21 Burst results for "Kelly Mcbride"

"kelly mcbride" Discussed on CATS Roundtable

CATS Roundtable

03:19 min | Last month

"kelly mcbride" Discussed on CATS Roundtable

"This is the cats roundtable drunk chasm keys here at sunbeam winning well. A lot of things are happening in america and a lot of things are happening in journalism and it seems like the country is getting divided and a lot of people are concerned about it. So how do we fix it. And one of the the people that teach journalism and teach ethics and leadership is kelly mcbride and kelly is the chair of the craig newmark center for ethics in leadership at the poynter institute. Good morning kelly. How are you good morning. I'm good how are you I am well and i try. i bought. Wabc radio last last year and it was known as a conservative talk radio. And that's the reason humorless salted because cumulus. The ceo of cumulous did not like conservative radio. So i bought. But i am a moderate. I am the person in the middle. I am the person. I brought back a music radio to wabc but dallas. You're at poynter institute you teach ethics. Ut you he teach leadership give us your view of what the heck is going on in journalism. And how do we survive. Well i i actually think john that you're a really great example. Because you're an opportunist right. You look you're a businessman and you're an opportunist and you look for opportunities And and media is about creating an audience around something right. It can be around anything it can be around cat videos. It can be around politics. It can be around concert conservative ideology It can be around liberal ideology so one of the problems that has happened in media is there have been a lot of opportunist jumping in and exploiting people by by sharing information with them. That is not true right. And so you see lots. And lots of startups getting really large audiences and they get a large audience particularly by maximizing social media because they create emotional reactions to stories and then they slip in either ball baseline is or information. That's grossly out of context and as a result you have you. Have you have a public that do not agree on. What the facts are. You know we have a public that that does not agree. On who is the legitimately elected president of the united states which the facts tell us is joe biden And and when you have media that constantly repeat either that that that he is not the legitimately elected.

poynter institute kelly mcbride craig newmark center for ethic Wabc radio cumulous kelly sunbeam united states dallas john joe biden
"kelly mcbride" Discussed on TalkRadio 630 KHOW

TalkRadio 630 KHOW

01:50 min | 3 months ago

"kelly mcbride" Discussed on TalkRadio 630 KHOW

"As soon as expected to be appealed approval from Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen of the G seven finance ministers agreement supporting a global minimum corporate tax of 15%. It doesn't require Absolute agreement across the board. It has a way of bringing hold out into it. The aim is to keep multinational companies from stashing profits in countries with low tax rates. The Justice Department announcing it will no longer secretly obtained reporters records during leak investigations. Kelly McBride, senior VP at the Poynter Institute, any government that does this that goes after journalists is afraid of being held accountable. This is ABC News. Health officials reporting a small increase in covid cases of the highly infectious Delta variant as Australia's second most popular state Victoria, including Melbourne under hard lockdown, Victoria's chief health officer Brett Sutton says they're searching for the source. Secondary attack rate being 50% greater than the Alpha variant. Um does mean that you can get a large number of people within a home testing positive and you can get those transmissions in other settings. More readily. There's still a state of emergency in Japan because of the covid pandemic, but there is no postponement of the Summer Olympics. ABC is Julia McFarlane officials said this week that any decision on whether Spectators will even be allowed into the venues will be announced this month. But polls show an overwhelming majority of the Japanese public just don't want these games to go ahead. Right now sailing on huge monster ships will be coming back, says Royal Caribbean planning to resume voyages with eight of a chips July and August. Chuck Sivertsen ABC News, Okay, three dozen by tomorrow, Moughniyah the Roses and Grasses flower shop is blooming to keep up with high demand. He must strengthen his businesses room just just one second. Frosty flowers Hold, please..

Kelly McBride Chuck Sivertsen Brett Sutton Royal Caribbean Julia McFarlane Summer Olympics 50% ABC Japan Poynter Institute Melbourne Victoria August Janet Yellen 15% Justice Department this week this month ABC News Moughniyah
"kelly mcbride" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:55 min | 9 months ago

"kelly mcbride" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Lawyer I want to know that this happened. You'd want to know that he would obstruct justice on your behalf because Gets you off. I think it Z. That it's a public service to leave his name up so that people know no because paucity of information that's in the story about it's all right. That's it. You have no context. You don't know what he's had The record expunged just something. Yeah, but What he's saying. So one of the first things that happened was that they started getting in these arguments about how much value an article had and whether or not it was serving a public good. That's the that's the use that journalist's 10.2. We do need names. We need to put names to these arrests because it's part of the public record. This is Kelly McBride. She's an ethicist at the Poynter Institute. I did have this experience where my kid was on a soccer team. And there was this. Coach who seemed really questionable to me in his behavior and the way that he acted around the kids and, um, you know, sure enough on the mug shot site in my local hometown. This guy showed up for domestic violence. Who and I'll you know, so I went to the athletic director, and I was like, Hey, this guy can't be working for us, and that's the that's the use. A journalist's 0.2 is that you should be able to find out the bad information about somebody because you might be considering employing this person around your Children or Really employing them at all, and to do back in the room, you know, the whole sense of like, If I'm one of his customers, I would probably want to know that there was a lot of debate is this thing? The lawyer did bad enough that all of us need to know about it, but Eastern licensed to practice law, right. I mean love I mean, they're the bar here. I mean, they're pretty thorough about, you know, looking at this stuff and deciding whether somebody is fit to practice law, you know, I mean, the bar didn't do anything to him. And so one of the big questions is how do we make that judgment? Should we follow the courts? You can hear them, putting a lot of weight on whether or not a court has sealed or expunged a record. Which is basically the court making this decision to remove the case from its own record. I mean, this is sealed. We're relying on a court that said Yes, you've done your time. You can have it sealed, so we would need a very strong argument here not to do that. Wanna make your arguments stronger while I mean No, I guess. Anybody want to make a strong argument here? All right. Not a chicken. In the end, they decided that this lawyer dude had the right to be for gotten, and so they just sort of like Vanished his name from the article, and that was one of the simpler ones like after that things definitely got tougher because some of the cases they talked about were so complicated. Like someone who killed somebody. On Ben. It was labeled self defense, and I was like, Well, that's is I mean, it's not murder murder, but that's like still killing someone, like does that person have the right to be for gotten on Ben? One of the hardest cases, all right on the fourth one. He did have it expunged. It was actually a cop. His record was sealed, but You know it is a police officer. It's theft in office. But over the course of a few years, he lied on his time sheet and walked away with thousands of dollars. We've said on the front end of this that Sex crimes, violence, crimes and corruption were were much less likely did to do this, So I guess this comes down to Would you view this as corruption or do you view this more? Is the guy who was theft in office kind of thing. The cop in his email plea to the group, he said, basically Look, I've been on the force for many years. I've never had an issue. I shouldn't have done this. I know that. But this was just one mistake. You know, this was not some elected official. This was not Use of force, You know, I mean, this guy got sky was skimming over time. You know, I think, but again, you know when the firefighters were having time stuff, too. I mean, that was a big problem. So It's but this is one guy doing one thing. I like I'm so back and forth on this one, but he didn't abuse his authority is an officer he stole from his employer. I mean, this is like any other theft. Yeah, but I hold him to a higher standard for being cop first place. It was interesting. You could see people just like opinion shift was not a momentary lapse in judgment. This one on for like Years. It looks like right which and it's only been Here since this story ran And so No. That means something to me like this was an ongoing thing about what he had going. He's taking the money, the extra money and I want Mark like the public trust issue here. You know, this isn't some, you know, Water department guy skimming copper off the You know, some job site like this is a police officer. Stealing over time over the course of Years. I mean, that's a veteran as he described himself, I believe, but I think that it's Yeah. I mean, I guess I see that at first I was like, Yes, I think we should let him be forgotten. But now I'm kind of on the other side like that. I think. Cause it's not a ton of money is not a public threat to people, but because he is in a position of trust in a public position tax to taxpayer money. I think you guys are right when you're saying he should be held to a higher standard, Remember, get back to our central question is the value of having his name their greater than the pain. It's causing him for being there. Again and again, Chris just steer the conversation back to that question, which is? Does the value of having this article up outweigh the harm? It's causing someone But the trick with that question is How do you know what information will be valuable in the future? I mean, if we put this story behind the wall and other police departments don't see it, what stops him from going to be to get a job? If he gets it sealed and the story goes away. Other other offices might not be I wonder if he lost his certification is opposed to we should look that up. We should do the research because if if I mean we're talking about another Tamir Rice case That's.

theft officer the public record Ben Poynter Institute soccer murder Kelly McBride Tamir Rice director Chris official Mark Water department
"kelly mcbride" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:55 min | 9 months ago

"kelly mcbride" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Lawyer, I know that this happened you'd want to know that he would obstruct justice on your behalf because Gets you off. I think it Z. That it's a public service to leave his name up so that people know no paucity of information. That's in the story about it. All right, That's it. You have no context. You don't know what he's had The record expunged something. Yeah, but What he's saying. So one of the first things that happened was that they started getting in these arguments about how much value an article had and whether or not it was serving a public good. That's the that's the use that journalist's 10.2. We do need names. We need to put names to these arrests because it's part of the public record. This is Kelly McBride. She's an ethicist at the Poynter Institute. I did have this experience where my kid was on a soccer team. And there was this. Coach who seemed really questionable to me in his behavior and the way that he acted around the kids and, um, you know, sure enough on the mug shot site in my local hometown. This guy showed up for domestic violence. Who and I'll you know, so I went to the athletic director, and I was like, Hey, this guy can't be working for us, and that's the that's the use. A journalist's 0.2 is that you should be able to find out the bad information about somebody because you might be considering employing this person around your Children or Really employing them at all, and you get back in the room. You know the whole sense of like, If I'm one of his customers, I would probably want to know that there was a lot of debate is this thing? The lawyer did bad enough that all of us need to know about it, but Eastern licensed to practice law, right. I mean love I mean, they're the bar here. I mean, they're pretty thorough about, you know, looking at this stuff and deciding whether somebody is fit to practice law, you know, I mean, the bar didn't do anything to him. And so one of the big questions is how do we make that judgment? Should we follow the courts? You can hear them, putting a lot of weight on whether or not a court has sealed or expunged a record. Which is basically the court making this decision to remove the case from its own record. I mean, this is sealed. We're relying on a court that said Yes, you've done your time. You can have it sealed, so we would need a very strong argument here not to do that. Wanna make your arguments stronger. Y Yeah, I mean, No, I guess it's anybody want to make a strong argument here. All right? Not a chicken. In the end, they decided that this lawyer dude had the right to be for gotten, and so they just sort of like Vanished his name from the article, and that was one of the simpler ones like after that things definitely got tougher because some of the cases they talked about were so complicated. Like someone who killed somebody. On Ben. It was labeled self defense, and I was like, Well, that's is I mean, it's not murder murder, but that's like still killing someone, like does that person have the right to be for gotten on Ben? One of the hardest cases, all right on the fourth one he did have it expunged was actually a cop. His record was sealed, but You know it is a police officer. It's theft in office. But over the course of a few years, he lied on his time sheet and walked away with thousands of dollars. We've said on the front end of this that Sex crimes, violence, crimes and corruption were were much less likely. Todos this, So I guess this comes down to Would you view this as corruption? Or do you view this Maura's a guy who was theft in office kind of thing. The cop in his email plea to the group, he said, basically Look, I've been on the force for many years. I've never had an issue. I shouldn't have done this. I know that. But this was just one mistake. You know, this was not some elected official. This was not Use of force, You know, I mean, this guy got sky was skimming over time. You know, I think, but again, you know when the firefighters were having time stuff, too. I mean, that was a big problem. So It's but this is one guy doing one thing. I like I'm so back and forth on this one, but he didn't abuse his authority is an officer he stole from his employer. I mean, this is like any other theft. Yeah. I hold him to a higher standard for being cop first place. It was interesting. You could see people just like opinion shift is not a momentary lapse in judgment. This one on for like Years. It looks like right which and it's only been Here since this story ran And so No. That means something to me like this was an ongoing thing about what he had going, taking the money, the extra money and I want Mark like the public trust issue here. You know, this isn't some You know what? Water department guy skimming Copper off the You know, some job site like this is a police officer stealing over time. Over the course of Years. I mean, that's a veteran as he described himself, I believe, but I think that it's Yeah. I mean, I guess I see that first read this. And I was like, Yes, I think we should let him be forgotten. But now I'm kind of on the other side like that. I think. Cause it's not a ton of money is not a public threat to people, but because he is in a position of trust in a public position tax to taxpayer money. I think you guys are right when you're saying he should be held to a higher standard, Remember, get back to our central question is the value of having his name their greater than the pain. It's causing him for being there. Again and again, Chris just steer the conversation back to that question, which is? Does the value of having this article up outweigh the harm? It's causing someone But the trick with that question is How do you know what information will be valuable in the future? I mean, if we put this story behind the wall, and other police departments don't see it, what stops him from going to be to get a job? If he gets a field and this story goes away. Other other offices might not be wonder if he lost his certification. We should look that up. We should do the research because if if I mean we're talking about another Tamir Rice case That's.

officer theft the public record Poynter Institute Ben soccer murder Kelly McBride Tamir Rice director Chris Maura official Mark
"kelly mcbride" Discussed on CATS Roundtable

CATS Roundtable

04:13 min | 9 months ago

"kelly mcbride" Discussed on CATS Roundtable

"The morning america. This is the catch roundtable. Chunk catsuits here. Well it's all over no more coverage of than the new cycle and the election. That's good news. I got tired of watching watching it well with us. Today from the poynter institute and the purpose of the point institute is journalism is we have kelly mcbride And she's been here for twenty years just about and She's gonna talk about journalism. Kelly how are you good. How are you. i'm flying. Tell everybody in. America who point is it is and what you do. We are a nonprofit with found in nineteen seventy five by nelson poynter who the owner of a local newspaper here in florida. The saints saint petersburg times. It's now called the tampa bay times He created the poynter institute as a mechanism for providing professional development and advancement to the journalism world. And so what we do is provide leadership thought leadership and training we also are the home of politifact and the international checking network and media wise and those are all divisions of pointers that help citizens malvo gate journalism. So we were were small. We have sixty seventy employees at any given time but our mission is to elevate journalism in service of democracy. The american people. I believe are having a little bit of problem with that as i told you when we talked before Is i was watching four different screens the other night and i was watching cnn. I was watching. Msnbc and i was watching fox. And i was watching the local news station new york one and i was like watching four different stories in i grew up. I'm much older than you. I grew up in days. Walter cronkite when ninety two percent of the american people. Believe walter cronkite has to say. Do we have a problem in america right now. What what's happened in america. Is that that time that you talk about with walter. Cronkite was a time when there were far fewer news outlets and so as a citizen you had fewer choices to make about which news you would consume and as a result you had a much. Larger proportion of the american public consuming. All of the news outlet so trust was not necessarily an issue because of a lot of things including the invention of cable the invention of the internet The invention of social media we have created a thousand times more news and as a result they have in order to define themselves against each other have chosen lanes and so what you described just watching on tv. Three of those are news outlets that have chosen a specific lane and their cable news outlets that broadcasts twenty four hours a day and so that is a certain genera of news that maybe emblematic of all the other lanes that other news outlets have chosen or not. I mean i. I think that there is a citizens when we talk about our consumption. We tend to define them in those especially those three lanes of you know. Cnn considers itself middle of the road. I know not everybody does. Msnbc is definitely Speaking to a liberal audience and fox news was created to serve a conservative audience and so They i think the problem is in.

kelly mcbride florida Kelly twenty years Three ninety two percent fox Today sixty seventy employees America three lanes nelson poynter twenty four hours a day Walter cronkite poynter institute four different stories Cnn one fox news nineteen seventy
Journalists of Color

It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

37:15 min | 1 year ago

Journalists of Color

"Before the interviews I wanNA share my theory. For why all of this exploded for journalists of Color Right now? It goes back a few years. So many of us went from covering the first black president to covering Donald Trump. And ever, since trump came down that escalator, announcing his campaign back in Twenty fifteen, when he denounced Mexicans as drug traffickers rapist. When he was that he would build a wall at the border and that Mexico will pay for it. Those journalists were told to avoid using words like racist or lie to describe some of trump's worse behavior. That kind of self censorship, especially on race for a lot of us, it became untenable after we had to cover the death of George Floyd and report on that video of a black man, being choked to death for eight minutes. On top of that we are now dealing with the coronavirus pandemic, which is laying bare racial inequities across this country. And Corinthian has given a lot of us time to sit and think. Notice what's going on in the world and in our lives and in our newsrooms? You have black journalists and other journalists of color who think of themselves as truth seekers in the same way that their white colleagues, too, but very often when they tell the truth about racism when they tell the truth about. Bright, white supremacy. They're labeled as activist. Highs! They dared to bring their blackness across the newsroom threshold. PSORIATIC McDonald's has been thinking a lot about race and the news. So I asked her as a black journalist in this moment. What does she want to see change so I would say what I want is actual structural change within newsroom leadership? I do not want the equivalent of painting black lives matter on a street in yellow letters, but in a newsroom. It's visible. By that doesn't really solve anything when it comes to pay discrepancies between. White male journalists and black female journalist who do the same job have the same level of experience and one is making thirty thousand dollars a year more than the other. The other thing is that. You cannot have. Newsroom leadership that is completely made up of six Cheddar straight white men. Even. Under straight white women. Zicklin or gender straight Whiteman that power needs to be distributed more equitably. You know the other thing died. I want to see I wanNA see US cover. Race honestly. right? Race isn't just something that black people, experience or something that non white experience, attempting that everyone experience and says and so. There needs to be a baseline of literacy rate when it comes to how we talk about race with an America how it operates within American history, and how that informs. President and what world. News media has played in that way. We have to consider that. The last time that we had a pandemic, the nineteen eighteen flu pandemic. We need to recognize that. The paper of record in Chicago the Chicago Tribune. Is Basically scapegoating black people who are fleeing the American south, basically saying Oh half a million darkies are basically invading Chicago. If that's objectivity as not the kind of objectivity that I want to participate in them. Yeah, yeah, I WANNA get personal a little bit You ended up being quoted in New York Times. Article about this reckoning talking about how you didn't have a great time at the Washington Post. You've tweeted about your experience as a black woman in newsrooms. What does this reckoning meant for you? And what have you been trying to get off your chest and this moment about your experience? In some of the newsroom's that we've been talking about my hope for this reckoning. is that. There is not one more class of you know young. Ernest! Twenty two year old coming out of journalism school I'm who basically have to go through this really damaging gauntlet. We're constantly sort of questioning yourself and your own worth and I think there are a lot of really talented journalists who have been driven from the field. Because at some point, they feel like they have to make a choice between their own mental health. Or being journalist. And they just self-preservation and I cannot blame them. and that is really a shame, because think about the people that those journalists now think about the stories that they could have told. The access they could have had picked the access to walk into certain spaces at their white colleagues cannot exactly and you know one of the ways, and this is not the only way that this is important, but one of the ways that this is important is. We need them to trust us. Our job is to tell their stories and to tell them accurately and to tell them fairly. And if people are are always getting pushed out the folks who might actually be able to empathize with them who know where they're coming from right I? There's a quote from their lake when I fall where she basically expresses the you know, she's probably the only person who covered public housing who's actually lived in public housing? That, yeah, that is. Expertise right that is. Valuable knowledge so I just I want us to be able to practice our profession with humanity. Yeah, and also it's like in this moment where it seems like more than ever before. At least in my lifetime, there is such a deficit of trust. Americans don't trust institutions. They don't trust journalism. They don't trust facts. Worst argument about whether or not mask can prevent the spread of Corona virus like in this environment if newsrooms don't act in fix some of this stuff. is going to create more mistrust in the media and these news outlets will become less relevant in a moment in which I would argue. They are needed more than ever before. Yes, and you know the thing is is and I've said this repeatedly at that American journalism does have a credibility crisis. The the credibility crisis that we have I think. Actually bears a lot of similarities to. Our current sort of Voter disenfranchisement problem. Being. In Journalism, we have not spent enough time. with the very same folks who are often disenfranchised when it comes to media coverage as well right. And when we think about the press and freedom of the press is an instrument of democracy we have to think about. enfranchising everyone, we have to think about making sure that they do find us credible. The folks. If they look at the newspaper, even look at a website or they listen to the radio and their conclusion is. That these entities are not telling the truth about them in their lives and held their lives are. For them yeah for them. That's a credibility issue for us. Yeah we can fix. It failed them. That means that. We have to develop far better relationships with folks who have historically been shunned or shut out of district of media coverage are only allowed to participate in very limited ways. You know I still very much believe in that adage, the journalism exist to comfort the afflicted and afflict comfortable. Thanks again to riot, not at McDonald's the culture writer for the undefeated and also this year. She was nominated a pilot sir. My mind. I wanted to hear from other journalists of color about their newsroom experiences. And they wrote in. Here if you, my name is Lavi Cima Guy side. I'm a naturalized citizen who came to this country as a young child. I worked at a bare he a newspaper for a long time and have fond memories of my time there. I had mostly white editors, and in fact, I've only had one non white supervisor in my over two decades in journalism. My name is John. Sepulvado, I mixed. I have Mexican Irish indigenous and Black Ancestry I worked in public media for fifteen years. There are tons of horror stories. There was the white woman editor who asked me if I like dog-fighting because she quote hurt. Might People like dogfighting? There was another white woman editor told me to smile more around the office because I quote have dark features and those dark features, scared herself and other white women around the office. One time a headline I, wrote for one of my own stories, led to a newsroom wide, meeting an emotional one, where a bunch of US had to persuade top editors to let us call the president's racism what it is! The most frustrating part was that I and others had to explain to our colleagues. Why our voices were important. And partly because they reflected the communities we covered. argued. Repeat, a thousand more stories like that. But at. A point I realized. That no matter what I did no matter how good I was no matter how hard I worked. I would always be seen. As something that is not. White. And my mobile was the leave the industry. All right time for a break. When we come back, we will hear from Latina, trailblazer who refused to leave the news business. Instead. She started her own media company to tell the stories that she wanted to tell. Hey another reminder asking you all to fill out that survey for us. Okay, it is anonymous. It is short and the link for it is NPR DOT org slash I B. A. M. Survey. All one word I BAM SURVEY NPR DOT Org. Slash IBM. Filled out I'll be really happy if he do thanks. This message comes from NPR sponsor discover. Sometimes, food is more than just food. It's an integral part of the community so this year discoveries, giving five million dollars to support black owned restaurants to places like Rodney Scott Barbecue in Charleston post office spies Birmingham back in the day bakery, and Savannah and hundreds more places in your local community all across the country. Learn how you can show your support at discover dot com. Whenever you face a choice. It helps to think like an economist and this week on Planet Lenny Summer. School will start off our course in economics within workout for your brain how to decide what something newly costs for? Planet money from, NPR. People still find it really interesting salmon like I'm like no. No I. I was the first Latina in the newsroom at NPR ever to step foot. WHO WASN'T CLEANING IT? That was me right that that was that. Was this Latina? That is Maria. She's had a long career in media, not just here NPR but also at CNN NPS in two thousand ten. She founded her own company for total media. And she has a memoir. It's called once. I was you that comes out in September, but most of you probably know Maria. As the host of a very long running public radio show turned podcast from NPR and through media. It's like new USA mighty. Hossack Latino USA has been around since the early nineties. It is attributed by NPR. which is why you hear NPR in the credits, but that will be changing USA is moving. As distributor. It means nothing's GonNa Change for you. Our listener that our audience is going to get way way way bigger. We're very excited. Announcement might have been confusing for listeners, but don't worry like. She said you'll still be able to hear the show. But the Journal of Color, especially in public radio that move meant that NPR was losing a hugely influential show dedicated to covering Latino stories in the US. And from its founding NPR has been well bad on race. More than seventy percent of NPR's newsroom is white and of the sources you here on NPR's air, those voices they are more than eighty percent white. People of Color who work in public media? We have been saying for years. Fix this including Maria Hosa. We're asking the question. Are you listening? Are you hearing? And that his own ready a power dynamic that is wrong. This notion is the assumption that they the they will always have the power I. Ask Maria what Latino USA leaving NPR means for this network, but I I asked her about blazing trails. One could see your path to be one of color who found her own company as a shining success, but one could also see your path as proving that the conventional spaces in media can accommodate of voice like you the way they should you know like. I'm so proud of what you're doing, but also the fact that you have to make your own production company shows at the NPR's and the PBS's and the CNN in many ways. Don't get it and can't help people like you tell the stories that you need to tell. I was thinking about that as I was thinking about our interview Sam because. My husband calls me Aguirre, a warrior, and then as I was thinking about our conversation, Sam. I was like well. That's great i. like that, but you know what I don't want. Journalists of color to have to be warriors at into order to be able to work as To work as journalists of Contians, who can bring their entire cells into the news room? Who are going to be seen who are going to not only be seen and heard but actually. Put into positions of power to be the ones who are listening and making the decisions about. Yeah, we want that story on the front page and the headline is going to say that exactly. I want you you know everyone has been using it. Everyone's been going to twitter sharing their reckoning story, the slight the knocked in that promotion. The being told you can't do this do that. Give me one of your reckoning stories from your career when I when I come to this country, I'm born in Mexico. My whole family's born in Mexico. We're raised on south side of Chicago. You know sixties and seventies, but as Mexican immigrants we also understood the essential nature of journalism and American independent journalism and so. My father was watching. Meet the press every Sunday and we were watching the today show and we watched sixty minutes, and because of the fact that it was so American in holding people accountable and I was like that's what journalism is so long. Story Short is many years later actually a decade ago go to sixty minutes when I'm out of work and needed a job actually and. They basically like look, can you Can you come back and talk to us? When one of the old white guys get secret is really and I, said and I just remember like. Like am I supposed to laugh? It's funny. Is that a joke as being? and. As we do in the media's people of Color, 'cause we're really good at laughing things off. Like. Yeah. Banter you know the the the the the we're so smart. On. Exactly Racism! Exactly. And I got into the subway at fifty ninth street onto my apartment in Harlem and I cried on the train. and. I was just like, but I am not. You know I'm knocking to let this take me down. And that was the moment that I decided to create food. Media Winds Rams history. Takes over Latino, USA. And Expands Latino USA grows the show and let the USA's audience twenty seven years in. Is in a continual upward trajectory. You love to see it. As I. Want to ask more about what needs to happen. We are in this moment now. Where so many journalists coming forward with their stories? But it's still unclear what newsroom leaders will actually do to fix this stuff you have been on all sides of media for profit nonprofit. Give me like a checklist of the big three or four things that mass media should do right now to effectively respond to the issues raised in this reckoning. Feel like this is a moment to be having that difficult conversation, which is pushing this reckoning that we're talking about to another level. I'm going. Give you an example, Sam it brings me joy, it brings me no joy to have to ask white men in senior editorial positions how they consider my role as a Mexican immigrant woman journalist. In relation to a president who insults every single one of those things that I do? And and And basis a lot of that on his white supremacy. Which is very challenging word to even use in our newsrooms right, but yeah. I don't feel comfortable saying it. I want you to feel uncomfortable having to answer that question. Because his white supremacy does not impact you in the way, it impacts me, and I am a journalist just like you. I am an equal journalist just like you so now. You helped me to figure out. Harmon handle that because that that impacts our might quote unquote objectively, you have to be able to recognize that you do not have an ownership of activity or an ownership of the media or an ownership of public media, or it's not yours to share yeah. Did any of the issues we've discussed about. In diversity and Unfair situations that journals of have to deal within this industry. Did those factor into your business decision. To leave NPR ex. Look I've had you know NPR's my family? IF NPR calls I'm going to say when you I was absolutely and Bureau Sam he's my family. You know we hung out once, but he's. He's my brother. Because we're digesting PR so NPR's my family Mi. Familia was my first job. But You know I started a company. And I have a team of very savvy business and media executives journalists. And when they said look, we have an opportunity here in in a competitive marketplace A. Somebody PR X.. Who wants to really go big? Yeah, I will say you know they are all of these. Underground email channels and slack channels and discussion boards were journalists of color are coming together to talk about all these issues and there's been a lot of chatter about your show. What says about NPR yeah? Why am I so disconnected? Oh my God. I thought I. Thought I was like connected because I'm on twitter and I got a fat. And what folks have been saying? People who love your show Oh my goodness. They're saying well. This speaks to the larger problems. NPR has always had with content may for people of Color. They don't market it enough. They don't support it enough. You have these program. Directors at various stations put a show like yours on at not great hours. This is the stuff that people are saying. Do you I mean like to the extent that you can elaborate on it, you know. Did you feel like NPR? Neglected or didn't promote enough your type of show. So of these issues at play with the race and diversity in space like NPR. Again. Let New USA right now is growing an audience at kind of extraordinary numbers I think we're one of the few public radio programs or previously distributed by NPR. That is growing an audience at these numbers. And so the fact that. We made this decision. Says everything about. WHAT NPR. Kind of thinks. About letting USA. Now having said that I don't know you know I. Don't know the internal finances at NPR. Maybe NPR's is is really facing a a real financial challenges that I'm not privy to. And so you know, but but when you're thinking about AH, show, that has this kind of. Audience Commitment There was a point not long ago. When one of your colleagues called me up, actually she works in. She's a Latina colleague at NPR in the newsroom, and she called me up and she said. Do you think that Latino USA has been this incredibly successful because of NPR or despite NPR. And no one had asked me that and I kind of like. ooh And I said well actually despite. Despite NPR, do you think you know 'cause? There are a lot of shows not produced by NPR. Distributed by NPR. Do, you think other shows like that in your same boat that were hosted by white people or felt to maybe India leadership more mainstream. Do you think they got more support than your show did pound for pound? Yeah How does that make you feel? Like I said, that's why. I didn't. See I've been feeling this for a long time, my love. News, so Gimme a word for the emotion. Well right now I'm glad that I'm with a partnership with Pr X.. That's not gonNA units not on the table so I'm like I'm looking to the future. That's why I'm like yeah I'm all about like? It's all about the dodge this morning, boxing teacher. was making us do the we've the. We've the constant, which by the way is really really hard, and that's just how I feel is a journalist of color in a survivor Mexican immigrant woman in this like it's always like whoo. Okay well and so. That stuff that you're saying like. How does it make me? That's rolled off me a long time ago, and it is a central part of what has moved me as a journalist as a woman of color in this country is that. Is like. Oh, you're going to try to silence me or tell me that I'm not objective or tell me that I have an agenda or tell me that is not going to be successful or tell me. Okay I might go home and cry. But I'm not GONNA give up. Thanks, again to Maria Hinojosa. She's the host of the Tino USA. We asked NPR for a response to what Maria told us and they gave us this statement. We have the highest respect and admiration for the Latino USA team and from Maria Hinojosa. We are proud. That Latino USA originated at NPR member station, K. U. T., and that since nineteen, ninety-four NPR has been the program's national distribution partner today, hundreds of NPR member stations bring the show to their listening communities. We are grateful. Maria entertain who are produced a consistently wonderful show and nurtured journalist who have gone on to work all over the public radio system. We are glad public radio listeners will continue to hear Latino. USA on their public radio stations across the nation. All right now. We're going to have a chat with someone who just began working with NPR Kelly. McBride NPR's newest public editor. I WanNa talk with her. About one particular part of this entire debate, the way in which we've been taught as journalists to do our jobs that most fundamental level leads to systemically racist outcomes. I am talking specifically about the idea of journalistic objectivity. This idea that reporters only report the facts. They keep themselves out of the story, and they eliminate all biased in their coverage. A lot of folks say well. That only works if you're man and straight. And White. I wanted to find out. Why are journalism so entrenched in objectivity and whether or not this standard is fair, so I went to one of the top journalism at experts in the country I am the senior vice president at the POYNTER institute. I am the chair of the Craig Newmark Center Ethics in leadership at the Poynter Institute and I am also the public editor for NPR that Kelly McBride. Kelly has advised newsrooms about difficult journalism ethics problems for years, so it made. Made, sense to begin by asking Kelly for her definition of objectivity in journalism, it really means that you will objectively pursue the facts in order to determine the truth, and there's all sorts of things that go into that right like there's how you frame the story how you identify who you're going to interview, and then really important is who else is involved in the story. So who edits it because that the the safety nets that are created in newsrooms are meant. To help an individual program against her own bias now the problem is if all the safety nets have the same biases that that doesn't happen right and that's. That's exactly what's been happier. Also objectivity has come to mean certain different things for different journalists. There are some. Who say well objectivity means that you have to. Pretend! That kind of you don't exist, and you have to just simply say what these powerful people are saying doing. You don't provide context you don't provide analysis. It's a kind of. Totally taking yourself all the way out of it to the point where you won't even tell people if you vote or not. And I think. This is the thing for me like there's so many different interpretations of what objectivity means, yet you know that's actually kind of a confederation of two different principals in journalism, so one is the principle of objectivity in this idea that that we are pursuing the truth in spite of our own biases, and that that we actually promised, swear to God that we're going to get it right because we have all these safeguards in place, even though they've failed numerous times in the past. But the other thing is is that in American journalism in particular? It was built on this business principle of aggregating A. Politically diverse audience, and then selling that audience to advertisers, so in in Europe you see much more you see much more of the journalism coming through a political lens because that's just how the business model grew up over there, but over here especially as in different markets, you went from multiple newspapers to a single newspaper. There was this motive that was really a business motive that you would bring in the entire political spectrum and if you were going to do that, you needed to convince that audience that you in the newsroom didn't have. Any particular biases it is refreshing to hear you as a leader in the industry acknowledged that some of this is about the principles and bedrocks of our journalism, and some of it's about business, and at the end of the day for whatever reason we have ended up with a definition of objectivity. That is as much about business as it is about telling the truth and I think what frustrates so many journalists, somebody younger journalists, journalists of color or women require journalists as at newsroom leaders are resistant to acknowledge that I read NPR's social media policy, and it's couched in terms of ethics and morality and idealism. But I also know that part of it is the bottom line is. Not Do anything of the public facing person at NPR. That would possibly damage NPR's revenue streams. And I mad. They don't just say that. Yeah? They don't mean to say that they. Don't I mean that's the thing is they? Don't. They really do believe, and I actually believe also that there is. That there is a line somewhere that we shouldn't cross, and maybe it is way up the continuum on just. If you're a political reporter. You can't help people who you're voting for. Maybe the line is all the way over there. Right, because of imagine that like if you were a political reporter in you were covering. Trump's campaign and you again. I'm voting for Biden though I was that guy. Did you tell people out loud. I didn't tell folks voting for in two thousand sixteen, and I wouldn't but I think gets. Those are the ones where I think everyone can agree, but there's there's there's other things like how much of me do I. Bring to a story when I'm covering police violence against black men. Am I allowed to say that's racist. Because I know what racism is experienced, it trust me and don't make me say racially tinged. Like those, and that's where it gets murkier well. You know you know where I. I experienced this. Yeah, so when gay marriage was was a hot hot issue, right? They were different cities or states that were making gay marriage legal. The Supreme Court hadn't yet decided in San Francisco the mayor of San Francisco. made it legal and a reporter for the San Francisco Chronicle on a Saturday after weeks of covering it, the City Hall reporter went down and got a marriage license, and she was taken off the beat. Wow, and as in as an ethicist, right is a journalism ethicist. I was like wait a second. That can't be right. because. She was exercising in San Francisco. What was a legal right? You don't mean you didn't tell people who'd been divorced. They couldn't cover this issue because they'd you know somehow. Defiled the sanctity of marriage by? Getting divorced. So that was, that was where realized that you cannot penalize people for who they are. That's not fair. Yeah, because you end up with the only people that are untainted enough to do all the work are people who are only straight are people who are only men are people who have only gone to college and has a certain pedigree people who are an the deaths a problem, so bias is to right. It's just that we don't well. That's the thing, but these leaders aren't seeing those. Yeah, because they look just like them. I think now what is required to speak to the Syria. Systemic issues being raised in this reckoning. Going to have to be an acknowledgement that the movement toward writing these wrongs. It's going to be in some ways painful and you should do it anyway. From your conversations with newsroom leaders across the country. Do you think they're ready to accept that idea that this might hurt that? It might not just be. A statement and everyone shakes hands, and says sure good now now I mean nobody wants to voluntarily sign up for something painful. You do it because you know that what comes on the other side is worth head. There's individuals in every single newsroom who are part of the problem. Then somebody has to tell those people that if they want to keep their jobs, they have to stop being part of the problem, and that means that they're either going to have to be quiet. Or they're going to have to change or leave. Just leave well. That's I mean if they want to keep their job right like. Yeah and I've seen people. Who are these problem, people? I don't think I've ever seen any of them. Actually chain, but I've seen some of them. Learn to be quiet and let other people lead. And then they actually become the beneficiary. Of what comes after yeah. And then I. Think also so many lessons of me too I. Think are applicable to this meteoroid. Me To kind of work. Because a lot of folks were just literally canceled and they had to go, they were shamed. They were fired. And you said you can't be here anymore. And it was painful for them, and probably all the folks that liked them in love them but like. Sometimes, it's just that yeah. So my last question for you back to these two ideals that butt heads this idea of objectivity. But also this business idea of needing to be somewhat neutral to appeal to a large audience. And reworking probably reassessing, what objectively means a newsroom? What advice would you give to newsroom leaders? Writing up that next ethics guideline for their journalist about quote, Unquote Objectivity Post reckoning. Yeah, so this is where I'm supposed to come through with something really profound and I mean I. I am I. Am humble enough to say. That I don't have the answer yet. But I'm also arrogant enough to say that I believe after working through lots of really really hard ethics problems with newsrooms that I think we are going to find the answer and I think it's going to start by. Recognizing that there is a difference between. Revealing political bias. and. Revealing lived experience. And we need to start there and say your lived. Experience should not count as political bias. Thanks again to Kelly McBride joining us and thanks to everyone who, over the last week or so shared very very personal stories about life as a person of color in the newsroom. I heard from colleagues as well. And one thing one of those colleagues told me about all of this. She said so much of this work is convincing journalist. who think they've been doing it right for so long that maybe in some ways they've been doing it wrong. And then she said to me. This phrase really stuck with me, she said. How do you argue with the fish about the water there's. I. Don't know just yet how to do that. It's pretty difficult. It seems frustrating,

NPR United States President Trump Maria Chicago Donald Trump Mexico Mcbride Npr George Floyd Washington Post New York Times Kelly Mcbride FLU Bureau Sam Chicago Tribune Scapegoating Mcdonald
Indianapolis police officer shot and killed on domestic violence call

Tony Katz Today

00:41 sec | 1 year ago

Indianapolis police officer shot and killed on domestic violence call

"The the mystic mystic violence violence calls calls are are some some of of the the most most dangerous dangerous calls calls that that police police can can get get over over their their radios radios Chris Chris Davis Davis reports on why is staying at home can mean more danger for some people than corona virus last week officer Brianne lease with the Indianapolis metro police were shot through a front door while answering a domestic call the traffic stops are the two deadliest called you don't know what you're walking into Kelly McBride executive director for the domestic violence network on W. I. B. C.'s first day she says with people put together in close proximity domestic violence is almost a given call to our crisis lines are increasing as well she says if you're in an abusive relationship shelters are still open and you should call to find a safe way out

Chris Chris Davis Davis Executive Director W. I. B. C. Officer Brianne Indianapolis Kelly Mcbride
"kelly mcbride" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

03:06 min | 1 year ago

"kelly mcbride" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"For at least another seven or fourteen days and that's why you can't always just look at the hospital rates to determine whether you're having an impact of ideologically the president says he's also taking action to prevent hoarding of essential supplies and protect against price gouging isolation because of the corona virus outbreak may increase the hazards of domestic violence Eric Berman reports domestic violence network executive director Kelly McBride says it's not so much the being in close contact twenty four seven makes an abuser lashed out is that the effects of self quarantining can aggravate the tendencies that make someone abusive to begin with a lot of and we'll look right says domestic violence shelters remain open the pandemic may make it harder for victims to get there Eric Berman ninety three W. I. B. C. mobile me and attempted break and ends with one person in the hospital police say a homeowner caught a man trying to break into his house on Lawrence Avenue early this morning and shot him that's on in the south side the man trying to break into the house was taken to the hospital in critical condition no one else was hurt he died trying to prevent himself from getting the corona virus that's a police say a man from Arizona did a couple in their sixties took a cleaner used on fish tanks called chloroquine phosphate to protect themselves from getting the virus will some early research does suggest the Cork when which is commonly used to treat malaria could treat the corona virus the couple tried to get emergency care within thirty minutes but it was too late for the husband who died while his wife is being treated I'm John Herrick on the level on the go and on Twitter at ninety three W. Y. B. C. and W. I. B. C. dot com it's eight thirty four sports was Sam runs up you will be seeing Peyton manning on Monday Night Football anytime soon according to the New York Post the colts legend reportedly has turned down ESPN's offer to become the analyst on Monday Night Football despite being able to command a salary in the eight figure range new colts quarterback Philip rivers join the ride with GMB on the fan yesterday and talked of his admiration for manning running the show and it's now on all digital actually and I was I was a rookie and was one of my favorite kind of house from all the whole bill in addition or leaving the game going out was because the cool thing I've ever seen banning turns forty four today and ESPN two is celebrating with five hours of paid related programming produced non conference basketball schedule is coming together the Boilermakers will take on West Virginia in the basketball hall of fame classic December thirteenth at Brooklyn's Barclays center I'm Sam from separately by B. C. sports now graphic on the five with Matt Baier northwest signs have been sixty five ten minutes down to the north would from four sixty five also looking to northbound sixty five out of the sales side four one four sixty five up to the south point other to to the north whatever thing looking pretty good right now to events funded by Sigur financial group market volatility making you nervous singer financial group understands go to singer financial group dot com to schedule review designed to address your financial concerns and.

"kelly mcbride" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

01:32 min | 1 year ago

"kelly mcbride" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Creative with friends online now the organization says they're working with a bare bones staff to provide a place to stay for families of critically ill children in local area hospitals they say these children need life saving treatments that can't stop they're definitely stressed I mean you see it on their faces and I think that's one thing all of us that work here always remember is you know no matter how bad you think we have it having a child is critically ill at this point in time in addition to everything else is is devastating the organization says doctors are trying to get children home as much as possible but while they still have families and their care they still need help again that immediate need is food will get all that information and how to donate and where to drop off up on wish TV dot com back to you Angeli thank you it is five fifteen right now happening in company is expanding its drive thru corona virus testing the company will start offering tested police firefighters paramedics and other emergency workers slowly launched the effort Monday at its downtown campus testing doctors nurses and pharmacists people in all the covered category still need a doctor's order or official department request before going to the drive through the Lilly spokesperson says the company is working toward public testing but there's no timetable for when it'll happen there is concern that the coronavirus outbreak could lead to a spike in domestic violence incidents we spoke to the director of the domestic violence network in Indianapolis Kelly McBride.

Angeli director Kelly McBride official Lilly Indianapolis
"kelly mcbride" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

02:02 min | 1 year ago

"kelly mcbride" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Hoosier state into lockdown it's a bid to slow the spread of coronavirus Eric Berman reports Indiana will join at least twelve other states in ordering residents to stay home except for essential travel like getting groceries no mistake about it this disease is killing people time is of the essence and we can do for each other and for our economy is slowing the spread of says there are still some restaurants and bars you can order last week's order to shut down except for Kerry out of delivery under a new executive order those establishments could have their liquor licenses suspended and pay a fine Eric Berman ninety three W. I. T. C. mobile news everyone at home could keep you safe but what about those forced to deal with domestic violence how a coworker of mine we need to call for help for you that's Kelly McBride the executive director of India's domestic violence network the shelters remain open but my gripes is the pandemic makes it harder for victims to get to them avoid one hundred forty first and state road thirty seven in fishers if you can a guy with a gun held at bay by police at the words of Britain apartments another off day on Wall Street the Dow lost five hundred eighty two points coronavirus may give businesses an Indiana trouble for months or even years Chris Davis reports the trouble stays long after the shutdown said while the shutdowns are happening you'll see record unemployment you're going to see a rise in the pressure on the state's Indiana's included state unemployment trust funds as more and more benefits being paid out Brian Burton president and CEO of the Indiana manufacturers association on Tony catch in the morning news he says some companies will be able to stay open by making needed supplies Chris Davis ninety three W. I. B. C. mobile news you'll find a list of frequently asked coronavirus questions and answers.

Eric Berman Indiana Kerry Kelly McBride executive director India Britain Chris Davis executive Brian Burton president and CEO Tony
After Synagogue Attack, Web-Hosting Sites Suspend Gab

NPR's Business Story of the Day

04:12 min | 3 years ago

After Synagogue Attack, Web-Hosting Sites Suspend Gab

"This podcast. And the following message is brought to you by jet dot com. Your one stop shopping destination. The jet experience provides a unique and relevant Dortmund with no membership fees. Start shopping conveniently at jet dot com or on the jet app today. Now, we have more about a social media site where the Pittsburgh synagogue shooting. Suspect reportedly posted anti-semitic attacks before walking into the tree of life synagogue with four weapons Robert Bowers apparently got fired up with words, he reportedly used gab which calls itself and alternative to Twitter and his popular among the far, right. Here's NPR's. Jasmine, garst gout is a site that proudly promotes free speech. It boasts that it lets anyone say anything, but it's been controversial critics have called it a home for anti-semites and white nationalists Robert Bowers was a user before allegedly going on a killing spree. He posted about the Hebrew immigrant aid society, a group that supports refugees. He said the group quote likes to bring invaders that kill our people. I can't sit by and watch my people get slaughtered. Screw your optics. I'm going in Andrew Torbay is the CEO of gab in an interview with. NPR? He defended the platform. I know you direct threat in there because I don't what what would you expect us to do with both like that? We you want us to just censor anybody. That says the phrase I'm going in is that what you're proposing here. Well, I got some birds. And here's the thing he answered it, bad speech or hate speech Harvey wanted to find that he's more speech and always will be when does online free speech become a threat. This isn't the first time the issue has come up in social media. Just last week. It came to light that the man accused of sending explosive devices to prominent Democrats in the media had a history of threatening tweets tore BA says gab follows strict rules, including no threats. He says he created gab because he saw no room for conservative points of view on social media. Take Twitter or whatever thousands upon thousands of people calling for someone to kill. Donald Trump saying they're going to kill Donald Trump expressing hate towards white people towards Christians towards minorities who may now support Donald Trump, they allow hate to be spewed at certain groups and certain people. So where is the line between free speech and inciting violence? I think the line is where free speech becomes a threat. Kelly. Mcbride is a senior vice president at the pointer institute for media studies. She says Torah is prioritizing free speech above all other constitutional values, and that is not necessarily what our constitutional framers intended. Right. They didn't want the government curbing free speech, nor did they want citizens to be irresponsible with their speech. She says last year Google band gobs app. Apple rejected it and Microsoft terminated its agreement with it last month just in the last twenty four. Hours at least two web hosting platforms have suspended gab CO. Andrew Torah is not backing down. We're not going anywhere toward says gab condemns the shooting, but he thinks it's now being targeted unfairly over the weekend. The social media site was filled with anger some of it directed at the Jewish community jasmine guards and pure news. New york. So that was over the weekend. And then last night gab released a statement saying it would be inaccessible for a period as it transitions to new hosting provider. Support for this podcast and the following message. Come from internet essentials from Comcast. Connecting more than six million low income people to low cost high speed internet at home. So students are ready for homework class graduation and more. Now, they're ready for anything.

GAB Robert Bowers Andrew Torbay Donald Trump NPR Twitter Mcbride Dortmund Gout Pittsburgh Synagogue Comcast Jasmine Andrew Torah Harvey BA CEO Apple
"kelly mcbride" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

03:45 min | 3 years ago

"kelly mcbride" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"My guest today are Kelly McBride. She's at the Poynter institute writes about media coverage of sexual assault. Also, Jane Costa senior politics reporter for vox who's covered the conservative movement, and also some of this hearings. It struck me that in recent days and weeks that these accusations against judge Cavanaugh have prompted a number of prominent women journalists. Talk about their own experiences. I think of Dalia lift wake of slate who's talked about this and who's has been very skeptical of Kavanagh's account, Jane coast in what do you make of the way in which many journalists, particularly female journalists have embraced the me too movement. To what extent do you think that's a coloring affecting a, how they are absorbing reporting on the cabinet nomination. Well, I think first and foremost, I think that the the idea that you could not be both personally affected by sexual violence or sexual assault and be able to report on the instances of sexual violence or sexual assault is a bit of a Canard because you we can walk and chew gum at the same time. We can have endured something that was awful, but also be able to look carefully at court documents and an acknowledged the presence or the lack of evidence in certain cases. But I do think that you my own colleagues have written really extensively on the metoo movement within journalism which is particularly important. But I think that there's a sensibility that we know better than a lot of people do just how omnipresent sexual violence is for many women in this country. Many people in this country more broadly. And I think that our ability to listen to the stories and report on those stories, which is incredibly challenging to do. Do is something that's been very important to me in very important too many women who are you on conservative liberal. I've talked to people who are within conservative institutions have talked about their own experiences of harassment and how challenging that's been. And I think that that's that's something we haven't heard enough about, but I think that journalists being able to recognize one, you'll how difficult this is for someone else. I think that there are times where we're talking about crimes. We're talking about robbery. We're talking about something manslaughter, murder. Those are crimes where I think everyone can recognize this would be very difficult. You can put yourself in the plate in the shoes of the person who has endured this. But for sexual violence, I think for some journalists you, you hear of people who are, you know, they're very, you know, questioning why the person was dressed a certain way or acting a certain way, or you even heard about this a little bit with kind of some of the allegations regarding cavenaugh of why would you keep going to these parties of terrible things happened at these parties. Not recognizing one year in high school. That's you. You keep going to the party where the cool people are because the cool people are there and to not understanding that the mindset of someone who has endured sexual violence or been around sexual violence is not one that is going to be inherently logical. And I think that being able to see that and see that through both what you've experienced, what you've learned about while reporting on it is incredibly important. Hennenberg the burger, the editorial columnist for the Kansas City star wrote a column titled don't judge Kavanagh's accusers, I covered the police and I didn't report my own rape. She wrote against what she called. The usual cries about how easy it is to ruin a fine man's life. The many female and male lives that are ruined by sexual violence and for the record. Mine was not a really mentioned by people. So Reverend about those upstanding citizens who are so -posedly being unfairly besmirched by liberal in media mob..

Kavanagh assault vox Kelly McBride Jane Costa Poynter institute Cavanaugh reporter Dalia cabinet Kansas City robbery harassment murder rape one year
"kelly mcbride" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

04:29 min | 3 years ago

"kelly mcbride" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Clarence Thomas hearings. Any difference in the way the media handles accusations like these l.. Absolutely. I mean, I am just old enough to have been a professional during the a hill trial. And I remember thinking myself in hearing many women in and men to thinking the accusations that Anita hill was making. It's not that people didn't believe her. It's that people didn't think it was that big of a deal. That stuff happened all the time and that she was taking it too seriously. Now, especially in the last year with me to both for sexual assault and sexual harassment. There's a reckoning and there's an acknowledgement that we. We have not told the truth in the media about this story, and there's a lot of reasons that have kept us from the truth when it comes to sexual assault, namely there is this privacy that we generally afford the victims and so they're not named. So they don't get a chance to tell their story that is falling away drastically and rapidly right. There are many, many victims who will come forward including Dr Ford in describe what happened to them. And when when in the past they were ashamed to do so because there was this deep stigma that was attached to being a victim of the crime, and that victims are throwing that off now and they are coming forward and they're telling their stories and the media's more willing to listen to them and, and so you see a different, you see a different truth being told a more fuller truth about sexual assault and sexual harassment, and then you enter into this particular conversation about this particular case. Where it is. It is very hard to say this definitively happened or did not definitively happen. But when you look at the broader context, the there are many, many people in society who are willing to say now, yes. This happened to me when that wasn't the case in the media has played a role in that. Want to take a call from Norman Oklahoma, Rita. What you see when you you're watching this play out. Hi, David. I'm snippets on this station of Dr Ford yesterday morning, but I watched on CNN Cavanaugh. Hours and was totally exhausted by his outrages equivocating. He was blatantly a skills liar. Well, briefly briefly read a, how do you feel the media treated that. I felt that CNN was leaning a little leftish, but I am from Oklahoma, which is a solid red state, and I'm not a custom to hearing anything fairly reported PBS did clips that were very fair. I thought. Okay, thank you. Read it for that call Kellyanne about minute or so that we've got left before the end of the segment. I wanted to ask you what, what would balance look like in this in coverage of this? What does fair mean here? How man that's such a hard question to even answer. We have this frame that we try and cover this in a courtroom trial, and this is an and we talk about evidence and and and innocent until proven guilty. But this isn't a courtroom trial. This is a job interview. It's very different. And so it's so hard to figure out what fairness would look like because we don't have a set of standards in a job interview for what. You should consider and what you shouldn't consider. And that's the hardest that that's the hardest part is I don't think we know what fairness would look like. In this case, some people would say, fairness is this is out of bounds and nothing's been proven, you need to disregard it. And some people would say that you should go completely in the other direction that everything is fair game. It's not a courtroom trial. We're not talking about convicting somebody of a crime. We're talking about examining his past actions, and there is not. I think that your opinion on that is going to be directly correlated to your political leanings were discussing the media and the news coverage of Brett cabin on Kelly McBride. You just heard there in Jane coast and like you both to stick around for all of you out there listening. I want you to stick around to. It's a vital conversation. You can join us. I'm David Folkenflik in this is on point..

Anita hill assault Dr Ford David Folkenflik Norman Oklahoma harassment Clarence Thomas CNN Kellyanne Brett Kelly McBride PBS
"kelly mcbride" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

As It Happens from CBC Radio

05:14 min | 3 years ago

"kelly mcbride" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

"The person says that they are part of the resistance inside the administration, how do they illustrate their resistance? Well, they described taking actions to thwart President Trump's agenda and and his impulses in his whims and Tim minimize the harm that he's causing. But that is I, you know, they could have done a story. They could have reported a story with anonymous sources and set the same thing. So I don't think that there's resistance within the administration. I don't think that was what was surprising. I think that what was surprising was that the New York Times chose to bring this into the marketplace of ideas with an anonymous op-ed, and you suggested that there were probably deep discussions here among the senior editorial people at the times because this is so impressively it. Absolutely. I mean, I'm. Sure that they thought about like, what is this going to do to the political discourse? And of course you can. You can sort of predict it right the the people who are die. Hard supporters of the president are going to dismiss it as fake, and I'm sure that the president will dismiss it as fake news and will be attacking the New York Times any minute now on Twitter, the rest of the country. I think I'm not sure how it changes. The conversation for the rest of the country to know in this level of detail that there are people within the administration who are working against him. Now, for those of us reading this, the the person is anonymous. But what exactly with the New York Times know about the person before they publish this, they would know a lot about him. They would know exactly who he or she is. They would have had long conversations about the possibility of this person eventually being identified about they would have edited there would have been a back and forth. I'm sure they know a lot about this individual. There are undoubtedly people at the senior levels of of any government who have complaints concerns, information that they might even find alarming. But what kind of president does it set if the paper of record? Let's a senior government official right in the first person anonymously. Well, I think it opens the door for other for for other attacks, and you know it is on the one hand, it is a significant piece because the this writer claims that the president is childish and impetuous and implies in unstable or instability. If you play that forward and you think you know if somebody in the mayor's office wanted to do that at the local newspaper, what would that do? You know, on a large scale, this would bring serious credibility issues to the press. And so so this is obviously has to be the exception, not the rule and I'm sure that they talked about that at the New York Times. Do you believe the times would have published this with any other administration? Nine. I don't think so. No? Why would they be rationalized that it was the thing to do this time around? I think there are so many questions about this administration and whether it's legal issues or ethical issues or moral issues, diplomatic issues. I mean, just on every front, it's so controversial that it's really hard to inform the public about what's really happening and they. Must have felt like this was an important piece to get out into the marketplace of ideas. Why should the op-ed writer get to stirred accountability for their own role in this administration? Well, that's a political question, and I'm journalism expert. I think it's definitely a question that we should be asking as journalists, but I'm probably not the person to answer it Kelly. McBride. Thank you for sharing your insights with us. You're welcome. Okay, Bye-bye. But I- Kelly McBride is a media ethicist and the senior vice president of the Poynter institute. We reached her earlier today in Saint Petersburg, Florida, and as suspected US President, Donald Trump did respond. Here's part of what he had to say from the White House during a meeting with sheriffs from across the US. When you tell me about some anonymous source within the administration, probably whose failing and the New York Times is failing. If I learnt here. I believe the New York Times probably wouldn't even exist. Some day when I'm not president, which hopefully will be about six and a half years. The New York Times and CNN and all of these phony media outlets will be out of business folks. No be out of business. So if the failing New York Times has an anonymous editorial, can you believe it anonymously, meaning gutless..

New York Times senior vice president President Trump Kelly McBride writer US Tim Twitter Poynter institute CNN White House Saint Petersburg official Florida one hand
"kelly mcbride" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

As It Happens from CBC Radio

02:05 min | 3 years ago

"kelly mcbride" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

"I am part of the resistance inside the Trump administration. That is a pretty provocative headline, and it sits above an op-ed published in the New York Times today. All we know about its author is that he or she is a senior official in the administration of US President, Donald Trump, Kelly McBride is immediate ethicist and senior vice president of the Poynter institute. We reached her earlier today in Saint Petersburg, Florida, MS, McBride. What was your initial reaction when you saw this op-ed today? I was blown away. I could not imagine the New York Times doing this until this moment. And I just think that they probably spent hours and hours days and days trying to decide if this was the right thing to do, and it's struck me as this is a historically significant action both politically in the country, but also for journalism for. The most significant news organization in the country to run an anonymous op Ed about the president. Can you walk us through the parts that most stood out for you and why? This is. So I guess, alarming too many people? Well, I mean, alarming significant game changing. I think there's a lot of different adjectives that you could use for this, and I'm not sure how to years ten years from now will look back on this moment and if we'll think, oh, this was a really great thing for the New York Times to do, or this was really foolish thing for the New York Times to do, but but the thing that stood out to me is it is anonymous, which is like a revolutionary war kind of journalism significance. We don't see in the paper of record anonymous claims about politicians. We see them using anonymous sources, allot. But to have it the full on op Ed that I think is the most significant thing..

New York Times senior vice president Kelly McBride Donald Trump Poynter institute Saint Petersburg US official Florida ten years
"kelly mcbride" Discussed on 1A

1A

03:10 min | 3 years ago

"kelly mcbride" Discussed on 1A

"We had to use Nana sources often because people were worried about being targeted by some of these extremist groups. And so you know, it kind of now at branches out into this whole entire world of sort of the bigger picture of anonymous sources. And there are times where we're doing it really to protect these people from a greater harm. It's Kelly said she's very right to to have corrected me and distinguish between these two things, but it's it's a very complicated issue, no matter what the issue, what the causes do. Want to get to the kind of consumer protection critical thinking part before we run out of time. Elissa asked if no consensus on what source terms like background and autumn off the record, cetera means if there's no consensus on what that those terms mean, how can news consumers know what sources or stories to trust, Jonathan, what would you like four times readers to keep in mind when they see aides say or someone familiar with the matter says, when he read that, what do you want them to keep in mind? But we tried to explain why this person is I requested anonymity because of this. Now I have to say that sometimes that becomes boilerplate requested anonymity because he or she was not cleared to talk to the press. Sometimes sometimes that are less revelatory than we would like. But we would like to have a little more transparency on that. I have Franklin think. I think if journalists got together and explain, maybe we should. The boilerplate should be requested anonymity because that's. What's done in Washington, which wasn't done it watching. I mean, I think I think that it's very hard for readers to understand why this sources off the record or is being quarterback around. And I think that's a real problem before we gotta go Kelly. What would you like readers to keep in mind as they read stories with anonymous sources of various kinds? Well, I would like them to judge the overall publication as well as the story itself. Does this publication correct information when they get it wrong? And are those corrections obvious to find do they correct in a story when they get something wrong? Do they note the correction on the story that is a sign that they want to act with integrity and gain your trust if they're doing that? And so so when you look at the overall organization, you wanna see symbols that they have the humility to admit when they get things wrong and to make it right. And to the extent that if they don't, that's where you should. Withhold your trust and Vivian, what would you like readers to keep in mind? Just realize that I mean m- myself as a reporter and most of my peers, I know we take these things extremely seriously. It is not something that we're flipping about. This is a huge responsibility that we have. We believe that we are serving the public for very important. 'cause and so just I hope that you guys trust us trust that we do this with with that mind, Vivian Salama a White House reporter for the Wall Street Journal. Vivian, thanks for talking to us, Kelly McBride, senior vice president of the Poynter institute, Kelly. Thank you. Pleasure. And Jonathan, Weisman, the New York Times deputy Washington editor. Thanks, Jonathan. Thank you for happy until we meet again. I'm Joshua Johnson. Thanks for listening. This is one. Mm..

Kelly McBride Vivian Salama Jonathan Elissa reporter Washington Kelly Joshua Johnson Poynter institute Franklin Wall Street Journal New York Times senior vice president White House editor Weisman
"kelly mcbride" Discussed on 1A

1A

03:15 min | 3 years ago

"kelly mcbride" Discussed on 1A

"So in that case, the Washington Post turn the full force of their investigative powers onto this person, and they discovered that she wasn't telling them the truth about who she really was. And because of that deception, they felt like the the promise that they had made to keep her anonymous was not necessarily worth upholding. And that is, in most cases, like Jonathan said, we journalists know who these sources are. We know their name, we know their title, we know where they work. We know what type of information they have access to when we don't. When someone approaches us, there is a lot of effort that goes into making sure that that person is who they say they are that they really know what they say. They know and that they are not trying to distort the truth in any way. I get the sense that kind of to Jonathan was sing earlier about the public's perception through popular culture. I mean, obviously Project Veritas goal here was to discredit the Washington Post and the power of this was to push back on that. I feel like this kind of feeds what we're hoping to dispel today, which the preconceptions about how we. We do our work that it's just this kind of black box that you just dump information into it feeds a printing press and then magically it shows up on your doorstep. Yeah. I mean, that's -lutely not the case. And in fact, to to build on Kelly was just saying, even when we do know the person, even when we do know what they do, how they might have accessed information, it's still terrifying to run a story based on information. I mean, no matter how much I confirm I'm able to confirm and get multiple sources to confirm something every single time I put out a story with anonymous source. I'm speaking for myself personally, I lose sleep. It is a really huge responsibility. An I don't. I'm personally someone who takes it very seriously because at the end of the day, there is so much at stake their jobs in their lives, my job in my life, my the reputation of my publication, the reputation of journalists at large because remember these days and this is something I tell people all the time you hear us described sort about largest fake news, but. When one reporter get something wrong, it reflects on all of us. And so we representing the press corps at large. It's not, you know, because these days when one one thing coz wrong, it's bad for all of us. And so it's an enormous responsibility. I take very seriously for sure. That's part of what President Trump has seized on in terms of Hughes critiques of the press. We'll talk a little bit more about the impact of the president on your perceptions about journalism anonymous, sourcing with Vivian Salama of the Wall Street Journal, Jonathan Weissman of the New York Times and Kelly McBride of the Poynter institute much more to come, stay close. Support for one a. and the following message come from American Express these days. Keeping up with everything in the news is hard, whether it's politics or pop culture. American Express believes it's always easier to stay ahead when they're someone behind you easier to focus on what matters to follow. What interests you to explore to discover and with American Express, you don't have to go it alone because they have your bag. Don't live life without it..

Jonathan Weissman American Express Washington Post Kelly McBride president Poynter institute reporter Wall Street Journal Vivian Salama Trump New York Times Hughes
"kelly mcbride" Discussed on 1A

1A

03:46 min | 3 years ago

"kelly mcbride" Discussed on 1A

"And so sometimes when we know the identity of that person, we believe that their personal. Speaking from a position of authority, we might allow it, but it's very rare that we will go first single source. And typically it's not a good practice. Let's talk to somebody else who has to deal with the policies of major news organization, particularly in making difficult decisions about when to trust in anonymous source. Joining us in studio is Jonathan. Weisman. The New York Times is deputy, Washington editor, Jonathan, welcome back to the program. Thanks for having me. So when it comes down to like an edge call. Right? You've got an anonymous source with some really powerful information. Talk about the thought process in terms of when a source is allowed to remain anonymous or when you go back the reporter and say, this is good, but we, we need something more. Do you push him to go on the record? Like how do you think that through? Well, we actually do push very hard to get things on the record. And if we have a story that is kind of marginal, that may not be so urgent that we absolutely have to you grow lie. On a anonymous source to to publish it. Sometimes we'll just pull back actually had this experience just this week where a reporter wanted to do a story, but the conditions on it were complaint anonymity, and I simply said, no, we're not going to write that. We're not going to run that story and I was talking to her yesterday, and I said, what happened? Should they're going to try to get me on the get Bs on the record. So I think a lot of times if reporters are tougher about anonymity, eventually a lot of sources will will put their names to stories, isn't there always the risk though that if times doesn't run at the post might the journal might. There's absolutely that risk and it is an important consideration because you don't want to end up getting beat because another outlet was a little looser with the enemy. But you know, we have to make those judgment calls all the time. Do you know who your reporter sources? Our reporters kind of have their own sources in their own Rolodex that they. Carrie in their own back pocket. That's an excellent question. Because at one time we gave reporters a lot more latitude to say to keep their sources under wraps. Then we made changes at the times that said that at least one re one editor must know the identity of every anonymous source. So there is nothing in the paper in which only the reporter knows the source. How many sources are enough to consider a nugget of information credible, you know it is. As Vivian said, sometimes sometimes a source is so official that you feel like this person is speaking for the institution and he will take it at face value. Sometimes you the sources a little sketchy and you really do need to three four sources to make make that correct. When I give you an example, when I remember when I was a reporter at the wall, the Washington Post, and I was told that was a a meeting that bra. Doc Obama having with House Democrats, and I will tell you the official spokesperson for the Democrats at that time came out and gave me a background about what Obama said. I used a single source on that to say, okay, Obama told Democrats this, and then they're bombing. People denied it vociferiously and because I said, well, this was a very official source. I, you know, I thought I was protected. But the fact is, this is an example where if you use anonymous sources, you become vulnerable because if they all say it's a lie wasn't said, you can't then go say, hey, but my source was ex- how could I possibly have not believed him? Kelly McBride?.

reporter Jonathan The New York Times Doc Obama editor Weisman Kelly McBride Washington Post official Washington Carrie Vivian
"kelly mcbride" Discussed on 1A

1A

04:17 min | 3 years ago

"kelly mcbride" Discussed on 1A

"Florida is Kelly McBride senior vice president at the pointer institute. A professional school for journalists pointers. Work focuses partly on fact, checking and journalism ethics, Kelly, welcome to one a. thank you and hear will listen studio. Is Vivian Salama who covers the White House for. The Wall Street Journal. Vivian welcome, Kelly. McBride. Let me start with you. I get the sense that there are a lot of misconceptions about sources and on the record off the record may be partly based on pop culture. What's the one biggest thing you find that people think they know about sources, sourcing journalism, but they really don't? Well, I think it's that what those words mean off the record, deep background, not for attribution, regular background, even among journalists, there is not consensus on what those terms mean. And so my advice to journalists always is to make sure with every new source that you've gone over what your understanding of those terms are. And when I talked to people who are considering or maybe our sources for stories, I tell them the same thing that you have to have the conversation because there's no universal definition for those terms. There's some widely agreed upon boundary. But there's a lot of fuzziness between about. I mean, they all mean you're not going to quote me by name, but off the record to some people means it will never ever be published in less. You find somebody else by name to to quote. And so it's confusing. Let's start defining some of these some of these terms. First of all, Kelly, when we talk about sources, what are we referring to? We're not. We don't mean the thing that I found in a Google search. We're talking about a person with info, right? Most of the time. Yes. Although a source can also be a document. So for for these purposes that we're talking about here, we're talking about human beings who have information about the story that we're trying to tell what we being by an anonymous source. We're talking about someone who refuses to use their name or the department, or their job title, or any combination of those exactly somebody who's not going to be named and who the reader is not going to be able to figure out who that person. It's. And let's get to those other terms, you mentioned on the record off the record on background. I let's let's take these one at a time if something is on the record. What does that mean on the record? That means that as a journalist, I can name you and put quotes in front of your name and say, you said this. So Joshua Johnson. The host of one a says doesn't. Yep. What about on background? What does that mean? So that's actually really confusing to me. What on background means is I'm telling you this, you're not going to say in your report that you've got this from an anonymous source, but you may use this information to go confirm it with either other anonymous sources or other named sources, so I can use the info, but you can't say it was Joshua Johnson, the host of of one on NPR. Exactly. And what about off the record? What is off the record me? So for some people, it means you won't publish that. But for. For most people, especially most civilians non-journalist. It means just don't put my name on it, but it's one of those terms. It's one of those terms that needs to be redefined every time you use it. Okay. So let's just back up to the top on the record. You can say, my name, my title. You can directly attribute that info to me background. You can use the info. You probably can't use all the details of who you got it from off the record. It may be useful info, but you can't report that you have to find some other way to report that out publicly and I got it, right. Well, yeah. But I mean, keep in mind. These are guidelines, and they're going to vary from journalist to journalist and especially setting to setting. So like the State Department does off the record briefings, and that means something very different to the State Department than it does when you're talking to somebody who doesn't work in the state of Hartman and they're offering you information off the record. So really, I don't wanna fool. Will people into thinking there's some..

Kelly McBride Joshua Johnson Vivian Salama State Department The Wall Street Journal senior vice president White House Florida pointer institute Google Hartman NPR
Watchdog report rebukes Comey for Clinton probe

C-SPAN

02:28 min | 3 years ago

Watchdog report rebukes Comey for Clinton probe

"Show them that so as business leaders and elected officials we have to show them what's important in life and what matters and what will get them recognition the thank you very much mr chairman on your back my time well i think we couldn't have a better panel today appreciate just we covered i think the full spectrum of all the issues in the closing that was fantastic does my you just gave that i think we'll give us plenty of think about to move forward on and that's why we do hold these panels we do seek your input from the business community and we're going to prepare another round zoom in until we hit the target and solve the problem and so i want to again thank all of our panelists today for coming in sharing your time and expertise i ask unanimous consent that members have five legislative days to submit statements and supporting materials for the record without objection so ordered this hearing is now a german thank you again very much congressman dave brat republican from virginia he chairs the small business subcommittee on economic growth tax and capital access ranking democrat dwight evans from pennsylvania and today's hearing featured todd hit ceo of kit or capital kelly mcbride is a ceo of hamilton reicher workforce in staffing company angela at schweitzer with saint mary's foundries presidency yell and brian greene's the owner and administrator of always best care senior services so she had a press reporting the justice department has issued a stinging rebuke to the fbi for it's handling of the hilary clinton email investigation report released today calls former director james comey insubordinate and says his actions were extrordinary but the report from the department's inspector general that's not fine that called me was motivated by political bias or preference in his decisions report criticizes komi for publicly announcing his recommendation against criminal charges for clinton also faulted him for alerting congress days before the two thousand sixteen election that the investigation was being reopened because of newly discovered emails the report runs over five hundred sixty pages we have it linked at c span dot org also an announcement today that sent the central judiciary committee beholding a hearing on this on monday next monday.

FBI Congress James Comey Director Hilary Clinton Administrator Kelly Mcbride Todd Dave Brat Komi Chairman Justice Department Brian Greene Saint Mary Schweitzer CEO Pennsylvania Dwight Evans Virginia Congressman
"kelly mcbride" Discussed on Reliable Sources with Brian Stelter

Reliable Sources with Brian Stelter

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"kelly mcbride" Discussed on Reliable Sources with Brian Stelter

"Kate spade on tuesday anthony bourdain on friday to household names to death by suicide as a result we've seen a real change now newsrooms are covering these painful stories cnn is joined lots of other news outlets invisibly listing the national suicide prevention lifeline number you can see here all three broadcast nightly newscasts were showing the number on friday night encouraging people in a very active way to call for help there's also the crisis text line we'll put both numbers up on screen but let's talk about some of the best practices for journalists when covering these sensitive stories there's a lot that's been done wrong in past years and allow that can be done right back with me now to discuss this indira lachman on thank you for sticking around you wrote about this for pointer and i wanna talk through some of the key points first of all what it is rooms get wrong when doing this indira well a lot of the problems in pointers vice president kelly mcbride has been writing about this for years a lot of the problem is sort of lionising and describing in detail not only lionising the people who have killed themselves but also then describing in too much detail how they do it and academic studies have proven this was a big study in the major scientific journal medical journal the lancet back in two thousand fourteen have proven contagion effect when there is more media coverage of suicide there is an increase in suicides so some of the guidelines that pointer has on our website pointer dot org you can also find similar guidelines on reporting on suicide dot org which is a consortium number of groups got together including pointer to make these guidelines to make clear to your readers first of all information about prevention like you say the suicide hotline is really important to also make clear that suicide is not the necessary natural outcome.

Kate spade anthony bourdain indira lachman vice president kelly mcbride cnn