in the two thousand sixteen election and said putin's denial of interference was very very strong here's republican mike turner a member of the house intelligence committee speaking on cnn this morning certainly what we know now is the only thing that's come out of this this summit is certainly a dangerous policies dangerous statements divisiveness between of course the president and and congress of the president needs to make firm statements that he understands that russia is not an ally that russia has metal knee elections of russia's a destabilizing force threatening our allies joining us now is npr congressional reporter kelsey snell kelsey one of the few elected republicans who is defending trump today is kentucky senator rand paul who decried partisan politics as trump derangement syndrome trump tweeted praise for senator paul this morning how would you characterize the overall reaction though from congressional republicans well i would say that senator paul is a bit of an outlier in this situation most other republicans that we talked to you on the hill are either directly criticizing the president or they are saying that they you know reaffirming their support for the intelligence community findings that russia did interfere in the twenty sixteen election or some kind of combination of the.

npr jeremy hobson president vladimir putin nato cnn russia senator rand paul robin young trump mike turner kentucky
"kelsey snell" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:05 min | 2 years ago

"kelsey snell" Discussed on KQED Radio

"From is between conservative and moderate wings of the republican party but npr's kelsey snell reports the bill is widely expected to fail house republican leaders are forging ahead with a vote on the immigration bill despite signs that it could fall far short of passing conservatives moderates and gop leaders ultimately couldn't agree on some of the more controversial elements that conservatives are demanding house speaker paul ryan is setting low expectations for the vote what we have here is the seeds of consensus that will be gotten to hopefully now but if not later there are still serious disagreements among republicans they are still at odds over how to secure the border while granting legal protections for immigrants who are in the country illegally after being brought here as children kelsey snell npr news the capitol wore monitors in syria are reporting another round of government air raids against rebel held areas today you in syria on voice to fund a mistrial is warning the urine un security council of the risks of a fullscale battle in south west syria npr's jane arraf reports that in jordan aid groups are calling on the government to grant entry to syrian refugees un says almost fifty thousand civilians have been displaced so far as russianbacked syrian forces pushed forward to try to take back dr province that provinces near the jordanian border but jordan says it can't handle any more refugees and it says its borders will remain closed the norwegian refugee council says there's room and an almost empty camp in the north of jordan if the country opens its borders and if other countries provide aid this is npr news from k q e d news i'm brian watt some of california's top elected leaders and unions are blasting the supreme court ruling issued this morning that weakens the power of the nation's government employees union the court ruled that public employees who choose not to join a union cannot be charged for the cost of collective bargaining senator kamala harris has the court's decision is just the latest by the justices to side with employers over employees corporations over consumers and special interests over vulnerable americans the california federation of teachers says the case is an attempt by deeppocketed interest to limit the voice of educators and other public sector workers the oakland unified school district is bracing for another round of budget cuts the school board is expected to approve close to six million dollars in cuts to next year's budget at tonight's meeting k q e d vanessa ron canio has more the district says it has to pare down the budget in order to set aside enough money to meet reserve requirements parents and students fought to keep those cuts away from schools and the school board is expected to focus cuts on overtime workers compensation and the central office for parent loose that as it's a small victory but longterm parents and students are losing the battle dobbin i quit she's glad they're listening to community input but she's worried about how the district will cope with the growing cost of special education rising pension obligations.

republican party kelsey snell six million dollars
"kelsey snell" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:07 min | 2 years ago

"kelsey snell" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Live from npr news in washington i'm janine herbs senate majority leader mitch mcconnell says he continues to support investigations into russia's meddling in the two thousand sixteen election npr's kelsey snell reports made the comments and a wide ranging interview with npr after emerging from a closeddoor briefing with intelligence officials mcconnell again expressed his support for the investigation led by special counsel robert muller and a separate probe of the fbi led by the justice department inspector general mcconnell has remained supportive even as many conservatives aggressively criticized both probes npr's kelsey snell reporting in hawaii kilowatt volcano continues to send out streams of lava volcano remains active at its summit and as a wii public radio's bill dorman reports more lava is reaching the ocean sri flows of lava or now steaming into the pacific ocean off the big island of hawaii the hawaiian volcano observatory says there's continued activity both at the summit of away and about twenty miles away where lavas shooting into the air civil defense officials warn nearby residents they should be ready to evacuate quickly if necessary the marine corps has sent to super stallion helicopters to the town of hilo each capable of carrying more than fifty people at a time that's close enough to the volcano to move people by air if roads are closed by lava for npr news i'm bill dorman in honolulu movie producer harvey weinstein is expected to turn himself into authorities in new york city today after a long investigation into allegations of sexual assault dozens of women have come forward since last year with allegations against weinstein which set the metoo movement into action weinstein has denied allegations of nonconsensual sex a federal appeals court is up held the policy of a suburban philadelphia school allowing transgender students to use the bathroom of their choice as bobby allen from member station whyy reports supporters say the ruling shows that the courts won't tolerate school policies that exclude transgender students eight and distefano is.

harvey weinstein whyy philadelphia producer honolulu justice department special counsel senate bobby allen assault new york city washington hilo marine corps hawaiian volcano observatory bill dorman kelsey snell fbi robert muller