37 Burst results for "Kazan"

Fresh update on "kazan" discussed on Behind the Bastards

Behind the Bastards

01:54 min | 9 hrs ago

Fresh update on "kazan" discussed on Behind the Bastards

"We are back okay. So the p. p. had made history by becoming the first successful police union and made history again here by setting a precedent that police unions would involve themselves directly and local and eventually national races. Stan was clear that his motivation for doing this was to make local elected leaders. Afraid of him. This new was the only way that the bureau could protect itself from the dangers of democracy. Portland yeah portland. Police were going to keep shooting people. In engaging and rampant corruption that was going to continue to piss portlanders off if they wanted to avoid real consequences for this behavior. Ppa would have to insert themselves into politics so they started donating the city council candidates paying to run ads attacking leaders who threatened to force any kind of accountability on them. Other police unions around the country paid attention and true to form followed suit in one thousand. Nine hundred ninety. Nine one of those coke addled narcotics. Cops we've been talking about officer. David crowder was shot dead during a drug raid on a motorcycle gang since he was. I don't know specifically that. He was a coke head but other portland. Cops say the narcotics cops were autocad so one one sue. I'm sorry if i unfairly. Slandered him as a coke head kazan's in a unit of coke heads. And there's nothing wrong with being a coquette as long as you aren't also carrying out drug rates. You know right. No shame on cocaine. Weren't you wistfully tweeting about cocaine like yesterday. It was mostly a joke. It's been a long time and happened in countries where it's legal. Let's just say that. Yeah so yeah. Since he was possibly a coke head cop may very well have helped to murder people because again his unit definitely murdered at least one person in stages a suicide..

Portland Stan David Crowder City Council Kazan
Fresh update on "kazan" discussed on Tha Boxing Voice

Tha Boxing Voice

01:13 min | 12 hrs ago

Fresh update on "kazan" discussed on Tha Boxing Voice

"You ain't got no tom and his. Could it catching up. You know it was good catching up who we got to go to. Buffalo falls davidian the morning. Tv or good afternoon It was good for instance. I've been listening a little bit I laid both them cats I don't know i would like eighty fight. Somebody you know. kazan shit. Whatever whatever He filed last owns phone. Sleep on good though but it was like okay. I thought he was going to beat them. Like that wasn't. I don't know i'm young. Like devin. haney. He's still young. He still growing into his grown. Man's strange song just had to see what they do. But i don't know. I like t. Oh you know. He did his thing You know that can't bros. Oh fight would be pretty sweet. I mean why wouldn't you do that. Like end in devon haney picked fight for tuna or somebody somebody. I don't know somebody would cut. It.

Kazan Buffalo TOM Haney Devin Devon Haney
Tyler Gibbs and Jack Irving of Toyota Racing Development's TD2 driver development program

NASCAR on NBC

05:22 min | 7 months ago

Tyler Gibbs and Jack Irving of Toyota Racing Development's TD2 driver development program

"Now. Let's get to part two of our conversation with Tyler Gibbs and Jack Irving just this I want to give you guys a chance to put some names with some faces here people who are listening. We've mentioned Christopher Bell. You guys mentioned Harris and Burton. I was reading a motorsports analytics story today in which Jack was quoted very highly on Chandler. Smith just wanted to give you a chance to tell us a little about. Who'S IN THE LINEUP? Right now and we're the names. We should be watching it from the Toyota racing development driver program. So it's funny. I think we have some remarkable kids coming up of all different ages all different ranges But it's still development like Chandler. Smith is is a gifted driver. I mean in in we've been with Chandler for three or four years i. I don't remember how long it's been a few years. He's been fantastic. He's always been a strong late model. Racer Kinda in his family team was was quite gifted enabled to kind of compete at a very young age with some very high level guys in racing and then he transferred that into Arca adventuring end and has been fantastic and the more he matures the better. He gets Which is really exciting. He's similar to like a younger Jones in that respect where he's young and been around it and he seemed so much older in a car and so much more mature in so that is translated into the truck races he ran last year and and I have some pretty high expectations of him as he does of themselves but he's definitely one of our up and comers that is on the young side mean seventeen and still developing and then obviously there's the Raphael Lazard the neckaces that we've been with for quite a while and I think most people know of Kazan truck races now. That were pretty happy about. And then there's there's lots of kids that we actively engage with and develop in all different areas were lucky not geographically focused either because we have teams all over the place and that's helped us engage with maybe some kids we probably wouldn't necessarily always get access to so there's some good kids in California. There's kids racing for Keith in Indiana. There's just there's just a lot of strong drivers out there the thing that's so interesting though. Is that their kids and kids. You never know what's going to happen so it's still development. I mean it's it's People. WanNa say whatever they want to say about how what what it takes to make it? But they're a work ethic focused drive a passionate WanNa do it is all super important to to make it and at some point maintaining that from fourteen fifteen. Sixteen seventeen is very very difficult to do. Know we can talk about it all the time about being focused in wanting it and all that but the proof is in Monday through Friday. And how hard? They're working what they're doing and to to be on top of their game and and for whatever reason at times that lapses and you know you could take a great kid who's Fourteen Jesse. Love is a kid we've been with since he was twelve. I think thirteen stupid. How young that was East we're really excited about him and you know then. There's kids like Geo celts. Who came out of nowhere in dirt and had outlawed program in in our racing with us and pavement. That's a little bit kind of a different road that he traveled and then we have Holly Holland and Greasy Trotter. Who really come aboard and done a really good job in kind of in all of our testing have looked quite good still have a lot of development to do. You know there's there's kids we lost Based on Ford coming in that is painful to so. There's I think there's a lot of good crop of young kids coming out racing and as long as they all continue to work hard developing keep good people around him then hopefully we'll see him down the road. We really good group. We have a good team of kids. it's exciting to them kind of interact with each other watch the quote unquote older kids. Who may not actually be older but have been in higher level than others and back and forth and so he has Jackson. We're really excited about about our kids. You mentioned most of the ones I attend to hit their Jesse loved Yosemite. I think Logan. Cv also part of the lineup. I believe I mean so. Logan was Logan is not as involved now. We still are working through some things to see if there's ways to work together it's just difficult to the process is difficult and how everybody fits in where they go. I mean Logan is ridiculously talented. I mean it's it's just finding the path and making it work is always hard. You know I mean you look at the McNally Lineup or venturing lineup with I mean. You have Corey Haim and drew dollar and Michael Self Austin Hills Rachel H at hr e and in. He's ridiculously good. And He's twenty four with two kids for God's sake so I mean it's awesome right. I mean in in in in Austin Hugely Involved Maximum Laughlin with with a jury in there. There is an amazing group of kids in. What's interesting is we're kind of lucky. We have some really driven dedicated guy who want participate and show up every day. And I mean that's what's crazy about the performance central a lot of those that we talked about minus the group their local to North Carolina. Right you get into dirt kids in our dirt. Kids are Cap. GotTa be the younger kids we've ever had consistently with Daisin Ken McIntosh and Buddy I mean it. Just these they're all babies right in and so they're and they're out. There racing are trying to raise eighty times a year. I mean it's it's just an amazing amazing situation but I think we've been very lucky. I mean part of it is. I think what we've done is a little bit different and and our teams of Baden in. That's been a big part of it. That's it goes back to what I said before. The integration of the teams is pretty special and something. I think I'm probably most proud about. Is that all those teams engage in actively discuss things with each other to try to help develop the drivers.

Logan Chandler Smith Jack Irving Toyota Christopher Bell Tyler Gibbs Harris Corey Haim Yosemite Ken Mcintosh Indiana Raphael Lazard Burton Baden North Carolina Keith California Jones WAN
Ancient Trees: Living on the Edge

In Defense of Plants Podcast

07:58 min | 7 months ago

Ancient Trees: Living on the Edge

"I hadn't research so when I started to do a research program I thought I need to find a place in southern Ontario which is far away for Hudson Bay. I had to find that place that had harsh growing conditions so that I could carry on with Mike curiosity about how plants living environments is exclude most other plants and took up and eventually I found that the cliffs of the Niagara Escarpment run basically from northern New York state. All the way through a terrier over to Michigan had not only Lichens mosses and other plans but had these scruffy trees growing on edge of the cliffs. And that's why did you need to the ancient forests of scar. Of course. No one knew that they were ancient time. In fact in one thousand nine hundred eighty eight. When I started the transition for like two trees I phoned. It was indication with the Ministry of Natural Resources asking if they would be interested in sponsoring research all on the ecology of the clips of escarpment and they wrote back and said well they were happy and by wanted to waste my time studying slips because he knew they were there. I have reminded them of that almost decade by decade. Since because Would they were disparaging where those little tiny trees growing the cliffs saying to themselves? Well Hey don't count compared with normal burnt tall forests. A scruffy vegetation on the cliffs didn't count so they could equal sign. Nothing is there and ironically but twenty years later when I was trying to confirm some of the early discoveries planned to do a sabbatical trip to France and I wrote to professor while palliate and asked him if I could come in at the cliffs in France and he said it was almost it was almost He said it was happy to host new but of course all their clips are there and in fact After we did the very cursory survey of the cliffs that he had we found the oldest living plants in France amid came Figaro He became famous because he then started a big research program. Events of living trees that stirred to grow for the Romans had left France shoe and it it freaked him out and everybody else said that he was a retrospectively so happy to have been rob his credit he was happy to say that to their discredit. Ministry of Natural Resources in Ontario. Even though they rode the ancient tree hobby-horse for years they never went. Service it oh by the way. We're sorry there was something there after all. Jeez wouldn't interesting trajectory on something that like you just interested. People wrote off and I grew up in that region looking at the Niagara Escarpment. And you see these trees they are small and I'm lucky that I grew up in a time where this was starting to be realized. And when you finally see the ages on some of these things that me. My jaw hit the floor. It's it's incredible to think of something that old in such a tiny package. Because you know you see three is or something like that in someone's yard and they're huge there but they're you know a couple of decades most but what got you interested in this idea of harshness. I know you said it started with Lichens. But to think about plants in harsh landscapes I mean you see them in asphalt you see them in gravel roads. Plants can handle it. But what made you want to study that you know? I think we probably need to have a shrink as part of the because what I've learned forty years during this is your personality. This is probably infected you right now to your personality guide to research ways that you don't even realizing now maybe this may be historical revisionism. But I think when I was a kid growing up I was the tall skinny guy that was always beaten up from school. Felt like I was the underdog in I always loved the idea of supporting anything in fastened with anything that would win by getting out of the way of the means of the bullets and those were often things cryptic where the things differently so I always tried to do things that other people were doing because then I wouldn't have to bump into that bullies that I didn't play sports. 'cause I was always the last one picked. I mean so does psychological component to working on high stress organisms whether they're plants or animals. Interestingly I fought against those buildings for years after ten years of working I actually got a H- site visit from the natural sciences and Engineering Research Council. They said by the way. We don't like the fact that you're working on rocks come and if you want to. This was a big incentive to move into the trees because they said if you WanNa have continued funding from us you have to work on something more real something more important like trees or higher plants but not Rocks Cup while many Lichen colonies several thousand years old and they said no one cares boy so with that encouragement lappy. We had all these people working in Allergy and we said okay guys. They're the writings on the wall. They don't want us to work on Lichens. What else grows beside them? That might gain some respect and one of the Grad students at whether trees growing on the same rocks. I mean maybe maybe we could just switch from the trees a A year later that we discovered on some of those cliff as trees that the rings were incredibly tight. We we had no plans to studying trees. We were simply looking at the way. Human Disturbance Influence the structure of these base forests. So to what could that. We decided a good thing to calculate was productivity enough to calculate the productivity tree. You have to divide its mass by age. Okay using architectural models. We calculated massive all the trees in climbed area in that massive all the trees in inclined area and then took core samples to find out how old they were Kazan. That would give us an estimate of productivity lifetime. Cry Tippety when we did that. You've got these core samples from the cliff face trees and we couldn't see any rings at all So then sanded them up more carefully. And that's when we realized reason why we couldn't see the richness is that they were too small and at that stage we with either. These trees are putting a tree ring every time it rains it because we were like an experts. Had We know the yet you know much about the biology trees at the time so what? We have a bunch of samples and said the sent them. Ed Cook It. Lamont Doherty in your you know in Palisades. Yeah Yeah just. North of the city in Ed. Cook wrote back and said Yes. Those are ancient trees where to find and I said well I can see Toronto from where they grow the sitting right on the edge of the escarpment facing the biggest city in Ontario. And it looks like some of them have over seven hundred rings in them. Whoa and he said well you got a good one expert instill as dendrochronology in the world. And so he he and I started to collaborate with some other lab partners and we did quite a bit work after that on the dendrochronology the series of the Niger. Escarpment but it was all accident really amazing. We weren't initially curious about ancient trees at all just wanted to see if disturbance influence productivity turned up the did disturbs make it. The trees grow faster because it was competition but that became a side issue once we found For us in a place where no one expected to find one.

Niagara Escarpment France Ontario Ministry Of Natural Resources Ed Cook Mike Curiosity Michigan ED Hudson Bay Allergy Toronto New York Engineering Research Council Niger Lamont Doherty Professor Kazan Palliate
"kazan" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

12:11 min | 7 months ago

"kazan" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Let's get back to my interview with Zoe Kazan. She's one of the stars of the six episode. Hbo series the plot against America adapted from the Philip. Roth novel of the same name. She was also in the. Hbo Series the Deuce she co starred in the big sick and the Coen brothers movie. The ballot of Buster scruggs she wrote the screenplay for the film Ruby sparks in which she starred with her partner. Paul Deneau Kazan. And Dino wrote the film wildlife adapted from the Richard Ford novel of the same name. Your partner Paul Deneau. He's probably look a little bit older than you know. He's nine months younger than me. Oh okay okay. So you're basically the same age but you've spoken how your experiences actors are so different because of gender like he auditioned for a lot of roles that require gunplay having a gun and you have not and you're asked to cry a lot in auditions or enrolls and he is not although I have seen him in roles. I'd like to hear more about thinking about the gender differences based on your experiences. Oh Gosh it's just so different I mean look. I think what's happened in the last two or three years with the rise of the metoo movement and that movement becoming kind of central in our cultural imagination and Harvey. Weinstein going to jail. And that's all great and I hope that makes a real big permanent change but I also know that there's like eight years and years eons of patriarchal construction that supports itself that will try to undo that work I think my experiences especially in my twenty s were so so very different than those of my male partner that I can't begin to describe not just in terms of what opportunities were available to us but also in terms of the way that we were treated on sets like the very casual sexism and sexual harassment that I received which I'm sure is like nothing compared to it. Some other women have faced and especially you know women of Color. Can you give us an example? Also something that you consider that kind of casual sexism. Yeah and I had a close star. Say to me in the middle of rehearsal once you would be hot if you gain ten pounds in a room in which I was the only woman being told by somebody. Hey you'd be really hot if you gain ten pounds. That's a really loaded thing to say to you. That person might not have known you had an eating disorder when you were younger so to say that is just really They might have been totally unaware of how problematic that comment was. Have you ever felt like you could say something about like an inappropriate remark or an inappropriate request? Sure I think I'm not trying to know I I still like I've gained more ability to do so as I've gotten older and also frankly because I I need the approval of other people less for both like financial and career reasons like speaking for myself and saying. I don't feel comfortable doing that or I'm not gonNA wear that costume or whatever it may be like. That has definitely gotten easier for me. As I've gotten older but within the last few years I had a producer. Send me an email saying you sure. Have such a big brain for such a small body. You know stuff like that. I think well I bet. I bet he's not sending emails like that's my male co stars. But I didn't say anything because I didn't WANNA frankly didn't WanNa make him uncomfortable because I still had to go to work for him for the next few months You know it's complicated. You've spoken about in the past how you've dealt with depression through your life and I think this is while we're all like isolating an isolated and anxious and worried. It's a kind of like a very fertile ground for depression wondering if if like you're having to deal with depression coming back because of the anxiety and fear surrounding the pandemic you know I I'm very lucky in that I feel like my mental health is in pretty good shape right now but also frankly. I don't know that I really have time to check in with myself or let myself Have a deep awareness of of really how I'm doing because You know we don't have any child care help right now. My my parents are both still working because there's screenwriters and My partner and I are trying to give each other few hours a to to write. But we're really like you know with our kid all the time. She's she's almost twenty months and she's extraordinarily active and You know we're really lucky. 'cause we normally employ a nanny who gives us time to ourself and we're without that right now so to be totally. Frank I don't I don't really know one hundred percent what's going on with the mentally because I'm so tired at the end of the day. I like we dinner. We clean up and then we we get better. Do the crossword puzzle and I go to sleep can. Can I ask you about the eating disorder? And how you were able to get past it. Do you connect that with the depression. Oh Yeah and you said that you know. The eating disorder wasn't because I wanted to like look thin that because you've never been preoccupied with how you look with clothes and all of that. So what do you think it was about? I mean I think it was about control and I think is about limiting what I was feeling. You know like I was very sad. I was very sad and I was trying to I don't know I have a lot of distance from it now because I think I got lucky in a lot of ways and like I really got better like I went to therapy. And it worked for me so If the eating disorder was about gaining some kind of control over your body had us acting relate to that if at all because as an actor your body's your tool it's your instrument and you have to control it and basically make a play different song than when you're just yourself the way that my brain connects it up when you ask. That question was that I thought you know. Part of my experience of having an eating disorder was that like was that like my feelings felt too big for me to handle and I was trying to dampen them in some way and I think that having that experience of my emotions as being like a great ocean that I cannot always handle is one of the reasons that I wanted to be an actor. Having a place to put my feelings has made me a Saner. Person You know acting really functions for me in a Cathartic Way. So maybe it connects up there. Terry can I ask you a question? You can try. So I was listening to your interviews with Philip. Roth before talking to you today. Just in preparation and I fought like Oh you interview so many people in this really intimate way and then they pass and you often like re air those episodes when they pass and I thought Oh it must be such a funny experience for you to have this like intimate sorta touch touch all these people in this intimate way and then your touching like really famous people that people are then like morning online. You've had like a one on one conversation with all these people like. Did you have a feeling when Philip Roth past of lake? All I know him. I talked to him seven times or do or do people feel. Does a person like that. Still feel like at arm's length to you well. It's it's a bit of both because I know like Philip Roth. I were not friends. We never met in person. We just had our interviews. But I just I really love his writing and Felt those conversations went really. Well I mean I felt like he he was just so interesting So when he died I I thought well I was very sad and I thought I'd never be able to talk with him again and I'll never be able to read a new book by him again. Yeah so that you know. Of course. They're still books he's written that I haven't read because he body of work was so was so large. So the the you know. That's that's some comfort but Yeah but you're right you know on both at arm's leads and yet still feel very connected. One thing I'll say While we're on the subject of rearing interviews when somebody died is that this is really fraught period for our show in the sense that you know more people dying now because of the epidemic and we've devoted I don't know two or three Fridays just to obituaries There was on Friday when I think we had like three obituaries on their show on. That just made me really sad and you know we're bracing for more And so it's makes me feel good that we have the interviews that we can play to help remember somebody. Who's you know who's WHO's public live? Whose work had such meaning for so many people So you know makes me proud. We can do that but it just makes me really really sad. Yeah well I have to say I I find them to be when someone passes that I really care about and you re air one of the episodes it means a lot to me and it makes space for me to mourn. Even though I don't know that person this a thing like we. We might not really know them but we know their work and the work is like a manifestation of some of who they are so. It's easier to feel like we know that that may make. They gave us the gift of their work. So you know there's so much to be grateful for Grateful to them for Yeah it's a time. Let's let's be honest. There's just so much sadness in the world right now the really is it's really hard to To do all the things that you need to do in the day and have that like A very pressure full storm cloud just hanging over. And it's like what you were saying before about being grateful that your toddler is so consuming of your time because it's exhausting but it's something you know something really wonderful unnecessary to focus on. Because you can't just sit around all day thinking about how frightening the viruses and all the people who are sick and the people who have died and fears health insurance and lost their jobs. Exactly exactly exactly. Yeah yeah well listen. I wish you and your family your extended family. I wish them well continued. Good health and thank you for taking some time to talk with us And I really appreciate your work. Thank you into you tear. Your work means so much to me. Zoe Kazan is one of the stars of the six part. Hbo Adaptation of Philip Roth Novel the plot against America the whole series is now on demand streaming on HBO..

Philip Roth partner Zoe Kazan America Paul Deneau Kazan Richard Ford Buster scruggs Philip Paul Deneau Dino HBO Weinstein Harvey harassment producer Frank Terry
"kazan" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

10:22 min | 7 months ago

"kazan" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Kazan is one of the stars of the. Hbo Series The plot against America which is adapted from the Philip. Roth novel by David. Simon and Ed Burns who also created the HBO series. The Wire Zoe Kazan was also in the David Simon. Hbo Series The DEUCE. She Co starred in the film the big sick with Camille non Johnny and she wrote the film Ruby sparks in which he starred with her partner. Paul Deneau with whom she wrote the screen adaptation of the Richard Ford Novel Wildlife. She's from a movie family. Her Grandfather Elia Kazan directed on the waterfront and a streetcar named desire. Her parents are both screenwriters. Let's start with a scene. From the plot against America. The story rewrites turning point in American history it said in one thousand nine hundred forty two forty two. Franklin Roosevelt has lost the election to Charles Lindbergh. Who's considered an American hero? Because he was the first pilot to fly across the Atlantic but he's also antisemitic. He Admires Hitler and won't enter. World War Two to fight against Hitler. He's an isolationist. The story focuses on a Jewish family in Newark New Jersey Zoe. Kazan plays Bass a wife and mother of two boys. The family is targeted for Lindbergh. Administration program to relocate Jews to the so-called heartland under the pretense of helping Jews assimilate and integrate into America for this family. That would mean relocating to Kentucky. Best has been trying to convince her husband. Herman to join the Jews who've been moving to Canada before it was too late. Although Herman is a passionate Roosevelt supporter and hates Lindbergh. He refuses to leave his own country but he also refuses to move to Kentucky. Meanwhile there's an increasing number of attacks on Jews and Jewish stores and Lindbergh is becoming more fascistic in this scene Besson. Herman have been listening to a radio. Broadcast by Walter Winchell. The famous syndicated gossip columnist. Who's been mounting a presidential campaign to oppose Lindberg and has been attacking Lindbergh on his radio. Show bessis husband. Herman played by. Morgan Spector has decided to write a letter to wind chill to get him to publicly protest the Relocation Program Zoe Kazan as best speaks. I what are you doing right to Helen? We need them to speak out. The government telling companies where people of this race that religion where they can and can't work. Let them get away with that. What's next so fascism works? You're sitting there writing to a wind. Chill Walter Winchell yes I am and you're predicting that these people will stop at nothing once. They know what they can get away with and yet you don't think they can do what they want to the mail. Come on bedsheets one letter. It's not just one letter. You're also planning to sue the government as you said we have rights. How can you see what these people heart and five? So little of what they're capable of. We have already had. Fbi agents harassing us. We have had our children question. Let someone else to wind. Chill someone else the next guy. Yeah but the next Guy. Step up and just sit here on. My is keeping quiet waiting for the worst to happen. No I don't see chassis. Sitting around writing letters waiting for the worst to hop in Canada. Yes Canada Fitch is my country not anymore it is. Lindbergh's it is the Jew haters in his the America's first. There's the people who share these children down the street asking questions and then deport their families to Kentucky. It's their country and if we run if we quit then they win and they do not get to win. Herman you've done nothing wrong. So because then. Welcome to fresh air. And congratulations on your performance in the plot against America just wanted to start by saying how are you so much? Terry? I'm all right. I have to say it seems really small to complain about anything considering what so many people are going through right now. We're doing absolutely fine. We all have her health. I'm staying at my parents House with my My partner in our child right now so it's a lot to adjust to but we're really lucky so you're on a set in Australia and your partner. Paul Deneau is on set in London. Both productions shutdown said no you and your daughter. Your young daughter are living with your parents or your in your childhood home now as a mother. I am strange. I think especially because we don't know when we're going to go back home to Brooklyn we've been gone from there because my job started in November. So we've been gone for six months now and we don't know when we're going to go back because quote unquote when this is over. I think we have to go back to our respective jobs or at least that's what I'm assuming right now But you know all of us are living in such a state of not knowing right now so I think that that makes it harder than if I knew like okay. I'm going to be living with my parents for six weeks or whatever but there's something wonderful to about I mean it feels like being inside of a dream or something like giving my daughter baths in the bathtub that my sister and I used to take baths in and talking to you right now sitting on the floor of my childhood closet. I used to talk on the phone to my boyfriend in highschool you know so. It's very strange. That's that's pretty funny. So let's talk about the plot against America. Are there parts of the story about living in America? First nation that's becoming very antisemitic and increasingly moving toward fascism. Other parts of that story. That resonate for you now and I should mention Philip. Roth wrote this in was a two thousand four. Yeah I think that's right. I was kind of taken aback at the parallels that are on the page I thought like Oh when people write about this. They're gonNA think that David Simon was being like ham fisted in making allusions to our our current government and our current situation but the high majority of them are right there on the page and like you said what he wrote more than a decade before trump came to power so Yes it feels like scarily prescient in some ways and then in ways he was just looking back at the history of our country and we had internment camps in this country in World War. Two as you know so. I don't know that he was imagining an America. That far off from the one that he thought we were living in are the ways in which. The story of the plot against America connects with your family. And I'm thinking here like your grandfather Leah Kazan Who's great director? Streetcar Named Desire On the Waterfront. He was called to testify nine hundred fifty two before the House on American Activities Committee during the Communist which hunting era the Joe McCarthy era and he named some names of Hollywood actors he gave up names. And you know he was a Greek immigrant and he was accused of possibly being. Un-american was the house UNAMERICAN activities committee and of course plot against America. The Jews are basically considered by President Lindberg to be un-american because if they weren't un-american why would they have to be relocated in order to better assimilate into America so I. I'm wondering if you were thinking about connections between the story and your family's specifically your immigrant grandfather grandparents? Yeah grandfather. My grandmother was like a mayflower American. Oh Yeah Of course I was. I think it's a Really apt question and I want to say that I. I don't normally like answering questions about my grandfather particularly about his experiences with the Husak hearings partially because it happened so long before I was born And I by no means feel like an expert partially because it's such a terrible chapter in our country's history and I feel a morbid fear of getting something wrong or hurting. Further the the victims of those hearings or their families and also because my family the large majority of my family are incredibly private. People who've chosen very private lives and I. I Never WanNa feel like a spokesperson for them or that. I'm betraying their trust store or anything of that nature And that's why it makes me emotional son who's to talk about it. I think that the parallels are are right there and I. I couldn't help but think of my own family history and I mean frankly think I wouldn't be much of an actor if I if I didn't think about it. It's a strong personal connection to the material. I thought very deeply about my grandparents and their choices and what it must have meant to them to be in that position and frankly it helps me. I think take one step in my leg personal maturation an actually playing this role in working on this material sort of helped me take steps into. I think a more adult viewpoint. My guest is Zoe Kazan. One of the stars of HBO's miniseries the plot against America which was adapted from the Philip. Roth novel the final episode was shown. Monday we'll hear more of our interview. After a break and Maureen Corrigan will share some suggestions for books. That may offer some solace in these troubling times. I'm.

America Zoe Kazan Charles Lindbergh Elia Kazan Roth Herman Philip David Simon Hbo Walter Winchell Kazan Kentucky Paul Deneau Canada partner Franklin Roosevelt President Lindberg Richard Ford Novel Wildlife Atlantic
Panic in the Streets

Now Playing - The Movie Review Podcast

09:08 min | 8 months ago

Panic in the Streets

"We're discussing panic in the streets starring. Richard Would Mark Paul. Douglas Barbara Bel Getty's Jack Talents. Zero mastel directed by Eliah Kazan. This is the now playing. Co-host who's fond of Shishkabob Arnie Stewart? And this the CO host. Who Likes High Foreheads Jacob? Well we hope everybody at home is healthy and safe and likely quarantined. No matter where you're listening to us from the world. Yeah at the moment of recording. We are all separated apart. Watching the news is one of the shows that we've taped since this pandemic has hit America. We are hearing reports. There are over sixty thousand cases in America by the time this airs. Who knows but we are thinking about this pandemic and checking in with you. You guys told us you were interested in watching movies about viruses. I don't know about that you know I can understand why some people might be like. I want to turn that off. I don't WanNa think about that. It's scary to contemplate when you turn on the news these days. Yeah but people are I think indulging in it in some ways entertainment as of this recording contagion is the number four movie on Itunes and it has been for weeks and outbreak is in the top twenty five and let's face it. We had to kind of fill out our schedule. The new mutants is punted for the sixth time or something but James Bond got moved black widow. The new saw film fast and furious nine and just a couple days ago when we're recording. This wonder woman. Eighty four half of our schedule for the spring has no release date anymore. Yeah I thought it was going to be a super busy month person July and lots of new releases and now we don't know yes and we didn't really necessarily know how to approach virus movies. Either there are a lot of them and we've covered some of them and you can go find those in the archives. Twenty eight days later and I am legend. All the stand. I did a list. I wanted to see how many we've really done if people wanted to do. A full now. Playing virus retrospective. There's the I am legend trilogy. Starting with the last man on earth in nineteen sixty four. Yeah then Omega Man in seventy one. There's the stand from ninety. Four twelve monkeys. That counts right. Nine Hundred Ninety five definitely twenty eight days later two thousand and two resident evil also two thousand two twenty eight weeks later as well. Yep Yep rise of the planet of the apes and then its two sequels but rise. Came Out in twenty eleven. Dare I add it in the name of the King Two worlds. It might make you sick watching it. And there was someone plotting to release a virus. Yes and they did. That's the thing it's not if they were blinded they released it in the Kingdom of EB World War Z. And Day of the dead bloodline. Yeah I think what's different here because we do want to be sensitive. We're not doing the sensational Zombie outbreak. Type films I mean. We talked about all kinds of viral outbreaks. And we really wanted something that that would speak to. What's going on right now. Though yeah I agree I mean I want a very clear eyed view if you WANNA laugh and enjoy camping ones no judgment but it might seem inappropriate to make light of something that seemed so severe the way I thought about it is. It's more interesting even though we're told. Time and again. These are unprecedented times. Mankind has always dealt with viruses. It has always been a part of our story and it was interesting to think that we could go back through the decades and look at the ways that it was presented on film and how the general public thought about contagion and viral outbreaks. And it makes sense that we would start with panic in the streets in one thousand nine hundred fifty film when we were discussing the Tom Cruise film losing it Stewart. You pointed out that in the eighties. A lot of movies were being set in the fifties because baby boomers who were in their formative years in the fifties grew up and now they were writing films in the eighties so setting them thirty years earlier while thirty years or specifically thirty two years before nineteen fifty. The Spanish flu was out there so a lot of people. My Ninety nine year old grandmother is regaling me endlessly with this coronas. Nothing you should have been there for the Spanish flu. Nine hundred eighteen. Not many of us can say that we were there for that but it does sound awful. It killed a whole lot of people. And Yeah that comes up a lot. But even in the nineteen fifties which is the start. I think of the movie. Sub-genre virus movies kickoff with panic in the streets. Nine hundred fifty s were a scary time. That looked a lot like. Are you know right. Now we're thinking very much about protecting our seniors because they're what's at risk for covert nineteen but back in the nineteen fifties. Hide your kids to let them go to the pool. Don't let him play with other kids because if you do they're gonNA get infantile paralysis. Polio I mean the scare was real people close pools. They didn't let their kids out. He was considered a summer plague. School's out and then all of a sudden just populations of people all throughout the United States would suddenly be hit hard and kids would suddenly lose motor function and only able to breathe when they were put into an iron lung interesting statistic by the way it sounds a lot like corona only two percent of the population actually develop the disease and most of those cases were mild. Most of the people were not left with long term disabilities but it did impact a whole generation. I know my mom believes. She was diagnosed with polio. My Dad's second wife had it. You know the thirty second president. Fdr The reason why he was in a wheelchair he got it when he was thirty. Nine years old. You didn't even have to be a kit. People were living like we were back in. One thousand nine hundred eighty. When this movie came out there was a real field. If you send your kid to the movie theater. He touched another kid. This could happen wasn't until one thousand nine hundred eighty five. When Jonas Salk released his cure which was very controversial he was doing things that scientists disapproved of in order to get that vaccine and it worked one monkey equaled six thousand doses of immunization. And before you know it all the kids got to lead the iron lung and come home and famously. He didn't even keep the patent. It's something that warms my heart. When I think about it he thought it was unethical for anyone to profit from this cure and so he gave it away for free so there was panic in the streets in nineteen fifty and I think the other thing that might have inspired. The onset of movies talking about viruses was the smallpox outbreak of nineteen forty. Seven guy got on a bus in Mexico. City drove all the way to New York City. Didn't feel so well with feverish. The whole time went to Bellevue hospital a week later he died. That was when the doctors realized. Oh my God is smallpox. They had had a vaccine for smallpox for over century but because smallpox was so rare like nobody was immune from it so suddenly everyone. That man had come in contact when the bus was infected and it was being you know across the country so everyone literally was being impacted. Kind of like we are now. Everyone potentially could have smallpox what the government did was they started a big PR blitz. They put out commercials on the radio. Tv magazines go to our free health clinics. They opened them up all over the country. Get your vaccines and so everyone could sing the songs everyone knew about shots and the necessity of getting immune to smallpox. Hollywood jumps on trends. If something is big in the news. They're going to come up with a movie about it and I think that's the movie we're here to talk about today. I'd never heard of panic in the streets until we decided we were going to cherry pick. What is what the best the most iconic virus movie from each decade the fifties through the teens. And you said this is the top one on the list I I. I never heard of this. Yeah nor have I. This is totally new to me. I knew by reputation but I've never seen it either. I do think most people know Elia Kazan. He was a director more famous. Maybe for Broadway the stage but he helped pioneer the method acting. So if you know Brando if you know James Dean if you know all of those leading light actors for the nineteen fifties Elliott. Kazan probably worked with them and got them to be the actors that they were. Yeah I did look up this director and and unfortunately Brando. Unless he's in Superman or the godfather I I got a blind spot for his films as well as James Dean so I recognize. Yeah Kazan oh he's he's actually done some big movies but this one isn't one of his that I've heard of

Eliah Kazan Smallpox Shishkabob Arnie Stewart America Kazan Polio James Dean Brando Director Douglas Barbara Bel Getty FDR Richard Jonas Salk James Bond Bellevue Hospital New York City United States Jack Talents Mark Paul
Fighting Youth and Teen Suicide with Kendra Fisher

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

08:27 min | 8 months ago

Fighting Youth and Teen Suicide with Kendra Fisher

"We are facing an increasing crisis of teen and youth suicide in America and it is especially affecting young girls. Today's episode is a difficult one Kendra Fisher former elite ice hockey player and mental health. Activist and advocate helps me dig into the roots of the problem and what we can do to turn it around years ago. When faced with the opportunity to realize her dream of goaltending for team Canada Kendra was diagnosed with severe anxiety disorder coupled with severe panic attacks depression and agoraphobia forcing her to leave the national program in order to seek help to learn how to live with what had become a crippling disease. She now dedicates her life to helping. Young people get help for their mental illnesses. We turn now to a nationwide tragedy suicide new report from the Centers for disease. Control SAYS IT IS GROWING. Rapidly has been on the rise for more than a decade but nation suicide rate is at its highest point since one thousand nine hundred twelve year old accomplice allegedly harassed. Szechuan included that. You should drink bleach and die. No one likes you and you should go kill yourself. Sedgwick jumped off a near her home. After writing friends nine year old McKenzie atoms last week from other says the fourth grader was the target of Constant Racial Thompson? Name calling I was diagnosed with mental illness and I had no idea where to go so it was actually out at a team. Canada camping in Calgary and leading up to it in the weeks before I'd been to the doctors I've been to the hospital emergency room. I had no idea what was wrong with me. I felt like I was having a heart attack. I felt like it was gonNA Faint. Couldn't breathe swallow and and everybody told me it was fine. I love hockey and I love everything. It's given me both my hockey career. Also it would have had a shelf life and now. I'm in this position where I've learned so much about myself and I've met so many incredible people because of the journey I've been on and hopefully I can be a part of something that might stop somebody else. I'm Kendra Fisher and I'm fighting for the lives of those living with mental illness. Sorry not sorry so I mean. We've got a tough topic today but really before we dive in a love for you to give my listeners. A bit of information about your background. And how did mental health especially in girls become one of your causes? My background is hockey. I mean everything about my background is hockey. I grew up like so many Canadians. Just really wanting to have that red and White Jersey. That had my name on the back and I wanted to play for team Canada. I wanted to go to the Olympics and everything in my life through. My teens really suggests that I was going to be successful in that. I was carded member of team. Canada's National Hockey Program and sometime after high school I just got to a place where symptomatically and not knowing what. It was without a diagnosis. I was off. I just I felt sick all the time I felt like I was making trips to the emergency room constantly. Feeling like I was having a heart attack feeling like I couldn't breathe and it got to a place where unfortunately the perfect storm kind of hit. When I was out at my tryouts for team Canada in ninety nine and I was out at the camp and I just couldn't hide it anymore. It couldn't hide the battle that I was having every single day I grew up in in the greatest. You know possible situation. I had a great family. I had great friends. I was in a small town and I had a dream and my dream was. I wanted to play for team Canada. I wanted to play in the Olympics. That was that was what I knew. That was everything I worked for and I was well on my weight that I went to the coaches and I tried to explain to them what was going on and quite honestly their response to me was what it helps to know. What already made the team? They knew they wanted to select me that year. And I was finally get that chance to live my dream and it's obviously been one of the hugest moments of my life but not for anything I WANNA remember. Kazan's there was no at that point. What I eventually learned was a severe panic. Disorder and AGORAPHOBIA. Ocd clinical depression had literally taken over my life. And I spent the next five years unable to leave my apartment. Valey participating in my diagnosis just kind of scraping by and doing the bare minimum to survive and after five years I realized that just didn't see the point anymore and at that point I knew I had to make a decision and somehow I found it in me to start fighting and I learned everything I could about mental illness and the system and how it works and what supports are available when I really kind of became at the risk of sounding unhealthy obsessed with my own recovery and I got to a place where. I live very comfortably with my diagnosis. It doesn't mean it's gone. I live with it every day but now I live with it as a professional speaker and travel the world helping others learn how to cope and manage. I also work as a firefighter. I managed to go back and play for team. Canada's inline hockey team and it's really just kind of become a journey that I'm so passionate about because I understand how hopeless it feels but more importantly I understand how hard it is to find hope and defined real help and support and understanding about mental illness. And I just want to be a part of that. Narrative does mental illness. Run in your family. Yes yes and no I mean. I've always done this whole. Why did it happen to me and I think we always look for the answers because if we could find the answers we can fix the problem? Certainly on my on my Dad's side of the family. There's some depression but it wasn't so prevalent that I ever knew about. It wasn't something that I was ever made aware of. It didn't show itself to me until I actually understood what I was dealing with. And you said that you're now living comfortably with your mental illness. What does that mean? I'm fully functioning. It doesn't affect my day to day life in a way. It did in the way. It did kind of earlier on in my diagnosis. I got to a place where I just have an incredible system of support set up around me and I have all of my tools and strategies in place and I'm very quick to identify when I'm not doing well and I've also given others the permission to hold me accountable when they see I'm not doing well and in doing so. It allows me to really react quickly and now. I mean I would challenge that on my worst days of anxiety. I'm at worst as a panic on my worst days of depression doesn't affect me any longer than it would affect somebody getting a bad cold or the you know the stomach flu. It's it's a couple of days of really having to focus on what's brought me back to that place and making sure that I am doing all of the things that I know. Keep me healthy and usually I can rectify it. Just by changing those behaviors. I suffer from generalized anxiety disorder and panic disorder. But I think it's so hard that when we're in the middle of it to do the things that we know will make us feel better right like I know that going out and being in my garden digging in the dirt or taking a hike or taking a yoga class. I know that these are the things that will make me feel better and yet it's so hard to break out of it. Do you have any advice for me? Yeah absolutely with love and affection. Not as an not an onerous way. But I think that we forget to practice the things that keep us healthy when we're doing well We get to this place where we let life kind of takeover and that you know that pace of just going and when we're good we don't feel the need to necessarily revert back to that self care in those things that we know keep us healthy feel like so many people only practice crisis response and I think that it's time that people learn education and prevention are really the way to manage things crisis response is really you know. You're too far already.

Canada Hockey Kendra Fisher Agoraphobia Olympics Canada Kendra Depression Severe Anxiety America Inline Hockey Disorder Calgary Sedgwick White Jersey Thompson Kazan OCD
A Simple Approach To Long-Term Goals by Anthony Ongaro of Break The Twitch on Building Successful Habits

Optimal Living Daily

04:44 min | 8 months ago

A Simple Approach To Long-Term Goals by Anthony Ongaro of Break The Twitch on Building Successful Habits

"Of break the twitch dot com after a third successful run of men's game unless thinking about what's next one of the reasons the minimalist game seems to work so well is that it starts out with a ridiculously easy challenge and works up from there. Establishing an easy win right away by getting rid of just one thing and building on that success. I've been considering different ways to apply the same thinking over new subjects. Amy and I are at a point where we're not feeling the need to declutter much more. But my love to apply the same action based model in other ways thinking more broadly. I'm working on an easy to reproduce format that can be applied to many different aspects of life like to be able to apply the system to anything whether it be decluttering exercise eating better creativity work. In more of years ago I learned about Kazan. Practice of continuous improvement. Small constant improvements to a process or towards a goal applying. This idea of discussing daily push ups with a friend. When this idea came up one push up every single day. That's it a single push up every day for a full week. Do One push up per day on day. Eight you've been doing one push up her day for seven days trait. What do you think your odds of being able to do to push ups are? I'd say pretty darn good starting to do to push ups per day in week three. You've been doing two per day for the last weeks. Of course you'll be able to do three in a row. This kinda slow methodical. Bill may seem counterintuitive. Prov realized that this is actually the best way to do just about anything. Can you do fifty to push ups in a row right now? If not I bet you could had started this program. One year ago it may feel like any down on the Florida. One push-up is ridiculous. But that's why it's so important to start this way. If you wanted to build a habit of doing daily push ups and start off by doing as many as you can possibly do. You're going to be too sore to do them the next day. This kills the habit. Before it starts men's game slowly builds up the habit in confidence of decision-making deciding over which things to let go of over thirty days almost five hundred items disappear. Br Stars with just one item on the first day. When I'm starting to realize. Is that what you care? Much about qualitative progress than simply making sure the short-term action aligns with that end goal celebrate the consistency of good habit versus progress toward a particular goal. I E success is going to the gym regularly. As opposed to losing weight weight loss might be the actual goal but focusing on that loses touch with sustainable short-term actions. They get us there and keep us there. If you'll strange since I started lifting weights again two months ago I decided to not make any fitness goals. My biggest problem has always been getting to the gym. Once I'm there I work out hard and do what I need to do to get a good workout is the actual act of stepping away from my desk or a couch putting on my workout clothes getting in the car and walking out the door that I've struggled with in the last few months I've been going to the gym three times per week while doing cardio and lifting of only weighed myself a few times out of curiosity. I haven't changed my eating habits at all. I've decided to focus on one thing and one thing alone getting to the gym at least three times per week. So here's what I'm proposing as my new approach to habit change one small ridiculously easy to accomplish thing every

AMY Kazan Bill Florida
From Adversity to Opportunity Pt2

Noble Warrior with CK Lin

06:00 min | 9 months ago

From Adversity to Opportunity Pt2

"Hello friends welcome back to par two of the from adversity to opportunity series. Yesterday we talked about the overall framework of what my intention of the series as a gentle reminder. My ultimate intention here is to help you be happier healthier stronger. In spite of all this chaos. That's happening as we know. This virus is impacting. Our economy. Impacting your social life. And from what I can tell. It's starting to really impact our mind as well if we look at a brain house evolve over time. It's evolved to help us survive and right now. The survival brain is in overdrive and the collective stress is now even amplified even more by media by our peer groups. What you can do instantly right now to impact your mind is to pay attention to what you consume. We are what we consume. Think about it. If we consume donuts all day it's inevitable that will probably have type two diabetes if we consume negative media. That's full of fear panic and overwhelm by the end of the day. You come out more fearful more overwhelmed more contracted so case in point. Today I had a few conversations with a few entrepreneurs in one of them is one of those guys who likes to think about the worst in prepare for the best and he's preparing for the apocalypse basically and he was telling me every little thing that he's doing to prepare himself every I won't get into the details. Kazan WanNa impact you that way but the more I listened to him the more I realize a couple of things happening with my body and notice I was buried drawn to what he's talking about. I also notice that there is a little bit more a little bit more a little bit more fear and panic within me because by comparison he is a lot more prepare for the apocalypse. Were as in my case. I'm not so I had to catch myself. Because ultimately I realized that our brain is designed to watch out for potential danger but if I pay attention to the potential danger than that's all I think about. Here's the caveat. I'm not saying don't prepare. I'm not saying just to hope this thing will go away by itself. That's not what I'm saying. What I'm saying here is yes. Prepare at the same time. Be Cognizant of how this preparation or this. Doom and gloom talks is actually impact your peace of mind your internal state as I was saying to all of you that when we are in panic mode we don't make the best decisions as leaders as entrepreneurs. There are people who depend on us to make the best decisions for ourself for our family for business for everyone who depend on us right so we have an obligation wherever responsibility to really stay in equanimity meaning center meaning grounded in all of this chaos. Happening Right. Beat the eye of the storm. I was talking to this friend noticing. Might internal say's happening in what I WANNA give you tactically as this you will require you know effort to get drawn into the negative downward spiral major media social media. You're negative friends. Your survivalists friends is telling you. It requires no effort to get drawn into that because our brain is designed to be attractive to potential danger. Okay so get your facts from sources that you trust in tactically spent equal time positive uplifting. Podcast audiobooks books silence meditation. That's GonNa lift up your spirit. That's going to create that spacious. That way minimally you are back to neutral maximally you can create more space in your mind more centeredness more ground. Dennis for yourself. So that's what I'll tell you. Get on the media diet if you can't do that spent equal time on the positive uplifting conscious news side of things that way you can come back to neutral. Are My friends again? I want you to practice all of this. This is not the truth is not dogma is just a possibility a way to think about it. Tested experiment with us. You know yourself to be true in ultimately everything that I'm giving you is. The is the intention for you to be happier be healthier be

Dennis Kazan Wanna Diabetes
The Power of the Weekly 5% Focus Habit

GradBlogger

08:54 min | 10 months ago

The Power of the Weekly 5% Focus Habit

"So we're going to be talking about the power of the weekly five percent focus habit so this episode we're talking becoming more effective in your business and your life and not by doing big sweeping changes in you know a massive overhaul of everything that you're doing but from small continuous improvement this really kind of falls. On the heels of a Japanese productivity philosophy called Kazan which stands for or is implemented as continuous improvement. So making these little small changes in your life or in Your Business and your productivity routines that accumulate and build up over time and we'll we'll talk about what this means and what this looks like in this episode so in this episode specifically roundtable why focus on small individual habits and continuous improvement. What is a weekly five percent focus habit of a four steps to implement the weekly Focus Habit into your life and they'll give some examples of habits? I've worked for me that I built up over time from building in these small continues improvements. We'll even talk about where this may go wrong. And and in terms of giving example right up front you know. There's some habits that I had during Grad School. That don't work now. There's some habits I had when when I didn't have a child that he don't work now. I used to have a really nice morning routine which we'll talk a bit about in this episode on. That doesn't work anymore when you don't know whether your child is getting up at three. Am Four am or five am because a lot harder to plan in a nice real productive morning. They'RE GONNA change over time. But with the strategy you'll be able to implement things continue into your life and seeing continuous improvement. One of these steps that will talk to create your five percent. Habit is to create what I call a habit backlog. So it's really just a list of things you could potentially put into your life. This is not the amazing version of you. All maybe parts of it. Are there things you can put in? You know? Carry a water bottle or all these small habits and we'll talk about examples of them by did put together a cheat sheet with Ford examples of of things that I've tried implemented in my life and I've worked for me We put those into a Chichi. You can get from the show notes that GROBBELAAR DOT com slash forty-six as always we have a copy of the transcript so they pdf documents. You can get there if you want to get the You read through the the backlog in this episode Lotta people download those put them on the computer and say it in the for a time when they actually have a chance to be able to go back and read through that material. So encourage you to do that. If that's the way liking soon this content so we'll start by kind of painting a picture talking a little bit of a story. So just pitcher in describing it's not wholly describing you but maybe it's some aspects that you you do want to change in your life you'll see in this kind of pitcher but just imagining you wake up. You're really groggy. Because you're up too late tonight before you slam back a coffee. Skip breakfast you head off to work. Then you work all day and really stressed out and you know you're you're sitting hunched over and your backs all sore me home. You're totally exhausted by you. Know you force yourself to to do some work on your blog. Whatever that is so you kind of scrape by for a few hours. You check social media every eight point three two minutes just because it's been ingrained habit and you don't really feel like you got much done at the end of the day and then you gotta go to bed in the wake up the next day in you you gotta do the same thing so so mentioned hopefully. This doesn't really describe you but just a picture of something that could happen if you have all these kind of bad habits are built into your your productivity schedule your routines or that. I WANNA pay a different pitcher. You know imagine you get to bed early. Wake up feeling refreshed. Maybe do a small workout and grab breakfast. Spend thirty minutes on the bus. Just creating lines for post. You might write you. Stop at a coffee shop before hitting up work. Spend thirty minutes writing blog posts on the ideas. You've already generated you go to work. You have a great day there. Maybe you use a stand up desk or no do some stretching or some breathing or something during the day and you come home and your body's not sore and in the evening instead of writing content because you've already structured into your day. He spent some time with family and friends. Enjoy yourself go to bed early and you get up and do it all over again the next day. So some questions from this you know. How much more effective do you think? The second pitcher is than the first pitcher. There are the second person is going to be in the first person how much faster they grow their blog. How much moral day enjoy their life and this again is not a slam anybody's closer to the first pitcher. I've been there certainly at different times in my life but the point is actually. I have two points on this one is. It's very hard to go from the first pitcher to the second pitcher in one hop. And if you do try your your chances of failure pretty high. It's real building in small steps along the way and that's what we're anytime of this podcast. So maybe it's if you're taking the bus instead of people watching your surfing social media maybe us as productivity time to write a couple of outlines for post you WanNa right. That's like the only thing that you do. And then you know the next week you get to bed fifteen minutes earlier and then maybe the the next week you put your running shoes by your bed and the next week after that you take some time to stretch for ten minutes a day in the afternoon and you kind of build these things up over time so that you are that more. Effective person for making the smog continuous improvements. So why should you focus on small habits? Then we'll one. It's much easier to do for an extended period if you ever try to make New Year's resolution where you're going to go to the gym and you know change your entire life and dropped fifteen pounds and and all sorts of. It's really hard to do after you know after a week or two. You're likely to give up on the flip side of you folks on the smallest possible incremental habit. Change after doing this after week or two it becomes pretty ingrained. Maybe it's drinking a glass of water first thing when you wake up if you do that for two weeks chances are the next time you wake up and you forget to put your water ball by your bed. You're going to be like oh shoot. I really wish had a glass of water drink. It's a lot easier ingrain. These really small habits more quickly into your processes and your routines and generally you don't really get better by implementing massive changes. There are some cases. And sometimes it's necessary to implement a really massive change. I'm taking some examples. But maybe they're really worth on this podcast but sometimes that's the way forward but for most people and even maybe not for most people but a better way to this by incremental small changes over time. It's more effective. Do this in in small increments. So what is the five percent focus habit? The weekly Iverson focused habit. Why why this name and really comes from thinking about? What is the smallest incremental change? You can make to improve yourself this week. If you were to get five percent better just overall in your life every week for an entire year you be five percent better the first week. Then you'd be five percent better than you were at the end of the first week at the end of the second week. Then you'd be five or better again and it compounds itself so you'll fly grow. How much better going to be at the end of the year? One Point Oh five to the power of fifty two that comes up to twelve point six so if every week you become five or seven better version of yourself at your you'll be twelve times better. So whatever that is twelve hundred percent better version of yourself and it's incremental. It's the pens on how berry a ten percent better every week. You're one hundred and forty two times better. Version result at the end of the year those really about nailing in delving into these really small habits changes that can can have a big impact overtime incrementally and if you failed that habit before it's probably even broke it down far enough and I'll give this example. Maybe a little later in episode two. But if you wanted to run four times a week or something and you can keep not being. We'll do that. Maybe you should look at a habit. That's okay I'm going to put on my shoes every morning. My running shoes all allow myself not to run. If I don't feel like it but the habit is put on the shoes so that every morning you know for a whole week you put on the shoes. And you're like I'M NOT GONNA run of Yuki put on the shoes. I guarantee eventually you're going to go for a run. So how do you actually go about implementing this process that? And if you listen to podcasts you know I'm pretty big on procedures and you know actually giving tactics and tips on how to put this stuff into your life. So I came to the fore step process to implementing the weekly fiber sent focus habit. Step number one is to make a habit backlog so actually do this in Google in a google sheet. Brainstorm all the things that you can think of to improve your life just a little bit and you can put big things in here but realized that you're gonNA probably WANNA break those down into their smaller increments down the road but just you know everything just brain dump anything. Nothing's wrong answer. Put everything you can think of in there and add to the sheet as you're reading as you're learning as you're coming through life maybe you forgot to put out the garbage and the garbage truck came by that day. Okay well maybe I can set up a weekly reminder my email to email me on Thursday morning so I won't miss the garbage truck again when I send out the garbage. I've actually done this I- boomeranged g mail. One of my automatic emails comes out every Thursday and says put the garbage out or put the recycling whichever week it is. Because I've missed the garbage truck so you can add your thinks this list as you're living with his big backlog different habits.

Google Kazan Grad School Ford Yuki I Iverson
New York Icons: Kaufman Astoria Studios

Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

10:09 min | 10 months ago

New York Icons: Kaufman Astoria Studios

"New York for its entire. History has brought people together of wildly different backgrounds and that might be different races or cultures or a geographic areas Irish people and Jews and African Americans and you know Italians but also different classes. You had the tenement girl and the rich playboy and everybody in between well. That's just a natural for storytelling. But when these stories were told by Hollywood what was distinctly New York about them could get flattened out for the mainstream. If you look today at a Marx brothers movies the first couple of Marx brothers films. They're throwing all these terms around. Mommy's Nora Nori. There is Jewish for free loader animal crackers in the coconuts where designs you know for a New York audience but when the Marx Brothers then do moved to Hollywood and they begin making films for MGM. There's no Yiddish in those movies anymore. Right they become the sort of universal. You Know Hollywood movie Marx Brothers that that's from forty second street classical nine hundred thirty three musical about the Broadway chorus girl who becomes a star that connick number has the busby Berkeley dance formations but it also has the skyline the elevated train street vendors and attempted rape and murder. It's a film about New York. Made in Hollywood that helped form what sanders calls the mythic city. That dream version of New York. That's a distillation of the real place. Forty Second Street and all those back stage musicals that were made all the homes that were about the putting on of a Broadway show. They were shot in Broadway theaters. They were shot in Hollywood sound stage theaters. You know there was just endless numbers of these amazing films which did not have a single frame except possibly the establishing shot the opening shot would be shot in New York as the credits ran by with music behind him in. May Nineteen thirty. Three paramount turned the Astoria studios over to its main creditor western electric that companies filmmaking arm Eastern Services Studios INC operated it as a rental studio for independent productions. Its output varied widely. The Scoundrel for example was set in Manhattan's literary world. Noel Coward plays a ruthless hated publisher. Julian place the woman he charms. Mary's then abandoned putting something happened. Man I do live. I hope you're playing folk killed when you're dying using it on. The homepage of the year does not think of human when he dies. He's condemned to damnation unless he finds one person on Earth to mourn. Him novelists writes Ben. Hecht and Charles MacArthur rotated but at Astoria. They also got to produce and direct. They won an academy award for best original. We don't be Marquette. Hulu your new. There was a series of Spanish language. Musical starring Tangos Star Carlos Gardell Tambien. A nineteen thirty. Three's Emperor Jones was based on the controversial Eugene O'Neill play main character was a black pullman porter who escapes prison to become dictator of a small island. The film could only have been made with independent funding. Then the studios were called to service for World War Two. The Department acquired the property in Nineteen Forty Two and the pictorial center of the army. Signal Corps moved into make trading and propaganda films. They expanded the facility and built barracks for the soldiers. The army used motion pictures in the war effort and turned to experienced filmmakers for help frank. Capra worked on a series of orientation films called why we fight one episode related to our won the Oscar for best documentary. Just what was it? Made US change our way of living overnight but turned our resources are machines our whole nation into one vast awesome producing more and more weapons of war instead of the old materials by the end of the war the ABC employed over two thousand people making movies over half of them civilians. All this work even brought new film techniques like multiple angles shooting and change film in even more momentous ways for five years American audience. It has been seeing newsreels. And it's someone you know. A movie maker said well you couldn't you couldn't bring in the enemy for for production meeting you know before. The battle and people went out with sixteen millimeter cameras. And these lightweight cameras that could go everywhere. They saw actual action after the war audiences and creators had developed a taste for this more realistic filmmaking. There was an appetite. For a new kind of filmmaking. That would be used more available light less contrived cinematography be shot with faster. Granier film be more shot on location and feel more like a took place in real place and not this kind of fabricated construct and be more adult this desire for realism meant the glossy representations of New York. That Hollywood made before the war wouldn't do director is like Ilya. Kazan felt their stories needed New York locations and New York talent. You don't understand I coulda had class. Gerber contamination could have been somebody by the MID FIFTIES NEW YORK. Filmmakers were more than just contenders. The Oscar wins for on the waterfront in nineteen fifty five and Mardi fifty six affirm. That excellence could come from outside. Hollywood New York is setting is capable of whatever mood or dramatic statement? You WanNa make architecturally in its light for talk about winter light as Mr Bergman did. New York's winter light image. That Sidney Lumet in the documentary film titled by Sidney Lumet. He grew up on the lower east side in nineteen fifty seven. He went from directing theater and TV. Two movies with twelve angry men. You're asking us to believe that somebody else did the stabbing with exactly the same kind of knife. Larger a million or one go onto make more New York classics like Serpico Dog Day afternoon and network. He died in twenty eleven. I'm not comfortable anyplace but New York when I leave New York for any other place in the United States My nose starts to bleed. Filmmakers at this time took full advantage of New York locations for their exterior shooting. When they needed a controlled indoor set they may do with whatever studios were available. Tv Or old movie studios the old Bronx by graph for example operated as a rental studio under different names until the seventy s the Astoria Studios. Meanwhile were still occupied by the army. There was some leftover stages from the twenty s and they reuse them and Sidney Lumet told me amazing stories of going onto these studios which he was in an editing room up in the Bronx. That had been Edison's old editing suite with an e draw you know kind of worked into the curtains E for Edison. These were the oldest movie studios in the world and they were using them in the nineteen fifties to make all those great early in mid fifty s movies like Twelve angry men and on the waterfront the city eventually recognized how vital New York and the screener to each other in nineteen sixty six mayor. John established the first mayor's film office in the world to lower hurdles to filming their Lindsay's film office streamline the permitting process and removed a lot of red tape for shooting in the city he even dedicated a police. Unit to location shoots then in nineteen seventy. The army moved production to different site and turned the Astoria property over to the federal government. This was not simply a movement of some soldiers because most of the people making the films were grips carpenters electricians and actress who were part of. New York's commercial motion picture industry so they were not at all happy when this plug got pulled in Astoria. The complex sat abandoned. For years unprotected and open vandals people would go in there. Rip The copper out of the walls and those people with a purpose then they were also just people in there for mischief terrible condition in the meantime you have this eyesore at the edge of a residential communities have halfway between the area and Long Island city. It's just getting worse and worse and worse. They abandoned cars dropped all around weeds growing through the sidewalk. I remember this very clearly. The film unions local community and the city got together to preserve the studio site. Save film jobs and clean up the neighborhood in nineteen seventy seven. They formed the nonprofit a story of Motion Picture and Television Center Foundation. They managed to prevent the studio from being sold off or turn down by getting the site on the National Register of historic places a process that normally took years.

New York Hollywood Astoria Studios Army Sidney Lumet Astoria Marx Brothers United States Oscar Nora Nori Marx MGM Noel Coward Long Island Eastern Services Studios Inc Manhattan Carlos Gardell Tambien
When Diet Culture Pervades the Workplace

Forever35

04:33 min | 11 months ago

When Diet Culture Pervades the Workplace

"GONNA talk about something I've been thinking about a lot lately yield diet culture Enjoy I am. I'm calling to the most recent episode I really appreciate it. I mean Kate Stotts and talking to people and having the hard conversations surrounding the tactic way we speak about eating and and I sort of wanted to get more of your thoughts on how huge gently calling as you guys. Put it When when people are making those comments I you know really struggle with US mostly at work in my last job? Eight worked at the State Corporation. And do things like the biggest lose. No change and They'd have biggles or pizza around. Everyone would constantly absolutely talk about how they felt about themselves. After now I work in a much smaller but You know she just the free people that I work with those constantly talking about steps and Muslim townies and things like that so I was just wondering if you have any suggestions for You know toll professional ways that you can say like hey like that's sort of puts me into a spiral Without having to make everyone else so totally awkward Yeah really looking forward to. Hey you guys are able to talk about this. I'm I'm many episodes. Sometimes they're thanks so much of the podcast. 'cause people people have a wonderful holiday. We're talking about it. Diet culture at work is so pernicious. Well it's also awful. How just these? This has become like as basic a conversation topic as the weather team overall eating bagels on Bagel Friday. Like own disgusting me to like that. It's just it's almost become something to fill space now because So apart of human interaction I'd love to hear how other people have navigated this in a work environment will i. I was GONNA say when it's ingrained like there. Someone is hosting a biggest loser. Competition that to me and it's part of the company is something I would flag to human resources human resources playing long again. Then I mean then. I don't know what to do so you're right help us someone. Tell us how to handle bill. This one I just. I just wonder if I don't know. How do you start with like a wholesale re education and rewiring hiring of people's brains? Because that's what it's going to take for people to kind of stop participating in this diet culture. Yeah and I ultimately you know you can infuse people with information and modeling and modeling and you can share your opinion and you can also I would say set some boundaries to protect yourself from the spiral that you feel. Yeah you know like condone engaged. Don't sit there and you're I mean it's too bad that this is what I'm suggesting and maybe I'm wrong but don't sit down at the table with the people who you know are going to engage in negative self talk about eating whatever is being offered. Yeah I'm sorry you're in. The situation. Sounds really hard. Kazan really hard. And you know I'll be honest. It's not something I have given thought to because my work environments in the past six no my work environments for almost a decade have been remote. Oh Wow so I have not been in a corporate office setting even though I was working for corporations you know up until like four years ago. I've not been in a corporate office setting in a while so I haven't had to have these discussions in a work setting. Yeah sorry. Listener sounds tough. Yeah I'd love to but you know again. I'd love to hear from other listeners about this yeah because I do think it is so pervasive. Yes totally

Kate Stotts United States State Corporation Kazan
Changing Jobs

Life of an Architect

09:21 min | 11 months ago

Changing Jobs

"This is the first podcast episode of Twenty Twenty and both Andrew. Nye have changed jobs in a manner of speaking making. I changed jobs in a big way and I have been getting flooded with emails and direct messages on various social media platforms. Asking me about the particulars is because either those people have or they are considering going through a similar change. I felt that this would be a good topic to kick off the New Year because they're all sorts sorts of things happening. You know especially with me with Andrew even here with the podcast some of which take a little more than usual planning and we wanted to let you know. As far advances advances we could of some of the places. We're going to be this year so that hopefully you can come and say hello. Should you find yourself in the same place at the same time. We'll get into for those details throughout today's episode cool. Yeah it's going to be awesome. It's gotta be cool all right so we're going to get into this now. Do you WANNA start under. Do you want me to start you. You go ahead and start. I'll interject his needed. Maybe we'll do a little back and forth about it as we start going. Sounds good to me. I also think that we should discuss quitting your job verses Mrs Changing Your Job Even if there is no obvious distinctions semantically. I think there's a huge difference between those two words. Quitting and changing changing quitting to me seems so imply like your flip the tables and you're storming out of the room tossing lit matches over your shoulder. You know that whole burning everything scorch orch start a little bit. Probably I mean it seems like it when you say I quit my job. It always seems to have a negative tone to it. Well it also seems to imply even though it's not this way and it's just again the phrasing of it to me changing your job means it's more calculated like you know there's a path change or course chain that you wanna make so you kind of put certain things in in place or put certain actions in motion before leaving your other job so that that way this is a calculated course correction Nada. I'm quitting and then I go deal with the fact that I just quit my job. Afterwards I would agree to me. It seems like changing jobs is a little bit. I'm going going somewhere for a new or better opportunity where quitting to me implies. I'm not working at this place anymore. I can't stand it. I don't WanNa be here more as as opposed to I'm changing jobs. It's doesn't mean necessarily that you dislike where you were just there's better or newer opportunities where you're headed like you say that's a calculated thing. Not Like I quit over lunch and then go to look for a job which I have quit over lunch before him. I know that was the reference. Well we know that chain gear jobs demands some measure of your attention so to get into that. Let me just kind of set the table. That says I left my last job the one the where I had my name on the door and I could pretty much do whatever I wanted and I need to make sure everyone else. I enjoyed all my co workers. Add some awesome clients and I had a really cool projects going on and for about eighty five percent of my work existence maybe ninety percent. I'm not doing real math here. It was pretty ideal and yet despite all those does ideal circumstances I do not ever wonder how I got to be at my current job. But I'm at Boca POW now and an actually look this up today. Day to day is four months and eleven days in so it's still pretty fresh really. It's been four months. Yeah that sounds a lot blah. It doesn't feel like four. I didn't think it'd been that long. Actually I was like it's been like two months now right. Yeah four months and eleven days so I don't have any regrets even though it's kind of interesting they brought me in a level to where I obviously I'm not getting the keys to the kingdom but I'm not being brought in to just manipulate digital files in Ramat. That's not where my skill set is and that's not why they want me there. You've been working for a long enough. That's not really what you had either but one of the things that's interesting is. This is a pretty big firm and Boka Powell. There's about about one hundred ten plus people and they're in the kind of the eight figure invoicing range in a year so they bet a lot of stuff in place while. Oh yes kinda surprising but when they brought me over they said there's a honeymoon period of six months and once I hit six months then they start to bring me into more higher level firm meetings. They essentially don't want to lift the skirt before they decided that this is not a failed experience experience. That's kind of a statement. Maybe but yeah I think so and I didn't realize it was going to be six months. Most places have six month trial period. That's really the way to put it. Yeah and so luckily for me because I actually had this conversation today of the. How's it going? I know it's gone fine. No worse so four months eleven days and I am really anticipating all the things that are going to open up to me at the six month period. Kazan collect a lot of skill sets that I have right now that I'm not using is they don't need me to do it because I'm not in the right kind of meetings so even then with what I'm doing right now it's gone pretty well pretty happy with it but you feel like you're settling in a little bit. I I mean I know for a while is like well. I don't know but you feel like you're doing all right right now. And that's something we'll get into an just a bit because there's definitely been some growing pains it hasn't always always been you know milk and honey since I've come over there's been moments where I've been incredibly frustrated and there's been actually more times than I really wanted Mitt but I think that's kind of the reason we're recording this podcast to talk about stuff that other people might be experiencing that folks generally don't put out there because I know people are private but there are moments when I go golly. Am I doing what I need to be doing. Because it's so different. It's so different. Let me get into the reasons why left. Like why would I make this change some. I'm fifty one years old. I've been doing the type of work that I had been doing. Which is kind of high touch white glove small commercial and high end residential essential work for about twenty years? And I like to think I was pretty good at it. I certainly enjoyed doing it. So what could possibly convince me to leave. The the circumstances were add my name on the door almost complete autonomy to do whatever I want to go do something that I have no real background in working on like. Why would anybody we do that? That's a reasonable question. I mean besides they tripled your salary and I'm not saying they did but I'm saying if that was the case then maybe so they didn't they didn't man. I'm just saying no but that was part of the consideration quite honestly because it's not just I will say this. So my compensation with where I work now is better than my best year ever at my last firm and my best year ever my last one was heavily contingent on bonuses and I was part of it and I didn't have any control all at my last firm over the bonus amounts. I could go eleven and a half months going. It's going to be great. It's GonNa be great and then one person decides that it's not going to be great. I have no controller controller which is one of the room one of the reasons why leaving so in a more structured manner. So let's get into this. I left for two major reasons and honestly honestly. I don't think anyone would be surprised by what those things were. Not because it was obvious due to my personal reasons or because my life is south there. Anybody can figure it out but because if you're going to leave a pretty amazing situation for the black abyss of doing something you've never done before. Yeah those reasons should be pretty obvious. I mean I think anybody could kind of rub two sticks together and come up with pretty educated guesses. Do I might do that. So first reason conflict inflict with one of the partners now. It wasn't anything nasty or salacious. It was just some fundamental disagreements on how things should be done and I'll say would you be. He's surprised to learn that I'm an opinionated person. Andrew no I know how particularly you are very particular all the time all the time and furthermore. I don't really care for situations where I feel like. I don't have a voice in the matter part of me thinks if you want my opinion you need to be prepared to act on it. I don't need facetime as time. I'm not that person. So the senior partner at my last firm has had his own practice where it's just been him calling the shots for twenty five or six or seven years or something like that now and hopefully. I'll say this in the most gracious way possible. Because I I care for him deeply I would even say I love him as a Human Ping but he was who he was and he was GonNa do what he felt was right no matter what which on one hand is a great attribute. You need to be have convictions and stand by those convictions. That doesn't necessarily make you a good business partner. So I struggled with the idea that no matter what I did or sad ed or however sound my arguments or my logic may be in the end. He was GONNA do whatever he wanted to do. I didn't love that. Yeah but I can understand that actually I I mean as a business owner for ten or so years that you get used to doing things the way you WanNa do him and you used to do them. I thought many times about whether or not I wanted to ever take on a partner and part of me as I know. 'cause I don't WanNa have to share responsibility. I wanted to share that. But you know the decision making process says yeah and it's hard I'm GonNa get a yeah the longer you do it. The harder it gets harder

Andrew Partner Twenty Twenty NYE Boca Pow Boka Powell Ramat Kazan Mitt Business Owner Senior Partner
New Iranian general steps out of Soleimanis shadow.

THE NEWS with Anthony Davis

02:06 min | 11 months ago

New Iranian general steps out of Soleimanis shadow.

"I'm Anthony Davis New Iranian general has stepped down to the shadows to lead the country could force becoming responsible for Tehran's proxies across the Middle East as the Islamic republic threatens the US with hauch revenge filling. Its previous head. Kazan Sulejmani while much still remains unknown about sixty two year old as male Ghani Western sanctions. Suggest he's long been in a position of power in the organization. One of his first US duties is likely to be overseeing whatever revenge Iran intends to seek for the US air strike early Friday that killed his longtime friend and Soleimani. It was the midway point if he's annual Christmas vacation where Donald Trump huddled at his Florida club with his top national security advisers who presented him with an array of options for responding to an earlier attack on a US Iraqi base including the most dramatic possible response taking ounce General Sulejmani the head of Iran's elite coulds force and the man responsible for hundreds of American deaths trump immediately wanted to talk so Lemani. It was a decision. He's predecessors had avoided and one that risked inflaming tensions with Tehran. Some advisers voiced concern about the legal legal justification for a strike without evidence of an imminent attack in the works against Americans his decision to authorize the drone strike has sent shockwaves throughout the Middle East and has dramatically escalated tensions between the US and Iran earlier that day trump was meeting with his political advisors about his reelection campaign when he was summoned to give the final go-ahead trump said he was eager to project global strength and replicate the message. He believed he sent last year after approving the rates to kill Islamic state leader Abu Bakr Al Baghdadi Trump's timing was also certain to divert attention

Donald Trump United States Abu Bakr Al Baghdadi Trump Middle East Kazan Sulejmani Tehran Iran Anthony Davis Florida Soleimani
Secret ways

Pass It On

06:19 min | 1 year ago

Secret ways

"Going to talk about the little seeks it ways that will make your household run smoother okay this is actually a chapter in the book for me by the Book and looks at stuff Steve made much this is stuff why think we'll help your household John Better you said to me that you wanted to know how to drop a circular box didn't you yes I did actually access oil tale you known slip when robbing a gift box the ribbon doesn't slip a steep the bottom of the bunks Mrs w Mountain thirty-five Garvey Clip coupons that's not the answer I already know that that's cheating I'm so well it does hats call Miss Martin didn't she I I ne- inadvertently led you straighten tonight the obvious both the moment would you up a box you're gonna like this one known 'cause that's why Kazan that lots of Sun Funny Ages have I disappointed yes you have yet again you can't tell but incite I'm being thought so okay okay if you're not with then try this MRI four pianos a bag of comfort hung inside the piano absorbs dump I'm prevent moths from attacking the felt hammers and dumbbells miss icy McCain up choice look what's comforts but come come full yup come full was e- stains substance which I honestly thought three hours I'm dodgy guarantee I don't actually know comfort is he women thing and smells nice I believe it doesn't smell lesson I think it smells but it's not most bullies as move I think actually come for is in fact the active muscles Kony's going to Google shaw this is one of those tips where I think wasn't he misses icy this icy MCI C. H. you're I think he should go piano well we hit a piano lot showing up come for a waxy flammable transplanted solid with a strong on Roma Google Comfort mothballs please tell me if it's actually the from multiple something I'll tell you I swear fee queant because it was the thing wasn't it yeah I'm going back to the stories my mother used to tell me of my grandparents everybody used to get loaned parties and tell them and they were accompanied on the piano by somebody playing the piano thinking my in my aunt Cathy loses up like yeah baby grinder I say I wondered if the piano that was in my house was the one inherited from a grandparent or something I tell you what do know though you have to keep a glass of water inside the piano you take the buckle ups glass of water it keeps the wires or something here's a funny thing because that's talking about humidity humidity us as a sully answer I don't necessarily the main difference income far on multiple is that comfort is grip of steady will ISO Mars I thank on what the mothball as a mothball that's not helping until I know but that's the only answer I can kid looking bookkeeping more we keep malls small ball of chemical Satan Deodorant place including another articles while have our bowl I great podcasting while comfort it'll be they're going on a white thomspon it might suggest no they're definitely they were in the break we'll sell the fact like okay in that case then I'm going to give you one of my fee tips in the entire we say annoyed that this this one actually loved this appeals to me as I was at the time is small boy with a fascination things and I love this one The self closing box if you've a books of much which is slunk putting elastic bond run the books lengthwise this lows books be pushed open and causes it to close off the much has been taken out Jake Karen one gloves glued one guy after I like it I like it once I spent loft time with much boxes Beatles and fellow small animals and kids uh-huh I think is the much box isn't a long term storage unit no once you finish the match away so valley you can get elastic from one bucks Jenna yes but been mind you've been cutting a much books how true Yangtze smokes didn't really I'm thinking but you're sitting at home and I'm wondering why it's important that you much toll puddle interior not to I need plus five star Gold Review is also I agree with that I have to find the right kind of size of elastic Bongino have made these yeah yeah I like now have a real thing for bags bouncer quite satisfying paintbox we wanted then I'm fascinated and like you have never done one myself the bowl of Lhasa Brown University Mine I've got one on my desk the head of you and phasers got one because we used to like debts in time you sip and we use box as covered velocity bunce. I'll give you Steve Oh don't want us as line in the Button Josh

Steve Oh Three Hours
Who Would Win Dracula vs Cyborg

#WhoWouldWin

11:04 min | 1 year ago

Who Would Win Dracula vs Cyborg

"Could not be more excited about this particular match up you know we talk about what I want to see out of battles me this Guy Ray I wanna see Contra asked of styles I wanna see to roughly matched characters fighting each other who aren't exactly the same we've talked before on this show many times sick and tired of the pedantic Green Arrow versus Hawkeye battle I'll always go back to his just who cares they're both the same dude yawn yawn bar Searle Wretch I'm over it what I wanna see is an ancient Vampire Count Dracula versus the cybernetic hero from the future org these are two class of styles but still very very compelling as a match up the this matchup reminds me of the first. UFC days where you would have you know the karate master versus the Kung Fu master or the jets jitsu versus the shoot fighter this one each of these characters clearly stays within their lane Cyborg doesn't dabble in the supernatural and I really don't think Dracula kind of goes over to the technological outside either I don't think he's ordering stuff on Amazon now that's he's definitely not neuberger either no no no no now to kind of help us with this debate we needed the think outside the box for judges and ray you had a great suggestion to bring someone in who when you think of contracting styles you think if someone who can kind of wrap their heads around the cultural impact of each character you brought up someone's name why thought was absolutely genius you can you can go ahead and Gush your guts out because what you're trying to say here's we needed somebody a little smarter for this episode and that's what I got for you definitely smarter than you and I and I think that's exactly what we got it's not saying it's not I know I I'm not saying doc I'm just not saying that you're smart and joining us in an amazing amazing actor comedian and voice over artists is Rama Blurry rumour accused of being on the show thank you for having me I didn't realize I was GONNA get buttered up so quickly at the beginning of the show well of course we're getting buttered up by James He wants something from you Aka Torri in this battle are you saying you don't want anything from me right I'm just saying I'll deserve it when I get it okay so you're willing to accept whatever my judgment is by the end I'm fact you look great today that out very very attractive man really James when I said let's bring someone smart maybe even genius intellect in the studio it wasn't actually needing for the person to be so gosh darn handsome but here we are well here we are and I'm I'm already tallying in my head I can't tell you who's winning this flatter off yet yet rabbi they'll tell you I I gotTa Tell You you're very successful active done a lot with your voice over career you're in a number of nationally and internationally syndicated commercials correct you know for different companies you're absolutely amazing I'm GonNa just ask you the question everyone else's thinking right now how are you friends with Ray I appeared on another podcast of raise knowing is half the podcast a great show that rates show and I linked to the three people on that show yeah it was here breath with the fabulous Mr Clark Chan and everyone's friend Eileen Eileen Mary O'CONNELL judge the muppets versus sesame street battle on the WHO would win six one of our favorites yep so I met I met Ray there and was wild by his podcasting acumen but also his passion for purely obscured or pop cultural Ephemera so when he asked if I would do this I said yes and then when he told me what the battle was I said Oh hell yeah very cool so what is your experience within geek culture because very often we have judges that have such a great background to them that we sometimes forget to say like hey by the a sheer he really is into this because they were they do how are you into Geek culture well first off I wear glasses so that got me eh into it very early I read compulsively I just finished my eighth book of the year and the year of the year and that includes graphic novel doesn't things some recommended to me by Mr Clark Chan I consume a lot of media and between the written word art nick cartoons as voiceover guy doing cartoons and video games and things I'm paying attention to everything going on because this is a fun visit a fun learning lesson for anybody who wants to do voices if you do impressions and I do a lot of impressions you have to realize that if you do a bad impression it becomes a character but if you do a good impression understand somebody else might do it too so the key example is this Alan tutic everybody loves Allen to one of the most underrated absolutely Kazan firefly's amazing he's easing everything death at a funeral he was one of my favorite parts of that he took the voice of Ed Wynn Vaudeville performer win famously in Mary poppins the laughing uncle off the table forever now I loved I loved doing this man's voice it was just so much on yet we're still in the middle of Shock Tober James you've been having a very shall we say successful shock Tober so far I have I've I'd like to say that I had to work really hard to get to wins in the month of shocked over the reality is I did not have to work that hard at all I didn't even research either character I just came to the show because you are a liar who was filled with lies actually researched the hell out of I hope I can say that in shock to over the heck out of both characters they were close matches by the a ray did will was there and I somehow pulled out the victory for both so I am in in crisis mode right now because I love this matchup I love Dracula vs Cyborg and look I cannot allow Cyborg to win this battle the idea that I could be facing a skunk for the entire month of shocked HCT sickens and appalls me in I'm not trying to influence your decision in any way Rama you still have to make the right decision you still have to make the right decision for you and family well see here's the thing ray as the impartial judge here I have to rule with my mind and not with my heart so you're pleading as moving may be as heartbreaking as it may be that you are putting up a goose egg this month I can't promise you a victory I can't I have to listen to the facts argued I want is for you to hear arguments and make the correct decision that's all if if every judge did that I would have a ninety five percent win percentage on the show well I gotTa Tell You James Your silence so far in your willingness to just plead the facts and all this is going to be a very dragnet performance I'm interested in just the facts ray all right just the fact enough all right well then let's waste no more time reduce the honors and announced as matchup representing the DC universe the manso metal he irons his clothes with his but cyborg doc and representing the Marvel Universe the count who will dig through the ditches burn through the witches and slamming the back of my dracula thank you okay I'll make a note about it we'll make a note about it before we go any further let's go over the official rules about who would win matched I roll number one each debater will be able to make three points rule number two the WHO would win matches a random encounter in neutral location with neither combatant necessarily knowing anything about their opponent or having any time to prepare part will number three the exact version the character has to be specifically stated so rare which version of Dracula you're using this is such a tough decision there are so many iterations of dragon in this world but I felt that since you assuredly are taking comic book version of Cyborg it would behoove me to take the powers feats and whatnot of the a six one six Marvel Marvel version of dracula gay that kind of scares me a little bit because that's in my opinion the most powerful form DRACULA in popular culture so it's Kinda what's being known as what People Know About Dracula these days I felt anymore right that's true okay well I will be using when did it become a New Yorker right now are you filled with a certain level of bombast when you get to the Mike you lean in and then you start projecting on Amazon by Taibbi and Hashtag who would win rate please give us the DETAILS ON DRACULA COUNT DRACULA is a powerful vampire who first appeared in the eighteen ninety seven brands Tokar Novel Dracula. Today's version of this iconic character is the marvel iteration who first appeared in historical suspense number seven in Nineteen fifty one then was rebooted in Tomb of Dracula number one in nineteen seventy two the newer version was made by Gerry Conway as well as Gene COLAN DRACULA'S PERHAPS THE MOST famous vampire of all time sorry twilight kids owing to the era a free to use characters in Comic Books Dracula makes her a formidable monster or overlord ending on the needs of the Story Dracula has a host of vampiric abilities including

UFC Contra Searle Amazon Gerry Conway Ninety Five Percent
News in Brief 25 September 2019

UN News

03:47 min | 1 year ago

News in Brief 25 September 2019

"This is the news in brief from the United Nations fighting in Libya is spreading on the capital Tripoli and contributing to widespread lawlessness war crimes and a humanitarian -tarian crisis the UN's top human rights forum has heard addressing the Human Rights Council on Wednesday Deputy High Commissioner for Human Rights. Kate Gilmore said that today the people people of Libya fear a return to a full scale civil war the situation in the country deteriorated in April when offensive to take Tripoli was launched by forces of these self stalled Libyan National Army under the command of General Kelly for after the result has been the deaths of at least two hundred eight thousand civilians and hundreds more injured Miss Gilmore said with more than three hundred thousand persons internally displaced while another four hundred thousand live within one two three kilometers from the clashes in Tripoli also at the Human Rights Council so Kazan Salami the head of the UN mission in Libya and smell said that widespread violations of the arms embargo by external actors had made things worse the current conflict conflict has now spread outside of the Capitol was the air and drone strikes launched against the strata sedan it also sparked the Michael Conflict and the city of Mozell in southern Libya where does the over one hundred civilians with killed over the bus to wants breath as secretary general recently warned the conflict risks escalating into full blown war together with the UN Human Rights Office this Mr Salami the Human Rights Council to establish an investigative mechanism to promote accountability in Libya the wells oceans and frozen spaces have been taking the heat for global warming for decades climate experts said on Wednesday in an appeal for urgent measures to tackle rising sea levels and melting blasio's ACEA is sheets and permafrost the experts from the Intergovernmental Panel on climate change warned that without a radical change in human behavior hundreds of millions of people could suffer more frequent natural disasters and food shortages according to their special report six hundred seventy million people who live in the world's high mountain regions and around the same same number in low lying coastal zones depend directly on the planet's oceans and frozen resources in addition for million people live permanently in the Arctic region and Small Island Developing States are home to sixty five million people without major investment in adaptation these low-lying zones would be exposed to escalating flood risks and some island nations are likely to become uninhabitable the IPC report insists it notes that in Europe Eastern Africa the tropical Andes and Indonesia smaller BLASIO's are projected to lose more than eighty percent of their current ice mass by twenty one hundred under worst emissions scenarios. This is likely to increase hazards for people for example through landslides avalanches rockfalls and floods in addition to problems for farmers and hydroelectric power producers downstream and finally a new generation of global commerce. Hamas and finance deals is needed to help poor countries grow without them having to resort to high polluting energy sources the UN trade and development agency UNCTAD said on Wednesday stay in a call for a green new deal for the world's economy in reference to the measures introduced in the United States during the Great Depression to boost growth UNCTAD maintained that what is needed is a clean break from current sturdy measures. UN Sustainable Development Goals can be achieved UNCTAD beliefs but it is going to require governments investing around one point seven a billion dollars a year in low mission policies that is around one third of what is currently spent on fossil fuel subsidies the agency noted adding that these strategy could generate at at least one hundred and seventy million jobs and resulting cleaner industrialization in the Global South Daniel Johnson U._N. News.

UN Human Rights Council Libya Tripoli Unctad Kate Gilmore Kazan Salami United Nations Mr Salami Libyan National Army Miss Gilmore Commissioner IPC Europe Intergovernmental Panel
Jets' Sam Darnold out with mono, could miss weeks

The Bill Simmons Podcast

07:26 min | 1 year ago

Jets' Sam Darnold out with mono, could miss weeks

"Is the jets season already over. That's number four it. It feels like it. It certainly feels like it from the jets fans that I know who have already just like Oh my God. It's not even mid-september yet so that's how it felt just after game one right before mono for the seventy and sixteen loss to the bill seventeen unanswered points and and even by the instant jets Adam Gay standard a really astonishing press conference to explain or really not explain anything anything that had happened in the game where he said in a quote. That's the beauty part being a head coach. I can basically do what I want. That was in response to someone asking about apptime Montgomery snap count leave. That's response to talking about time Montgomery that how are you GonNa talk about Sam Darnold having mono or Levian bell getting an MRI on his shoulder anything actually consequential. When do we think Sam Darnold had mono because they got the ball back with like a little less than three minutes left down one? They only had two forty yards at home for riphil goal and they looked like an absolute shit show. I don't know I think that's that's a question after today's announcement because he's it sounds like he's GonNa miss a Lotta time unclear how much the things that they said is that he lost a ton of weight so then you wonder about his physical readiness CBS last week even to play like what was his conditioning. What was his stamina? Maybe that did have some sort of a fact act. I don't know but I think it's one of these jets stories where the instant reaction on twitter and on the Internet was like low mono and it's like you're saying it's actually not funny. It's a serious illness and yeah yeah. It is terrible way to derail the beginning of Sam Darnold Sophomore Season boot because it's the jets the impulse to say oh my God like how many things are gonNA happen to the jets only heading into week two and they have their Monday night football. They have the browns game on Monday night. The browns Ashley also coming off a disappointing week. One is kind of like instantly feels like a must-win game for both of these teams you look at the schedule. There's a real chance especially with donald out that they can start cr Owen sex like a real chant what happened to the line today. After the motto announcement the Browns went from minus three to minus seven yeah I mean that seems reasonable right. Ever seen is going to play quarterback as reasonable. If you actually watch Sam Darnold last weekend but go ahead of schedule the schedule is browns this week loss New England and week three loss by and week for a very very fortuitous bye week placement. They're good for the jets fans just emotionally they get they get a brief reprieve early in the season and then it's Philly Dallas in New England again brutal brutal that's L. draft picks Levian who by the way they might be injured when rusher but him but he would have to go nuts and one of those games levy on bell unclear what the severity he is. He's got soreness in his shoulder getting an MRI CJ Moseley. They're big ticket from Raven. One of my one of my favorite is good in the first half of the jets. He looked fabulous to give him a huge contract. He's hurt art sounds like he's progressing well but it's unclear when exactly he'll be back the already loss quincy for the entire season first round draft pick from the past draft when Williams it's not practicing right now ankle injury. If a lot of injuries mounting they had to they had to elevate Luke faulk Washington state talk on this podcast yeah so far I was not expecting us yeah from the practice squad to get ready to be the backup quarterback for Monday night football game that is now the place you WanNa be in week a two and then geese all of this get off his his announcement today of the Darnold mono illness was so bizarre like even by hi. The Adam Gates bizarreness scale standard. Here's what he said. Fourteen has mono and we'll be out for this game. You can't say you're starting quarterback's name name fourteen. He then continues so trevor will be starting okay big for all of our trevor say like nine starting. It's strange and then you can use in Luke. Falk will get elevated at some point. It'd be the backup so that would be that that he concluded then then the other thing that happened this week is that manish head report and the Daily News that way in case was still at the dolphins he broke the story SARCI prefer he was in love with one quack fell in love with the tape that he was crunching the film that he was studying. Oh it's Baker Mayfield okay sign like probably a lot of NFL front offices and coaches thought Baker Mayfield was the best quarterback in the draft. That's fine. Here's here's ears this Zinger bill he reportedly also preferred Josh Allen to Sam Darnold and did not quote didn't believe that Darnold had star potential so that's the thing that's now out in the world and even though he wasn't the jets doesn't matter it's like the thing that people are talking about is that Adam could would be made up sure I mean it could be somebody just league in that too mannish just to screw a random guess. It's definitely possible is just like the general tenor around Jason. The team makes it kind of hard. Doubt anything you here. It's one of those situations pretty pretty quickly gotten to that place like again you back to the way he was talking. After after the bills loss in just like the line played like shit the receivers played like shit the DB's played like shit you know he wasn't actually using foul language processing but he was pretty willingly throwing hired knitting them right because he's a Dick and Peyton manning is a hall of Famer of all time WHO's like show I kinda I like this Dick. He just says his mind Cher and he can handle it but if you put somebody like that with a young team in young quarterback in the big city might not be here I I am. I made excuses for news of Miami because the roster they did so many weird things for that. It was even hard to evaluate fused coach but I don't like anything he's done so far at the jets. He just seems kind of like a jerk. Never forgot that this is a man who said that the Internet and social media are pollution of the brain while he might not be wrong in that. I just want to say one thing on mono. Yeah 'cause I do think people underrate it and I think think it all stems back to a famous Brady Bunch episode seventies where it became you know it's a sitcom that was one of the formative shows has the seventies everybody under the age of I would say thirty five in every brady bunch probably right kyle over thirty five nine hundred thirty five kiling once I had had monitor just didn't watch other Brady thirty five over I would say at least knows all the brady bunch episodes right and that kind of made light of motto and it's like Yeah you can actually he died from on how you can get on school and not come back for two months right. It's like making kissing jokes but it's weird. It'd be like Kazan. darnold might have leukemia but models like really bad. It's it's it's terrible for Sam. I feel bad for my feel bad for jets fans and I wish that it's not realistic to wish for the fans to be able to enjoy a winning football team. I think the DADS fans host winning post football ball enjoyment. I wish now post apocalypse for the jets

Jets Sam Darnold Browns Football Adam Gay Apptime Montgomery Adam Gates Twitter Kazan. Darnold Baker Mayfield Darnold Brady Cj Moseley Trevor Luke Faulk CBS Cher Donald Trump Daily News Dads
Chemists Investigate Casanova's Clap

60-Second Science

02:49 min | 1 year ago

Chemists Investigate Casanova's Clap

"This is science Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Karen Hopkin all Cazenove the name is synonymous with a reputation for romantic. Let's say excess but a new study suggests that the real Jacome Cazenove may have exaggerated his sexual exploits none in terms of their sheer volume, but in their infectious aftermath because though Cazenove claim to have suffered several bouts of gonorrhea, researchers could find no traces of the responsible microbe on the pages of the womanisers handwritten memoir. The findings will appear in the journal electro freezes casanovas memoir completed in seventeen ninety eight fills twelve volumes and its English. Translation, runs to thirty five hundred pages in this tell-all casanovas tally some hundred twenty two lovers then confesses to recurring gonorrhea relapses to investigate these claims. Researchers turn to a technique they'd previously used to. Positively identified the bacterium that causes plague on the pages of death registries from seventeenth century Milan. Thus we thought we would be able to detect the gun Opoku on Kazan Avas pages. CC candidate meted in use memoirs have been been infected by gonorrhea in his first sex intercourse at the age of eighteen and having suffer from relapses of the sex Peja his lifetime as a gun lover. Giorgio Righetti, professor emeritus at Milan, polytechnic Righetti and his colleague glib Zuber Stein. Who has a company called spectra fon in Israel developed a hand held device that allows them to capture characterize protein, fragments and other macromolecules from the surface of historical documents such biological materials. Can get stuck to a manuscript when say someone licks his fingers to more easily turn the books pages leaving behind traces of potentially infected saliva, but in the case of Kesse. No. Ova that goes not racist caucus could be detected. They did however find traces of cinnabar a red pigment containing mercury sulfide at the time that chemical was used to treat these sexually transmitted diseases. Do your including syphilis gonorrhea quite likely that cousin Alvin been using macrey suit, find to cure relapse, his taraji. So it could be that as infection was in remission when Cazenove pen the three or four pages of chapters one and two that the researchers were able to examine and that in addition to his way with women Cazenove also had a deft hand with eighteenth century pharmaceuticals. Thanks for listening for scientific Americans, sixty seconds science. I'm Karen Hopkin.

Gonorrhea Karen Hopkin Cazenove Milan Jacome Cazenove Relapse Giorgio Righetti Israel Kesse Zuber Stein Opoku Syphilis Professor Alvin Sixty Seconds
Breaking Down 'Shazam!'

The Big Picture

10:36 min | 1 year ago

Breaking Down 'Shazam!'

"Finds itself at an interesting inflection point. I would say I thought she was a very fun and entertaining movie, but it did not really feel like anything that had come in the DC universe before. And you kind of explain to me. What should I am is? And what it's trying to do. Sure. I mean, I kind of had the. To do the same thing after watching the movie because like right around the time the post credits scene with a evil Caterpillar happened. I was kinda like I've no idea what any of this stuff is. So thankfully, Mike does have a a piece on the ring dot com. A great website kind of breaking down the kind of Kazan origins. But yeah, he's he was actually originally called captain marvel and like in the movie there was like a wizard named 'schisms who gave him like all these superpowers. But when he sorta got folded into DC comics because marvel had its own captain marvel he then became Zam. But the whole spiel is basically the same thing like the wizards powers you activate it by saying Zam, and then I guess in the big conversion you just become buff, Zachary Levi. Yeah, I didn't even know buff Zachary Levi was going to be a thing that I would ever have to talk about. I can't say when I was watching Chuck ten years ago. That this ever crossed my mind that he would be a superhero, I think Tony Lee. This movie is pretty significantly different from superman vs Batman and the Justice league films and even wonder woman, which I thought was you know, is a very charming and obviously hugely successful movie. But there is a lightness in the tone, and it's not quite as operatic goofy. As was l-. You know, what did you make of the kind of movie that Sam was trying to be yet? No, I thought it was fun at kind of had like almost throwback Amblin entertainment coming of age vibe like something you'd see from like Amblin in like the eighties. But with the caveat that instead of a kid going on venture or something he can just become a superhero. But I thought it was a it was it was kind of an appropriate tone for for the kind of here that this guy is and I kind of like that, you know, a kid like a teenager becoming Kazan like he has like a bit of an aimlessness to him at the beginning. Like, there's not the sort of great power with great with great power comes great responsibility type speech. You just sorta has to learn things on the fly Yemen. One of the first things that the character does after he realizes his powers as he just goes to a convenience store in buys beer and candy. And you know, I it, you know, the movies clearly pitched as sort of what if big, but superhero, and it's very effective in showing us like maybe not with the real world ramifications would be because it's a little bit different in tone in the real world. But some of the like aspirations that you have as an adolescent, and the things that you wish you could do when you were thirteen sham does for the first hour of this movie, and the movie ultimately just becomes a story about like friendship and the way that we act bigger and older than we are. And what we can get away with in that time. And then it does turned into a little bit of a superhero movie. What did you make of the kind of balancing of those tones? Yeah. I mean, I think I did prefer sort of the the first half of the move. In that respect, as you know, there are so many superhero movies out there. And I think for the most part it's sorta gets derivative to when the movie gets the guy discovers his powers, you know, like Peter Parker, like scaling skyscrapers type of thing. But it was fun for Suzanne because it felt very like very genuine response. What if a fourteen year old kids suddenly had powers like, yeah? He would try to buy beer. He would go to script strip club in like beam about the chicken wings because this is a PG thirteen movie. You know, if he's in a world where superman Batman exists, and he doesn't really know. What to do is? You just if he can't find people to save is he just going to he's going to try to make cash and become a YouTube star. It was an interesting approach. But I think like I preferred that half of the movie versus like, the Mark strong shows up with seven CGI deadly sin, archetypes, or whatever. And it's time to punch him a lot. Yeah. I agree. I don't think part was active. It's funny because it feels like a movie like this, which is not exactly a reinvention. But is a is a reconsidering of what these kinds of movies can be still does arrive and its conclusion at the notion that needs to feature a lot of punching and a lot of fighting the bad guy. I'm curious to see if as we grow inside, the D C E U, I guess much like Zam. If they'll ever change the the the approach that they take having kind of the final showdown in the final forty five minutes of the movie that was also one of my struggles. Honestly with wonder woman, which I thought as I said was really clever and well made and then ultimately just turned into Diana fighting a demon monster who was played by David through Lous. What do you make of the decisions that DC is now making to singular is each of their movies? I mean, it's interesting because like, you know, they they did a pretty quick pivot from like fast-tracking their Justice league movie which end up being like relative to the expectations a bit of a bomb for them. Also, it didn't really track critically. But you know, they're kind of like making these films that have this very little interconnectivity like aquaman was only really playing the seeds for Auckland to and I guess a trench spinoff, which I could go on like a twenty minutes handed about the trench about the trend. Can't wait for the trench. And like kind of the same thing with wonder woman sequel in feels that way, which is. To you know, if it does well enough at the box office like affiliates just leading into sham two or maybe like a black atom movie, which is like a sham villain. That's supposed to be played by Dwayne Johnson. If you look at like the C projects that are in the air like a rebooted suicide squad, James Gunn, new bad movie. Perhaps a flash movie there's all these other projects like the one glaring omission is there are no plans to make like a Justice league to and not to say that would never happen again. But clearly like the D C you right now is content. Just kind of throwing stuff out there and seeing what resonates with audiences yet. If you look down there slate, we talked about this a little bit during the release of aquaman, but I was just in add an in Vegas at cinema Khan. And they were very proud of the approach that they were taking telling their stories because the next the next handful of movies. They have is of course, Zam, and you know, they also have joker which is coming in October. Which also feels quite standalone seems to have virtually nothing in common with the movie Lakesha Zam. And then there's also a birds of prey which is. Theon story of sort of five superhero team that will also include Margot Robbie Harley Quinn, and that totally and visually looks completely different from those other two movies. And so they've taken this decision to not just make that flash movie and not just make whatever inevitable green lantern movie. And with the same kind of stormy visualises that that Zack Snyder created, but to just kind of individually each story, which is what a lot of comic books are actually a lot of comic books have separate illustrators. They have separate writers their tones are quite different amazing spider. Man could be quite different from x men and superman could be quite different from, you know, detective comics, and what's going on with that, man. And of course, I guess next year late next year. We'll have the Batman which Matt Reeves Batman movie. Do you know, your your very closely track the comp films for us is it more interesting to you of all of this the fits together or do you like it better? If it stands alone and the movies get to be what they are. Well, I. Kind of like maybe I just have a bit of a marble fatigue. Just because it feels like we've been preparing for endgame like just just forever. But yeah, I kind of like this approach because you know, like, if something doesn't, you know resonate with with audiences like I personally wasn't as big of a fan as as wonder woman as other people were which is fine. You know, I I like parts of it. But, but you know, for the most part people really enjoyed it. And I think you know, it's an interesting approach. I think what will probably be most interesting is with wonder woman command and Zam they've all been pretty well received. And they've made a good amount of money. I'm curious what happens like how the DC EU responds when something flops with critics audiences in the box office. Do they like shake it off? Or if it's like, if it's bracing a certain tone, like, you know, let's say joker is actually quite terrible. And and you know, it's like a Scorsese prestige that. Just kind of doesn't work like will the DC you kinda void being that experimental. Again. I I'm curious to see what happens when there's kind of like a speed bump on the road for them. I am too is an interesting question because it does seem like in with Shas AM and most likely joker and handful of these other movies. They don't come with that two hundred and fifty million dollar production price tag. You know, they're definitely smaller movies with more modest ambitions, at least in terms of the execution of the movie. And so the risk is lower. So if let's say joker is not the sort of world-beating, cultural colossus that many would have us believe this week. That's okay. I think that they could probably survive that. And it's an you're right. It is a really interesting pivot away from all of that interconnectiveness. Is there anything else about his that you you really liked and you responded to? Yeah. I really like that, you know, I thought Zachary Levi was was just so good at like kind of capturing basically like, you know, a kid in a swollen dealt spot ended it so well like there were times where you almost felt to childlike for guy who's still like fourteen years old, but you could tell he was just having such a blast. And and yeah, I would have never expected Chuck would be like a swollen superhero. But I never expected Jim from the office to like, you know, make some hard movie also become buffer like Michael bay film. So I I guess, you know sick. I'm stars. They can transform. Yeah. Could you cast a sitcom debauche sitcom figure into into a superhero movie right now is there? Anybody springs to your mind? Is Jim Parsons our next. Green lantern. You think? Oh god. No, no. I'm trying to think of like if someone from parks and rec ado that transformation that isn't Chris Pratt. Because I mean, he's he's just forget about this point. He's he's like a discount printing. Frazier. But he he has done that as well. I mean, I guess maybe if if Adam Scott were cast as as galactic that would probably that. That's as close as we're gonna get

ZAM Joker Zachary Levi Justice League Kazan Chuck Dc Comics Captain Marvel Amblin Entertainment Jim Parsons Mike Marvel Peter Parker Youtube Chris Pratt Dwayne Johnson Yemen Adam Scott Zack Snyder Auckland
What Is the Mandela Effect?

BrainStuff

05:26 min | 1 year ago

What Is the Mandela Effect?

"Countless humans have watched the Star Wars movies. And most of them will tell you that the bumbling droid named see three PO is gold all over. But did you know that C three PO actually has won silver leg? And what's that immortal line? Darth Vader utters in the movie The Empire Strikes back. It's not Luke. I am your father. He actually says no, I am your father, a both of these are pop culture examples of what's called the Mandela effect which are false memories. Shared among a large population of people a collective miss remembering of sorts, the phrase was coined around two thousand nine by self-described paranormal consultant view on a broom who used it to explain the phenomenon where many people around the world believed that the South African leader Nelson. Mandela died in prison in the nineteen eighties. But he was released in nineteen ninety later served as president of the country and died in two thousand thirteen at the age of ninety five brooms theory is that at all. All times there are multiple realities of each universe. Sometimes called the multi-diverse and that within each universe. There are variations or iterations of objects people end events. So according to this theory memories of these. Incorrect shared moments are not really false. They're just instances where parallel universes crossed paths for an instant the multi theory is also applied to various concepts in physics and Spiderman. A science has other explanations for how the men della effect happens much of it boils down to the fact that human memory is notoriously unreliable in this hour age of digital technologies. We often equate our brains with computer, hard drives. As though our experiences are typed up in filed away in our own organic storage. However, our prefrontal cortex sees where many memories are stored don't work with the same precision as a hard drive. We spoke by Email with Caitlyn a moat a UCLA PHD candidate in neuro science. She says that based on what we know about the brain. We can make inferences about what contributes to the Mandela affect quote memories are organized in the brain. So that similar memories are stored in nearby neurons when a memory is recalled those cells are able to change their connections, which allows for the addition of new information, but because neurons that fire together wire together sometimes false memories can emerge from aronie is connections. Well, we might think of recalling memories as solidifying them in our brains science seems to suggest otherwise recalling a memory often triggers. Other memories in the process, often intertwining various scenarios and people in new ways a sort of reconsolidating of the information in our brains. Human beings are also vulnerable to the concept of confabulation, which is an error or misinterpretation regarding a memory without a conscious attempt to mislead ourselves or others confabulation occurs. When the brain is attempting to fill in the blanks for incomplete memories. A speaker may mix and match similar experiences and information in order to complete a story in their mind complete with details and emotional responses. Certain that the tail is true. This kind of behavior happens more frequently and people coping with neurological issues such as brain damage or Alzheimer's, but healthy individuals confabulation too. Okay. So that might explain how one person misremembered something, but why would lots of people misremembered. Remember the same fax a moat points to twenty sixteen psychology. Studies showing that eighty eight percent of people in an online survey incorrectly. Picked Alexander Hamilton as a US president from a list of possible candidates, Hilton's recognition rate was much higher than that of some actual presidents like Franklin Pierce and Chester. Arthur Hamilton was actually the first secretary of treasury. But since he's associated with many early US presidents and has a hit Broadway show with his name in the title one or many could be forgiven for mistaking him for a former commander in chief. A moat also notes the power of suggestion. She said suggest ability is the tendency to believe what others suggest to be true. This is why lawyers are prohibited from asking witnesses leading questions at suggest a specific answer. These days. There's also the viral power of the internet and its ability to magnify human error suggest ability and gullibility just for example, if one person should Pacific sleep claimed the actor Sinbad start in a nineties movie about a genie called ZIM and could pro- off her plot. Details that strike a chord with other readers? This could generate a false narrative that many people might believe to be true or even claimed her member themselves in actuality, the actor in the nineties movie about genie was Shaquille O'Neal, and the film was called Kazan. Experiments continually demonstrate just how flawed human memory can be in one test about thirty percent of subjects confirmed. They had viewed video footage of United flight ninety three which crashed as part of these timber eleventh terrorist attacks, no such footage exists. Even twenty percent of people with highly superior autobiographical memory that is incredibly accurate memories reported viewing the nonexistent video and outside of the lab examples of the Mandela affect are pretty common are the popular cartoon bears called the baron Steen bears or the baron stain bears. It's the latter. Something that shocks many people who remember reading these books as children and do you remember a famous portrait of England's king? Henry the eighth grasping Turkey leg. The so do a lot of other people, but it never

Mandela President Trump Darth Vader United States Baron Steen Shaquille O'neal Arthur Hamilton England Alexander Hamilton Ucla Caitlyn Alzheimer Consultant Henry Kazan Franklin Pierce Nelson
"kazan" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

04:15 min | 2 years ago

"kazan" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

"Wanted to do because you I can't believe both you and your sister are doing it. Yeah. My sister's an actor too. I think I did as soon as I knew what kind of job that was. Yeah. Like a job. I not as I wanna be a movie star. Yeah. Things like a good job. Yeah. I think I I think as a very little kid. It didn't seem like I didn't really understand what an actor did. Right. You watch movies. And it's just like the people on the screen, and then probably like nine or ten sort of occurred to me that that was a job that was something do you pretend for living boy percents that seemed like a good job? But I wanted to be a writer before I wanted to be an actor. So that one came I did. When did you start writing things for the floor? I could spell for like riding. What did you think writing for movies or just writing found it wanted to be like a poet? Oh, yeah. Sure. Poets? Good job. Great. Great John, very lucrative. Yeah. Oh, yeah. Yeah. Security totally poet game can be secure that you're never gonna make any money. You can be secure that if you don't get a teaching job, I can really pan out. That's right. So I wrote a lot of poetry and then stories and then all of those problems hold up. So they're they're a little kids poems. Zoe don't you? Yeah. Okay. Good. What like Zell? Yeah. Some people do that. So I think they do partially be as Caldwell was like a famous actress, and and her parents, she when I met her. I said, oh, people always call me Zo because of you and she said, oh, my parents didn't know how to pronounce the name they mispronounce turning. Fair life by the time. I was in high school. I was like, you know, writing little plays and acting amount. Well, I started doing that as a kid. I mean, it's part I feel partially to blame for my sister's acting career because I like I enlisted her into my projects as a little kid out much. What's the age difference three years apart, she's younger? Okay. So so like starting at probably five or six and started, you know, putting on little plays on our futons in our living room for your folks were they proud look the writers, look, she's a writer. I don't know. I they were a little trepidation when I told him I wanted to be an actor. They were pretty upset. Isn't that interesting about people in show business? It's like dance you do anything else. Do you wanna wife of heartbreak? I don't even Scientists intas. why the rejection why do you crave this horrible thing? You know, when I was graduating high school, I wanted to go to conservatory in my parents told me that they wouldn't, you know, pay for it. They wouldn't help me if that's what I did. And we want you to college. They wanted me to go to college college. So I did. And I think it was one of the better parenting moves they ever made. Oh, yeah. Yeah. De- decide after you, go get an education. Yeah. Well, I'm grateful to have my mind. Yeah. Oh, yeah. It's good with so. And so you acted in high school accident high school I wanted to act professionally they were like dead set against it. Did you go out for stuff in high school? Absolutely, not they wouldn't they wouldn't let me, but they could have. I like like producers and stuff like giving my parents their cards at like a my school plays and things are really. And they were like, no, I was pretty devastated. I thought they were ruining my life. Oh, yeah. You could've been they ruined your wife. You could've been one of those weird child stars kind of why everyone looks at in bizarre way at this point. Well, look, that's what happened to her. She was so cute. And that thing remember when she was seven remember when she was twelve yet you void dodge a bullet on that one yet. I agree completely. But at the time I thought that they were like actively trying to ruin my life. So okay. So the big fight at the Kazan household is like why can't I go to conservatory, and then and I played to regular school..

writer Kazan Zell Zoe Caldwell John three years
"kazan" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

04:18 min | 2 years ago

"kazan" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

"Very nice. You to say, I love it. And you're you're you're like best pals with the Betty, Betty, and I go way back. You know, sister fronts. It took me a while to like the first season. I was just scared of her really got to know even how to be talked to that person. And I don't usually have that problem. Really why just sort of like, she's intense? But then second season Betty tonight. We're better. It was good. I I love her. I think she's great. Yeah. Me too. I. Oh, I I met Betty when she was at the Williamstown theatre festival with some friends of mine was at Williamstown Williams time, Massachusetts. Okay. Yeah. I wasn't sure. And and I remember seeing her from faraway and thinking she looked really confident, and then, you know, getting to know her and realizing that she had a lot of a lot of work to do on that front on the confidence like silvering beautiful. What's interesting to me in talking about go. And I don't know if I've said it publicly that Allison came up here, and she's very much a product of this business and Betty's like New York theatre. So you get these two completely different approaches in a way and experience with with acting, right? That are kind of going head to head. And it's particularly have that in common. We both came up in the theater. So it's one of the things that like, you know, we met probably an audition rooms long before we became friends. So how does it work? So you grew up in Venice. Speech, and you have this. You have the sister that I think I met once my my who lived by Sarah, my girlfriend the painter, and that's it. Just one sister to us. Yeah. And you grew up in show business. Really? Yeah. Sort of I don't know what that's why is that like, but like in the sense, it's sort of like is just what your parents did. Exactly. And also, I grew up with screenwriter parents. So I grew up with two people who are like sitting at home hunched in front of the computer. Did they write together they wrote two movies? They were two movies together one of which got made this movie, this children's movie Matilda they wrote and then they've both written a bunch separately. They're they're working screenwriters both of them. Yep. They're writing right now as we speak. Well, not as we speak. But I mean, do you know what they're working under? They talk to you about it. Yeah. Sure. My mom talks to me about it. More than my dad's more secret really just they have separate writing rooms. Yeah. But you also are a sort of a legacy. Right, right. My Grandpa's the director your Grandpa's at direct was director Elia Elian Kazan. Yeah. That's right. I know was movie you're not an pronounce his first name. They. Yeah. You're really good. No. I didn't. I did it wrong and corrective hand, nobody did you know him. Yeah. He died when I was twenty. Oh, and was he pretty cognizant all to to the end. Yeah. Totally. You know, I feel like I got the best of him as a grandfather sort of because he was like seventy five when I was born. So he was like ready to be a grandparent was he retired completely sort of retired. He didn't make any movies or directed me. Plays after I was born. But he wrote he wrote his autobiography after I was born in was still writing until he died. Did you read is out of aggravating? Never never did. Yeah. I skimmed through it. Like actually just in the last year and was like, I never need to read this. Why did you want to know all that stuff there? Like, there's certain things as a grand daughter. You don't need to know about your grandfather. There's a lot I think about his sex life in it. But also, it's like, you know, you have a you have a like a personal experience someone, and then the world has an experienced, and I feel like there's some part of me that just wants to protect my own experience of him that makes sense. But like coming up when your kid like when he started do sort of realized who he was did you go watch his movies? Did they inform you in any way? I didn't know that. He was a director until I was like twelve I knew he was like a powerful person because the way people treated him. But I didn't really know what he did in..

Betty Elia Elian Kazan director Venice Williamstown Williams Massachusetts Matilda Sarah Allison New York theatre
"kazan" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

02:06 min | 2 years ago

"kazan" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

"You know, it's interesting is that I watched my buddy Steve Brill directed. The the new Adam San where special on Netflix, and look I years ago, and we're and I had a problem. I saw him recently at an event, and he was nice to me. I'd love to talk to him. But I I was never I was a little older to be to be grabbed by the San. We're thing. I don't know if I would have been grabbed by the San we're thing, but certainly have known him and certainly have liked some of the work. He's done. But I'll tell you the standup special is it's a very touching very personal and oddly, very Sandler special and the effect of it. I watched old thing. And I and I I was very I was moved. And it was it was a great show. He somehow able to maintain what makes him Sandler from when you were a kid if you grew up with them, but also to be mature and and share the life. He's living now and write some clever songs and there's a joke in there about. His dad that killed me. I actually got squirted out a few tears. I laughed at few times. I enjoyed it. I'm just saying that because I don't know what some people think I I am. And I think I've judged Adam harshly when I was younger and more angry. But I thought the special was great. And this isn't even pay dad. What do you think of that? I'm just saying a fellow comedian. Who who I haven't seen do stand up in a long time if ever really for for a whole hour did a great stand up special. That's that. Why is it so hard for me just say that why why do I gotta be that? Why is it so hard so Zoe Kazan is here and not here? Why I did, you know recorded it, you know, at home. But I watched the film wildlife, and I watched it very intently, and I and I enjoyed it. And I thought it was beautifully shot and beautifully executed. She co wrote the film with Paul Dino. He directed it. And it's now playing in select cities, and this is my conversation with her about her. Okay. All right..

Adam San Steve Brill Sandler Zoe Kazan Netflix Paul Dino
"kazan" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

03:38 min | 2 years ago

"kazan" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

"I didn't mention today that I had Zoe Kazan on. She's got a film that she co wrote with Paul Daino her partner and they're not married, but they're together. And he directed it. And it's now playing in select cities it's called wildlife. We'll talk to her and a few minutes. Nice conversation with her. I enjoyed the movie. I watched it very intensely. I like Paul deneau I've talked to him before. So so that's coming up. I guess I should talk a little bit about New York. If I could because I'm I'm continuing feeling a bit alienated from it. And I guess I should outside of the politics of the week and the swatter and blood wedding of the week and the fucking horrendous terrorism that's happening in our country. I should say that my experience on the joker was insanely exciting. Like, I said, it's not it's not it's not a huge part. It's not a huge scene, even but to engage as an actor with Robert deniro and with Joaquin Phoenix. Was was pretty amazing. I didn't really talk to Joaquin Phoenix. He seems to be pretty submerged in his work, but it was sort of a baptism into a movie making that I had not I had a little part in almost famous million years ago, and I've done a couple of little movies. But this was this was big time. And and it was I was hoping I would do good work. And I think I did all right. It was funny because when we were doing the scene yet deniro I threw went to the director, and then director comes to me. And there was this moment where it's like, you Oh know. will big little big at the end there. Yeah. So take it. So I had to make adjustments did a little acting. But it was a great experience. I think it's going to be a pretty wild movie. It's a it. It's definitely kind of who's gonna Tori to be on a film set that that is a different world for you twelve thirteen hours a day. Anyway, that being said to sort of move into more about New York that I was feeling the other day, which was nostalgia. And witnessed algae means in the sort of darkness at the edge of it. The I used to always say that Los Angeles is is horrible because it's a horrible place to feel that you can feel very alone there and isolated. But I think New York it's worse if you feel isolated in New York because I'm here. I'm stuck in midtown in a hotel there things. I wanna do. There's always things that's the other part about being in Manhattan is sort of the party, your brain is sort of like, jeez. New York City. I should be out doing something. I should be out, man. There's a million things going on there. So I got what what am I? How come I'm not doing something that feeling is kind of unnerving because that goes right to like everyone else is doing something. But me, and then and then that goes to like a missing everything in that goes to like, I'm a fucking loser. Look at me sitting here doing nothing, but those are old patterns, but I do think that being isolated in a city that's filled with people is definitely a worse feeling than being isolated in a city where you don't see anybody around because when you're on your own head of mung people. That's a that's a type of loneliness that really kind of pounds at you. Because like they're all right there. Everyone's right there. We're all people. Why can't I feel connected to people? But when you're out in L A, and you're sitting alone your house you like there's nobody around. So fuck it, it's different. And I think you can ground yourself into a little differently, but I'm just sort of struggling with these feelings, and I need to go down and need to like, I should go down the cellar. Get a couple sets in here. And there by just haven't I haven't wanted to. And then I. To think about what the place used to be. I start thinking about how how it was. When Patrice O'Neal was around when Greg Giraldo was around, and you know, what's going on down there. Now, they changed the Hawaii out of the I don't know..

Zoe Kazan New York Joaquin Phoenix Paul Daino New York City Paul deneau Robert deniro Patrice O'Neal director partner Los Angeles Manhattan Greg Giraldo Hawaii Tori twelve thirteen hours million years
"kazan" Discussed on The Adam and Dr. Drew Show

The Adam and Dr. Drew Show

01:54 min | 2 years ago

"kazan" Discussed on The Adam and Dr. Drew Show

"Hair but now mainly thinking michelle data cello but either way you can say what do you sit to her for music identity sort of connection to like somebody's it's weird she made good music so i enjoyed listening to music why why else why does there need to be other elements that are play here both went to north ave at high so this is i don't know where she is still never i don't know who she's married doing where she from or what are deal is made good music to listen to it crazy to guys driving the silver like all right let me tell you about truecar she's still alive truecar i got some tips for you get yourself joan arm and trading kazan and here's another tip you might not know truecar also helps people get used cars with a certified dealer network and a nationwide inventory of nearly one million us cars enjoy real pricing on actual inventory and a simpler buying experience so whether you're looking to buy new or us see what other people paid for the exact same car apples to apples you go you go online find your car lock in your price get your certificate and then go to your certified dealer and go pick up your new ride enjoy faster buying experience by connecting with truecar certified dealers they compete amongst each other for your business as well so it's not just truecar against the world's true on true crime true true wow that's right so ready to buy used or you wanna buy new you go truecar and enjoy a more confident car buying experience some features not available in all states all right where's it chris here hey chris thirty seven so i got.

joan arm kazan michelle
"kazan" Discussed on Hurry Up & Wait. LA

Hurry Up & Wait. LA

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"kazan" Discussed on Hurry Up & Wait. LA

"Elliot kazan's book on on directing and rod steiger did all of his films in that famous scene in the car with some pa it was just got up and left on his so i could never do that yeah it's it's funny because a director i get the same thing where when i got hired as a dp i ended up doing the job as director because they can't translate what they have in their brain to the actor i and but in the seventh competition with a kid and it's like no they taught you how to be a good dp you're a good dp you're not a director you don't have the base of story you don't know how to talk to people who know where to put your lurks and keep your camera angles but how to and that's it and maybe how to keep energy alive in a scene basic storytelling there's like we were started shooting our web series and i we saw two for seen at i'm telling dan dan playing in my strength is comedy so basically i'm going with him as he plays it okay in this line this what this means is what's me detail by detail it is a one minute scene but if i didn't have that background in stand up comedy or acting i couldn't translate this to them so it just becomes flat and boring and the jokes don't hit but also being a stand up comedian is communication to an audience and and that's that's to me what this is it is the art of communication in having been with my wife for twenty five years and having two kids like i can answer any question i can do.

Elliot kazan director rod steiger dan dan twenty five years one minute
"kazan" Discussed on The WAN Show Podcast

The WAN Show Podcast

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"kazan" Discussed on The WAN Show Podcast

"Mm yeah i dunno we're talking like i okay to be clear i think there are going to be people putting new rags in them and they're going to be people changing of the gas i don't care sure i'm not gonna do but i i think it's going to undergo hope my friend who lives on a farm clear blackberry bushes with it kazan sounds front right all right anyway that's what i'll tell what were you saying about the uh so this is like super rumor mill stuff and to be clear i'm pretty sure if anything i think it's like insider information now super rumor mill no no no i didn't hear this directly is posted on some website chair okay um and it was very much like they are interested in doing this not those other companies are also okay with hit shirt so and one of them i'm very sure is not okay with it but pudgy corp is esa and fouls which they technically have the war chest money to deal with but like i'm sure the last one is not okay exactly yeah they're not publishing corp it sounds like they're micro uh there minecraft acquisition yeah hey this is already popular and everyone already bought it let's now by it too were not really sure by okay curtains ashley yet part of the idea behind that sorry i just remembered was not letting it go to playstation because it's a timed microsoft xbox exclusive.

esa kazan microsoft mill
"kazan" Discussed on AM 1590 WCGO

AM 1590 WCGO

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"kazan" Discussed on AM 1590 WCGO

"That cash there to make sure you make this transition and turn this corner into your next phase of life into your career how old are you 43 okay all right well they're certainly a lot of things you can do all kidding in joking aside apparently the divorce news is fresh news yeah so i i get you it's a hard time right now so you the faster though that you can see the future the easier it's going to be emotionally and on negotiating and so forth through the divorce process the more you don't the war you see something in your future rather than a big black hole the easier all of this was going to be for you agreed problem i mean when there's a light at the end of the tunnel this not an oncoming train a changes the way we go to the end of the tunnel well then that's what you're doing the you're gonna this next phase toss though admittedly i'm not not minimizing that but so if i'm you i'm actually going to go hey you know this sucks but i can in this much manure a other will grow something you know it's like this a clean slate on forty two or anything i want a big girl what are on their you know and there's nothing really stop a may accept my decision to go do it and kazan once you kinda start targeting where you want to go what you wanna do then you can say you start asking yourself the immediate question what has to be true for me to do that take a class do i have to get a certification got to get a licence because i'm going in real estate business do i have to do this or that or you know do i have to start making some contacts to get that job whatever it is that you wanna do you make the decision and then you start asking yourself okay what has to be true this monetary right now for me to be doing that and that's called living the dream so you the laying out and you start stepping on that one step at a time i'm going to give you a.

kazan
"kazan" Discussed on The Director's Cut

The Director's Cut

01:48 min | 3 years ago

"kazan" Discussed on The Director's Cut

"And then they said yes and then the money was in the bank and that was that it was a completely painless wonderful experience that is amazing that gives a lot of us hope of it was ridiculous but i mean so is is one of those things where i mean my entire career i've been told the same thing that black films have no value internationally and particularly in this pacific rim they have no interest in you in your life and i keep going but really i mean i like chris hour he wasn't thinking about me i mean i think if he had tell us a good story you know it kind of works and uh so the fact that the financing came from there i mean the more the story is nobody knows nothing there and i nor one sells yes no one knows nothing except for me a basically thick no really no one would have predicted that would be the source that financing and then open road stepped in kazan okay you've got finance you got to cast we like the script so they picked it up for distribution so it was actually after the first independent movie i've done in my whole career i've actually been doing studio movies from the very beginning we had strike as house parties newel yeah so it was it was a may i mean it's kind of in some ways the better way because it's like i work within the system of all those years so now to have no training wheels no supervision we just made the movie riot it was a really handmade movie and we just made every decision ourselves and it was great because we knew the rules we knew and we should break them we knew we should in culled within lines and you know that was it.

kazan
"kazan" Discussed on KMET 1490-AM

KMET 1490-AM

01:37 min | 3 years ago

"kazan" Discussed on KMET 1490-AM

"In the open right now he's he's he's i love him i love his family i love his speech i thought his speech was absolutely beautiful it wasn't a selfserving speech it was the true so what are the women protesters in this country protesting about why i know it was a peaceful one okay that was very good very good girls keep that peaceful but the cover like pink you just don't wanna get too crazy kazan meal make pink and ugly color and pink as in right now so we gotta keep those pink hats nice in cool the truth is there is no real reason what are they trying to say okay let's just go down the line of liberal causes they want to kill babies okay that's my opinion yes i don't care what you think i i do not believe in abortion because i do believe the moment a little baby is conceived it is a baby otherwise women would not freak out when they have a miscarriage okay we all know and then they say they want to have a right to their bodies will they should have the rights to their bodies but why don't you just take that right and be right like touchdowns think about it when you have sex because that's a recreation for most you people lotta people want to have sex so they have babies i know this is an xrated i'm going to talk about this stuff right now okay i'm probably going to blush but that's why you that's what she used to have babies.

kazan
"kazan" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"kazan" Discussed on Fresh Air

"To the cross so that you could hang their without really hurting yourself well as a matter of fact the playing that scene we learned an awful lot about crucifixion uh we learned that it would be impossible to be crucified the way very over new see crucifixion uh you know the body would say right down but to make our a scenes effective it was very easy every cross had a bicycle seat just kept the body apyamed so that you wouldn't be sagging down in the very unattractive position okay so that's the secret you started off in your first movie playing someone who is pretty weak in from the strange love of martha i have risen you went on to become a character who is seen as very strong in fact are you you were mentioned that yulia kazan refers to you in his autobiography at read one of the things that he says when he was making the film the arrangement based on his bestselling novel you wanted to be in the film and he cast un at although he says he there was something about the role role that he thought marlon brando would have been better for and yulia kazan rights there was one problem with kirk eddie the character has to start defeated and every person away the film rests on how basic and painful his initial despair as kirk has developed a professional front a man who can overcome any obstacle he radiates in dominant bility morlin on the other hand with all his success in fame was still unsure of his worth and of himself acting had little to do with it it was all a matter of personality.

martha yulia kazan marlon brando kirk
"kazan" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"kazan" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"It is something to cheer you up and it is a selfaware cry for attention what does that mean i mean pick me up is sort of this great joke that i think a lot of my work houses you can read it as a positive or negative and so there's something for everyone and especially with pick me up i wanted to create what is essentially a very blood self care mental health aware journal but i didn't wanna call it the selfcare mental health journal kazan the people who could really benefit from it would either never give it a shot or be afraid to carry it around and so pick me up is a gift that someone older than you gives you and you're like oh great quirky and then he opener and you're like who okay i'm going to save this for later and so it it was meant to sort of sit on a shelf and not scream i'm full of secrets but then become a place to be full of secrets you've said that this book is what you wish you had when you were fourteen why is that 'cause i was a mess because i you know that's a time i think that were fall of insecurity and we just there's so much jumbling around as an early teen and also you don't trust anybody and so there's no one to talk to about it so the idea of using a paper journal sure if you don't need that push but a book like pick me up that encourages you to write and draw frankly about what's happening and then also forces you to keep.

kazan
"kazan" Discussed on The Young Turks

The Young Turks

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"kazan" Discussed on The Young Turks

"I keep causing to forty kazan specific sexy 540 eastern right and then the show sources six and he's going to be in the first segment to but if you miss any part of the show downloaded stream it added free you get all the other shows including all school tonight if you and the post schemes if you become a member there's only a couple of days leav where you can get a free trial membership of a month so to you i t network dot com slash join and use the promo code free to you i was six all right following protests for the 2016 presidential inauguration officials seized phones of some of the protesters and are now trying to crack those phones in order to charged with conspiracy to riot let's breakdown what's happening prosecutors have indicted over two hundred people on felony riot charges for protests in washington dc on january 20th that broke windows and damaged vehicles some defendants face up to seventy five years in prison despite little evidence against them but a new court filing reveals that investigators have been able to crack into at least eight defendants locked cell phones how did they get their cell phones howard these people rounded up this is what happened dc police officers channel hundreds of people into a narrow blockaded corner where they carried out mass arrests of everyone in the area some of those people including a journalist and to allegedly peaceful protesters are now suing for wrongful arrest now while they were doing that they seized more than a hundred cell phones from defendants and other unindicted arrestees and uh as of now for while we didn't know what was going on with these cell phones but we do have a court documents that now show the investigators were successful in opening some of the locked phones eight sees phone six of which were encrypted and two were not encrypted what lean prosecutors moved to use a wealth of information from the phones as evidence including the phones call detail records sms mms messages contact logs email logs chats are other messaging applications website search history and website history and images or videos so long as the data related to january twenty as the protests are other people suspected to have been involved in the protests but that is so.

kazan windows search history washington seventy five years
"kazan" Discussed on Off Camera with Sam Jones

Off Camera with Sam Jones

01:49 min | 3 years ago

"kazan" Discussed on Off Camera with Sam Jones

"They are taught how to use the cameras themselves and there really are no gimmicks and no force challenges these people face extremely dangerous conditions in situations such as finding food and water building shelter and fending off predators why they want to do it is beyond me but it is some great entertainment so check it out the new season premiers thursday june fifteenth at ten nine central on history now let's get on the show while in the film you you there's a lot to stand up in the film the fn in it you meet your wife played by zoecke kazan when she hecklers you yeah and you know i'm curious throughout this film what what was real and and what was made up for the film and i wondered if that was a moment that was that really happened or think well i don't i mean it's such a meet q ten this in the traditional romantic comedy that i would call bs on it now it's real it is that that is totally real exactly what i said the same thing too i was on stage i was like i said something about pakistan she will who'd an hours i looked at this really cute girl now if you're not from pakistan i would have noticed you and i did right her name and noted do like that i did that was like all that was kinda like my right and we should say for in the in the movie that sure sort of bad move with the ladies is to take their name and writers noorduyn give a sheet and she recalls you on that too in the movie in real life at worked he's very and and you know she was like him we started dating in a couple of months and she was so charm by that and she would like tell her friends that can so sweden romantic and i had to be like hey hunting.

zoecke kazan pakistan sweden
"kazan" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

Maltin On Movies

01:30 min | 3 years ago

"kazan" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

"And a guy from chicago john roy very funny comedian who lives here now rights for a ton of shows he won stars search and so at the open mic where we used to do the bar we like we watched him win and he thanked the bar which is now shira's ikea for all the the the comedians vaca lions dan who are like working hard it can happen and they of course he drank for free their arrest casting can about then highly how did you get into this film well jarred maybe africo yeah so we you know we cast zoe whose fantastic in the movie kazan zoe kazan plays the part of emily and she's unbelievable and and that's a whole subject himself what i won't stop your story but we want to come back to go back to her about and then judge had the sort of the he was like holly hunter should be the mom and we really like sort of rerouted an and had to convince her to do it we wrote a letter and all there's me are the ones that she's so amazing woman is just great to see her comedy and all the source we got holly then ray than judge was like it should be it should be ray because jetted worked with ray on funny people and we were all huge fan of yours here are the ones sitting in front of yeah was it with tom governor were them and he he was like race so funny and he can do this and we were all immediately on board and honestly.

zoe kazan holly hunter ray tom governor chicago john roy shira kazan emily