35 Burst results for "Kelsey Snell"

"kelsey snell" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

01:59 min | 5 months ago

"kelsey snell" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"People are creating fake accounts using computer generated profile pictures on the job networking site LinkedIn Here why tomorrow on morning edition from NPR news Tomorrow morning at 5 on 90.1 WAB From NPR news this is all things considered I'm Kelsey Snell And I'm Elsa Chang 33 year old Sophia Bret has lived in New York City for the last decade But she was born and raised in the Ukrainian city of harkey about 25 miles from the Russian border Her mother has lived there all her life and has continued to live there as a city has endured some of the worst shelling from this war Sophia and her mother have talked almost every day since the Russian invasion And as conditions and hard key worsened the pair faced a difficult decision Radio diaries brings us their story Every day I wake up reach to my phone and that split second before I look at my phone I have a fear of not seeing the message from my mom My mom's name is Vita And in the beginning the building where my mom lives It's like oh we're all together Cooked together Love together be scared together But then it got worse and worse every day Artillery falling into people's apartments and roofs Buildings explode And people started living Trying to evacuate Until only two other families was left in my building And I kept asking her would you be willing to evacuate their trees If I find someone for you to give you a ride or would you go But my mom told me right away that she's not going to leave Because she doesn't want to leave her aunt.

NPR news Kelsey Snell Elsa Chang Sophia Bret harkey LinkedIn New York City Sophia
"kelsey snell" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

01:35 min | 5 months ago

"kelsey snell" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"All things considered from NPR news I'm Kelsey Snell in Washington And I'm Elsa Chang in Los Angeles After more than a month of bombing and shelling Ukraine Russia says it will drastically reduce its military operations near the capital Kyiv But there are doubts on the ground in Ukraine and also at The Pentagon about what that actually means We have seen over the last 24 hours The repositioning of a small percentage of the troops that and the battalion tactical groups that Russia had arrayed against Kyiv If the Russians are serious about deescalating because that's their claim here then they should send them home But they're not doing that At least not yet And at his Pentagon spokesperson John Kirby speaking to reporters this afternoon western intelligence suggests that Russia will focus its war efforts on the Donbass region in eastern Ukraine Russian separatists have been battling Ukrainians for years there and Russian troops recently joined a fight Joining us now to talk about these developments are Ampere's Becky Sullivan She has just returned from eastern Ukraine and joins us now from Kyiv And we also have with us NPR Pentagon correspondent Tom Bowman hated both of you He also hey good night Hey Becky Let's start with you Is what Russia claims about troop reductions actually happening Like how skeptical are Ukrainian officials and Pentagon officials Yeah you know Ukrainian officials are really echoing what we just heard from The Pentagon there They say they've seen some withdrawals but it's far from everything essentially Here's colonel Alexander modigliani He's a spokesperson for the Ministry of Defense Speaking.

Russia NPR news Kelsey Snell Elsa Chang Pentagon John Kirby Kyiv Donbass Becky Sullivan Los Angeles Tom Bowman Washington Hey Becky NPR colonel Alexander modigliani Ministry of Defense Speaking
"kelsey snell" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

03:12 min | 7 months ago

"kelsey snell" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"But Republicans and some Democrats in the Senate are impeding those efforts The president has also been unsuccessful in what he said what his was his number one job and that is bringing this pandemic under control And while we wait to hear from the president we're joined now by a number of NPR correspondents who will be listening along with us We have NPR White House correspondent Tamara Keith and Pierre congressional correspondent Kelsey Snell and NPR senior political editor and correspondent domenico martino hate all three of you Hello hello Thanks for having us All right Tim I want to start with you because as we've mentioned it is not been the greatest stretch here for President Biden Can you just catch us up Where would you say things stand right now for The White House Well his approval ratings are completely underwater even on his handling of the pandemic which has been an area of strength for him an average of polls finds that in recent days that has crossed over two So he is in the negative in that realm as well There is a generalized anxiety in the country about COVID Some people worried about more shutdowns Others worried about their kids schools or preschools closing Others worried about getting the virus His build back better legislation is I'm starting to interrupt It's like the president is stepping up to the podium and the press conference is said to begin Oh folks I should be here Well good afternoon everyone Tomorrow will mark one year since I took office It's been a year of challenges but it's also been a year of enormous progress We went from 2 million people being vaccinated at the moment I was sworn in to 210 million Americans being fully vaccinated today We created 6 million new jobs More jobs in one year than any time before Unemployment dropped the unemployment rate dropped to 3.9% Child poverty dropped by nearly 40% The biggest drop ever in American history New business applications grew by 30% the biggest increase ever And for the first time in a long time this country's working people actually got to raise Actually got erased People the bottom 40% saw their income go up The most of all the cataracts We cut health insurance premiums for millions of American families And we just made surprise medical bills illegal in this country You know those bills you get that you don't expect them to two to 5000 dollars from the hospital beyond what you thought you were going to have to owe because of the consultation you weren't told was going to cost that much No more They're now illegal Thanks to the American rescue plan and other actions we've taken We've seen record job creation record economic growth in the past year Now thanks to the bipartisan infrastructure Bill we're about to make a record investment in rebuilding America to take us to be the number one best infrastructure in the world Now we're way below.

NPR Tamara Keith Pierre congressional Kelsey Snell domenico martino President Biden Senate White House Tim America
House Democrats Propose New Tax Hikes to Pay for Their $3.5 Trillion Bill

NPR's Business Story of the Day

02:01 min | 1 year ago

House Democrats Propose New Tax Hikes to Pay for Their $3.5 Trillion Bill

"In congress are moving ahead with president biden spending plan. It includes up to three point. Five trillion dollars for new programs mostly aimed at helping lower income americans. They plan to finish work today on a long list of new tax increases to make that spending possible. Npr congressional correspondent kelsey. Snell has been looking into this story. Good morning kelsey. good morning. What are democrats proposing re taxes. So democrats say they can raise at least two trillion dollars in as much as three trillion dollars with this plan. You know the big ticket items are increases to the top corporate and individual rates. You know basically they're trying to roll back. The tax cuts republicans passed under president trump. In two thousand seventeen okay. Let's parse those two out. What would this mean for taxes on individuals on the individual side. Democrats promised voters that they'd undo taxes for the wealthy and this is really their moment to do that. They want to return the top tax rate to thirty nine point six for individuals. Earning over four hundred thousand dollars. They also want to increase the rate high income. People pay for selling things like stocks and other assets. It's called the capital gains rate. And they wanna make the top rate for that twenty five percent which is a pretty big hike and what would it mean for businesses. Their plan would increase the top corporate tax rate from twenty one percent to twenty six and a half percent. Now that is not a full reversal of the tax cuts. Republicans passed and it's lower than what biden proposed they also plan to include changes to the rules for pass through businesses. Now sometimes that includes doctors and lawyers but it basically means that someone reports business income on their individual taxes and they wanna make it harder for companies to avoid the new higher taxes. How are republicans responding to these proposals while republicans say that the bill will actually have some pretty harmful effects on the economy. Mostly by making the us an unattractive place to run a company and they say it would penalize companies. That would normally use the money. They'd have to pay in new taxes to reinvest in their

President Biden Kelsey Snell NPR Congress Biden United States
Lawmakers in the House Narrowly Approved a $3.5 Trillion Budget Blueprint

NPR's Business Story of the Day

01:41 min | 1 year ago

Lawmakers in the House Narrowly Approved a $3.5 Trillion Budget Blueprint

"Slash 401k. House speaker. nancy pelosi yesterday kept her democratic caucus together to advance. The party's three point five trillion dollar budget framework. But the hard work of deciding. What exactly will be in that budget. Bill remains ahead pelosi herself not at at some of the future challenges. This legislation will be the biggest and perhaps most controversial initiatives that any of us have ever undertaken in our official lives before members of the house left town. They also passed voting rights legislation named after the late. Congressman john lewis. Npr congressional correspondent. Kelsey snell is here. good morning. good morning so kelsey. We spoke yesterday and democrats. Were stuck with moderates refusing to go along with speaker. Nancy pelosi's plan to advance these bills. How did she get this massive budget framework to move forward. We'll pull up has been seeing since june that there would be. No vote on the bipartisan infrastructure. Bill until the senate passed a separate three and a half trillion dollar partisan spending package so centrists were willing unwilling to sign onto that and they successfully lobbied to get a specific date. September twenty seventh as the official date that they will get a vote on the bipartisan bill. Regardless of what happens with that partisan bill now that is a victory for them in the sense that they were able to separate the two issues and give themselves an opportunity to you know have a test to vote on infrastructure if democrats are not able to come together on that very complicated process of writing

Nancy Pelosi Congressman John Lewis Kelsey Snell Pelosi Bill Kelsey NPR Senate
House Impasse Threatens to Derail a Part of Biden's Domestic Agenda

NPR's Business Story of the Day

01:55 min | 1 year ago

House Impasse Threatens to Derail a Part of Biden's Domestic Agenda

"House. Democrats try again to pass a budget framework. Today it's three point five trillion dollars. It contains within its provisions a large part of president. Biden's agenda and it is a special bill because under the rules. It is one of the few bills the democrats can get through the senate without any republican support. Trouble is the democrats face a divide among themselves in the house. Npr congressional correspondent kelsey. Snell has been covering the story kelsey. Good morning good morning. I had assumed the problem would be in the senate that would easily pass the house where the majority party is usually pretty unified. What happened instead. Well the democrats in the house really just have a very slim majority and some moderates have taken advantage of that that moment to try to get some concessions from house speaker. Nancy pelosi basically. She is trying to satisfy demands from two very different wings of her party. Progressives want to get moving on that three and a half trillion dollar budget framework because it could help them pass a lot of their major priorities. Like you mentioned things like addressing. Climate change are paid family. Leave or child care programs but the moderate wing was pushing for an immediate vote on the senate passed one. Trillion dollar bipartisan infrastructure. Bill they say that those priorities just need to move forward now. They can't wait for further negotiations on this bigger budget framework so pelosi's strategy since june has been detained the fate of both of these things together. She's essentially saying that. You know the infrastructure bill and the budget bill have to move together or nothing moves at all as you mentioned. They reached an impasse and after a lot of haggling arguing. They kinda came around this idea that they would use a procedural work around to pass the budget resolution without ever having to actually vote on it just on the idea of moving it forward that might sound crazy but it isn't unprecedented and it's within the rules and it would allow the house and senate to actually get to work writing the spending plan because right now. They haven't even done that part yet. This is just conceptual

Kelsey Senate Majority Party Snell Biden NPR Nancy Pelosi House Pelosi
Senate Set for Final Vote on $1 Trillion Bipartisan Infrastructure Bill

On Point

00:56 sec | 1 year ago

Senate Set for Final Vote on $1 Trillion Bipartisan Infrastructure Bill

"President Biden of Victory, Senators are expected to give that roughly $1 trillion bipartisan infrastructure plan a final vote today and send it to the House. After that. The Senate is expected to begin working on that larger $3.5 trillion companion bill that Democrats want to pass without Republican support later this fall. Here's NPR's Kelsey Snell. The idea is that once they vote on this $3.5 trillion frame, more committees will get to work, writing legislation to spend money and meet the goals. That President Biden sat out and they want it done by September 15th. And they're using that pretty familiar process of budget reconciliation that we've been talking about for some time now. Basically, they're using the budget process, um to pass spending a deficit related programs without the threat of a Republican filibuster, assuming all the Democrats in the Senate agree $3.5 trillion bill includes Democratic priorities, ranging from child care and family leave to climate change. As a nation deals

President Biden Kelsey Snell Senate NPR House
House approves Biden's $1.9 trillion COVID-19 relief bill, with no Republican votes

All Things Considered

03:47 min | 1 year ago

House approves Biden's $1.9 trillion COVID-19 relief bill, with no Republican votes

"The House of Representatives has approved a $1.9 trillion coronavirus relief. Package for those of you keeping track with this bill. Congress has now spent roughly $6 trillion to bail the country out of the havoc caused by the pandemic. And to put that into perspective that is about seven times larger than the stimulus passed back during the great recession of 2009. His latest bill includes a fresh round of $1400 stimulus checks, also a new and expanded child tax credit to rent relief utility relief and more money to help the uninsured by health coverage through obamacare. The bill passed with no support from Republicans, President Biden plans to sign the bill into law on Friday. NPR congressional correspondent Kelsey Snell joins us now, with the latest take Kelsey Hi there so no support from Republicans and tow layout. Republicans say they oppose it because it's not targeted enough. They argue it controlling the virus. They also say it's just we don't need to spend this much because the economy is already on the path to recovery. Do they have a point? What we're talking about here is really a question of two really different ways of viewing the economy and this pandemic. Republicans say that GDP numbers Wall Street All of these things are improving their you know the unemployment rate is falling. And they point of funding for the arts and humanities programs, museums and things like that is not necessarily about the pandemic on the face. House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy also compared federal spending in this bill to socialism, and he said, it just isn't sustainable. Showers money on special interests. It spends less than 9% on actually defeating the virus. They're really focusing on that money about getting back scenes out. They're reopening schools. That is the core of what Republicans say the money should be spent on and some Republicans said during the debate today on the House floor that sending checks to people is just popular, but they think bull object once they realize how much the government is spending on things that are not directly related to coronavirus relief. Okay, now, how do Democrats respond? All that Democrats? Say that Wall Street gains really just paper over major problems in the economy that are not felt by the vast majority of people. The vast majority of people are not stockholders, and they say This bill is meant to be a big social safety net. It's supposed to have more support for the uninsured. Like you mentioned more support for families with Children, people who are unemployed. People who are homeless and people who are struggling to make rent. You know, unemployment is improving, but the job Liz rate is still nearly double what it was before the pandemic, and the number of long term unemployed people is still up by three million this year, and that's all, according to the official Bureau of Labor Statistics. There's also money in here for institutions like museums that have been shuttered or have seen revenue declines that threatened their ability to reopen one vaccines or just tripped, barred out and distributed and people are going back in, and Democrats say this bill is about the whole system. No, I will note that Americans a lot of Americans seem to be on board with this legislation. Polls show fairly widespread support for it, which is something Democrats like 2.2. Are there potential political downsides here, though, for four Democrats, while Democrats say the Republicans will pay the price for lining up against something that is at this moment so popular House Speaker Nancy Pelosi pointed out that people who will benefit from this bill don't just vote for Democrats. And she says Republicans are voting against something they'll take advantage of later. It's typical that they vote no and take the dough. And this bill has bipartisan support across the country. You hear her? They're speaking through a mask on the house floor. But you know, a lot depends on how this is administered. Will it go out slowly You do. Schools actually reopened. Do bad actors get money? And does he economy actually improve with this infusion of cash, and that's all a

President Biden Kelsey Snell House Minority Leader Kevin Mc House Of Representatives Kelsey NPR Congress Bureau Of Labor Statistics LIZ House Speaker Nancy Pelosi House
Donald Trump's second impeachment trial begins today

BBC World Service

00:46 sec | 1 year ago

Donald Trump's second impeachment trial begins today

"Trial of Donald Trump is said to begin today. Defense attorneys say the proceeding is illegal because the former president's remarks to supporters who attacked the U. S Capitol last month amounted to free speech. But NPR's Kelsey Snell reports that House and Peach Mint managers are insisting that trump inside it the mob. They say that evidence against the former president is as they describe it overwhelming and they say what Trump is trying to do is to escape accountability. They also say that you know that the arguments that his lawyers are putting up basically don't meet the definition of what is constitutionally protected. They say that they're going to argue That the president should have been held to account for his actions because they happen well. He was in office, therefore, making him subject to impeachment. NPR's

Kelsey Snell Peach Mint Donald Trump U. NPR House
VP Harris casts tie-breaker vote in Senate progressing stimulus bill

Here & Now

04:05 min | 1 year ago

VP Harris casts tie-breaker vote in Senate progressing stimulus bill

"The Senate passed a budget resolution after a 15 hour marathon session known as a vote a Rama. It ended with Vice President Kamala Harris, casting her first tie breaking vote of the Biden administration. Passing the budget measures sets the stage for Democrats to move forward with Biden's coronavirus relief plan without Republican support. NPR congressional correspondent Kelsey Snell joins us now and Kelsey Walk us through what happened last night in the Senate and into the early morning. So this whole process known as a vote A Rama is a normal part of getting a budget passed and the very first step in using the procedural tool that Democrats want to use to pass the coronavirus aid is passing a budget. Down that also involves up just an endless string of amendments. Basically, any senator can offer basically on the amendment as often as they want and as long as they want until they get tired. The thing about it, though, is most of the amendments that get past are nonbinding, meaning that they end up having almost no no real impact on whatever legislation is to come. So we went through this long ritual, this long process to set up what will be now the committee work. So all of the committees that are named in this budget resolution will start to get to work on writing an actual covert, really fill a thing that could be enacted into law. And speaking of those amendments, Republicans and even some Democrats have suggested limiting Biden's proposed $1400 direct checks to a smaller group of people. Are there any details yet? About who could be excluded from that relief and what the income threshold might be. We don't really know for sure yet, because, like I said the committee's haven't actually started doing their work. What we do know is that there is some appetite, including among Democrats to make sure that those checks are targeted more. There have been some arguments that people who are making more than is may be necessary to To need an additional influx of cash. But those people have been receiving tax and there's an effort to kind of parrot down to make sure that as Republicans say it is targeted relief Now there is a debate about who really qualifies as being too high of an income to require such stimulus on I think we're going to be seeing that play out over the next several weeks. And I think the fact that there was an amendment on this issue that it got debate and that you know, it's indicates that this is something that both sides really care about, which means that it is most likely to have a really serious conversation that could drag out for at least the duration of the time that this isn't committees. I see. I see. And did we learn anything more during this process last night about the fate of a plan to raise the federal minimum wage to 15 bucks an hour. We do know that this is another place where there is, You know some disagreement among Democrats about the fate of the $15 minimum, which some Democrats say that $15 is just not What it should be across the country. They say that maybe in some cities in jurisdictions $15 is a reasonable minimum wage. But they say that other places in the country that doesn't need to be quite that high. Now President Biden has said that it needs to be part of the package. Bernie Sanders, the Budget committee chairman, says that that needs to be part of the package, so this could be one of those issues. That really drags Congress into a fight we've seen with budget reconciliations process that they're using that little fights over things that are important policies to some members can drag down entire bills, and this is a policy that is very important to a lot of people. So it could be one of those issues that we see people fighting about for the next several weeks. Kelsey. I spoke with Senator Tim Kaine earlier this week. And he tried to make the point that this budget reconciliation process could still be bipartisan. Even though a final bill likely isn't going to require any Republican support based on what you saw last night. Is that true? Are Republicans having much of a say in this process? That is technically true. There have been bipartisan reconciliation bills in the past, but you know in this situation Republicans air starting out at about $600 billion, and Democrats are talking about $1.9 trillion. Bridging that gap and finding bipartisanship on such a big divide would be very difficult to come by. NPR's Kelsey Snell. Thank you so much. Thanks for having me.

Vice President Kamala Harris Biden Administration Kelsey Snell Kelsey Walk Biden Senate Rama NPR Bernie Sanders Senator Tim Kaine Budget Committee Kelsey Congress
Trump Impeachment Trial: House To Deliver Article To Senate

Morning Edition

04:56 min | 1 year ago

Trump Impeachment Trial: House To Deliver Article To Senate

"Will carry impeachment papers from the House to the Senate to officially marked the start of the second impeachment trial against Donald Trump. A single article accuses former President Trump of inciting the insurrection at the U. S. Capitol on January. 6th. Tonight will be the ceremonial beginning of a trial that is set to get underway two weeks from now. Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer stressed yesterday that the process must go forward even though Trump is left office. Everyone wants to put this awful chapter in American history behind us. Sweeping it under the rug will not bring healing the only way to bring healing. Is to actually have real accountability. Which this trial of Ford's We've got NPR congressional correspondent Kelsey Snout with us this morning. Hi, Kelsey. Hi. Good morning. Why start things today on Lee to delay the trial for two weeks? This started because Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell asked the for delay to give Trump's team time to prepare and to give the Senate more time to get some work done. You know, Once the trial begins, senators have to sit in their seats in the chamber and all other Senate work has to stop, and it basically takes all of the energy and oxygen out of Washington while the trial goes on. And President Biden back the delay because he wants his cabinet in place. It also gives them a Democrat, some time to work on a covert relief package that they promised and just to get a little bit of work done, so they'll start by transmitting those articles of impeachment. Senators will get sworn in as jurors and the pretrial briefs will be due on the eighth so that the trial could be in on the night. Republican senators have been expressing a number of objections to the tri Elit self tell us what they've been saying Primarily, we've been hearing from senators who say that this process may be unconstitutional. They don't agree with the idea of holding a trial after Trump has already left office. Here's what Florida's Marco Rubio said yesterday on Fox News Sunday. I think the travel stupid. I think it's counterproductive. We already have a flaming fire in this country, and it's like taking a bunch of gasoline and pouring it on top of the fire. That's a pretty blunt assessment and kind of giving the other side of this, which is Republicans say that, you know, doing an impeachment trial once Trump has gone just makes the tensions in the country. Worse, Democrats have a narrow majority in the Senate. They're going to need Republican support to convict. How are they responding to their Republican colleagues making these arguments I talkto lead impeachment manager Congressman Jamie Raskin. He has a concert. Occasional scholar, and he says that impeachment is a constitutional tool. And it's one that applies on the first day of a presidency and the last day of a presidency. It doesn't just stop being valid because somebody lost an election. But it's true. You need 17 Republicans to vote along with Democrats, and that number seems very difficult to find. NPR congressional correspondent Kelsey Snell. Thank you. Thank you. We're going to bring in Senator Angus King of Maine. At this point. He's an independent who caucuses with the Democrats. Senator King thanks for being back on the show. Glad to be with you, Rachel. I want to start by asking you to respond to that clip. We just heard from Senator Marco Rubio. He says the coming impeachment trial is like taking a bunch of gasoline and pouring it on top of the fire. Well, it strikes me as as a little disingenuous for people who have been building the fire and throwing gasoline on it for months to suddenly say Oh, no, no, we have to stop now We have to have unity. These were the people that were spreading disunion. I'm not talking about Marco himself, but generally the president, of course, and many of this allies in Congress, so to say, now we have to forget about and shove under the rug, one of the most egregious assaults on American democracy in our history in the name of unity when the folks who are Saying that we're so interested in unity a couple of months ago, and for the record, you supported the president's impeachment in the house. Have you made up your mind about whether or not to vote to convict? No, there are two. Well, I'm clearly I just used the word egregious. I mean, I'm I'm I'm very concerned about what what happened on by the way. This will be one of the first impeachment trials in history where all of the jurors were also witnesses because we were there that day. But they're two pieces of evidence that I think we need to be developed at the trial. One is what did the president know? That morning when he addressed that crowd? What did he have for intelligence in terms of the nature of the crowd? What Their plans were, whether they were talking about violence and and storming the Capitol. If he knew that it seems to me that raises A really bad inference for his his role. The second is what did he do that afternoon to quell it? Once we knew that the capital had been stormed? Did he take any actions serious actions to try to quell it or As there has been reporting. Did he think it was a kind of kind of cool thing going on up there, So I think those two facts will have an influence on the outcome of this trial.

Senate Donald Trump President Trump U. S. Capitol Kelsey Snout President Biden NPR Chuck Schumer Jamie Raskin Mitch Mcconnell Kelsey Kelsey Snell Senator Angus King Senator King Marco Rubio Senator Marco Rubio Ford LEE Cabinet
Democrats take control of Senate as Harris swears in Padilla, Warnock and Ossoff

NPR News Now

00:56 sec | 1 year ago

Democrats take control of Senate as Harris swears in Padilla, Warnock and Ossoff

"Wednesday after the swearing of three new members. Jon ossoff and raphael warnock of took their oath alongside california's. Alex padilla who fills the seat that was vacated by vice president komo kamala harris. Npr's kelsey snell has more. The senate is now tied. Fifty fifty vice president harris would be the tiebreaking vote giving democrats control of the chamber. Newly minted senate majority leader. Chuck schumer has promised to tackle major priorities for democrats including climate change and racial injustice but he also acknowledges that in such a closely divided senate democrats and republicans will have to work together. We have no choice but to try to work together. Every day to reward the faith. The american people have placed in us schumer and senate minority leader mitch. Mcconnell are still working on a power sharing agreement covering committee assignments and senate operations kelsey snell and pr

Jon Ossoff Raphael Warnock Alex Padilla Kelsey Snell Komo Kamala Harris President Harris Senate NPR Chuck Schumer California Schumer Mcconnell Mitch United States
"kelsey snell" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:13 min | 1 year ago

"kelsey snell" Discussed on KQED Radio

"You know other issues. He wants to make clear what his priorities are, including Cove in 19 and climate change, but also racial equity on that critical issue. He wants to show that he's taking concrete steps. To address systematic racism, such as revoking Trump's ban on diversity, training and canceling Trump's 17 76 commission that historians say distorted the history of slavery. And, you know, Biden also wants to demonstrate that he's going to be president for all Americans, including the most vulnerable. Kelsey Snell, tie it all together for us and give us a sense based on your reporting on the hill today and all the days leading up to this about Joe Biden's ability to work with Congress on his agenda. Well, One thing we know is that Joe Biden knows Congress that he knows that all of the leaders of the House and the Senate personally he will have a relationship there, and we know that he personally wants to be involved in negotiations, but his Mara said, there are no honeymoons, and this will not be an easy road. That is NPR's Kelsey Snell. Along with Franco or Dona as and Mara Liasson. Thank you. Thank you. Thank you. Thank you. You're welcome. You're listening to all things Considered from NPR News near listing on KQED Public radio, there's a new four car crash in San Francisco. Hillary Walker. What's happened? Well, we have the right lane blocked. Unfortunately, Beth 101 South bound just after Cesar Chavez, you will be feeling that back up to the one on 1 80 split. Stalled big rig blocking the right lane in Fairfield, 80 westbound that's just after Texas Street and then conquered crews still trying to get that two car crash at the left lane four eastbound just.

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House prepares to impeach Trump for inciting the U.S. Capitol riot

Morning Edition

04:02 min | 1 year ago

House prepares to impeach Trump for inciting the U.S. Capitol riot

"Democrats are moving forward with the plan to impeach President Trump for a second time. President has just nine days left in office, and Democrats say this week they plan to file an impeachment resolution. This follows Trump's incitement of his supporters last Wednesday, hundreds of whom descended on the U. S Capitol. The violent scene left five people dead, including a Capitol police officer and NPR congressional correspondent Kelsey Snell is here with us this morning with the latest take healthy. Good morning. How will this impeachment proceeding work? Well, it will start today when Democrats plan to bring up a resolution that would call on Vice President Mike Pence to invoke the 25th amendment. Democrats will try to pass that unanimously, but Republicans could and probably will block it with just one objection. After that, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi is basically giving Pence 24 hours. I kind of ultimatum to decide if he's going to invoke the 25th amendment. If he doesn't she plans to bring the process you know to Ah, hold of bring together the process to hold a vote on impeachment. Which could happen as early as Wednesday. Now on the question of impeachment, it's currently just one article referring to incitement to insurrection. It's based on Trump's address to the crowd before the riots began, and his attempts to overturn the election in 2020 more than 200. Democrats have signed on, and I'm told that they expect some Republicans will support it, too. You know, Democrats are pretty unified and saying what happened? The capital cannot be swept under the rug. Is that Trump can't be allowed to simply leave office without any consequences, And they want to make sure that the Senate has the opportunity to vote to convict so that it can bar trump from holding future federal office. Okay, Kelsey. This actually brings me to the question of Republicans. We heard a few of them say over the last few days, they want Trump out of office. How widespread? Is that feeling within the GOP, you know, some of that is kind of hard to gauge because most of them have been quiet. We know that Alaska Senator Lisa Murkowski was the first to say that Trump should resign, but she's been joined by retiring Senator Pat Toomey. He was asked about this yesterday on CNN. I think at this point with just a few days left, it's the best half forward. Now there are a few others that agree. But some others, like Missouri Senator Roy Blunt, who's part of Republican leadership, says he basically wants Trump to be quiet for 10 days and just leave. You know, House Republican leaders have also mostly been silent, except for Liz Cheney, who has often broken with the rest of House Republican leadership when it comes to Trump Okay. This process the house wants to do is is really quick. But there's still the Senate, right? And you know, that is really the wild card here because Republicans will control the Senate until the Georgia elections are certified. And then the Senate has to meet and do some required organizing work. So that means that Mitch McConnell would control the timing and the Senate is out of session. So what would need to happen is they would have to bring them back into session. They would start a trial basically around Inauguration Day. Once an impeachment trial is triggered in the Senate, it stops everything else from happening. It forces senators to come to the Senate floor stick down six days a week until the trial concludes, and that could take weeks. House Minority Whip Jim Clyburn floated a proposal that he says could solve it. Here He is yesterday on CNN President Look Bad 100 days he needs to get his agenda off and running. Maybe we'll send you the articles. Sometimes after that, Ah, 100 Days is a really long time And that could be well after Trump leaves office And you know, Democrats want to proceed for all the reasons I've mentioned before, but this creates a really complicating political moment for Biden as he tries to, you know, move forward and move the country ahead. And this is all happening. I 30 seconds with you as we prepare for Joe Biden's inauguration. What are the concerns about safety? Yeah, they're still concerns the capitals a little bit like a fortress right now, with fences and National Guard troops and there. There's a process of a review right now. But there are serious concerns about whether or not the capital but will be fully safe for the bite. Administration were told that there are really efforts right now trying to Trying to beef up security and take every precaution. Possible.

Donald Trump President Trump Senate Kelsey Snell House Speaker Nancy Pelosi Capitol Police Mike Pence Senator Lisa Murkowski Senator Pat Toomey Senator Roy Blunt Liz Cheney NPR U. Kelsey CNN House Minority Whip Jim Clybur GOP House Alaska Mitch Mcconnell
'Her toughest test yet': Nancy Pelosi reelected speaker with narrow vote in what may be her last term

BBC World Service

00:50 sec | 1 year ago

'Her toughest test yet': Nancy Pelosi reelected speaker with narrow vote in what may be her last term

"California Democrat Nancy Pelosi has been re elected speaker of the House. In a narrow vote. NPR's Kelsey Snell reports Speaker Pelosi was reelected with five Democrats choosing not to select her for the job. Democrats begin the new session of Congress with a narrow 222 2 211 majority. This marks Pelosi's fourth term as speaker. She was first elected the job in 2007 and regained the gavel in 2019. Pelosi will lead Democrats as they prepared to work with President elect Joe Biden to enact his agenda. The new session of Congress is beginning under 10 circumstances as the Corona virus crisis continues to ravage the country. Roughly 50 members of Congress have tested positive for the virus since the pandemic began. One member elect Louisiana Republican Luke let Lowe died last week of complications from covert 19. Healthy smell. NPR NEWS

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The U.S. Senate has passed a bill that will keep the government open for 1 week

The Takeaway

00:57 sec | 1 year ago

The U.S. Senate has passed a bill that will keep the government open for 1 week

"A one week spending stopgap to avoid a government shutdown. MPR's Kelsey Snell reports. The legislation gives lawmakers a short extension toe work out details of a long term spending package. And new coronavirus relief. The Senate passed the bill by voice vote ahead of the looming midnight deadline. The measure was not without controversy and on Lee passed after senators from both parties dropped objections. Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders had been demanding a vote on his legislation to approve another round of stimulus checks for most Americans, he relented, but he says he will not back down again. Unless the Senate votes on his bill. We cannot go back to our families. During the Christmas holidays. While tens of millions of families are suffering they are looking toward us. The funding extension already passed the house and goes to President Trump for his signature. Kelsey Snell. NPR NEWS Washington While vaccines are on

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Discussions Drag On For Another Coronavirus Relief Bill

NPR's Business Story of the Day

03:33 min | 1 year ago

Discussions Drag On For Another Coronavirus Relief Bill

"So when are millions of struggling americans going to get another round of financial aid that answer not likely before the holidays. Lawmakers on capitol hill are struggling to find an agreement and there is so much at stake here because a lot of the additional financial relief. Americans are receiving will expire this month. We've npr congressional correspondent. Kelsey snell kelsey. I feel like a lot of people who might face fiction or who have been out of work for all. This time are justified in wondering what's happening on capitol hill Can you tell us yes. Oh the state of play. This week was that they started out with house speaker. Nancy pelosi and senate minority leader. Chuck schumer working with bipartisan group. An kind of negotiating starting point nine hundred billion dollars and that really seemed to be steam That would have stopped the expiration of several programs that are supposed to end at the end of this month but then sent majority leader mitch. Mcconnell said that he wanted to remove some major sticking points to pave the way for a deal but things he wanted to take away. One of them was money. For state and local governments said it was an exchange for getting rid of liability protections that republicans favor but democrats said it was just not negotiable for them to get rid of that state and local money because they said layoffs were at stake. That governments needed that money. In order to keep people on the job and then the white house made even more confusing and complicated with their own offer that included six hundred dollars in relief checks but not unemployment insurance that was in the version that congress had been talking about you know. It has been a chaotic week. And this is something that often happens in in congress when they're trying to get to a deal. There is a little bit of chaos but is particularly chaotic. And at a time when a lot is at stake especially chaotic indicate in an already chaotic place what lawmakers it sounds like a centrally giving themselves like one more week to cut some sort of deal. What is it like a self deadline. Doing some of that is just that they are trying to tie this to spending bills that are working their way through congress right now they have to pass a spending bills to avoid a government shutdown. And the do not want to shut down the government before the holidays you know and also congress just works well. Dad lines and the holidays are clear deadline and so are the widespread fears about what will happen to the economy into people fired for. We'll say house speaker policy did not rule out working between christmas and new years. If they can't get a deal done on the timeline that they've set up for themselves. Also say that there's now a push from progressives like alexandria ocasio cortez and bernie sanders who say that. They're frustrated with the aid packages under discussion and they want to include stimulus payments to help people who might be protected by fiction fans that are set to expire people who were behind on rent and bills who need extra cash right now just what happens to to them into so many other people with lawmakers can't find agreement. Yeah i mentioned that. The programs will expire and that includes unemployment insurance for gig workers and people who already exhausted traditional unemployment benefits The federal eviction ban would expire so would a pause on federal student loan payments and business. Deductions that were intended to keep these businesses hiring and to keep their employees on despite the pandemic plus a number of other elements that people may be starting to feel at home any expectation. That different president will will change the climate on the hill. That is the expectation for democrats. But you know no matter what happens. Things are being very tight in the senate and you know. I'm not sure that it'll be actually a lot. Easier to start getting bipartisan agreement. They've been in a staring contest in july. And each side. Fundamentally believe the other is wrong. About what the country needs and a lot of that would have to change for deals to be done in a simpler clearer fashion

Kelsey Snell Kelsey Congress Chuck Schumer Capitol Hill Nancy Pelosi NPR Mcconnell Mitch Alexandria Ocasio Cortez Senate Democrats White House Bernie Sanders
McConnell Says Negotiators Should Drop Sticking Points To Get Coronavirus Deal

BBC World Service

00:56 sec | 1 year ago

McConnell Says Negotiators Should Drop Sticking Points To Get Coronavirus Deal

"Remained at an impasse over a short term coronavirus relief package as NPR's Kelsey Snell reports they hope to reach deal before several major programs expire at the end of the month. Congressional negotiators are continuing to argue about the fate of a GOP back liability shield for Corona virus related lawsuits and Democrats demands for money for state and local governments. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell says the two provisions should be set aside until next year. What I recommend As we set aside, liability and set aside state local and pass those things that we can agree on. But Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer says without the money and local governments could be forced to lay off workers, adding toe already troubling jobs numbers. The two sides already agree on other major elements, including $300 in weekly federal unemployment benefits for four months and an extended ban on evictions. Kelsey SMELL NPR NEWS Washington Britain's prime

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"kelsey snell" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

08:07 min | 2 years ago

"kelsey snell" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I'm an NPR congressional correspondent Kelsey Snell and Amy how legal analysts who writes for the Scottish bloke Thanks very much, thanks very much, all for being with us. You just said this is part of the reason for these hearings is to have them broadcast. Have the American people be able to hear and see them? But it's interesting to know that it was Justice O'Connor's confirmation hearings in 1981 What were the first that were broadcast. Until then, they were not broadcast they way depended on Members of the Senate. Would come out of hearings very important hearings. Dina me interrupt briefly to tell our stations were listening to the Supreme Court confirmation hearings for Jamie Cockney Barrett. For the Senate Judiciary Committee. We now go back to the honorable Nina Totenberg. Visions, and I actually do remember hearings before they were broadcast and senators. This is really quite funny. Senators would come out and relate to the TV cameras what had happened inside and certain senators were really quite good at doing that. Without too much of a spin, and that's how we got audio and video. Other than that we didn't have any Oh, mercy until 1981 you say it was the 1st 1981. Well, it seems to me Nina. There was a Very good exchange. I think between Senator Blumenthal and Ah, Judge Barrett on the whole the whole issue of how she felt her reluctance to talk about Whether or not she believed that same sex marriage was essentially law on DH, she said. Once again, she didn't want to express yourself. Senator, Blumenthal said. Can you understand how you would feel if you happen to be in a loving relationship, and somebody who was about to sit on the Supreme Court of the United States didn't recognize your love. This thing. This was a very strong exchange, don't you think? It was a strong exchange. But in fairness to Judge Barrett Obergefell, which is the court's decision. 5 to 4 decision upholding the right of same sex couples to marry is still very controversial, relatively new Capable of being reversed and certainly capable of being undermined in a variety of ways. But what was striking, I thought was her refusal to comment on Griswold versus Connecticut, which is goes back to 1965 and guaranteed the right of married couples in the privacy of their homes to use contraception. And to buy contraceptives and that And she wouldn't She wouldn't bite on that one either, and Blumenthal, then read her. What other Part of the current members of the court had said in that included Chief Justice Roberts and Justice Thomas and I think that I look at my notes. Maybe there was one from Oh, it was Justice Kennedy. So it does contrast her. Reluctance to comment. On Very long established precedent in the Griswold case, and she says, quite accurately. Look, I can't imagine this would even come up again. I mean, who would bring such a case? But it doesn't take much to bring a case. I think it's worth noting. If I may that the legislatures of Sarah McCammon legislatures around the country in the past couple of years have been passing Not bans on contraception but extremely restrictive bands on abortion. By the standards of the last few decades, At least we've seen multiple states in the Midwest and South. Prohibit abortion of various stages in the first trimester. These so called heartbeat laws, which ban abortion as soon as any cardiac activity can be detected. We're talking seven weeks in a lot of cases, often before a woman even knows she's pregnant. And so I think well, Judge, Barrett said. It's hard to imagine any legislature prohibiting contraception, I think, ah, a number of years ago, most people would not have imagined the number of legislatures that have tried to ban abortion that early. Doing so And yet it's happened now. Of course, those those laws have been blocked by lower courts, and they've not made it to the Supreme Court. Yet there several steps away, but This is you know, this is why senators are asking these questions because we don't really know where the landscape is going. The landscape has changed quite a bit in the last few years, and this is this continues to be a contentious issue, and there continues to be I mean, while the majority of Americans support abortion rights and at least to some extent in support, support Roe v. Wade staying in place. There is really organized opposition to abortion rights and that opposition has been very successful in a lot of places and sand groups. Some of the same groups that oppose abortion also opposed. Contraception. So it's not crazy to theorize that that a case could arise that a state might decide to limit the availability of contraception. For example, Sorry just to follow up on what Sarah said. The challenges to some of these laws banning abortion that assumes there's a fetal heart beat may still be stuck in the lower courts, but the Supreme Court does have before it right now. A petition by the state of Mississippi, asking the justices to weigh in on the constitutionality of a law that bans abortions after 15 weeks, and it is all briefed, and the justices have rescheduled it a couple of times. Perhaps waiting for you know, we don't know what's going on behind the scenes but perhaps waiting for a justice Amy Cockney Barrett to arrive on the bench. Kelsey's now let me enlist you in our conversation because You might have a few more minutes before they try and resume the hearing. We hope with restored audio again. Nina mentioned that really wasn't so long ago. There was no broadcast of the proceedings. And then, of course, in recent years we've gotten used to seems of the full committee tables and bristling with Spectators who often got involved and reacting to the proceedings. How did they have to do it this year during a year of a pandemic? Yeah, the capital is really from top to bottom of completely different place right now. In this specific committee hearing room, there are no members of the public. There's a small pot of chair set aside for a judge Barrettes family. Andres Baird is sitting by herself at a distance from them on there is a second pod behind her for members of White House staff. And aside from that the only people in this room are a small gaggle of reporters about 10 people and the senators, and they're very, very close staff. Such it is so well regulated at this point that each senator only has one pass that they can share between all of their staffers. So if you are holding the past, you have to pass it off to the next person in order to have someone new come into the room. So it is a fairly tightly regulated situation and, you know, they even had to build a second row of seats so that they could allow the senators to be more distant. There also pp stations throughout the room, and every senator has access to masks and gloves and sanitizer. If they so wish, though, we see many of these senators air coming in with their own maths or choosing not to wear them at all. Yeah, Senator Ted Cruz, wearing the Lone Star mask, for example. Ah, And we should note that the second the audio problems we've had today or not. Senators who are participating remotely and pristinely way that a bit in the previous day. Senators, senators are actually on site. This is our second audio outage of the day in the in the Committee hearing room. Or hoping audio is restored..

Senator Supreme Court Jamie Cockney Barrett Nina Totenberg Senator Blumenthal Amy Cockney Barrett Judge Barrett Obergefell Kelsey Snell Senate Judiciary Committee Senator Ted Cruz Griswold Justice O'Connor Sarah McCammon Senate NPR Justice Kennedy Chief Justice Roberts Midwest United States
House Democrats pass partisan COVID bill; relief talks drag

Morning Edition

03:54 min | 2 years ago

House Democrats pass partisan COVID bill; relief talks drag

"Hours before the news broke that President Trump had tested positive for the Corona virus. The House of Representatives approved a new stimulus bill mostly along party lines. The $2.2 trillion bill is the latest bid by House Democrats who want an aid package passed before the election. Congress is still negotiating with the White House. But House Speaker Nancy Pelosi says now those talks may have shifted. This kind of changes the dynamic because Here. They see the reality of what we have been saying all along. The inability of Congress in the Trump Administration to reach bipartisan deal comes as companies are announcing mass layoffs and markets are responding to the news of Trump's diagnosis. We've got NPR congressional correspondent Kelsey Snow with us. Hi, Kelsey. Hi, there. What else did Speaker Pelosi say this morning while she was speaking on MSNBC, and she says she is praying for the president his family and that the line of succession is intact. We shouldn't remember that she is second in line behind vice president Pence in that line of succession. If something were to happen to the president But, you know, she also said that while it is tragic that the president was diagnosed with Krone virus spreading this disease is preventable. Going into crowds unmasked and all the rest was sort of. Ah, brazen invitation for something like this to happen, said that it did. But nonetheless hopeful that it will be a transition to a saner approach to what this virus is all about. Just for some context, I think it's pretty notable that Congress has no testing regime of any kind. Pelosi herself has been tested and is awaiting her result. And several top White House aides have been in contact with senior Senate Republicans in recent days who also don't have a testing regime. They were shepherding trumps nominee for the Supreme Court, Amy Cockney Barrett through her meetings on Capitol Hill. So there's a question about how why the impact could be in Washington right so and in Washington next week. Judge Amy Kuney. Barrett is expected to have her confirmation hearing. I mean, do we have any idea how the president's positive Corona virus test and the contact tracing that will emerge from that how that's going to affect the hearing? Well, we should say that we know that Barrett has been tested and she tested negative She's tested daily. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell had an interview this morning where, he said this nomination process is moving ahead, and Judiciary Committee chairman Lindsey Graham says everything is on track for the hearings to begin on October 12th. No, it's it's a situation where they're talking about having her nomination come out of committee by October 22nd and she still has a lot of meetings to do, and there is a question of how these hearings would actually happen. Majority leader McConnell suggested that perhaps this would be a more virtual hearing than we saw in previous confirmation process is so ah, lot is still up in the air, but they do expect to have a vote on the Senate floor, though McConnell still will not commit to exactly when that will happen. So let's get back to the Corona virus Financial relief bill. I mean the speaker, Pelosi said the dynamics of the negotiations might change. I mean, how does the president's diagnosis really make it more likely that there's bipartisan agreement here? Well, we don't really know exactly because the president hasn't been particularly involved in these conversations. In fact, he's been not involved at all. He has left it to Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin to continue talks with Speaker Pelosi and included an in person meeting this week. Now they this is a situation where if President Trump decided to endorse a Billy would have considerable sway with Republicans. On DH. Obviously, there's going to be political blowback from for both parties. If they can get something done, right? Absolutely, You know, this is a situation where they There is a strong feeling that Congress needs to be able to get something passed before the election because this has become a nationwide problem and both in the economy and as a public health crisis. Impairs. Kelsey Snell. Thank you. Thank you.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi President Trump Congress Amy Cockney Barrett Senate Mitch Mcconnell House Of Representatives Vice President White House Kelsey Snow Kelsey Snell Kelsey Amy Kuney Washington Trump Administration Lindsey Graham Supreme Court
McConnell says Trump's Supreme Court nominee will receive a Senate vote

Weekend Edition Saturday

01:10 min | 2 years ago

McConnell says Trump's Supreme Court nominee will receive a Senate vote

"Fly from NPR news. I'm Giles Snyder. Several Republican senators are lining up in support of Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is plan to vote on the nominee to replace Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. NPR's Kelsey Snell reports. McConnell has not given a timeline for replacing Ginsberg, who died yesterday from complications of cancer majority leader McConnell hasn't said if he plans to hold a vote on an eventual nominee before the election in November. Much of the timing will depend on how quickly President Trump announces his pick. Supreme Court nominees undergo a lengthy process before an eventual vote on the Senate floor. Typically that involves one on one meetings with senators completing a lengthy questionnaire and extensive background checks all before public hearings and a vote in the Senate Judiciary Committee. McConnell says Republicans were elected on a promise to fill federal court vacancies. Republicans have overseen a broad reshaping of the federal bench in recent years, approving more than 200 of President Trump's judicial nominees. Kelsey Snell. NPR NEWS Washington Top Democrats say Senator McConnell set a historical precedent when he refused to allow a vote in

Senator Mcconnell Kelsey Snell Supreme Court NPR President Trump Senate Majority Senate Judiciary Committee Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg Senate Giles Snyder Ginsberg Washington
"kelsey snell" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:36 min | 2 years ago

"kelsey snell" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Wednesday. Alabama Governor Kyiv is urging Alabamians to seek safer grounds as soon as possible, especially for those living south of about 10 and in low lying areas. I urge you in the strongest way possible to evacuated conditions permit and seek shelter. Elsewhere as possible. Today, the storm's outer bands are already hitting the coast President Donald Trump has already declared an emergency of parts of Alabama, Mississippi and Louisiana. For NPR News. I'm standin gold in Tuscaloosa, Alabama. Speaker of the House. Nancy Pelosi, is promising. The House will remain in session until Americans can be sure of a new round of covert relief. NPR's Kelsey Snow reports. Speaker Pelosi says Democrats agreed this morning to forgo on upcoming recess ahead of the November election in order to negotiate Corona virus aid. We are committed to staying here until we have an agreement. An agreement that meets the needs of the American people. Pelosi has rejected calls to fund individual covert 19 related programs, She says thie economic and public health needs are too vast and the larger package is necessary. Some Democrats worry they must pass fresh legislation ahead of the election. Republicans want to approve programs that already have bipartisan support like a popular small business loan program, rather than continuing to fight over bigger elements like funding for state and local governments. Kelsey Snell. NPR NEWS Washington, The top spokesman at the Department of Health and Human Services tells NPR that he did, in fact, say on Facebook live on Sunday that quote Should President Trump be elected? If you carry guns by ammunition, because it's going to be hard to get. Michael Caputo said He was not speaking in his official capacity. But as someone who had been physically threatened when he was at home with his Children, he says he's been under a lot of pressure. Wall Street the Dow up 99. This is NPR. And this is W. N. Y. C in New York. I'm Rebecca Ibarra. New York City's Department of Corrections says it's adjusting courthouse meeting rooms after attorneys complained it's impossible for them and their clients to practice social distancing. W. N. Y. C is Beth for take explains when defendants are brought to court from jail to meet their attorneys, they sit in tiny space is run by the Department of Correction where it's impossible to stay. 6 FT Apart. Some of these rooms have Plexi glass with a large hole. So the two sides Khun talk in Manhattan Criminal Court attorney Glenn Hardy says there's just a wire mesh barrier and that an angry client spit on him recently. They called AMs They took me to the hospital and spend about.

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Lawmakers Tackle Spending Deadline, Look to Revive Coronavirus Aid Talks

Morning Edition

00:53 sec | 2 years ago

Lawmakers Tackle Spending Deadline, Look to Revive Coronavirus Aid Talks

"Week ahead of a September 30th deadline to avoid a government shutdown. NPR's Kelsey Snell reports lawmakers air hoping to reach a spending agreement With or without additional Corona virus relief. Lawmakers and members of the Trump Administration agreed that they want to avoid a government shutdown when the fiscal year ends on September 30th. That likely means that they'll have to pass a short term extension of government funding at current spending levels. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Treasury secretary of Steven Mnuchin have already agreed on that goal and that they should approve the funding without any additional policy writers. But the duration of that extension is still up in the air. As our talks over additional Corona virus aid negotiations over that funding have been there to stand. Still for weeks. Democrats have said that they're willing to drop the requested $2 trillion, but Republicans say a much smaller figure is in order. Kelsey Snell NPR NEWS

Kelsey Snell NPR Trump Administration Nancy Pelosi Steven Mnuchin
Rep. John Lewis Makes Final Stop in Atlanta

Morning Edition

24:00 min | 2 years ago

Rep. John Lewis Makes Final Stop in Atlanta

"Rights activist and icon who became a moral force in the United States. Congress will be laid to rest. Today. He's been celebrated in a series of memorials this week and this past Sunday, he received a hero's sendoff in his native state of Alabama. And on Monday, Congressman Lewis was honored in Washington, DC It was an emotional Ceremony with lawmakers. His colleagues Speaker of the House, Nancy Pelosi, played a portion of a speech that Lewis gave to graduates at Emory University in 2014. As young people. You must understand that there are forces that would take us back to another period. But you must know that would mark warned by way made too much progress and we're going to make you some step back. Some delays some disappointment, but you must never give up. I give in. You must keep the faith and keep so eyes on the prize. That is so calling. That is your mission That is tomorrow. Obligation that is oh, man. They get out there and do it getting away. Lewis lay in state in the Capitol Rotunda following the ceremony, making him the first black lawmaker to receive that honor. And today, Congressman Lewis comes home to Atlanta, Georgia. The funeral service is being held at the historic Ebeneezer Baptist Church, where the Reverend Martin Luther King Jr was once co pastor and joining us Now is Emma Hurt. She's a reporter with our member station W. A. B in Atlanta, and she joins us live from outside of Ebeneezer Baptist and Emma describe what it's like there where you are right now. Hi, Emma. Can you hear me? Emma will be joining us shortly. She is outside of Ebenezer Baptist Church. Now let's go to Debbie Elliot. We'll check back in with Emma. And just a few moments. Hi, Debbie. How are you? I am good. I know that you spent a lot of time in Alabama over the weekend. There were several memorials and services. It was quite a scene. Right. You know, I think the thing that stands out the most was was when he was in Selma and his casket was on this horse drawn carriage. And it crossed the Edmund Pettus Bridge, of course, that iconic place where he was met with state troopers and sheriff's deputies who beat him up in a peaceful march for voting rights. Back in 1965 and people had come to sort of witness him make that Symbolic final crossing. Yeah, you've been You've known the congressman for for many years. You spoke with him back in 2015 at that. Edmund Pettus Bridge. Tell us about that. Yes. So this was in advance of 50th anniversary celebrations marking You know, 50 years since the Voting Rights Act passed because of that horrible incident on that bridge. The nation in the world really became aware of the brutality against African Americans who were pushing for equality in the American South. And so I met him there. We stood at the foot of the bridge, and we had a conversation about what it was like back then. And let's listen to a little bit, and he describes what happened on that came before. Beating us. Shrimping with horses. Releasing the tick and I was getting here. A state trooper with the night stick. My legs went from under me. I thought I was going to die. I thought I saw death. He thought he saw death, You know, and this was a moment where he had been that the the sheriff's deputy in the state troopers told them you have to turn back. We're not going to let you march to Montgomery. And they asked to kneel in prayer and as they went to kneel in prayer before they were going to turn back and go back to their churches. They were told. The meeting started. Tell me what's so powerful about that moment in history is that it was it was. It was a time where people were able to see for the first time the brutality. Those images were so powerful. It was labeled bloody Sunday and it sped up the passages you said of the 1965 Voting Rights Act. Debbie will will come back to you a little later to talk more about that. That's NPR's Debbie Elliot. We now have with us in the hurt. She is a reporter with our member station W. Abe in Atlanta, and she's outside of Ebeneezer Baptist Church where services will be held today. And Emma describe for us what it's like for you out there right now what you're seeing. Okay. Hi, Emma. This is Tanya. Can you hear me? Hi. Yeah. Can you hear me? I can I know that. It's It's quite a crowd. Okay? Can you tell us a bit about what you're seeing out there? I'm seeing I'd say about 200 people out here and we've kind of got to groups. We've got the people that are starting to gather at the Jumbotron, which has been set up right outside the church. I'm waiting to watch the service live there. And then we've got a crowd of people who are who are welcoming people as they arrive, welcoming the VIPs on presidential watch. Right now, I would say, waiting waiting for the three former presidents who are going to attend today and speak and the mood here is is really. I mean, it's it's serious, but it's also so joyful. It's about singing, and the stories that people have been telling me are just really powerful stories of how much Congressman Lewis meant to them. How much his message means to them in this time. And how much they want their Children and their grandchildren to make sure to remember him and what he stood for. What's really powerful, a swell about his home state of of his home state of Georgia and the city of Atlanta. Is that so many people felt like they knew him because they met him. You're hearing all of those stories from folks, I'm sure their interactions with him. Ebeneezer Baptist has so much history is I mentioned earlier, Martin looking Junior was a co pastor their share with us the significance of that church. Well, this was this was more Luther King Juniors from church. He grew up in it and was pastor as you said. It was also John Lewis's Home Church, where his wife's funeral was held in 2013. And it's really special. I think for these two figures overlap in this In this part of Atlanta to on Auburn Avenue, which is really the centre of Black Atlanta life, and some would argue the center of the Civil Rights movement and the two figures. I mean yesterday what was so powerful about Congressman Lewis lying in state in the Capitol in Georgia was that this was an honor denied to Dr King when he died. So I spoke to people who said I'm here because of all the people like Dr King who were denied that honor. And here we are giving Congressman Lewis most them may be the most honor. That we can right now. Sure, Let's listen to some of those folks that you spoke with you. It was amazing. It was amazing. All people on the young people. A lot of my friends has passed away. But I remember him from there. So that's why you mentioned This church being in the Hart. I just want to tell you that was Patricia Spicer, who's here, and she was talking about seeing Congressman Lewis speak at the 1963 march on Washington and that that's why his words were so powerful then and grabbed her then and she had to come today. The body of John Lewis was brought to Atlanta yesterday, and as you mentioned, it passed a number of important landmarks in the city. Walk us through. Some of those final landmarks that this journey to finally to Ebeneezer Baptist Church. There were there were quite a few stops because, as you said, Congressman Lewis has been such a presence in his district for, you know, 30 plus years. There was a pause at the Rainbow Crosswalk in Midtown, which you know, celebrates LGBT Q. The LGBTQ community here they passed by his downtown congressional office and a major street here that was renamed after him in the John Lewis Freedom Parkway on DH. It was there was also a big stop at a mural that you, Khun see driving down the interstate that runs through Atlanta. It has a picture of John Lewis and the words hero and, you know, it was really powerful. Tio. Watch him land for the last time in Atlanta and to watch him, you know, make his his final journey around the city. That's Emma hurt. She's a reporter with our member station. W. A. B in Atlanta. Thank you so much. Thank you. We're going to bring in another voice to our conversation. Remembering today the life and legacy of Congressman John Lewis Bishop Leah Daughtry is with us. Now. She's a political organizer and strategist. She ran. The Democratic National Convention is in 2008 in 2016 and she is the presiding prelate of the House of the Lord Churches. And there is perhaps no one better to talk about the intersection of faith in politics in this moment, which is what's so much of John Lewis's life really represents Bishop. Doctor. Thank you for being here. Good morning to you. And thank you very much from including this conversation. I guess I would just start by asking where your thoughts are this morning. Oh, you know, in the it's Ah, it's a powerful day. In the African American tradition. We call this the services home going And so they are mix of sorrow and sadness, but also great joy, particularly when it's someone like Mr Lewis, who has lived his life in such an exemplary way and in keeping with the principles of his faith that we know that he And our tradition. He's going home to be with the creator. And so we rejoice in bed and in the deeply held idea that we will see him again. So the mix of emotions on and I'm looking forward to the servants and being able to worship with those who have gathered To celebrate his life. The the word and his faith came before politics, did it. Not that was with what guided him first? Yes, yes, And I think that's so instructive for all of us who are people of faith. He was deeply guided by the principles of the face that he held so deeply and so closely and though that is what informed him and informed his action. Informed his decision to get involved in the civil rights movement on then to pursue a career in electoral politics. It's because of the ideals of of of our faith of our share faith that God intends for all of us. To live a full and abundant life. It holds us equally ah, in God's eyes and ah, divinely created and therefore in endowed with these Possibilities of being hole and equal. And then we have an obligation to pursue of society that sees us as God. And so for John Lewis that meant getting involved in the civil rights movement. That meant going on the bus boycotts being part of the leadership because it was he was pursuing the principal's off his face. And then in his later life, Of course, he came to Congress again, seeking ways to create a just society, a beloved community that treats all of its citizens equally. That has got had intended them to be he. It was almost a joke near the end of his life. How often he was asked to talk about preaching to chickens as a child on how readily he wanted to share that story, right? It was, he just he reveled in it of the idea of Off the joy he had as a very young man. I mean, eight years old, even sharing what he believed to be the most important important message there, Wass and and it helped him. Negotiate through through Washington. It helped him find ways to communicate with people with whom he disagreed. This's a very important part of his legacy is enough. It is it is, you know it and it tells you how deeply held his faith was. You know in these days, particularly when people are chasing followers, and ah likes and so forth on social Media network to think of this young man who who so loved his face. It was so impassioned by that any audience any Opportunity. He had to share his fate. Even with the chickens, Wass and was a chance to home his craft was a chance to get his ideas out was a chance. The tests, cadences and rhythms of words was a chance to share was the chickens and with those around the pick of the air, the grass the field how passionate he was about things that he believed and then bringing those ideals to Congress and understanding again. The people I help The idea of our faith that God has created a so equal And so if this idea that you don't have to be just like me to be just like me, there's something we have in common with each other. And if we can just talk if we can just be in conversation, we can see each other perhaps here because we may not still agree, but at least The tendency to demonize the unknown goes away lesson diminishes in the conversation. And who could refuse the conversation with Mr Lewis, who could refuse to just sit and talk and listen, and he was as good a listener. As he Waas a conversationalist. So you know, I think the Congress was richer for having him there on the Congress was Richard that his colleagues were Richard for just being able to be in conversation with someone who has deeply held ideal of deeply held conviction and experience. We should point out. Three former presidents are expected to get the memorial today. Bill Clinton. Barack Obama and and George W. Bush. I mean, just exemplifying the way that he he was very firm about what he believed and believed in his party, but he would work with Republicans if it meant Getting getting through the legislation he thought was most important. That's right. I mean, red and blue. These sorts of lines. These artificial divisions that we create among ourselves to categorize each other didn't really existed. Mr Lewis's lexicon. It was all about the humanity of people, and so has admit moving communities forward if admits Getting everybody the rights they deserve. Then he was willing to have the conversation. He was willing to be engaged and involved. And we see that in the folks that are going to speak today that are going to be present today at the tone and the tenor of the service, which he himself Designed. He spoke to his his closest staff. A. Stephen knew his time was shortening and said, who he wanted to be there. And what's the one of the elements of the club is to be what we see. Today is of Mr Lewis's own crafted bishop. Doctor, Can I ask one quick question if you were involved in the ceremony today, Realism putting you on the spot. But is there scripture that you think represents this moment, something you can point to that that carries the weight of history with it, but also Is about hope is about the future. You know, The thing that comes to mind for me is the passage and Hebrews. There's a chapter the faith chapter. We call it. Chapter 11 that talks about all the icons of our faith. Abraham and Sarah and getting and so forth on a long litany and in the middle of verse 13 says these all died in the faith, not having received the promises. But having seen them afar off, and for me that speaks of the hope. That was Mr Lewis's life. He stood on the shoulders of those who went before who didn't see freedom who didn't think the achievement of our civil rights. He followed them and he lived his life in such a way that he advanced the faith. He advance the causes, but he didn't see all of the achievement. And now we come behind him on continue his legacy. So he believed he held these convictions didn't scenes didn't see everything he fought for comes repair, But he still believed he still continue fighting. And henceforth Scripture goes on to say there was laid up for me A crown of righteousness was the Lord. That right? Justo shall give me on that day. And not to me only bought to all those who love disappearing. And so we look forward to seeing the two of us again in the future. Bishop Leah Daughtry. Thank you so much for sharing your reflections with us on this day. Thank you. Yes, very powerful. Let's go now to NPR. Congressional correspondent Kelsey Snell and NPR's senior editor and correspondent on the Washington desk. Ron Elving. Hey, guys. Kelsey. Good morning. We've heard so many powerful tributes from people throughout the country and the world. But But Louis is home state of Georgia. His presence and work had an especially profound. Meaning for his home state of Georgia for his district. Tell us a little bit more about his time there. You know, I am reminded of a couple of really, really standout moments of. I think one of the things that I think about a lot right now is the tribute that that they delivered for Johnny Isakson, who was a Republican senator. Of from Georgia, who retired last year, and in 2019 it was in November. So just just so a bit ago, Johnny Isakson was being was being honored and John Lewis Delivered this speech explaining how they could work together and and how there was an opportunity for anybody to find spaces where they agreed. And then, at the end of his speech, he walked across the Isaacson, who was in bad health and who had had trouble with his spine and said I will come to you brother and walked over and gave him a hug. That was really very much representative of the way. That John Lewis approached, you know, working on problems was what he wanted there to be bipartisanship. He wanted to be the person who came across, walked across and shake somebody's hand gave them a hug and said We can get something done here. He was also the kind of person who, whenever you saw him in the capital. There would be some person some tourist or a constituent who wanted to come and talk to him, and there was always had the time he had the time to tell his story had the time to talk to people about their story. He was extremely generous with his time and his constituents were known to come up to the capital and spent time directly with him. There was never a moment when it team like he was bigger than anybody else. Yeah, it's been Ah, so enriching and so fun over the last week to hear how so many people that I personally no have have met John Lewis, whether it's in Washington whether it's in Atlanta. New York Across the country. People have had a chance to meet him, but also have these intimate one on one conversations with him A CZ. We've learned he never turned anyone away. He was always willing to stop and have those conversations. One of the things that jumps out to me was a story about Congressman Lewis. When Hey, was in his district and he would spend a day doing a job in the district so even way back in the seventies, he would do things like drive a ups truck for a day to get a sense of what his constituents were up against. That is something that so many people feel is that he was of the people. Absolutely, and a lot of members of Congress that I speak to say they learned from that approach. They learned from John Lewis not just from the work that he did in civil rights, but the way he had a relationship with his constituents the way that he continued to speak about issues that meant something to him and then became active in them. I am reminded of the sit in on the House floor. On gun violence. He led House Democrats in a sit in and following. I believe the pulse shooting and they said that this was not a time when they could leave, and then he wanted to be the person who, you know who did the good trouble that he always talks about. He did not want to just be a person talking about it. He wanted to be a person involved in it. And you know so many members of Congress on Democrats and Republicans who felt inspired by that personal connection to his beliefs. The service eyes expected to begin shortly, and about 10 5 or 10 minutes. Ron, I'd love to go through with you what we can expect for today's service. But I want to talk first about Lewis's time as a civil rights activist, part of the movement back in the sixties. We expect to hear a lot about that today during the service, right? Yes, indeed, his life traced if you will, the trajectory of the African American experience over the last 70 80 years in American history. He was one of the group sometimes referred to as the Big Six, of course, beginning with Martin Luther King, whose name will be invoked. Many times today, but also Whitney Young of the National Urban League. Roy Wilkins of the CP. James Farmer of the Congress of regular Racial Equality and a Philip Randolph from the Pullman Porters Union. They were in many respects the Giants. Of the civil rights movement, as it took shape after World War two and rose in the fifties and sixties. Of course, John Lewis was there for most, all of it. He was part of the citizens at lunch counters in Nashville. He was one of the original 13 Freedom riders in 1961 integrating bus travel in the south. He was the youngest speaker on that day in 1963 when the march on Washington for jobs and justice featured Martin Luther King's I have a Dream speech. John Lewis spoke that day was the youngest speaker. He's the last person surviving from the speakers Dyas that day. And then, of course, the 1965 moment we have referenced Many times his beating on the Pettus Bridge. And, of course, his career in Congress, As Kelsey has described and then his links to the Black lives matter movement, which he paid tribute to In death as his cortege was coming to the capital earlier this week and paused on black lives matter Plaza in front of the White House to pay tribute to the movement and the people who are carrying forward his ideals today. Yes, And as we

Congressman Lewis Atlanta Congress Emma Hurt Martin Luther King Jr Washington Civil Rights Movement Debbie Elliot Ebeneezer Baptist Church Georgia Reporter Congressman Alabama Kelsey Snell John Lewis Bishop Leah Daughtr W. A. B John Lewis
"kelsey snell" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:36 min | 2 years ago

"kelsey snell" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Next live from NPR news I'm korva Coleman the trump administration is asking the Supreme Court to overturn the affordable Care Act NPR's Amy held reports the move could take away coverage from more than twenty million Americans just before midnight deadline the trump administration joined a challenge to the affordable Care Act brought on by Republican officials in more than a dozen states in an eighty page brief the Solicitor General argues the decade old ACA should be struck down because Congress has already removed the individual mandate tax penalty rendering the rest of the law unconstitutional it comes as nearly a half million Americans have turned to the ACA after losing jobs and coverage in the economic downturn in a statement house speaker Nancy Pelosi called the effort to dismantle the ACA during the coronavirus crisis an act of unfathomable cruelty Amy held NPR news the centers for disease control and prevention says there are likely more than twenty million people in the U. S. who have been infected with a corona virus the number of infections is surging in more than half of US states especially in the south and west one of the states seeing a sharp rise in virus infections East Texas Dr Cedric dark is an emergency room physician affiliated with Baylor college of medicine in Houston he told NPR's morning edition that many more people are seeking care I've seen patients that have been in the E. R. S. waiting for over twenty four hours trying to find a place for them a bed for them that has isolation capacity to handle cold and that just doesn't happen and as the numbers will show you the doctor can see in and around the Texas Medical Center has started to grow exponentially over the past couple of weeks Texas governor Greg Abbott has put a ban on elective surgeries in several Texas counties to free up hospital bands the house has voted to approve a sweeping police overhaul bill written by Democrats and peers Kelsey Snell reports talks over police reform are at a stalemate because Republicans in the Senate have refused to take up the house bill the legislation would end of qualified immunity mandate data collection on the use of force and create a national registry of police misconduct would also banned chokehold and restraint similar to the one used in the killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis congressional black caucus chairwoman Karen bass says the legislation meets the demand to end racial injustice and police say the world is witnessing the birth of a new movement in our country this movement has now spread to many nations around the world with thousands marching to register their horror at hearing the cry I can't breathe the legislation is backed by civil rights social justice and labor organizations Republicans say the bill is a non starter in the Senate Kelsey Snell NPR news Washington this is NPR news the federal reserve is directing banks to hold off on buying back their own stock they're also being told to camp in dividend payments the fed says this is to help prevent a worst case financial scenario stemming from the pandemic in that situation more than thirty of the nation's biggest banks could lose about seven hundred billion dollars the fed is checking to see how well banks can respond to economic situations a psychiatric hospital in New York state is treating patients who have tested positive for the corona virus but have no symptoms from member station W. X. X. I know well Evans reports the facility also treats their mental health doctor Kevin Brazil oversees the unit at the university of Rochester Medical Center what we're trying to do is prevent anyone who may be covered positive from inadvertently spreading the virus to other people in psychiatric hospitalization patients interact with each other it's part of the therapy but in that environment the corona virus could easily spread so if a patient tests positive on arrival and is a symptomatic they are sent to this unit nine people have been treated so far if the patient starts to present cove in nineteen symptoms there's a liaison team of medical staff ready to assist Brazil says that's key because people with severe mental illness often fear of the medical system for NPR news I'm no well Evans and Rochester New York meanwhile vice president pence and members of the White House coronavirus task force will hold a press conference today president trump is not currently scheduled.

NPR korva Coleman
"kelsey snell" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:39 min | 2 years ago

"kelsey snell" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The next aid package and pairs Kelsey Snell looks back at the last time lawmakers were called to help rescue an economy in free fall it's fall two thousand eight and the economy is collapsing breaking news here stocks all around the world are tanking because of the crisis on Wall Street the Dow tumbled more than five hundred points after two pillars of the street tumbled over the weekend Congress has a response on how and quickly it passed a seven hundred billion dollar bank bailout with broad bipartisan support but that vote and the years of economic legislation that followed caused long term political consequences Eric cantor a former top Republican leader in the house helped write that bill he vividly remembers his reaction the day the chairman of the federal reserve tried to explain the depth of the crisis what do you meet the banking system would collapse would work and one of the responses was Welsh your constituents can wake up tomorrow morning and go to the ATM cash the sudden onset and depth of the crisis than mere the fears in Congress today the collapse a decade ago started with big banks and so did the bailout this public health crisis is much bigger and much more broadly felt but these two crises share an unprecedented demand on Congress to figure out how to help like the two trillion dollar relief package Congress passed last month the first attempt in two thousand eight wasn't enough to fix the economy Democrats took control of Congress three months later and immediately got to work on a massive stimulus with the newly elected president Obama the scale of the problem and the urgency required us to you do a lot of different things at once on the federal government actually has a limited number of ways to get out resources to people quickly that's Tom Perriello a former democratic congressman from Virginia doing things fast doesn't come naturally to Congress economists warn the country was on the precipice of a depression so Congress rosh and by the time the seven hundred and eighty seven billion dollars stimulus was done they had to pass it without a single Republican vote show the normal legislative process the Norcross is holding hearings just wasn't possible that's Phil Schiller he was president Obama's director of legislative affairs in the rush some members voted without even reading the bill and then they shifted to reforming the nation's health care system Congress was forced to move quickly but it took time for all of the changes to show up for most people one of the fundamental problems with the economy generate current time they were deep seated problems it was going to take awhile Schiller says jobs did come back in the recovery lasted basically until last month but politics moved faster hello lost a seat after one term in a massive wave election in twenty ten Democrats lost sixty three seats and control of the house Kantor's bank bailout vote which he defense today it was used against him when he lost a primary challenge in twenty fourteen says responding to the media crisis was more important than the political fallout the most important thing is to know whatever happens in the next election that you did what was right that you stepped up and use the power you have in Congress to try to help people there's no way to know when the damage from the virus will fade but Congress will learn if their actions went far enough when the country votes in November Kelsey Snell NPR news Washington this is NPR news it was the San Mateo bridge.

Kelsey Snell
"kelsey snell" Discussed on KCRW

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03:32 min | 3 years ago

"kelsey snell" Discussed on KCRW

"Congressional reporter kelsey snell has been following the negotiations she joins us now from capitol hill and kelsey let's just start with where things stand on the border funding more generally well talks are actively ongoing with an effort to try to get something passed by the end of the week so the senate passed one bill the house passed another and now they want to reach an agreement before the week is over nearly everybody on capitol hill grease that there is a crisis and that the agencies are going to run out of cash that is not a question the question is how are they going to reconcile these two only slightly different bills if everyone says they want to make sure the money's approved what are the obstacles the bill that the house passed has a lot more requirements and restrictions than what the senate approved and that's really what it comes down to progressives members of the hispanic caucus in the house push for that bill to require agencies to set minimum standards for karen detention facilities for talking about things like nutrition and hygiene and basic medical care they also want caps on how long unaccompanied children can stay in shelters and they want those standards of care to be uniform for government contractors and they want there to be some way to hold these companies accountable if they don't follow through now the senate doesn't have any of that what they do have is one hundred forty five million dollars for the department of defense and house democrats really really don't like that part house and the senate up being on the same page not unusual but what happens next well house speaker pelosi called president trump as we heard the president say there and it was right before we left for the twenty summit in japan and she wanted to make sure that they could do some negotiating and reach a middle ground even though he's not going to be here in the country i caught up with her today and she said the house and the senate are just doing their jobs and a compromise is possible they have their bill three affect best will protests are bill we have they would respect that and there's some improvements that we think of camping reconciled now that's not as black and white as we've heard in previous negotiations where the house senator pretty far apart and senate minority leader chuck schumer told some reporters to pelosi is asking specifically for the final bill to include checks on the department of homeland security and child related policies we don't know much more than that it is important to note the policy didn't completely reject the senate bill she just says that hers is better any chance they're going to find a way to agree on something before they all leave town for the july fourth holiday well aides tell me that they are very serious about getting this done and it's to be clear if there's a lot of pressure to do something and serious consequences if they fail and the senate has a strong hand in the negotiations are bill was bipartisan pass eighty four to eight which is really a very powerful vote this all suggests that the house could pass me the senate bill if pelosi was willing to let that happen or they could reach some sort of kind of narrow agreement that would allow both sides to declare some sort of victory and go home at the end of this week and tell their constituents that they took their actions to know get the money to the border that's n._p._r.'s kelsey snell kelsey thank you thank you You're listening.

kelsey snell reporter one hundred forty five million
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02:04 min | 3 years ago

"kelsey snell" Discussed on KCRW

"Horrible. You see, now the roofs of houses off, but usually just everything just splintered, one person is dead. And dozens of others are injured after a tornado ripped through the city of Salona. Search and rescue operations are ongoing in both cities crews are also working to clear debris. Another House Republican is blocking nineteen billion dollar disaster aid package. NPR's Kelsey Snell reports Kentucky, congressman Thomas Massie prevented the legislation from being approved or in a brief meeting of the house during a week long break for Memorial Day. Massey as the second House Republicans to block attempts to pass the disaster package in the middle of preplanned congressional recess. Democrats had hoped to skip the usual voting process and. Approve the legislation by unanimous consent. But Massey stood in the way of that plan house, majority leader stunning Hoyer called on Republicans to drop their objections needs to be passed as soon as possible for the welfare of our people in this country who've been attacked by natural disasters. The Senate has already approved the funding and democrat on the house, expect to pass the Bill with bipartisan support when congress returns in June Kelsey Snell, NPR news, Washington. The state of Oklahoma's facing off in court against drug maker, Johnson and Johnson. The company is accused of using deceptive marketing campaigns that, downplay the dangers of opioids and overstated their benefits. The multibillion dollar lawsuit is the first major case against an opioid maker to go to trial. At last check on Wall Street, the Dow was down two hundred nineteen points at twenty five thousand three sixty six the NASDAQ down twenty three the s&p down twenty one. This is NPR. News. Support for NPR comes from NPR stations. Other contributors include the Andrew, w Mellon foundation guided by the belief that the arts and humanities are essential to the well-being of diverse democratic societies. Learn more at Mellon dot org, and.

NPR Kelsey Snell Massey Salona Mellon dot w Mellon foundation Thomas Massie Johnson congressman Hoyer Oklahoma congress Senate Kentucky
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KQED Radio

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"kelsey snell" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Live from NPR news in Washington, I'm Windsor Johnston. House speaker Nancy Pelosi says Democrats are not on the path to impeachment. That's despite her belief that President Trump has engaged in a cover-up NPR's Kelsey Snell reports. Democrats say they'll continue their investigations of Trump, his campaign, and his business dealings, Pelosi's as Trump's behavior, including ignoring subpoenas, and obstruction of Justice have happened in plain sight. But she says Democrats have to get more facts through congressional investigations are caucus is very much saying, whatever we do, we need to be ready when we do it, and I do think that impeachment is a very divisive ties to going country. Policy blame the failed talks between Democrats and the White House yesterday on Trump's frustration with Democrats over there continued investigations. She says she believes Trump is upset that the. Courts have already found in favor of to document requests by Democrats. Kelsey Snell, NPR news, the capitol, the Trump administration says it's planning to send at least five thousand troops to the Middle East NPR's Tom Bowman reports while the White House calls the move defensive in nature. It's concerning some officials at the Pentagon. The administration is goading Iran into a fight. They talk about pulling out of the nuclear agreement, they talk about the heavy sanctions. They talk about the Revolutionary Guards are now named as a terrorist organization, so there is concerned in the Pentagon that the administration wants a fight with Iran NPR's.

Trump NPR Kelsey Snell White House Nancy Pelosi Iran Pentagon Windsor Johnston Revolutionary Guards Washington President Tom Bowman
"kelsey snell" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"kelsey snell" Discussed on KCRW

"Senate majority leader Mitch McConnell is raising questions about the possibility of President Trump. Nominating Herman Cain to the board of the Federal Reserve. Here's NPR's. Kelsey Snell McConnell says he's waiting to see who President Trump will officially nominate before weighing in on a specific candidate. But he did acknowledge that former Republican presidential candidate Herman Cain, could pose a challenge to obviously critical components to making a nominated one is the background check on the other is likelihood of confirm ability, and as you know, some of. A member of expressed concern about the nomination. Kane. A former pizza company CEO touted controversial economic policies during the twenty twelve GOP primary and was accused of sexual misconduct allegations. He denies several GOP senators have questioned his credentials. Kelsey Snell NPR news, the capitol bombing in Pakistan today has killed at least sixteen people. The explosion in an open air market in Quetta, also wounded more than thirty others has been no immediate claim of responsibility. A strong earthquake shaking parts of Indonesia today. The US Geological Survey says the quake had a magnitude of six point eight it struck the island of Sulawesi. There are no immediate reports of damage or injuries. There are concerns though about possible. Sue NAMI, I'm Dave Mattingly. NPR news in Washington. And on this Friday, I'm Cheri Glazer. And you are listening to KCRW good to have your hair CHP. Emergency crews dealing with a wreck.

Herman Cain Kelsey Snell McConnell President Trump GOP Mitch McConnell Kelsey Snell NPR Kane US Cheri Glazer Federal Reserve Senate Quetta Sue NAMI CEO Sulawesi Indonesia Dave Mattingly
"kelsey snell" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:11 min | 3 years ago

"kelsey snell" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Live from NPR news in Washington, I'm Lakshmi Singh. The United States could be hurled into another partial government shutdown at the end of the week. If there is not a compromise soon. NPR's Kelsey Snell says congressional negotiators have resumed their talks on a border security spending package. Top congressional negotiators hope to move past a weekend stalemate on a spending package for border security during the afternoon session. Lawmakers were optimistic about a deal heading into the weekend. But talks broke down on Saturday. Democrats said they could not overcome a disagreement over funding for additional immigration detention beds. Democrats have been willing to agree to some new beds to accommodate already overflowing immigration detention centers, but they want a cap on that expansion. Republicans say the beds are unnecessary trade off in the effort to enforce existing immigration laws. Lawmakers have until the end of the day Friday to pass a border spending agreement to avert another partial government shutdown Kelsey. Snell, NPR news, Washington. The embattled governor Virginia says he is not resigning. Ralph Northam has been under pressure from Republicans and members of his own party to step down after revelations that he wore black face in nineteen Eighty-four. He tells CBS that he's confident he still the best person to lead the Commonwealth. He has also stopped short of saying that Lieutenant governor, Justin. Fairfax should resign after two women accused him of sexual assault. Nor them says he supports an investigation and this morning is state lawmaker who threatened to begin impeachment proceedings on Fairfax decided to hold off for now. The NFL's Cleveland Browns have signed controversial running back Kareem hunt. NPR's Tom Goldman says a twenty three year old was released by his former team late last year after a video merge that appear to show him shoving and kicking. A woman. Cleveland is giving Kareem hunt. A second chance for two main reasons Browns general manager, John Dorsey says hunt has taken full responsibility for his actions, and he's undergoing and committed to necessary professional treatment hunt was the NFL's leading rusher as a rookie for the Kansas City Chiefs in two thousand seventeen but his promising career was derailed after the video surfaced costing him job. He wasn't charged following the incident hunt says he's grateful. The Browns are giving him the opportunity to earn their trust hunt. Also is accused of punching a man in the face last summer. He's not eligible to play until the NFL finishes investigating both incidents. He still faces a possible multi game suspension by the league, Tom. Goldman NPR news teachers are on. Strike in Denver labor talks with school administrators have collapsed leading to the latest in a series of strikes stage by teachers over the past twelve months across the United States before the close. The Dow was down fifty three points at twenty five thousand fifty three. The NASDAQ was up nine points at seventy three o seven and the S and P five hundred is up two points to twenty seven zero nine this is NPR news. And you're listening to WNYC in New York. I'm Jamie Floyd as people get started on their taxes. New York governor Andrew Cuomo is taking his complaints about the recent federal tax code overhaul to the White House. Cuomo plans to meet with President Trump tomorrow to discuss a provision that sharply limits federal deductions for state and local taxes Cuomo told reporters that as it stands the tax overhaul has unfairly affected wealthy democratic majority states, like New York, and California it has. Redistributed wealth in this nation. From democratic states from so-called blue states to red states. Cuomo says he hopes to deduction limit might be repealed now that Democrats control the house of representatives. But it would still have to pass the Republican controlled Senate and be signed by President Trump at city hall today. Public housing advocates protested mayor Bill de Blasios proposal to sell sixty two thousand Niger apartments to private real estate interests. Denise Harris is a resident of Nitras Richmond terrace houses in Staten Island..

Kelsey Snell NPR Andrew Cuomo Kareem hunt NFL United States Cleveland Browns Tom Goldman Ralph Northam President Trump Washington Fairfax Lakshmi Singh New York White House Cleveland Bill de Blasios Virginia
"kelsey snell" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:23 min | 3 years ago

"kelsey snell" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Won't hold back. They want and they sent me here to be aggressive to get it. It will be up to Cummings to overcome that divide. If he wants the committee to be more than a partisan sideshow. Kelsey Snell, NPR news the capitol. Now an update to a story we brought you last week. I spoke with an undocumented immigrant named Victorino Morales. She used to work as a housekeeper at a Trump golf club in New Jersey. She described how supervisors and staff at the club helped her get fraudulent papers a or says this seven, okay, you're not any. They knew that. I didn't have documents and the supervisor. George took my ID photo in the laundry room and a cousin of his took me to a place to get fake documents. He told me that I had to pay for them. And I said sorry, but I don't have money to pay for that. He told me not to worry about it that he would cover it, and I could pay it back. She I told her story publicly in the New York Times in December. And by the time I spoke with her last week. The Trump organization had begun to crack down more widely on undocumented workers. Attorney Audubon Romero told me he's representing about a dozen immigrants who were recently fired from two different Trump properties. The workers are the victims the employers recruited them brought them into the organization told them to go purchase fraudulent documents. It is not illegal to work in the United States. But it is illegal when you knowingly hire undocumented immigrants now, the Washington Post reports that the purge of undocumented workers from Trump properties has spread reporter, David Farren. Fold is here with the latest either. Hey, how widespread is this? Now, what are the latest numbers that you have what we know? So far is that there have been undocumented workers fired from five different Trump golf clubs all in New York. New York state of New Jersey, and that's a total of eighteen fired them at some that much. But remember golf courses in the wintertime are operating on a pretty skeleton staff, what kind of jobs, do these people do how long do they work there? Some of them and work there for eighteen years fifteen years. It's a mixture of folks who worked in landscaping folks who works in maintenance and the female workers have generally been, housekeeping, employees. I understand you spoke with Eric Trump. The president's son who helps run the day to day operations of the Trump organization. Tell us about that conversation. You had he and I went back and forth a couple of days ago about this. And so we learned from him about a couple of clubs where we didn't know have been firings. Pine hill. The of course, Trump has a ten Philadelphia colts, neck golf course near the jersey shore, plus three we already knew about a New York. New Jersey still this is a small fraction of the total properties that the Trump organization runs in the United States. Do you expect this to spread still further? It's really hard to know. So the Trump organization has said that. They are now doing a companywide purge a company wide review of these employees documents the documents that they're reviewing and they're using as the basis for firing. These folks these the documents that they gave when they were hired. What's unclear to me now is how many of them were doing any kind of extra immigration checks before this only a few of these properties were enrolled in e-verify, the federal government's sort of voluntary extra check system from employers. You want to check their employees an extra step and a few others. Eric Trump says a few he won't specify the number. We're using a third party HR vendor to do the same thing. But I don't really know the universe of clubs at weren't really checking immigration before. So it's hard for me to know, how many more will fire people. Now, I want to ask about a phrase you use in your latest story on the subject, you say, the Trump organization previously had paid little attention to their immigration status. We just heard Victorino Morales describe supervisors actively helping her procure fake documents. So at least on her case seems they paid a lot of attention to our immigration status. Is it your sense that the Trump organization more often turned a blind? And I or actively worked to keep documented employees on the payroll. Well, we've heard from workers both indications there's some people who said, look, I gave them a document fifteen years ago, and I bought on the street in queens, and they took it and didn't ask any questions they came to the Trump golf course sort of with the understanding that this was a place that didn't ask questions. But as you said there have been a few other examples where the Trump organization supervisor. So not Eric Trump personally, but the people who worked for him down at the golf club and supervise these workers where those people would either the workers have said, they either help them procure documents and one case at the Trump, Westchester golf club north of New York City. There was a guy who said look, I brought them fake document. And the supervisor said this is bad fake, go get a better one. He went to queen's came back and brought another fake the person said no this is fake. It's still not good enough. Go get a better fake finally comes back from queens with a third fake document. And the supervisor at Trump Westchester says. Okay. This fake is good enough to all those things seem to indicate a pretty high level.

Trump Eric Trump Trump Westchester supervisor New Jersey Victorino Morales New York City United States New York Times Kelsey Snell NPR Cummings queens Pine hill golf Washington Post New York George Audubon Romero president
"kelsey snell" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:48 min | 3 years ago

"kelsey snell" Discussed on KCRW

"Classic. To majority, and we are the class that I think many ways is closest to people. And so we want folks have been here aware of what our parties specifically Allred says Democrats want to protect preexisting conditions. The defining issue that helped them win this new majority. Those are things that no matter where you are on the spectrum you have a combination cremated. And they'll probably have some discussions on the things that are a little bit different more complicated areas. Like how far left to go on Medicare for all will wait. The slow. Start is beginning to pick up Democrats held their first hearings on reintroduced legislation to close the gender pay gap more experience hands like Hoyer palm also want to remind members that they're still lots of time before the twenty twenty election. We're in January, we're not we're not in June. You know, if this is still the case in June. That would be that would obviously be a problem vulnerable. Democrats are hoping she's right because by June their necks. Campaign could already be underway. Kelsey Snell, NPR news the capitol. Later this afternoon on all things considered the ban on bump stocks takes effect next month, which gives people time to stockpile the device. Tune in by asking your smart speaker the plan PR local member station by name. This. This is morning edition on KCRW ahead on morning edition in one thousand nine hundred nine the song. No scrubs by TLC became an instant athem for women and girls and it still resonates today. He's are people who are born after the song was released girls, especially can relate, you know, having that kind of struggle with like a guy who's not worth their time. No, scrubs, twenty years later. The best coming up on morning edition. The.

Allred Kelsey Snell Hoyer Medicare KCRW NPR TLC twenty years
"kelsey snell" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

05:54 min | 3 years ago

"kelsey snell" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"This is ninety point three k acu. This is all things considered from NPR news. I'm Mary Louise Kelley, and I'm Audie Cornish. Today is the thirty four th day of the longest government shutdown in history. And on Capitol Hill, the Senate took their very first votes on bills to reopen the government. That's right. One Bill backed by President Trump would have reopened the government and exchange for five point seven billion dollars for a border wall. The other Bill backed by Democrats would have opened the government. I short time to keep talking about the border now both of these bills failed. But taking the step of voting seem to shake up negotiations that have been stalled for weeks. Senate majority leader Mitch McConnell and minority leader Chuck Schumer went immediately into a meeting to discuss an alternative path forward one that could reopen the government and give lawmakers few more weeks to work out the details. NPR's congressional reporter Kelsey Snell joins us now from Capitol Hill, and Kelsey can you give us a sense of whether this new development is a sign of real progress. Well, it's kind of hard to tell at this point because things came together really quickly. After those two votes failed a group of about eighteen senators from both parties almost evenly split went to the Senate floor, and they started talking about a plan for three weeks spending Bill to reopen. The government just to let the talks continue and South Carolina, Republican Lindsey Graham was one of them. He said he'd already brought the idea to President Trump and Graham said congress needs to agree to give Trump a clear parameters for talking about border security and spending. Here's what he said, you're not giving President Trump a bunch of money to do anything. He wants to do with. He's got to spend it on a plan that the professionals have come up with. And he said Democrats would get some things they want to. You aren't eight hundred million dollars for refugee assistance. She'll get it. We all need more judges two hundred and fifty more border patrol agents on the border would be good for us all our leaders responding to this idea. Well, as you said McConnell and Schumer went and had a meeting about it right after the votes, and they talked about the possibilities. And by the time it was over Schumer came out. And he was smiling. He told all those reporters that they were continuing to talk, but it's really hard to tell right now. How far those talks will go in part because the president followed up by saying he needs a down payment on the wall before he can agree. And that's something we know Democrats have rejected so far the impression has been that the Senate has been completely taking a back seat in these talks. But now, it seems clearly the majority leader is engaged. Do we know what sparked this uptick and talks people on the hill are getting incredibly irritated? They want a deal, and they every time they hear from constituents or they turn on the television. There's a new story about the impact of this shut down on people who are voting for them and people who are hurting Ohio. Publican Rob Portman told many of us reporters that there shouldn't be so hard in that. There's actually a deal to be had shutdowns are always stupid this book, particularly stupid one. Because the underlying problem is one we can resolve we're not that far. This is not healthcare. He also said this isn't abortion. This is a kind of social issue that divides the two parties it is a conversation about border security, which in the abstract is something that both parties agree on. And that's kind of been the feeling from both parties are House Democrats sharing that same frustration. Yeah. They have passed several bills that also in the same message that they want to reopen the government first and then talk about border security later and the past another one this week. They're getting really annoyed with the White House to because essentially, they're calling the Whitehouse callous. They're really upset about some comments in particular that were made today by commerce secretary Wilbur Ross he was talking on CNBC and seemed to downplay the seriousness of the impact of the shutdown on workers. Here's what he said. I don't really quite understand why because the obligations that they would undertake saying. Borrowing from the Bank or credit union or unaffected federally guaranteed. So the thirty days of pay that some people will be out. There's no real reason why they shouldn't be able to get a loan against it. And we've been focused on the Senate, but House Democrats are they offering anything new and herbs negotiations behind the scenes speaker Nancy Pelosi is working on a new proposal that will detail all of the border security spending. They would be willing to do once the government reopens now that's important part. Right. Once the government reopens, and what I'm told is that all together the money. They're talking about proposing could meet or exceed the president's demand for five point seven billion dollars for a border wall. It just wouldn't be spent on the border wall. It would be spent on other types of border security, which Democrats say they're gladly would support. That's NPR's. Kelsey snell. Kelsey, thank you. Thank you. For government workers who aren't getting paid the shutdown feels more dire every week every day. Savings dry up the bills. Keep coming in the small town of oakdale Louisiana working at the federal prison was a ticket to financial security good salary. Good benefits. Now, the people with those jobs are making extreme decisions about how to keep their families afloat. Our co host Ari Shapiro traveled to oakdale to meet some of them. If Louisiana is a boot oakdale is the ankle smack in the middle of the state more than three hours drive from New Orleans or Houston. The typical family in oakdale makes about thirty thousand dollars a year. People at the prison earn thousands more than that from day one. So these were the jobs people were excited to get in. All of my years are never thought that America couldn't pay their workers. Corey Trammell is one of the local union leaders at the federal Correctional Institution. I've thought of a whole lot that could go wrong in a prison setting, but never to have an employee. Look me in the eyes entail me I cannot afford childcare. I cannot afford gas. To get to work. I can't afford my mortgage. How do you answer something like that the union arranged for us to meet some of the workers in town who are most affected by the shutdown corrections officers case managers secretaries we sat down with them at the burger in a local.

Senate President Trump Kelsey Snell Chuck Schumer NPR president oakdale Mitch McConnell Audie Cornish Mary Louise Kelley Lindsey Graham Rob Portman oakdale Louisiana Trump South Carolina Bill White House
"kelsey snell" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"kelsey snell" Discussed on Here & Now

"I'm Lisa Mullins. I'm Robin young. It's here now and the one hundred sixteenth class of congress is being sworn in today. It includes record numbers of women, including for the first time native, American and Muslim women and democratically controlled house of representatives. They all hit the ground running in the middle of a government shutdown. We're joined by NPR congressional reporter Kelsey Snell, and Kelsey you've covered congress for a while. Just your thoughts on this day. Well, it's really interesting to watch a really big and robust off freshman class. Come in. This is the largest that we have seen in many years, and it's also the most diverse, but I think it's really interesting to point out that while this freshman class is very diverse. It does. Can't really change the overall a aspect of the fact that is really still predominantly white and male. So this is a changing congress, but a slowly changing congress that he'd sounds as if if you scan the the rooms you can see the difference. Yeah. Particularly for Democrats. They have made a strong effort to recruit more diverse candidates. So you'll notice a larger change on the democratic side of the I'll well the house, which the Democrats now control gets to work immediately. After being sworn in. There's a short term measure. They're putting forward that would fund most of the government for another month while a longer term solution on border funding and homeland security can be debated. Here's incoming house majority leader, Steny Hoyer, he spoke on morning edition, those bills gives us another four weeks with government open with government serving the American people with the federal employees not traumatized by thinking. They're not going to get a paycheck and not be able to make them mortgage payment of the car payment or the kids college payment. We think that's the right thing to do for our federal employees..

congress Kelsey Snell Lisa Mullins Steny Hoyer Robin young NPR reporter four weeks