36 Burst results for "Kawasaki"

Fresh update on "kawasaki" discussed on The Steve Matthes Show on RacerX

The Steve Matthes Show on RacerX

02:37 min | 13 hrs ago

Fresh update on "kawasaki" discussed on The Steve Matthes Show on RacerX

"Amex Sports. Relaxed a little bit as far as hey, after the races if you see the riders. kind of in a safe zone which is outside of their truck. They can do interviews Kawasaki though is still said Hey no no interviews after the races no matter what. So. These are things that led me to kind of say you know what? I'm maybe I'll stay home like it's not great access and I'm not complaining because I understand it's cove. We're getting through this thing I totally get it but it has hurt the job a little bit. At the races Lewis, has it been for you and everybody that makes vice. A well, I was expecting to us when the first one in Latvia, I was hitting thinking Ryan I wanted to speak to anyone went out to do anything essentially thinking I was going to tweet and that was all I was going to get from it. It's kind of normal and I'm not even sure I should publicly save that. As far as like doing poll Cosco Yep, I'm doing just as many as as an overall he's won. It's Different have you can you go under the tents and the teams? They're okay everybody's fun. Most of the teams are Wheatley Kawasaki, you're the only one here like. Okay. It must be a global cow thing. Yeah. The same way over here right? I I imagine that if the teams didn't know me, they wouldn't want me any whenever and all the teams have just been like, yes. Fine. Do We? Do respect everything. Yeah you took. It's been unkind like. There's no reason why would think it wouldn't be worth regards, for instance. Realistically up been able to do everything I need to do right right? Okay. Interesting. Just it's worth like you know considering that we've been tested twice to get in paddock made even get in the circuit you you know you have to produce those two negative tests. So it's not like your discharging into a team. Like luxury said, there are teams cayote is off limits Husqvarna I tend to find is pretty much off limits. ATM, him a little bit more. Arrange things in advance then you can get stuff done I mean nobody really wants to close the door, which is, which is cool part about it. Because again, doing quite a work inside murder GP everything is by them I'm going to the second this weekend, but I have to go into a test tomorrow I can only do interviews with some team manages a mechanic's a conflict, any writers I found logic material ms is is like said is pretty much normal..

Kawasaki Ryan Wheatley Kawasaki Amex Sports Latvia Husqvarna Murder Lewis
Saudi court sentences suspects in Jamal Khashoggi murder

KYW 24 Hour News

00:32 sec | 2 weeks ago

Saudi court sentences suspects in Jamal Khashoggi murder

"Handed out in the Kama Hachioji motor trial, but many wonder if Justice was done. Two years after his grisly murder in the Turkish consulate. A Saudi court has jailed eight people for between seven and 20 years for the murder of Jamal Kashiwagi. None of the defendants was ever named. The court had already concluded Kawasaki's murder and believed dismemberment was Not premeditated or ordered by anyone in power, and these sentences, like the trial itself are likely to be rejected as illegitimate. By international jurists. Vicki

Murder Jamal Kashiwagi Kama Hachioji Vicki Kawasaki Justice
A 6-year-old girl is now the youngest person to die of COVID

The Situation Room with Wolf Blitzer

01:09 min | Last month

A 6-year-old girl is now the youngest person to die of COVID

"Many kids are going back to school. Now, a six year old little girl has just become the youngest child to die from this my risk in Florida that according to the Department of Health in Florida Florida also just reported two new cases of Kawasaki Disease in Young. Children. So far, eight children in Florida have died from coronavirus pandemic began according to the Tampa Tampa Bay Times. Clearly, kids aren't virtually immune from corona. As the president has said. That's right. We know that children tend to get less ill than adults do but children do get sick they do become hospitalized, and unfortunately some do die and we actually know based on the statistics so far that the disparities that we're seeing in adults with corona virus are also mirrored in children as well. A city study found that African American children are five times more likely to be hospitalized Latino kids eight times more likely to be hospitalized, and we have to take this disease very seriously. Also recognizing that children may even be silent spreaders of covid nineteen.

Florida Kawasaki Disease Tampa Tampa Bay Times Florida Florida Department Of Health President Trump Young
Starting Zocdoc with Oliver Kharraz

How I Built This

1:03:33 hr | Last month

Starting Zocdoc with Oliver Kharraz

"Oliver Karaz was born and raised in Germany mostly in rural parts of the country his mother was German and his father was from Iran in came from a long line of doctors. For me, it really starts in some ways with my dad and. The timing rapidly had every reason to become a social activist and and so he came to Germany from the Middle East when he was very young around twenty with no money in his pocket no language skills. And you personally then worked on of odd jobs, but he eventually became a psychiatrist but what has really shaped me much more than being born in Berlin is. Social. Active. Isn't that I that I saw him live and that he really made our family mattress we always talked about talent responsibility and the need to use. Whatever telling behind to help those. Around us that we can make a difference. Given that your father was Iranian and your mother was was sort of. German. An Uber even though you were born in Germany, did you feel did you feel as Germany everybody else? So I didn't have a second identity. We only used spoke German at home and yet. As you say I was also a not always fully accepted. So if I give you an example, my school twelve hundred students and you could pick out to the didn't look like everyone else and I was one of them right and even an enlightened country like Germany. That is notable. So I had what I call a visual accent would people would see me on the street and they would ask me how to speak German. So well and But they also school the skipped my name when reading out scores because they weren't sure how to pronounce my last name and opportunities taken away and even at was physically threatened so i. I think that really shaping in many ways because I realized. Very early that in order to be as successful as everyone around me I would have to be dramatically better in really work much much harder than anyone else and so that used to be strong work ethic in me. For the record Oliver is somewhat down playing his work ethic. Because just out of high school, he actually started his first successful company. It was the early clunky days of the Internet, and he designed a way to help people send emails more easily and he wound up selling that business not for a ton of money, but enough to get him through medical school. But. After practicing medicine for a couple years Oliver realized he couldn't stop thinking about that first business he'd started and how he wanted to start another. So he quit his job in medicine and consulting job with Mackenzie and eventually moved to New York. That was my goal was actually to start another company that that's A. Healthcare, but I I'd also realized at the time that I sold my first company and far too cheaply in that I should learn more about business I and at McKinsey God exposure to balance sheets and panels and hit a lot of very practical experience and what it means to manage business. And I think they fondly of my time at McKinsey was one of my better decisions. McKinsey GonNa Mackenzie is a little bit like going to business school. A lot of people at McKinsey have come from business, schools. In that. Many people go to business school thinking they will find a co-founder. Did you were you actively looking around at your colleagues to think maybe I can do something with him or her you know maybe that person. Absolutely and were you just thinking about different business ideas all the time? Well, it is actually very hard to find good ideas and my definition of a good idea was that it needed to have a great mission I. wanted to make sure that we actually do something good in that. We stayed true to sort of talent breaks responsibility, but also wanted to be a large market and to have a great motor rounded and also I wanted to be based on contrarian inside. Because I thought that all of the best companies have that at its core. While she wanted mission, you wanted a company that could kind of dominate its field by building a motor around it, but was also contrary and that's that's that's those are some interesting. Criteria. And that's why I screen for several years rejected pretty much every idea that that I came across And meanwhile. While you're going through all that I guess you meet this guy Cyrus Masumi. WHO's another McKenzie consultant and and just you just. Become friends like he's like somebody like in and you guys start hanging out. While we got put on study together that required us to travel globally and you've ever done that it meant frost were sixteen eighteen hour days together for three four, five months on end and we really. Got To become great partners in that and and what we realized that we had some. Very complementary skills. Cyrus is one of the most charismatic and gregarious individuals. You'd ever meet his very passionate. He could be more forceful, which sometimes was needed to be effective with clients. And you've talked to me now for a little bit as you can probably tell. More dispassionate and logical and more measuring. German? More, German in many ways, right. also was effective with clients by by. and Cyrus is American right? He's American this but that That close listened and how we work together that really started friendship and we stayed close for the study and be caught up over lunch pretty regularly denounce different business ideas off one another and. I think we connected because we had similar interests because. On. Some levels We were equally passionate about what we're doing higher says, passion was more visible to others than mine but we. Were close enough together that we both accepted. The other as. individual that that we could learn a lot from. Was it was it clear pretty soon after you start hanging out, Sarah's that this was the guy because you were. You're on the lookout for a partner. They I think it was was absolutely an option I know reality is that. With. Both founded companies before Mckinsey and we both knew that we wanna do it again and as I. was always great about being. Very honest. Rather than just nice and and I value that a lot. Yeah. All, right. So So this guy, Cyrus Super Charismatic, really smart clearly, the two of you start to to work together. And what what kind of business ideas are are you coming up with? While we kind of fell in love with a new idea that came about a one of these launches were Cyrus. Told me about how he recently ruptured his eardrum by flying with a cold and then found it very difficult to actually find a doctor and he had asked for recommendations and called down his insurance directory listing started with the as. Doctors weren't accepting new patients some no longer accepted two centurions one provider Pasta Way and so he said, well, why does it take four days to the doctor when I'm in pain right? And why can't this much easier? And we. Both very quickly. realized the potential of this idea from. Working at project be new helps us the for actually spending millions of dollars for marketing to grow their patient base because they had wasted inventory, right they had something that I like to call hidden supply, which is these last minute cancellations no-shows reschedules. That the that go to waste, and then on the other, there are the patients who had a hard time accessing this. You thought it immediately clicked with these my God. Yes. Doctor's appointments connect patients to doctors. Yeah. Well, look if you go through the forfeiture that I had read, it's a great mission right? We're making one of the most personal needs more accessible for for patients we can help patients to get in fast we can help the doctors become more efficient. We can make the entire health care system more cost effective people out of the emergency room things like that, and it's a marketplace. So there is a strong mode and clearly anything in healthcare is a large market and I think the contrary and inside that we had. was. The fact that. Most people thought it's normal that people have to wait twenty four days to a doctor because there's a doctor shortage in read our inside was really no doctors have asthma debate ability because of these last minute cancellations, no-shows reschedules and so I felt very about this idea. So. So you member like how long between the time that the you had that first conversation To the time were both you said, let's start this business was like monster or weeks or days. was was weeks. We what we what we started doing is actually. Mocking up the side in how imagine back then in powerpoint pointing just the wire. Website. Yeah. Wire frame. Exactly. We would. We'd go into starbucks and we'll chat up strangers and say, Hey, here's a five dollar gift card. Give me your thoughts. Sorry I'm GonNa. Go back. You just go to people in starbucks Gift Card and say, can you give me your thoughts? Random Person? The absolutely that's that was sort of our market testing. They wouldn't. They would be like excuse me this is a little weird. You're my space. Might also happen from time to time but you know there's lots of people on starbucks is very in German of you. That's debris because usually he would be to report tentative about doing that. Well, you know I think there was a lot less rejection than you think people actually quite open I. Suggest you try this out but if you If you're unthreatening in Luke harmless as we probably dead and then they'll be pretty open. You went up to and starbucks and you'd say, Hey, we're thinking about a company here. Can you just look at his powerpoint give you five dollars Gift Card and what was in the powerpoint, the popcorn and was just what we thought. This website would look like and we would ask them is the set service that resonates with you would you use it and and we got an incredibly valuable feedback here and really set us in many ways on the on the right track right? So and what pointed to the two of you decide let's quit McKinsey. Let's. Let's pursue this. Probably a month or two after we initially discussed idea did anybody say you were crazy for quitting? Everyone. Everyone told us. Crazy and got a lot of negative feedback on the idea to write people would say this is Bloomberg out I would never pick my doctor on the internet or I already have a doctor or you know doctors wouldn't accept patients that that are looking on the Internet of all kinds of protections that people had when they were thinking about their own situation by. When when you talk to people and starbucks, they actually thought about it much more positively. So we were encouraged enough to say, well, this is going to work as long as we get out of our circle and don't ask McKinsey consultants doctors. The responsible be better. All right. So you are in your thirties at this point. And presumably were making pretty good cash at McKinsey because you were probably you'd know expenses you're on the road all the time so. When you quit, I'm assuming you had some money to launch the business and probably live off for a while. Yeah. So I very deliberately had never raised my living standard to the money that the paying McKinsey and I had saved every dime so that I could. No be in a position where can fund this embraced can afford not to take a salary for a couple of years. Wow. So so a couple of hundred thousand and you saved. You know. Maybe. I'm to Germany to discuss personal finances but. I had. Built this. Radio, you can tell the. Story Yeah I I had I had enough money to live off for for several years but I also Saturday night both finance the company early out of our own savings so that clearly diminish We had leftover after that. So now, you both decided to quit. and. You have some technical expertise because you had. You had done some coding but this is next level stuff. Were you able to be that technology founder and Cyrus was going to be the the sort of the business founder? Absolutely not as I add coated but at that point, I had not touched a computer for a long time We knew we need to have a technical co founder and so Sarah's knew a guy named Nick Guanzhou from the time together, trophy software, and this is another company that they would both worked at the that's the company that they're both previously worked together and Nick just brought a totally different perspective and really educated Addison me on a lot of things and and he was really the one who understood a building a seamless experience for the consumer and ends May. Zach Docs. Early Genius, did you did you have the name dock from the beginning? Not, not initially we we went to several phases on on what the right name could be for for while we wanted to have a descriptive name. So we looked at physicians, dot Com Doctors Dot Com, and we actually tracked down the owners of one of these domains and they wanted several million dollars for the domain name. And and we were finding the company ourselves. So that was out of the question. So then we just sat in a room and we brainstorm a list of fifty or one hundred names, and then started eliminating names until we arrived at Dr. What does it mean? or it doesn't mean anything which was the WTO bit we could. There were zero search results. Okay. There's no meaning behind his ACH. There's no meaning behind and and in hindsight it was precisely the right thing to do because it really was a blank slate for us to fill with with meaning and really build a brand around. Zero such as October we started. It address nate the right lake once you know that it takes more than three weeks from picking up the phone and dialing for doctors till you actually see someone you realize Oh, this really not much else that we have to wait so long for to get. And this is more important than most of these other things you already have. Fantastic access View Magin. If air travel way that healthcare workers that wouldn't be an expedia that wouldn't even be Delta Dot Com that would be individual phone numbers for every plane. Imagine. If that happened, you know a half the planes would fly empty it would be a massive pain and that was actually the state of health care before sock. Is Amazing that that the nothing like this was out there in two thousand seven. I look at I. Think. In many ways you couldn't build it a much earlier. In the early days. When we went out there, we were the ones installing Internet of the doctor's offices. We. They they were a many times just migrating from a paper books to scheduling systems. We were at the cusp of digitisation for healthcare. We were just lucky in our timing to get this right in and start offering the service when that also happened. All right. So you decide to pursue Zach dock and it's the three of you. I'm assuming really just at the beginning and were you working out of out of one of your apartments? Did you guys rent space? No, we worked out of respect for. Many. Times we came to make yet the nicest apartment and and we could bring breakfast Burrito and bake him up and you know the the reality is that we originally had a pretty ambitious launch plan right so we got together around July. We wanted to launch by December of two, thousand seven. Something interesting happened were nick send an email suggesting to look at what was then called techcrunch forty. Take is is now a household name but the draw for us back then was there was a fifty thousand dollar prize now it's called tech crunch disrupt think. So it's a major a startup competition. It's a startup competition and we were the first class of this was much less known be budgeted two hours to fill in the application in really which will send it off. He didn't think about it anymore that there was an early July and early August we've heard that we had been accepted, but there was a complication we'd have to be ready by September eighteenth or. That was three months sooner than we had originally planned to launch. So you'd have a live website by September that is right that is right with doctors with doctors, right So we actually debated for a few hours whether we should even tried to go for that but we ultimately said, yes, we can get the website working and we wanted to have enough doctors just a bars wouldn't look pathetic. Brayden. Coded Night Neither Day and nick really busted his but he did the patient facing side of the website and that was the programs. What was potentially even harder because we're tried to launch a marketplace was to actually get the initial supply on there and remember the website wasn't there yet so. Tires ended up going door to door for doctors offices. Excuse telling them a powerpoint page, and this is really a testament to cyrus sheer willing determination if you think about what it means to really start a company early on, there's nothing to show right you may be a powerpoint but there's no website there's no patience. There's no other doctors no social proof and it has to run on passion and very clear that that is Cyrus superpower. He just went to random doctors offices or he had like a list of doctors offices and he started kind of walking block by block. Well, there's a lot of walking involved a we launched in Manhattan so you can literally go down the street and you see. The signs and you walk in. And he was basically saying look, it's a way to connect you to patients. How was how many by the way? What was your objective? How many doctors do you need to sign up to have this website look okay by September Between six and ten was our goal. Okay. So just doable it is a was extremely hard really. Is telling doctors is one of the hardest things to do why were they saying? Well, first of all, it is baby very hard to even speak to a doctor they are being shielded. Their time is very valuable. Office managers are trained not to let anyone talk to them to protect the doctor from people walking in selling them stuff shirt them. Secondly, they many didn't want to give up control over their calendar which has to write. We ask them to post times that a patient could book into it and it was just a far fetched idea for many of them the patients would actually do this. So he got a lot of knows he got a lot of knows. He'd go there and he just simply not leave until he got a chance to speak to the doctor and a few times. It was even escorted out by security. I really think one in a million could have put this off. I mean was he going to particular kinds of doctors or was he generally focused on an Internet general? Practitioners Ob sobe began with dentists Okay. Because our thinking was that. People go to dentists most often, and we wanted to make sure that we have an offering that is relevant for patients as often as possible. I. Got you so so eventually unassuming, you do get what six to ten or how many did you get by September of two thousand seven Eight. In the meantime, you inequity doing the back end stuff you were doing the coding and building the website does right and as you were building it. How did it look? So. The bit that Nick Build looked awesome for the time I think. It was impressive. We were. Very. Satisfied that we had a scroll bar that we had a map that we had back then already the insurance selector and a lot of feature that. Weren't to be found really anywhere else. All right. So September two, thousand, seven, you are ready to reveal. This service at. Tech. Crunch. And Doth Review present or did did Cyrus kind of wishy the spokesperson? Cyrus. I presented Nick stayed behind in New York to make sure that the less the website was actually up and running This is in San Francisco that you went to the we flew out to San Francisco and So we lost sock talk in front of Eight, nine, hundred people. A lot of them were journalists when the judges opened up with feedback guy covers ocoee who we newnan in valued. As embezzles forever apple he came out to said he he didn't get it. He would never use this in front of everyone right and. His direct load something like honestly Oh, it just never occurred to me to go to any doctor that's really burned in in my brain and what was worse is that he seemed to be right we didn't get a single booking. We were hoping that this PR would get us out of our initial batch of users, right because your other. So many tech journalists there. So you know the publicity may be would would would lead to bookings and that was the hope but. It actually took three days before regard our first legitimate a patient, and and in the entire first month, we only got five bookings. You come back from San Francisco and. You know you had Guy Kawasaki. Say I don't I would never use this service? I'm sure he feels differently today but man maybe then Ezio said that but did did you come back feeling like like dejected like losers or or were you excited like how did you feel coming back? While you know I think we obviously hoping we would eventually get more bookings and In the beginning you probably refreshed. The Bookings Report Hundred Times a day by as we were thinking through what we realized. It was really a typical two sided marketplace challenge It's just a classic chicken and egg problem. You need the supply to get the demand and you need the demand to entice them supply and for dark was even trickier. Right when you think about it, healthcare is hyper local. Very complicated. So you have to match. Supply and demand on a Zip code specialty level, and then we have thousands of insurances take. Until we realized that our odds of actually finding a patient that wanted. An offer there. Quite low, and so the best path forward was to methodically build up supply, and so we just kept going put up a huge map of Manhattan on the wall, and then a sleep put little flags on of where the doctor's brother we're on the website in which insurance is accepted and we just we knew the perseverance. Is the name of the game. Back in just a moment how oliver and Cyrus Begin to drum up interest in stock and how they even start to raise some money at figure out how to dress differently, stay with us guy rows and you're listening to how I built this from NPR. Hey everyone. Just a quick thanks to our sponsors who helped make this podcast possible I to epic provision maker of epic bar beef was nature's idea the epic bar was. The new Vif Sea salt and pepper bars have three grams total carbs why it's in their nature after all, they're made with one hundred percent grass fed beef, and nature's Metro's three grams, total carbs, eleven, grams of protein find them in the bar borrow or at epic Bar Dot Com. Thanks also to stand for Small and American Express. If you're a small business owner head to stand for small dot com slash partner for resources, offers and tools from a growing group of companies that want to help your business get back to business visit stand for small dot com slash partner to get started. Thanks also to Microsoft, the world has changed and Microsoft teams is there to help us stay connected teams is the safe and secure way to chat, meet, call and collaborate to learn more visit Microsoft dot com slash teams. Here, at life, we know that getting your financial house in order can feel painful. Now, there's this whole corona virus pandemic. The deal with our personal finance tuneup series will help you feel more confident and get you on the right track listen and subscribe to NPR's Life Kit. And just a reminder, you can preorder the how I built this book right now, and if you do I'll send you a free signed book plate to go inside the book. The book is a collection of insights and wisdom from some of the most incredible and inspiring makers, inventors, builders, and dreamers on earth to preorder and to get your free signed book plate while supplies. Last, please go to Guira DOT COM or how I built this dot. com. Hey welcome back to how I built this from NPR Cairo's. So it's two, thousand, seven and Oliver. Cyrus. Nick are basically powering through with Zach dock going door to door trying to convince doctors. It's a valuable service and the thing about doctors even though they're really smart and capable and we depend on them. A lot of their offices especially back in two, thousand, seven or sort of technologically in the Stone Age. There was incredibly complicated to sink the doctors calendars with ours. Because none of the software was actually made to sink. Were even in the places where we had syncs up and running, we would frequently get. Feedback while the punishment didn't happen because the doctor wasn't available and we really couldn't figure out why this was the case because when we did screen chairs with the office to their calendar and and our calendar, it was identical right and couldn't figure out why that's happening. So I decided to sit next to the office manager I went there and got to know him and his family photos of his dog. I fixed the printer taught a better strategies to play minesweeper still couldn't figure it out. Until one day, the doctor would come out and she'd say, Hey David I'm out next Friday. And then what does David do does he go into the calendar and block out next Friday or does he take a post? It note On a doctor out next Friday and sticks this too is monitor. In the real world. These post it notes, of course happen and but once you know that Matthew Friend, you can start filtering this out and that's one example they were literally a thousand point, one percent solutions that we had to figure out to make this work. Wow. That sounds I'm getting exhausted. Just hearing about that because this is like even like Google calendars, right? Yeah. Yeah. That was that was early days and what we were extremely focused around were making show the experience was fantastic. If something went wrong, we fix it. Right. So I was our customer service I personally would call the doctor and and confirmed the appointment was all said if it wasn't I, personally contact the patient to let them know and then I would offer them. Amazon Gift Card alongside with an apology those actually one case where it didn't catch a patient in time. and. The were in the subway to the doctor, and so I raised them to the doctor's office and picked up a bouquet of flowers on the way there and met them in person to apologize. And that was really a turning point burs. The service has to work and we need to be have this patients I attitude in in terms of how it works completely ingrained in the company. All right. So you clearly need to kind of grow this Were you offering this service doctors for free at the time? Initially. We for free by we eventually started charging fifty dollars per month. But Sam doctor you come into my office and you say, Hey, if you pay me I can bring you more customers. I would be skeptical I would've said to you you who whose, who even knows about you. You'RE GONNA you're asking me to pay you money for Phantom bookings for maybe no customers I mean did some of the doctors say Many. The US summarize our sales challenge. Right? It was very hard because even if you wanted to, we couldn't easily share how many patients their competitors are down the road God like that was something that was confidential. All right. So you are you got this chicken and egg problem. Not, enough people signing up and he gets skeptical doctors but you know that the service could really benefit the doctors, but you also need them to pay for because otherwise you know but business. Meantime at a certain point I'm assuming you guys start to think we'd better go out and look for money if we're going to really make this thing work. Yeah. Yeah. That that happened in the spring of two, thousand, eight we decided we raise series. And we we make the rounds we get in front of a number of the big name, BC New York the also go to Sandhill road in impel. Toho Santo Road we leads and road initially were very successful at all we got Polite knows. and. Ray No feedback control someone took us as I told us you know what the idea seems. Good. But you're consultants I'd and the perspective of its consultants can't get anything done and what realized is that even though we had both founded companies before our Mackenzie Pedigree in our keys and button down shirts, they were really hurting us, and so we wait rank Khakis and button down shirts. It sounds crazy. Were they pleaded pants or were they at least nine pleaded please. Yeah Yeah. Yeah we after hearing that feedback We very quickly just went to the next gap and bought jeans and t-shirts and from that on the combos with VC's when but a lot better. So you went from McKinsey consultant look to this are the tech casual uniform of jeans and t-shirts that that's exactly right and we introduced ourselves not as NBA's and McKinsey Consultants but we introduce ourselves previous entrepreneurs that are starting their next company. was was anyone biting? Were there people who were like? Yeah there's a great idea I'm in. So interesting enough we had raised some money from. Friends and colleagues, and many of those they invested in US business plan unseen just based on the fact that we. Were giving up our careers at McKinsey to pursue talks. So that felt really a great. and. As we started changing how we appeared in how we introduced ourselves to venture capitalists L., we started to get offers and so in August of two thousand eight, we ended up raising five million from KHOSLA ventures expeditions mark. Wow Mark Banya Jeff bezos, and Venus is. All their. Funds are in which sounds like a lot before you WanNa do it's actually. Kinda limited because you still it seems to me in two thousand eight even though you have five million dollars a lot of money you still have this problem which is you've gotta get. Customers, and then to get customers, you need lots of doctors had lots of options but to get doctors, you need lots of customers booking through the site to you do that precisely D- These five million dollars per lily earmarked for making New, York, work, right, Miguel, I market work but. immediately after raising the money the financial crisis hit. And You may remember there was rest in peace a memo that went around about startups, right? Yes. About start ups, never being able to raise money arrested in peace good times. So we got this job is to make the money stretch in. We probably learn not during this time This was really our first go round making hard choices and what I want to be frugal and not to do things we can't afford and We learned to not let money replace critical, thinking and creativity. But now we continued to grind away at New York and at some point felt while if you want to get. To the next level we have to prove. Dr Isn't just a New York City phenomenon. Right? We had to prove that it would work in a second city But at that point, we didn't have the money to do this anymore, and by the way you're still your approach was still the same. It was door to door. That's right door to door and how how you building awareness about the about the fact Zach existed with customers with potential customers. So we it was day very difficult to get someone. To the website. Yeah but when they did. They loved it because it was such a step change from how healthcare used to work for him. Right they used to have to pick up the phone and wait on hold and then plays scheduling. tetris. With the office manager, can you do Wednesday morning about Thursday noon? Friday afternoon, and now they could do the same thing in a minute and have complete overview about the ability patients loved it and they told their friends. So we we started to get word of mouth. Going, and so we saw New York really taking up and we felt like, okay, this does this go into work in New York. At a minimum rate, but we also realized that it took us a fair bit of time. And money to get it going. In New, York and do we couldn't with the money we had left from the five million easily expanded into a new city at the same time. Raising money was going to be difficult because the next generation of investors wanted to see that it works and other cities as Walter. So we were a little bit in this catch twenty, two we ended up. Applying to. Force boost Your Business Competition Four. Forbes has his competition as sell to where they give away money right to they were promising a hundred thousand dollar prize. And at this time. We won. And Yeah what did is they gave us one of these large publishers. Clearinghouse is sex and very useful actually used to cover a hole in one in our only conference room. There was a hole in the wall and we covered it with that. At, this point you are, you are working out of an office, not not an apartment at this point we were working out of A. Shared Office space we work. Yeah. So they had given us publisher clearing house is is check but they fail to give us the small check for three months and we were getting really nervous, but it would still get it but. But ultimately, we got that one hundred thousand dollars and that's what we used to launch and our second market in DC in Washington DC and would did it require you guys to move down there or were you did you hire because I'm assuming you had to? A lot of your early capital was going into sales. Business Development hiring sales reps, is that right? Right, we had a couple of sales reps at the time. A. Very first employee ever was a sales rep is still with the company today and He was great. He figured out how to. Really charm his way. To the doctor. So there were no more security guards escorting anyone out. When did you? I'm assuming that even in two, thousand, nine, two, thousand, ten, and beyond we're not yet profitable. Far From It? Yeah. Far from it right because it's a capital intensive business. Yes. We obviously invested heavily in customer service wanted patients to have a great experience. And we had a quite sizable engineering team because that was actually a major engineering effort. So what started to happen when did you start to kind of see? A real turning point. Yeah. So we we we had launched New, York successfully with. Years. Of hardwork, we've gotten it off the ground is transported that to DC at work well, in DC, and now he said, well, why are we not in more cities and so we actually we raised serious be with fouled respond and We used to expand off the East Coast Francisco then Chicago and we just got better better at it. So we then ended up raising serious and two thousand eleven from Goldman NTSC, and we primarily use this to grow our sales team and sign up more more doctors in from two thousand eleven till two thousand, thirteen, we launched roughly thirty new cities I read that by by two thousand, fourteen would covered. Like forty percent of markets in the US, which is huge I mean that's right I mean that's a huge number of cities. And in that year evaluation. Of tzakda. Past Billion Dollars I mean that's That's pretty remarkable i. mean you were kind of on this like really rapid trajectory and you a pretty straightforward model right and you were charging doctors a flat fee every year and then. They could take all the bookings they wanted and I think that by that point like by two thousand, fourteen knew it was not cheap. It was expensive viewed really raised the price it was like three thousand dollars a year, right? Something like that. Yes recharged Dr Three thousand dollars a year and and there was a flat fee. No matter. How many bookings Actually facilitated for them and and the reality was for some doctors that got a lot of bookings that was a great deal. Yeah. But but there were also doctors that God a lot fewer bookings and for them that fixed cost was actually too expensive and some of them were starting to leave the service, and so we got into a situation that required us to invest a lot to stay where we are and then invest even more to continually grow our overall provider base, which means we had to build out a massive sales team to always sign up more doctors right and. Some point during this time L. Nick actually ran an analysis showed that it would take several years if ever fries to make our money back on on many of the doctors we signed up because you would have to sign up. X number of hundreds of thousands of doctors paying that amount every year. To make your money back to to make sort of our the cost of the sales team back. Wow and L. it. This was pure that would make us dependent on external capital for our very long time, and now it's a clearly there are many companies that have taken. Grow fast at all costs approach. And They Held onto this forty extended period of time by L., it clearly puts talking to a dependency to. Investors in their mind says, yeah. So. Meantime. You know I I from what I understand. There's disagreements I mean there there are you know the leadership team including Cyrus he he's I. Think he's he's sort of his position as the flat fee model is actually the best way to go is that a fair assessment of of his position? Yeah. I think that's right. I. Mean there were two fundamentally divergent ways held the business could go forward right. One way was to continue to work on optimizing the unit economics of our subscription model and the other way was to think about how to make it more transformative leap and then find a new more profitable. And more sustainable model and. Their. Look I can certainly understand The reluctance and taking this leap if companies rechange their underlying business model once they have a certain scale and then live to tell about it, right. We know the names of the companies that have done this net flicks, but from DVD's to streaming adobe. From box software to the cloud, but there's not a lot of companies that do that. and. Needed to make a choice which which direction I wanted to go. And and I should say over that. Became intensely personal for you because hugh and Cyrus really disagreed on on on the direction of the company should take. Steps down he he left the company and you moved into the role of CEO. Those right and what ask you about this neo. Beauty's in the flies of this show is its simplicity and we talked to one person or sometimes too. It's a single narrative, and so we don't have cyrus with us to tell us what happened but I wanna ask you about this time because. This was your co founder. This was your partner This is your friend and he was leaving the company. How did you feel at that time? I all I can say was a very hard and very emotional period for everyone involved and It was certainly a departure But how was through that given these two divergent choices you you couldn't. note, both of us could be useful to talk and. I have to imagine that for for period. China. was sort of the friendship. Look been we were very close we. Were not only friends we had worked for eight years believe together fourteen hours a day, and we probably talked more to each other than to anyone else in our lives but you know. Still touch from time to time and. I think he's joining us on from sideline. He still at prison million owner of the company Yeah, he's still. Here's the thing I mean we've we've told stories about breakups we've had we've had episodes were there were married couples who split divorced but continued the business e O products. Susan Griffin Black and an her husband Brad They continued the business stacy's pita chips continue the business after the divorce sold it for a quarter billion dollars. You guys were worth value to one point eight billion dollars at this point. was was ever party that just thought you know, God look at what we're doing on the core we're going and. I mean did you in service it down and say you know this thing is just growing and? Let's just figure this out. I think the challenge is that it's not as if there was an article way to decide what the right path forward is. As long as investors wanted to give us money growing all costs was yeah. Fine Strategy. The question was just how dependent you wanted to be on the continued goodwill of investors. It sounds like you were tired of going out raising money. You didn't want to do that anymore. Oh, not at all but I think you want to raise money from a position where you know what your turn to is and and. It wasn't clear that the business model would work in in a way that that we could just flip a switch and be profitable. Yeah. So. That was a tough year for you. Two, thousand fifteen. There was an article in business I think business insider, and it was about the sales team. It's October that year and it was. It was some allegations that you know Pete member sales team using adderall even cocaine they were under immense pressure. They were working all the time when you saw that article. And I'm not saying you even aware of any of this. You may not even aware of it but I. have to think that that article really alarmed you and and maybe even embarrassed you. Look A. There were a number of articles in two thousand fourteen fifteen. Didn't absolutely get everything, right but Budweiser I can say is that At. The time doctor had their sales team and we're. Getting very quickly and Your maybe maybe. Too focused on. L. Hitting targets and. Not. Focus enough on creating a strong culture the I hear these stories from six years ago from from time to time and from from now from candidates and and really every time. This happens like a Gut Punch. Because, this we know we're completely different company now. On on so many levels, but clearly, you saw that in new that you had to change something. While yes, I look I l there's a there's a couple of things about this. Right? We are a technology company, but we had said ourselves up too much about. Instead of writing wins and really too little about being adaptable and darning and and building the trust required to try things that now pet the risk of failure. and. So one of the first things I did is to change core values. You know to emphasize those behaviors each one of our values adaptable, not comfortable and other one is progress before perfection learners before masters right and. We only kept really one DIA CONSTANT DEL patients I. Personally that. That was more of the culture that I thought was right for Doc to succeed on many dimensions. So, you take over the company it's got high valuation, but you're still not making money and you know that you've gotta change the underlying business model you're never gonNA make money. And from what I understand this is the beginning of what you have internally described as the second founding of the company. That is right. That is right and that basically happens in in two thousand, eighteen you you launch this new business model where instead of the the dollar membership fee. Basically, you would charge doctors a lot less like two hundred or three hundred bucks, but then every booking you, you would take a cut from that booking. So like a travel agency. A little bit charge for new patient booking. So the existing patients to practice we made free but yes, there was the fundamental idea and. It sounds like such an obvious thing to do but but here's the problem with it and why why are we thought it was incredibly risky to try this. Our best customers that had been on for a long time. They got lots of pockets right and if we start charging them per bookings, their prices go up very significantly in some cases ten times more and that seemed. Competing, insane to us. In. Particular because when we talked to other companies that were at gone through similar changes and even pricing experts, they're number one advisor was make sure whatever you do never charged your best customers more and frost would be precisely. The opposite. In the thing that was counter-balancing this in our mind was well, maybe we'd be able to bring on a lot more doctors because the barrier to entry is now much lower that was there was the back and forth in the team to figure out whether that's the path we want to want to go. So, this is still a risky strategy because you're depending really on new bookings because the two hundred dollar annual fees dramatically lower and I have to imagine in year one, you actually saw drop in your revenue in the year one of of this curve. Second founding. Right. Well, it's from a risk profile worth at that. Right the warriors that you lose all your best customers in with it, all the bookings day used to be getting. and. So we needed to be ready for a very significant drop in bookings and revenue and the second Challenge was here that. The beauty of this approach modest and we got all this money upfront right and Sharon. Now to bond, we're getting paid after the booking with with a thirty day payment periods, we had a huge working capital requirement to make that happen. So did you see a drop and revenue in two thousand eighteen when you rolled this out? No we didn't because we actually didn't see the doctors leave the way that we hit on -ticipant did in fact, you know while we had very much worried that they would be upset and some of them certainly were upset. We were providing so much value to them that. You know what? What took you. So long I knew as getting a great deal all along. So that worked really well, and we had piloted in Georgia initially in April. Two thousand eighteen and then that had worked. So we we then all allowed in Colorado a few weeks later that work to, and from there we went to Washington state and again, very positive results and after these three days. Okay Great. We know this works does it out in our largest most important market? Let's go to New York and that and terribly horribly wrong. They the doctors in New York. Not only were so pissed off they actually I read. mounted a change dot org. Petition I. Don't know what to to to end this practice or something. They were really mad. They were really really mad and I guess you guys responded you said, are we won't we won't roll this out in New York for a while. Yeah look in New York. We. Facilitate Roughly, one in five new patient doctor relationship in the entire city on dock and so. The economic impact for the providers in. was much greater than for the providers in Georgia Colorado Washington. So yes, to give you one example, there's a dermatologist and so and he paid under the ultimate model ten doctor say paid thirty thousand dollars and under the new pricing model, his cost was going to go up from thirty thousand dollars to roughly three hundred, forty, thousand dollars. Wow. So what was your response to that? I? Mean it seems like a pretty reasonable. Concern. Yeah. So look after the conversation with the Dermatologists I. Actually. Put down the phone and I thought you know what? He's right. And so I pause and we regrouped and. We did a couple. Of things during this time, like the first one is we just went on a listening tour. You know we talked to provide their feedback and we just adjusted our this plan to give providers a much longer grace period to decide whether the wants to addition to the new model or not, and then. So then we read on New York six months later and and when dramatically better. So the strategy works and you see results from the strategy pretty quickly like within a year. Within a year, we had we finally at some incredible momentum was really going better than we had expected in our wildest dreams. Our existing client went down to essentially zero. I mean people still retire and and move jobs by no one really left the service and we were adding more and more providers because the barrier to entry was low and So in two thousand, nineteen we began growing profitably. It sounds like two thousand and nineteen was really the banner year. Two thousand nine hundred was a was a fantastic year and honestly we had so much momentum coming into twenty twenty and feel like, Hey, we worked really hard for three years and profitable and now the sky was the limit until. Tells Sam until March of two thousand twenty. Two Marjo twenty twenty and that's. That's really maybe the third founding DOC right? Well, I want to ask you about March twenty twenty because. Your Business is based on people booking with doctors and going to the doctor I have to imagine your revenues must have plummeted like every other industry like I mean doctors offices are still in most of the country. Slow or are trickle of patients coming in. With the lockdown started happening we saw impersonal bookings declining anywhere between fifty to ninety percent by the end of March I'm not surprised and lot of that buys I was getting was to. Lay off people and make sure that we hunker down to weather the storm but I saw an opportunity to build windmills, right so I thought well, we need to be there for our patients. We should be expanding into telehealth and I need every team member to help me do that and so we. Really went all important and supporting video visits and I'll probably June eighteen began redesigning the tire marketplace support virtual care, and so we actually released. Doctor Video Service and we made this available to. Any. Physician whether they are on soccer. for free. And by the way head, you plan to do this. How long would would I mean I'm imagining if you said in in February district I really want to focus on telehealth Would you have expected that by May would have been ready to go. Absolutely. Not I think what has been really fantastic to see is how? We really finished two years of roadmap in two months. Wow, and it's great because it's just gives us a window on what the next phase of doctor will be and really looking forward to that in my mind were the point were Amazon started from going. Books to also adding CDs. We have just gone from doing only in person to also A. Doing telehealth and I can't wait to see how this unfolds. It sounds like you. Might be reading between the lines but. You. Really, admire and respect your co-founders particularly. Cyrus and the work that he did to to build this company but I wonder if do you think that you will a I dunno, rekindle your friendship i. Is it something that is in the cards because a break is? Is Emotionally, it's hard Mesa really hard. Yeah, look I Do I think we'll work fourteen hours together again maybe not but you know I I've gotten through tougher breakups and reconciled in my past, and so I think we are we're in good shape and honestly know we are meeting were talking from time to time Yeah. We both have things to do and places to be so we're. Not, hanging out all the time. But it's now also five years ago So We are we're merch focused on making our join the baby successful. When you think about your journey and All Its happen to you how much do you think this has to do with? with luck and how much do you think it has to do with with the hard work you put in your your skills. Well I'm going look I I believe that there's really three ingredients to success. In order importance there are lock the talent, then hard work and. The only one. That's comedian. You control his how hard you work right and Now working hard to gives you more shots on goal It helps his day on the top of what you your talent allows and absolutely restarted at the right time the right place. So What what I'm proud of an all that journey has only that yet when we were wrong and when be had to revise and. When we needed the grit to actually make it work. I L we lived up to that and and that's really The all that anyone can ask themselves to. Oliver Karaz co-founder of Zach Braff by the way, remember how they originally wanted to call it physicians dot com or doctors dot. com. COULDN'T AFFORD THE MILLION DOLLAR PRICE TAG to buy the domain name. DOC DOT COM wasn't only available the price they paid for that domain name. Six Bucks. and. Thanks so much for listening to this show this week, you can subscribe wherever you get your podcasts. You could also write to us at H. I. T. at NPR DOT Org. If you want to send a tweet, it's at how I felt this or at Cairo's can also follow me on instagram that's at Guy Dot Roz. Our show was produced this week by Jet Anderson with music composed by Tina. Bluey. Thanks also to Julia Carney Candice Limb Neva grant and Jeff Rodgers I'm guy. Roz even listening to how I built this. This is NPR. Black voters play a crucial role for any Democrat who seeks to win the White House but some big devise amongst that block and some serious influence

Cyrus Masumi Mckinsey New York L. Nick Germany Starbucks Oliver Karaz Partner Office Manager United States Dot Com Doctors Dot Com Co-Founder Amazon Zach Dock Manhattan Middle East Sarah SAM Co Founder Iran
A Pediatricians Guide to COVID-19 and Cellular Resilience with Dr. Elisa Song

Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

06:21 min | Last month

A Pediatricians Guide to COVID-19 and Cellular Resilience with Dr. Elisa Song

"Welcome to the broken marine podcast where we dive deep into the topics of neuro plasticity epigenetics, mindfulness, functional medicine mindset, and more. I'm your host droid and each week my team, and I bring on a new guest who we think can help you improve your brain health feel better and most importantly live more. This week's guest is Dr at Lisa Song Dr. Song is an integrative pediatrician pediatric. Functional Medicine expert and most importantly Amama in integrative pediatric practice whole family wellness she's helped thousands of kids get to the root causes of their health concerns and help their parents understand how to help their children drive both in mind body and spirit Dr Song as taught around the world on integrative pediatrics topics for multiple podcasts in summits including functional medicine Australia Bio Circles, Australia integrative medicine, and mental. Health Institute for Functional Medicine A for 'em and a lot of other really incredible institutions, organizations that the song created healthy kids happy kids in online holistic pediatric resource to help practitioners in bridge the gap between conventional in integrative pediatrics within evidence-based pediatrician backed approach Dr Song Thank you for being here on the broken brain podcast. Thank you for having me. It's an honor to be here with. You and your audience, and I wanNA give you just like a massive dose of gratitude because for so many of my friends I don't have kids, but I want to get educated on his many of these topics as possible not just as a podcast hosts in a community leader because I wanNA learn for myself in the future. This is probably not the last pandemic that will ever go through. Talk about help for Awhile Joe royle knock on wood. But I do want to say that for so many in the community right now you are the voice. Of Reason, you are the voice of really helping people understand what's real what we don't know because there's a lot of what we don't now and you've run so much peace to so many families. So thank you for your incredible work and I know it's a team effort. You know your husband, your kids the whole team over there that's helping out but really utilize. Knowledge you for that. Thank you that means so much to me. Yeah, absolutely, also I want to check in because in addition to use servicing your online community and your patience. Your family you've been very vocal about this has had first-hand experiences with Cova nineteen and we're gonNA talk about that. But I just WANNA check it on a human human level. How're you doing during these times? You know I mean it's crazy times everybody. My son and daughter for those of you who follow me they actually contracted co bid on. I mean really it was about a week after we wanted to quarantine. So we all went to quarantine from school Friday, the thirteenth, and then maybe seven to ten days later my daughter got sick cough fever search you have a little trouble breathing. Thought well, this can't be Kovic she's been in quarantine right? We haven't been in contact anybody in as far as I knew there was nobody at school who had had covid Right, around that time when quarantine was happening, I had a little bit of a sore throat and a headache nothing major but I did my usual kind of functional. Medicine Integrative Medicine dosing that I do and I get sick and I teach families. My husband had something similar but we we were fine then a week after Kenzi got sick she recovered ten days fever cough you know not feeling well little bit alot ish tonight a similar. She got maybe about ninety four, ninety, five percents but that's literally on Day ten. It was like the switch flipped she she bounced back and she was completely like nothing ever happened. A few days later, my son starts to get a fever and I'm like, oh no, it's going on here. Right at the time. Remember early in the days of the pandemic testing was really not available I mean that available. Right so but then even more. So I managed to get a swab and do swab my child, which is not fun experience and the Senate to quest four days later it came back negative. Okay. Maybe she caught something. Weird, right Then when Bodey start to get, he had a fever and stomach ache his tummy was hurting him so much that was his symptom and that in the fever little bit a sore throat and so I thought and even back then the early days remember we we know so much more about covid nineteen than we did back in. February march and remember this is March back in the early days we still have so much word learn right but abdominal pain was kind of maybe a symptom maybe not subdue might. So I'm thinking maybe he's got a stomach flu but in the back of my mind, I, think, okay this has to be Govan. So he he then so developing abdominal pain fever really bad headache a little bit of a cough. He started seeing things and hearing things, which is really frightening He sought a wall. Yeah. He had auditory visual hallucinations. He heard voices in his room. He would see the wall moving in and out and kind of scary people in front of him. Here's H-. You really mean people saying I mean he he said he was embarrassed to tell but really bad words right? Like you know words you wouldn't use in polite conversation and so and then he got a rash on his face and pink guys, right Thank goodness back. Then the really weren't reports of this Kawasaki Like Disease Right. Multi-system. Inflammatory Syndrome associate with children. Because if I had known about this phenomena I think I would even more freaked out than I already was right but his oxygen levels dropping he did go to about eighty eight percent at which time I did bring him to the ER. Now I was low dam up with all the supplements that I had researched. You know for Kobe nineteen both preventatively am for support. Active Illness and I fully one hundred percents. We're GONNA talk about some of the things that I did but that the interventions that I was able to do for him through the through the research really helped him to bounce back very quickly.

Fever Medicine Integrative Medicine Health Institute For Functiona Abdominal Pain Functional Medicine Dr. Song Joe Royle Community Leader Cough Visual Hallucinations Govan Cova Headache Inflammatory Syndrome Kenzi Kobe Illness Senate Bodey
7,000 children test positive for Coronavirus in Florida

Squawk Pod

04:16 min | 2 months ago

7,000 children test positive for Coronavirus in Florida

"Eight thousand number of cases confirmed in the United States a new record and seven thousand, the amount of children who have now tested positive in the state of Florida alone since March Dr Scott. GOTTLIEB is the former FDA commissioner now a CNBC contributor he joins us once again Dr Gottlieb's good to see you. Let's begin with these cases of children in the state of Florida. How alarming is this? What does it tell us about? The age groups now that are susceptible to getting this virus. Well we always knew children were susceptible. The belief is that they're less susceptible than adults, so they're less likely to contract the virus than adults and that when they do get the virus, they're less likely to have a bad outcome. Data seems to support that, but they're not impervious to the virus. They do get sick. They get infected and we have seen some bad outcomes in. In children, we also don't know what it looks like. When this virus becomes epidemic in children, we don't know how many kids have actually had corona virus. There aren't any good seroprevalence studies to look for antibodies and kids to see what the exposure has been in children, and it might be the case that a smaller percentage of kids in the United States have had this infection. Infection at this point in adults on a relative basis, because the very first thing we did when we had these epidemics was closed the schools, and so that that closed off an avenue of spread, and I would venture to guess that parents with school age children were probably more here into the at home, mortars, wearing masks good hygiene because they were doing those things to protect. Protect kids, so might be the case that a smaller percentage of kids have actually been exposed, and so we don't know what it looks like. When this becomes epidemic and children in the same way for example, flu becomes epidemic and children every year, if the virus outbreak stays at the current pace. Are we going to be able to send our kids to school in the fall? I don't think so in the south. I mean if they don't if they don't correct the situation and they don't have a lot of time to do it in states like Texas. Georgia Alabama California Florida Arizona. It's going to be very hard for local school. Districts parents on boards of local school boards to make decisions to open those schools I think in the northeast we will be able to open schools in the north I. Think Parts of Northern California San Francisco be able to open a schools. We should really try do that. There should be an emphasis on doing that because we might be in a situation where we have to close the schools again later on. On in the school year, getting kids back to school socializing them, get him started on classroom learning. If we have to go to distance learning on a selective basis as outbreaks occur, it's going to be really important to get them back into the classroom. At least for a period of time, I think a lot of states in the south really have lost the opportunity do that because they have to make those decisions and July those schools open in August in many in many cases, and so they're probably going to start the year with schools closed in a lot of parts to those states. Do we know anymore Dr Leave about that syndrome that had been affecting. Growing numbers of children and we haven't talked about frankly in six weeks to two months. So there was a really good analysis studying published in the New England Journal of Medicine about two days ago that I would encourage people to take a look at that gives sort of a qualitative assessment of ninety nine cases in New York City, it appears to be opposed by real syndrome that occurs about a month after the virus. What we still don't know is what is the total number of kids who had the virus? We know how many kids had. This syndrome appears to be sort of a post. Viral Inflammatory Syndrome could be quite severe sort of like a Kawasaki Type Syndrome. When you get inflammation of arterial vessels it could. It could have disturbances heart. It's treatable, but we don't know how. Many kids are in effect with corona virus, so we're seeing one hundred cases, and there's been one hundred thousand kids infected, or we seeing one hundred cases there. There's only been five thousand ten thousand kids. In fact, it's probably the case that a lot of kids have had this new. New York City and it's a low incidence event and you do see these similar post viral types of syndromes with other viruses including corona virus, where you also see it on rare occasions, a Kawasaki Type Syndrome, with other forms of Corona virus, and so when you see these epidemics, viruses enter a virus echo virus sort of move through population. You will see a month later three weeks later. A preponderance of these post viral kinds of syndromes, so this isn't that unusual in many respects. We just don't know what the incidences of

United States Dr Gottlieb New York City Florida Kawasaki Type Syndrome Cnbc Dr Scott Commissioner New England Journal Of Medicin FDA Northern California Texas San Francisco Arizona Georgia Alabama
Dallas - 4 Children Treated for Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome (MIS-C) at Cook Children’s

KRLD News, Weather and Traffic

03:16 min | 4 months ago

Dallas - 4 Children Treated for Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome (MIS-C) at Cook Children’s

"Info continues to come in about this new syndrome it's called multi system inflammatory condition cook children's Medical Center for says it's now treated for cases in kids kids Dr Dr Leanne Leanne so so hands hands a a local local expert expert in in internal internal medicine medicine yes yes initially initially there there was was you you know know some some kind kind of of relief relief that that at least children didn't seem to be acquiring severe forms of corona virus unlike influenza where kids can get very very sick and tend to be affected more severely than ten young adults however and financially out of out of New York and then now there's four parts popping up around the country there's this this inflammatory condition it's also known as California's disease our children can get can get quite ill with kind of a systemic illness not not similar to what doctor crying with with with mostly you know pulmonary and infections cardiac issues and and kidney issues California's either behaves somewhat differently in the fax shows up in the skin and can cause kind of a multi park and because systemic inflammatory response where kids can get quite ill it does appear to be affecting a very small minority of kids to get infected with chronic virus there still certain there's still still good data that the majority of kids that acquire coronavirus or either mildly symptomatic or or completely asymptomatic the the concern though is that even the kids that are that are either a symptomatic or mildly symptomatic are still potentially spreaders of the disease to others the and here's the thing that parents really kind of need to just be on the lookout for the strange rash unexplained fevers and kids and you know can consultation with their pediatrician if they're concerned about the potential issues as well as knowing that that child can be infectious even if they're mildly symptomatic so this syndrome that they're calling MSI C. is it the same as Kawasaki's disease or is it just similar to it yet it appears to just be similar to it you know and subscribe to the fore in any of the prior coronaviruses but it behaves very similar to what we call California's disease I think there's a lot more that's going to be learned over the next you know few months about this condition and but you're given that everything is very new and they weren't really describing it as condition and in China or or Italy in two months early countries are affected before the United States got hit hard with those with the disease and is it a highly contagious we don't know yet I mean coronavirus yes it's highly contagious and either if these kids are still talking positive by and PCR naval club and then they are likely still to be to be contagious but they're not they're more contagious than than anyone else that has cover nineteen it's unknown but but overall this virus appears to be highly constructively and so

Medical Center
"kawasaki" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

05:12 min | 4 months ago

"kawasaki" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Of being in shock so the connection the connection in having this this this Kawasaki with the corona virus definitely puts the kids and and and I guess you could say more peril than it if without the corona virus definitely yeah what does the blood pressure problems that we see so what's your feeling about going I sending kids back to school in the fall well you know I didn't look at the numbers are what they are and it couldn't back you know I'm better area we've had you know let's call it even a hundred and fifty cases even if it's double that if you think about the number of kids that live in the metropolitan area it's still a really tiny percentage in of all of the kids so it's it's not like a rampant disease it is important to diagnose it early so it can be treated but you know every kid that has a fever doesn't necessarily have this and we're not paying for parents not to be attentive we want them to be attentive to the look for all the other findings and all who their kids acting right yet they're not super irritable or you know with the logic in some way we we think their sector and clearly if the fever and done re knitting for a couple of days then I think that they should really be seen medically by that person now on that note about children in the fall in school the mayor here in the city today announced that these men are alarming drop in children's vaccinations it down sixty three percent this has nothing to do a corona virus just the normal vaccines right people are afraid to go to hospitals unless you absolutely have to how you going to convince parents and grandparents to bring their children and grandchildren in for their round of vaccinations yeah that's you know Walker added that that is the key question because that's the perfect thing literally hundreds of thousands of children and we do that the national you know it's not true here in New York interestingly I was actually on a call yesterday with the budget directors from other children's hospitals around the country everybody reporting the same thing and interestingly we getting the first immunization done in the baby because we're the mandate that the baby come back it was there and it could very early vaccine and so I bring them in that will really work really really worried about it not only that group but the old the kids who need there later vaccine is even a much lower percentage so we're trying to get the word out through pediatrician through community groups to school I mean you just you guys you know being on the radio and having someone like me say these words and tell parents it's gonna be safe you know to get back to your pediatrician's office and get your kids vaccinated he is a much bigger worried me then the worry about getting this Kawasaki like do the right I wish we can have you on for a couple hours we we definitely would love to have you back we can check in with you not just about the children's perspective but about somebody a perspective from somebody who's had on this coronavirus and also we're always ask about the antibodies the antibodies what's the latest with that but we'll talk to you another time hopefully addresses and thank you so much Dr Charles schline he is the senior vice president Cohen children's Medical Center and just a great guy we appreciate you taking the time out of your busy day to join its records and Juliet now you know with all the talks about the vaccine the president commented about that yesterday the pursuit to fast track for a vaccine we hadn't even thought about just the normal vaccination cycle as the mayor here aptly correctly noted faction nations city wide and sixty three percent has nothing to do with corona virus we know it may be difficult to get people when a vaccine eventually is created for corona virus to come in and take that he will gonna be terrified of watching I actually talked with a a doctor about this and we mentioned this a few weeks ago what the doctors themselves and to do doctors offices they need to set up their offices and set up their appointments so that you have the healthy kids come in in the morning to get their updated shots their wellness and then you have the the kids who may have corona virus or for you know sicker kids come in in the afternoons so you have to help the kids in the morning after they've already cleaned and everything is gonna find out let's do a show to let me stance of our listeners how many of you even if a miracle vaccine would come about let's say towards the beginning of the upcoming year right before the beginning of the year we want to kid GA grandchildren they get this coronavirus vaccine and what is delaying you out there from getting your kids the series of vaccines that they gonna need if there ever get back into school they got to prove that they been vaccinated one eight hundred eight four rate W. ABC that's one eight hundred eight four eight nine two two two download.

Kawasaki
Miami Has Cases Of Pediatric ‘Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome’ Tied To COVID-19

Dave Ramsey

00:22 sec | 4 months ago

Miami Has Cases Of Pediatric ‘Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome’ Tied To COVID-19

"Vegas a children's hospital in Miami reported what could be one of the first cases in Florida of a rare inflammatory syndrome affecting some kids with the corona virus both kids are in the pediatric ICU but showing signs of improvement New York state's also seeing more cases of this mysterious syndrome affects blood vessels and organs and as symptoms similar to the Kawasaki disease and toxic shock

Miami Florida Kawasaki Disease Vegas New York
COVID-19: What You Need To Know

COVID-19: What You Need to Know

06:04 min | 4 months ago

COVID-19: What You Need To Know

"This is an ABC news special. Kobe nineteen what you need to know here is. Abc News correspondent. Aaron Katersky as this school year nears an end. Parents wonder about the start of the next academic year. We'll schools welcome kids back. What will the classroom look like or will there still be online? Learning the answers dependent part. On what the virus does to kids and how kids transmit the virus. The World Health Organization said over the weekend that children appear to be less capable of spreading corona virus than adults. The comment came from the. Who's chief scientist? Sumio Swaminathan who appeared on the BBC? What we have seen in countries where schools remained open is that they have not been big outbreaks in schools and where there have been seen associated with we defense. A lot of people gather not in regular classrooms and it's often been associated with Donald who's had infection and who spread it so it does seem from what we know now that children are less capable of spreading it even if they get infection and certainly are very low risk of getting from the Z's for more on what all of this may mean. We're joined by Dr Edith Bradshaw Sanchez. A pediatrician and professor of pediatrics. At Columbia University. What do you make of her comments here? I think some of the reports that we're seen in the comments that were seeing from the. Who are definitely reassuring. I just want more data so a number of things have gone into into these comments from what I understand and there are countries that have opened schools Germany Denmark Some parts of Canada in those countries are not seeing big outbreaks of covert nineteen in children linked to schools which is reassuring but we just need more data. These countries have also done a variety of things to keep kids safe in school Germany. For example we've rent reports that they are having children self test every four days and given a green sticker to kids test negative and allowing them to walk around the school without a mask on some schools are taking temperature. Some schools have introduced a variety of social distancing in hygiene techniques. So so when we look at this at these reports and we we look at the lack of outbreaks linked to children after they were allowed to go back to school. It is reassuring but we have to remember that there are measures that these countries have taken and that we don't have all of the information yet. Really the bottom line is can. My kids hug their grandparents. Yeah I think that's such an interesting point for a long time and longtime in the cove world is a few months for a long time. We've been thinking about children in terms of the risk that they pose to adults. We've been saying okay. Well my kid goes back to school. Can they? Then come home and bring me the corner virus or bring the current virus to to grandma and GRANDPA if they visit in now. Not only. Is it that that is very much too little consideration? But now we're starting to learn for example that there is a new rare but serious complication of covert nineteen seems to affect children very differently than an affects adults. And now I think that the conversation starting to switch to what is the risk to children themselves from Bo Bo from going back to school. What's the answer? I wish I had it but I just don't know we just don't know there are reports for example right there. There is a report of a child. I believe from England who was in the French Alps and then went home. Was In contact with seventy two people that child himself tested positive for current a virus. None of the seventy two people. He came into contact with tested positive. So that was reassuring but then we had another report of a six month old whose parents had couvert nineteen and the child had to be cared for in the hospital and so they were constantly testing this little baby six months old and he shut the virus at very high levels for sixteen days. The data so far has been mixed in. I think that's why it's so important that we collect more data in children and the NIH as you probably have heard launched a study at the beginning of May to follow two thousand families to try to answer this question. What exactly is the rate of transmission? What exactly is the risk to children because we just haven't been collecting the data yet. Pediatric Multi Symptom Inflammatory Syndrome. What do we make of that? Does it matter whether it specifically connected to cove it as the CDC seems to suggest that it is? I do believe that it is linked to covert nineteen. And I'll tell you why. This new syndrome seems to have some characteristics of Kawasaki disease but it also has some characteristics. Overlap toxic shock syndrome. And I'll explain very very briefly Kentucky Diseases and inflammatory condition. It is cost by inflammation and then the the blood vessels in the body are affected. Ultimately different organs can be affected. The one that we worry about is the heart children present with fever with the red. Is the rash The swollen hands feed swollen. Lymph nodes some of the same symptoms that we are now seeing in this new condition but the difference one of the many differences that we're still learning is that these children were presenting with the new syndrome also seemed to have some of those symptoms from toxic shock. They are very sick when they present to care. They sometimes have low blood pressures and signs that there multiple there's multiple organ systems that are affected. And that doesn't go with Kawasaki. Disease it also here before cove it so we can of spectacularly Why are they testing? Summer testing negative for the antibodies and the virus itself. And that is absolutely puzzling. But I think at the end of the day you just sort of have to take a step back and think okay well. Even if it's not linked terrific can't prove it yet for some of these kids remember them majority are testing positive. And where was this before cove

Abc News Germany Aaron Katersky ABC Kobe Dr Edith Bradshaw Sanchez Bo Bo Kawasaki Disease World Health Organization Sumio Swaminathan Professor Of Pediatrics Kawasaki BBC French Alps NIH Scientist Donald Trump Fever Columbia University
More children sick with rare syndrome, linked to coronavirus.

THE NEWS with Anthony Davis

01:47 min | 4 months ago

More children sick with rare syndrome, linked to coronavirus.

"Encourage social distancing. It Saturday may sixteen. I'm Anthony Davis dozens. More children in the US are reported have developed a rare but potentially lethal inflammatory syndrome that may be linked to corona virus infections. The New York Governor Andrew Cuomo confirmed that at least one hundred children had been diagnosed in the state including three who had died cuomo noted. The illness affects children of all races. And that they may have been exposed to covert nineteen weeks before the syndrome resembles Kawasaki Disease. Authorities said an inflammatory condition of the blood vessels in which children develop high fever rash on the back chest and abdomen bloodshot eyes swollen hands and feet swollen lymph glands and swelling around the mouth and lips. Kawasaki Disease is rare about three thousand. Children are diagnosed with the disease. Each year there are seventy four million children under eighteen in the US. The cause of Kawasaki Disease is not known. Although some research papers have linked it's trigger to viral infection. It was first diagnosed in Japanese children in the nineteen sixties and does not appear to be either contagious or hereditary. According to the American Heart Association like the Corona virus itself. New York City appears to be the early center for infection in the. Us IN

Kawasaki Disease Governor Andrew Cuomo United States New York City American Heart Association Anthony Davis
Coronavirus: CDC warns doctors about inflammation disease in children

Pat McCrory Show w/ Bo Thompson

00:53 sec | 4 months ago

Coronavirus: CDC warns doctors about inflammation disease in children

"Centers for disease control and prevention issuing guidance to doctors on how to recognize cases of a rare life threatening syndrome being found in children apparently linked to the new coronavirus the name of the illness as a mouth full pediatric multi system inflammatory syndrome potentially associated with code nineteen and the CDC is telling doctors what to look for it can mimic the symptoms for toxic shock and Kawasaki disease fever rashes swollen glands and in severe cases heart inflammation and can be found in anyone under twenty one the CDC tells doctors to rule out other illnesses and the children with the condition should also test positive for current infection with the corona virus or for antibodies demonstrating a recent infection more than a hundred cases have been reported in New York state and internationally it's been found in France Italy Spain and Britain in New York Tonya J. powers

CDC Inflammation Tonya J. Powers Kawasaki Disease New York France Italy Spain Britain
Cases Of Mysterious Pediatric Illness Climb To 100 In New York City Alone, Up From 82

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:58 sec | 4 months ago

Cases Of Mysterious Pediatric Illness Climb To 100 In New York City Alone, Up From 82

"Thirty concerns about a sometimes fatal condition which attacks young people infected by covert nineteen governor Cuomo says there have been a hundred and ten cases of this inflammatory illness in people who have or had cold with nineteen right now we have it affecting children from less than one year old so inference to twenty one years old and three people have died the condition is similar to Kawasaki disease which is an inflammation of the blood vessels mayor Blasio this is a deep concern I wanna throw everything we've got added the number of children affected continues to grow it is still in the scheme of things a rare condition but it is something that we take very seriously and we're now on high alert the health department is putting together a weapon are aimed at the city's twenty three pediatric icy use to make sure all doctors have the latest information Roger stern ten ten wins

Cuomo Kawasaki Disease Blasio Roger Stern
Children's Hospital Los Angeles reporting 3 cases of mysterious syndrome in kids linked to COVID-19

Bill Handel

00:34 sec | 4 months ago

Children's Hospital Los Angeles reporting 3 cases of mysterious syndrome in kids linked to COVID-19

"The children's hospital LA have been investigating a possible connection between Kobe nineteen an inflammatory syndrome pediatric cardiologists Dr Jackie's much coverage says something was a bit off during the month of April children's hospital Los Angeles experienced an unusual check in the number of cases of the syndrome that appeared similar to Kawasaki disease they gave it a name pediatric inflammatory multi system syndromes much of it says the kids showed up in April tested negative for covert but then three tested positive for the antibodies she says the syndrome may be a delayed reaction to the corona virus

LA Kobe Dr Jackie Los Angeles Kawasaki Disease
A coronavirus-related disease is now hitting children

Charlie Brennan

06:30 min | 4 months ago

A coronavirus-related disease is now hitting children

"About new development or new word of element I guess I should say it's an inflammation that seems to be linked to covert nineteen in particular doctor they call it pediatric multi system inflammatory syndrome what should our listeners know about this well this is something new and we're really just trying to learn as much as we can as fast as we can about it but a number of children have been identified both in in Europe and in the U. S. who have a very severe illness with a lot of information sometimes the hard is infected sometimes other organs are infected they they can be very sick they require care in an intensive care unit and it seems to have some link to code that although not all of the patients have been positive for coverage so the the symptoms that these kids are experiencing the if they're unusual and that's what's making them stand out and then the possible link to cove it is a secondary issue well I think both things are important we want to understand the nature of the illness itself and of course if it's if it's related to cope with that would be very important to how concerned should our parents in listening audience be well I think they have to keep in mind two things one this is serious mysterious illness but the other is that it it appears to be quite rare at this point we're talking about only probably about a hundred cases or so that have been accumulated from around the world so it does look like it's it's pretty common I need pretty uncommon and for the most part it seems that code in children is a very very mild illness but these did this new condition that you're seen in these one hundred cases it's similar to Kawasaki disease but it is not and I guess that's my point is that this is something unusual that has scented itself at this time so you're trying to see if it has anything to do with cove it yes it has some relationship to what we call callous sake disease we had some relationship to toxic shock syndrome but it seems to be somewhat distinctive really a little different from either of those so we are trying to get a handle on on just what it is by cooling experience around the world and seeing what are the common features among the cases no Dr we are very concerned about code nineteen as a respiratory syndrome or also learning that it seems to affect organs and there's something going on through the internet called cove it tower or something like that where you know people are taking a look at images of disfigured toes as a result of covert nineteen can all that possibly be true yes I think it can be I think this is a virus that has the number affects on the body effect to number of systems early the losses yeah hi causes a severe pneumonia and the and the bad cases but we've learned that it can also affect the kidneys it can affect the heart it seems to cause the tendency to form blood clots sometimes the very sick patients will have blood clots the long that complicate their course and in the case of coded to that may I code the code that may reflect some inflammation of blood vessels in the extremities such as the toes and fingers Dr Mandeep Mehra of Harvard Medical School it was quoted in The Seattle Times and also the Washington post that cove it begins as a respiratory virus and kills as a cardio cardio vascular virus and that's why we're seeing people with cove it with low oxygen levels yet inexplicably conscious still but then suffering from maybe stroke or pulmonary embolism toxic shock damage blood vessels and and skin rashes and is that what we're seeing more and more that it's affecting the cardiovascular system more than we initially thought yes I think that's fair to say I think when we started seeing Kobe cases we thought it was primarily in the bone yard and section of the law but it's clear that these other organs are frequently involved and and especially the bad cases and really contribute to fatal outcomes and in some cases well we've been talking to for almost two months right now about covert nineteen but on Monday in St Louis city and St Louis county some businesses are going to open up malls for example dine in restaurants June first we hear the state's gonna open up casinos all right you're a professor at the wash University school of medicine what are your thoughts about these developments well I do think that the virus is declining in the Saint Louis area not nearly as fast as soon as we would like it to but I think there are a lot of promising signs that we're on the downhill side of things but it's not gone by any means and so we have to be very careful as we start re opening we have to move slowly we have to watch what the outcomes are and be prepared to change course if necessary importantly people have to keep in mind their own risk profile and if a person is elderly specially over sixty five war has serious underlying medical conditions then they need to be particularly careful they probably should not be the ones going out to restaurants or are doing a lot of shopping and and things like that what are your thoughts on schools re opening in the fall you know I think that's a very difficult issue at this point I don't think it's the right time to make a decision R. right now I think we have to see what the course I think it is as we start to open up if things continue to go down it might be possible to cautiously opened schools but if things go the wrong direction we may the right decision making to keep him close I think it is too early right now very important issue in a very

New clues in mysterious illness potentially linked to COVID-19 in children

KNX Morning News with Dick Helton and Vicky Moore

00:27 sec | 4 months ago

New clues in mysterious illness potentially linked to COVID-19 in children

"The CDC is due to issue an alert to doctors this week about a mysterious inflammatory illness in children that may be linked to cove in nineteen CBS is doctor terra Rouleau says it mimics another disease treatment for Kawasaki appears to be effective for these kids and that treatment is IV IG sometimes steroids immune modulators and blood pressure supporting medication so overall if China children develop the syndrome the prognosis seems to be pretty

CDC Kawasaki Terra Rouleau China
3 New York children die from disease similar to Kawasaki

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

01:34 min | 4 months ago

3 New York children die from disease similar to Kawasaki

"New York City has the most cases so it is taking the lead in looking into the inflammatory disease in children which may be related to covert nineteen governor Cuomo remains very concerned about it the mayor as well as Glenn Schuck reports from midtown this morning blind unfortunately this is a pretty serious stuff again here federal officials in fact are preparing an alert for doctors to be on the lookout for conditions affecting kids similar to the Kawasaki disease which causes inflammation in various parts of the body at least three children have died from it here in New York one hundred two cases on all yours Andrew comma it is frightening because the the one good news right was that the children wouldn't be affected by covert and now we see these cases from less than one year old two twenty one years old we lost a five year old boy seven year old boy an eighteen year old girl died from this so now leave the New York state department of health today actually will host a statewide weapon are today in New York City is launching an ad campaign that started last night to educate parents to look for symptoms of this the mayor says it's all part of why we need to go slow to re open we're being very rigorous here we are not going to reopen anything Intel we prove di real data that we've made enough progress to do it safely and then we're going to do it in small careful steps and smarts not just New York Lee fourteen other states have had these cases involving children including Connecticut and New Jersey one shot ten ten wins live here in

New York City Inflammatory Disease Cuomo Glenn Schuck Kawasaki Disease Intel Connecticut New Jersey Andrew Department Of Health LEE
CDC will alert doctors to look out for syndrome in children that could be related to coronavirus

KYW 24 Hour News

00:40 sec | 4 months ago

CDC will alert doctors to look out for syndrome in children that could be related to coronavirus

"The CDC is preparing to release an alert warning doctors to be on the lookout for a mysterious inflammatory syndrome in children that could be like to call the nineteen more states began reporting diagnoses of the central this week but Pennsylvania health secretary Dr Rachel Levine says so far the Commonwealth has been spared to date we have not received any reports but we are actually specifically reaching out to our six children's hospitals to find out more information if they have any of those cases the illness is marked by persistent fever inflammation poor function in one or more organs and other symptoms similar to shock experts say the illness bears some resemblance to a rare condition called Kawasaki disease

CDC Inflammatory Syndrome Dr Rachel Levine Kawasaki Disease Pennsylvania Secretary
As cases rise of rare COVID-linked illness in kids, Cuomo warns much remains unknown

KYW 24 Hour News

00:34 sec | 4 months ago

As cases rise of rare COVID-linked illness in kids, Cuomo warns much remains unknown

"Week to help track that mystery children's illness that is thought to be related to the coronavirus the rare inflammatory illness is now affecting more than one hundred fifty children in the U. S. New York governor Andrew Cuomo for example warns it does not present itself as normal a normal covert case which tend to be respiratory he says this presents as an inflammation of the blood vessels experts say this illness bears some resemblance to a rare condition called Kawasaki disease possibles and at least six states have reported seeing similar

U. S. New York Andrew Cuomo Kawasaki Disease
Up to 5 New York Children Dead, 93 Sickened by Rare COVID-Related Illness

Mark Levin

00:43 sec | 4 months ago

Up to 5 New York Children Dead, 93 Sickened by Rare COVID-Related Illness

"Officials in New York are concerned about a growing number of children who have come down with an inflammatory disorder similar to the rare Kawasaki disease nearly one hundred children across New York state of now presented with this inflammatory disorder while also testing positive for corona virus antibodies at least five have died New York city health commissioner Dr ox years Barbeau said it's very important that parents and doctors recognize the symptoms I'm seniors as well rash and very read it intact I want red swollen lips characteristic it's you know it's a strawberry she said early intervention is critical because drugs have to be given

New York Kawasaki Disease Barbeau Commissioner
"kawasaki" Discussed on AP News

AP News

01:49 min | 4 months ago

"kawasaki" Discussed on AP News

"Of the virus rather than the genetic code of the virus itself quite else's the test can provide an accurate automated response in fifteen minutes the FDA says it expects to authorize more antigen tests in the future Ben Thomas Washington the federal government is sending supplies of the first drug that appears to help speed the recovery of covert nineteen patients to six states from death severe was cleared for emergency use by the food and drug administration last week now the department of health and Human Services says it's delivering three hundred and sixty cases of the antiviral drug one hundred and forty two Illinois one hundred and ten to New Jersey forty to Michigan thirty each to Connecticut and Maryland and tend to Iowa each case contains forty vials of ram disappear state and local health departments will distribute it but HHS says it will go to more critical patients including those on ventilators or in need of supplemental oxygen Ben Thomas Washington New York is investigating the deaths of three children one was five years old all died from a mysterious toxic like shock syndrome linked to the corona virus governor Cuomo cautions this is new and developing but warns parents and doctors to be on the look out for symptoms similar to Kawasaki disease or toxic shock like syndrome at least seventy three children have been seconded Cuomo says the three that died all had covert or the antibodies but those were not the symptoms they showed when entering the hospital this is the last thing that we need at this time with all that's going on with all the anxiety we have a governor also says the state's death toll ticked up to two hundred and twenty six ten more than a day earlier but hospitalizations are down Julie Walker New York thank you for listening to.

FDA Ben Thomas Washington federal government Michigan Connecticut Maryland Iowa HHS New York Kawasaki disease Illinois New Jersey governor Cuomo Julie Walker
"kawasaki" Discussed on KYW Newsradio 1060

KYW Newsradio 1060

02:18 min | 4 months ago

"kawasaki" Discussed on KYW Newsradio 1060

"Symptoms similar to Kawasaki disease or toxic shock like syndrome there's no proof of the virus causes the mysterious syndrome but researchers are looking for a possible connection I'm Sam let's sing more states are lifting restrictions this weekend despite failing to meet White House guidelines for safely re opening doors bonnet Danya Bacchus has more parts businesses animals are starting to re open across the country as a new report shows the devastating impact the corona virus continues to have on the economy after weeks of restrictions most states across the country have started to reopen their economies in California just in time for mother's day the gift of flowers once again a possibility over cloth like almost two months this is like a glory in Tennessee where the Great Smoky Mountains national park reopened with limited capacity people couldn't wait to get outdoors of the more than forty states that have loosened restrictions nearly half have seen an increase in newly reported cove in nineteen cases there are now more than one point three million known infections in the country with the death toll topping seventy thousand the corona virus pandemic has left many supermarket shelves bare and that's why a man from Skippack Montgomery County is so thankful to the managers of the area grocery store for helping him secure the only food his sick wife neat he would have used us because this has the story Kathy leblanc center three suffers from three diseases but she says it's her gastroparesis that has really narrowed what she can consume how does she know what she can eat it's really trial and error it came more to what I could keep down and as the disease progressed it became a lot less products that they could keep down over time she says she's come to rely on one food as her main source of sustenance Dannon wild berry yogurt they all know me as the younger guy hands that's her husband al who had looked all over for the yogurt and eventually he says the folks from Hennings market in Harleysville came up with an arrangement to have them pick up three cases a week Kathy says the first time she saw her husband with all that yogurt she nearly cried at least three boxes of twelve and I looked at him I I kept thinking when we get me when I was trying to place in this and that and straighten it.

Kawasaki disease Danya Bacchus California Tennessee Skippack Montgomery County Kathy leblanc center gastroparesis Harleysville Kathy White House Great Smoky Mountains Hennings
"kawasaki" Discussed on Leadership and Loyalty

Leadership and Loyalty

13:24 min | 10 months ago

"kawasaki" Discussed on Leadership and Loyalty

"And I we we're new balance shoes and I have a black mock turtleneck and I buy a car but don't license it and the Carpool Lane and I parked in the handicap slot and I rip people publicly will be the next Steve Jobs. No you just is be an asshole so household. Who looks like Steve Jobs? Still be your old. Yeah though I think one of the dangers of Studying Steve Jobs is it's very difficult to separate causation. From correlation right and the probability that anyone. Aw watching this or reading a book about Steve Jobs or the movie or anything is another. Steve Jobs is very low so you should not. Aw You should try to just be the next Steve Jobs and we saw that we turnovers right so I mean I'm I'm I'm I'm I'm a great believer in the we are created in our childhood and we that childhood either refines defines joins us and if it refines as we become better human beings because it defines us than it the negatives drivers and sometimes they will drive us to being geniuses in one area. An absolute shitheads in another at. That is the battle. That's the internal battle not just jobs but with any of us you know so you know it's it's a it's a fascinating subject. I can see why people are fascinated with him because he is. He's a dichotomy in many ways. The genius the ask in all those well. I think the thing that people should take from. Steve is that yeah. He was always anticipating right so he either anticipated what people would want or decide to build whatever he wanted and convince events people they wanted it. It's kind of each side of the coin of Steve Jobs but one thing that one thing that many people have not upon Steve Jobs that is a lesson that they truly should learn. Is Steve Jobs in the middle of the nineteen eighties. He did not give gave a crap about your race. Your religion your gender your sexual orientation nothing thing like that. Steve Jobs had a binary view of the world. You either great or shift and there was nothing else. Nothing in between right. So if you are white anglo-saxon Protestant mail from Ivy League school but you're shit you're still struggle and and about half of his direct reports reports in the mid eighties or already women. So that's a lesson that people should go from Steve Jobs. It's so hard to find. Great people why would you make harder by looking for people of a certain gender sexual orientation religion in whatever man I mean you you you that would be crazy. That'd be if you're running a professional sports team I'M NOT GONNA draft a certain race of athlete. Striven lost your mind I mean so. Let's go to something that you brought up that. which is that you know? We're all told certainly. Certainly in the entrepreneurial world were all sold find. The problem in the market meant meat. The problem stop coming up with stuff and stout finding out if they actually want what it is that you that you've come up with and jobs didn't do that. Didn't do apple said you need An ipod thousand. LP's or cassettes or seen a talk about your understanding of that guy from from from because you are entrepreneurial you're in that world as well and the rules that will let's look at what they need and really meet the need and then there's the it's way riskier way more balls to say listen. You don't know you need this yet but you can you well. I think the first thing that people should understand is there is no single path. Success right there is the path of I listened to my customer. They said build ex. I built ex. They bought it. Life is good. There's also Steve Jobs Path is I. Don't talk to customers at all. I'm telling you they need this. They don't need. It might take them years to figure out they needed but trust me they need it. That's the Steve Jobs Path. Both pass can work I don't want to like you know everybody. Listen to this. Oh man we should stop listening to. Our customers of. There are other ways to do this but Steve had that way now it could be that in the history of man. Maybe it's only Stephen Ilan mosque and Edison and all that have been able to call it in advance but I think the Dow side of quote being marketing driven and listening to your customer. Is that your customer number can only tell you what to do in terms of what they're already getting from you so if you went to the apple customer in the mid eighties and said why should we do next. They would say better faster cheaper apple to show. Guess what you know. That's not what Steve May with the Macintosh. Nothing to do with an apple two so if apple had gone to his customers and been marketing driven and listen they would have built a better faster super apple too and trust me would not be a trillion dollar company. We will be having his podcasts. That we'd be saying remember Kota for Roy. Remember apple apple remember cluster thrown into the they'd be thrown into the wrong. Remember borders books. I mean we having a different discussion well talking talking books and talking about your less than stellar school. You've written fifteen books. Most people struggle to write one. What's the secret for a guy who struggled at school man Eh? I don't WanNa pay myself too much as a failure in school of you know I did get into stamfor- American back. I'm so old. I am so that when I applied to college being Asian American was an oppressed minority. Okay that's how old I am so I I have A. I have a lot of things to say about writing. Books so I think one should write a book when you have something to say Doug but I any people particularly businessmen they have this attitude like. I'M GONNA write a book. The book is a means to an end at me. More business more consulting in a position me as a leader. Whatever the hell that is it oh position in years the speaker you know whatever I think all of that is bullshit? Why you write a book is you have something to say? If you don't have anything to say don't write a book a book it should be an end in and of itself not a means to an end and If everybody would apply this it would be a better world. Now the flip outside of that is you may be an unknown person with no platform. No fame no money. Whatever but for some reason you have something you know? Let's say it was World War Two you hiding in addict during Nazi Germany. Right like you know who is that and that the absolutely history altering book abso because she had something to say that you definitely need someone to say. That's a very good point so very simple but very good point we could going to any one of your books but for now. Let's let's look to the first one. What was your inspiration this? He's actually from my good friend. Just Mela who is a great coach on Lincoln good friend of mine and he was actually going to co host also today but we because we get to change the schedule. He couldn't do it because he is a huge fan of yours so he wanted me to ask you. What was your inspiration for writing and gentleman because you just said you have to have someone to say ration- foot for writing that? I always like to do this when somebody asked me. What series Brazier? For writing a book. There are some levels a big advance. Truer words never spoken by author. Well I suppose you want something more a little more mean something more humanistic so I I was a very big fan of two books Dale Carnegie's Book How to win friends and influence people. Sure also book called influence by Bob. Giannini Oh beanie from dusty book. I saw two great books but Dale Carnegie died a long time ago. I don't in the forties fifties and bought Joe Dini in his book influence was written prior to really the digitalization of marketing social media. All that kind of stuff I said to myself. I want how to write a book about how to be influential and persuasive and enchanting now right and so that was the genesis you know if evangelism and social media or topics that were unusual at the time but it was was about it was I. Finally Chaldeans is fantastic work. It was at a lot of depth depth to it but yours sort of one of the like about your guy is you. Wrenching sounded very simple terms. And then you then you then you break those down which I actually really you like right. So there's like three three pillars of enchantment and then his the ten parts that are to those bills in likability. Everybody but again you know you gotta be likable but how to be likable. I mean you broke that up very very well and you talked about about being trustworthy. Union broke that had a pot. You took all of those pieces if you were going to punch somebody in the nosebleed. What they really do get out of a book? What is it? You mean the one single overarching. Whatever the overarching message being need to get from this because you know I think it's like Dini stuff a lot of the a lot of the people who were what were they called the dating guys you know? They used Shell Dini stuff and they turned it and they made it into something something quite negative and they took a lotta persuasion stuff. They are master trainer. NLP helping design but the only tools. A wonderful evil enchantment is a wonderful book with great messages. And I rather than having to go to the dockside. Let's to Whoa. What is that central message? You WanNa drive home because there's something for me that stood out there and I want to bring it up to you but I want to hear from you. I approach but I think there's less central. Listen It is if you WANNA be enchanting be influential persuasive you WANNA be a good market or social social media be a good person. That's a decent person. Yeah manipulation is all. It's just you know that's ninety nine the you don't even need to read my book. Have you just a good person. I believe there is a a scoreboard in sky. That keeps track of your karmic points. you know the the challenge. The only challenge with that is the moral. Compass is subjective. Jeff and so a good person I mean you know. Every German soldier thought they were a good person and that moral compass every every every person who rounded ended up Japanese in America thought they were a good person. Everybody who did the same to aboriginals of Australia are are of the native in A. I think that's part of the challenges. We we're running our own moral code and we don't know that and those people craig we might look as crazy right wing right now. Who are saying the things they believe that good people not part of the challenge is a huge challenge? And I don't know but in I mean I mean seriously how can you. How can you re? Can you really tell me that those those people believe that by breaking up families at the border they are doing a good thing. That is just a stretch right. And you'll get no argument from me on a personal level. Yeah I.

Steve Jobs Steve Steve Jobs Path apple Dale Carnegie Joe Dini Ivy League school America Union Shell Dini Stephen Ilan mosque Kota Jeff craig Germany Doug Australia Brazier
"kawasaki" Discussed on Kickass News

Kickass News

02:22 min | 1 year ago

"kawasaki" Discussed on Kickass News

"Inc Entrepreneur Harvard Business Review. I'm assuming business. If I follow you I will see great stories. I don't have to try to read harvest. BIZTV rewired Fast Company Verge Check after twenty follow you okay. That's a very okay all right. I'll see what I can do that. Okay now. Oh you know as we wind down here. I have to ask about the person you most get mistaken for taxi chair Hassan. Is it Jackie Chan or is it. The author is really Robert Kiyosaki because once a week somebody comes up to Mrs. Your book changed my life. I had no direction. I didn't know what I would do. In my life and your book changed my life and I say well which one of my fifteen books change your life and he's a rich dad happens all the time sorta gone after it's all the time people come up with the rich. That poor asked me to autograph it. Really you decided you so that's poured in well. I could end by asking. What's the most important lesson that you've learned but I think I'll you just you probably get that all the time so I'll ask you? What is the hardest lesson that you've learned over your life? The hardest one business less is probably that the best widget doesn't necessarily win. The best we did doesn't necessarily well. I mean I think macintoshes thus far superior to windows and their many more windows machines yeah yeah. I still can't wrap my mind that so that's why we need evangelist guess so you can only do so much well again. The book is called Wiseguy lessons from in my life Guy Kawasaki. Thanks so much for talking with me thank you thanks again to Guy Kawasaki for coming on the show order his book wiseguy lessons from life on Amazon audible or or wherever books are sold keep up with him Guy Kawasaki Dot Com on facebook or on twitter at at Guy Kawasaki. You know folks when my wife and I sit down to bend watch our favourite T._v.. Show or catch up on the newest episode God it's always better with a pint of Ben and Jerry's her go to Israel Classic Cherry Garcia but for me it has to either be chocolate chip cookie dough or chocolate fudge Brownie because really it's like getting to desserts in one you get ice cream and cookies or ice cream and brownies..

Guy Kawasaki Harvard Business Review Kawasaki Dot Com Jackie Chan Robert Kiyosaki Cherry Garcia twitter Amazon facebook Ben Jerry
"kawasaki" Discussed on The Unbeatable Mind Podcast with Mark Divine

The Unbeatable Mind Podcast with Mark Divine

02:05 min | 1 year ago

"kawasaki" Discussed on The Unbeatable Mind Podcast with Mark Divine

"We need it is room full of engineers in QA evil at all that because we are going to be on time and great just what you are going to be late, and the dogs will not even know that you exist, much less be eating your food. Right. And so they create an infrastructure that's geared toward. The fantastic success, they expect and it never goes that way. So the bottom line, my last piece of advice is always be thinking eat what you kill right. As opposed to eat what you plan to kill. You are not going to kill as much as you think you are as fast as you are right. And every kill is gonna be a lot of work every kill is gonna be hand to hand combat. Just as like, you're gonna die. Is this kill? That's this is if it's going, well, exactly. Awesome guy will times up here. So appreciate your common. Joining us on the show here. Good luck with everything. And I'm looking forward to reading the book. So why guy lessons from life? Go. Check it out. It's available now. Right. It's in the past. Yes. Yes. Awesome. And hope to see you in the surf why sometime? You know, if I drop in on you. I apologize in advance. Awesome. Thanks again. Take care. Bye. Bye. All right, folks. Thanks so much for listening. That was guy Kawasaki check out his book wiseguy lessons from life and again, thanks for listening. Thanks for your support, the unbeatable mind podcast and train hard. Stay focused and have fun who. Yeah. Divine out. Make sure what you get. Bye..

guy Kawasaki
"kawasaki" Discussed on The Jordan Harbinger Show

The Jordan Harbinger Show

01:34 min | 1 year ago

"kawasaki" Discussed on The Jordan Harbinger Show

"All right. Here's guy Kawasaki. How many people book interviews with you? And then tell you how much they loved rich, dad. Poor dad interviewers very few people as people you run into conferences. Yeah. That makes sense that's sort of not the first time that you've been mistaken for different Asian guy. No, I thought it was really funny that you started at the book off being more or less pretty humble about the fact that you got mistaken for Jackie Chan by group of girls and the convertible. Well, that was a very funny mode. I was very funny moment. Actually, I feel like rotten riding high at that time. He tells that story I think it's a plant. I was at that point. I had a Porsche nine eleven and I was stopped at a slight at El Camino look over the car with four teenage girls giggling smiling making eye contact girl in the front seats road on your window. I wrote on my window, and she sticks. Her head honest is are you Jackie Chan, oh my God. It was very funny. And since that day, it's been my goal that some teenage girl asked Jackie Chan as he's sitting in his Bentley and Hong Kong or wherever he lives. You know, are you guy Kawasaki, it's funny? Because of course at that point. You're like the height was the height of tech evangelism as we know. It was the dot com. They just started garage dot com. Post apple art already written books already given hundreds of speeches. I've arrived. Yeah. I'm in my car women know who I am. Right. I've arrived as Jackie Chan's clone. Yeah. Wrong ethnicity and a lot of other things wrong with that. But hey, cool..

Jackie Chan El Camino Kawasaki apple Hong Kong
"kawasaki" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

01:54 min | 1 year ago

"kawasaki" Discussed on KGO 810

"Kawasaki. The new book is worth it. It's wiseguy lessons from a life. It's always a pleasure to speak with you. Thank you so much for your time. Thank you. Thank you, very. Guy Kawasaki whose recent book wiseguy is his fifteenth title. He's an author advisor investor and evangelist for corporations guy also into innovation and his take on innovation has garnered about one point three million views of his Ted ex talk. Here's a quick snippet from that presentation. And I think you'll notice that if you happen to change the world, you will also probably make money, but if you start off with the sole desire to make money, you probably won't make money you won't make meaning you won't change the world, and you will probably fail. So my first thought for you is determined how you can make meaning how can you change the world? Here are some examples with apple apple wanted to democratize computers. They wanted to bring computing power to everyone. That's the meaning they made with Google. They wanted to democratize information making information available to everyone with EBay. They wanted to democratize car. Commerce. So that anyone with a website could stand toe to toe with any other large retailer examples of companies making meaning and YouTube finally wanted to enable people to create video to upload video to share video. So these this is an example of the company and the kind of meaning they made, and as you know, they all made this kind of meaning and they've been highly ATI successful. So what I noticed in my career is that if you truly want to make meaning it's the first step towards innovation. The second step is to make a mantra a two or three maybe four word explanation of why you're meaning should exist..

Guy Kawasaki apple advisor EBay YouTube Google Kawasaki.
"kawasaki" Discussed on Sportstalk 790

Sportstalk 790

01:32 min | 2 years ago

"kawasaki" Discussed on Sportstalk 790

"Them so basically they should be good enough for you i don't know how other way to say it i mean sean and i have been telling you about them for over a year now lance berkman has gone there purchased multiple calendars sake meals including last one as a birthday present for his wife and then you know what's don't call steve austin has done he's gone there he's gotten several of his kawasaki mules outfitted tricked out they look amazing we've seen one of them while it was in progress being worked on and it's just what they do out there ebc power sports is customize it to your liking and just go above and beyond they're actually speaking with stone cold right now out on his ranch in the los angeles california area and i think what shannon told me they were gonna do was put the big tires on them put the lighting effects on them i mean there's just so many things that you would even think that to to even imagine doing that they do to those kawasaki meals and you see them on his television show the broken skull challenged so they're out there they're right out there for you see their work and man they stand by it not a hop skip and a jump away from where you're listening right now in all likelihood but it's worth the trip when you get out there shannon and scott trace you're gonna make it worth your drive and you are going to love.

steve austin shannon sean lance berkman los angeles california kawasaki
"kawasaki" Discussed on The Ziglar Show

The Ziglar Show

01:52 min | 2 years ago

"kawasaki" Discussed on The Ziglar Show

"Good enough good enough i think it sounds good enough to me the next spoke here guy is spiritual and i'll have to hearken back to our last show and you gave us a little insight there that apple starting with them and surfing those religious experiences so along with those what's the spiritual side of guy kawasaki's lifeline i am i am a christian i believe in god but i can't tell you that i would be a good role model that regard i think today the churches in a very tricky place because some of its image has been coopted by fishes and it's it's a tricky tricky thing so it's almost like you have to separate god from religion today mitt it's different and so that's kinda were at i it's i don't i don't buy up as a role model for that and i may not whole myself i may not have these you know particularly outstanding religious characteristics but i really think in terms of values in terms of making the world america crecy doing unto others as as i would have them do unto you all those kind of things are try to live up to those to the degree the degree i love this term you keep saying it over and over mayor talk rec which which is which by the way i've forgotten the last show this is totally off subject next book as you writing books i love the idea of paint the bullseye.

apple kawasaki
"kawasaki" Discussed on The Ziglar Show

The Ziglar Show

01:52 min | 2 years ago

"kawasaki" Discussed on The Ziglar Show

"Good enough good enough i think it sounds good enough to me the next spoke here guy is spiritual and i'll have to hearken back to our last show and you gave us a little insight there that apple starting with them and surfing those religious experiences so along with those what's the spiritual side of guy kawasaki's lifeline i am i am a christian i believe in god but i can't tell you that i would be a good role model that regard i think today the churches in a very tricky place because some of its image has been coopted by fishes and it's it's a tricky tricky thing so it's almost like you have to separate god from religion today mitt it's different and so that's kinda were at i it's i don't i don't buy up as a role model for that and i may not whole myself i may not have these you know particularly outstanding religious characteristics but i really think in terms of values in terms of making the world america crecy doing unto others as as i would have them do unto you all those kind of things are try to live up to those to the degree the degree i love this term you keep saying it over and over mayor talk rec which which is which by the way i've forgotten the last show this is totally off subject next book as you writing books i love the idea of paint the bullseye.

apple kawasaki
"kawasaki" Discussed on The Ziglar Show

The Ziglar Show

02:06 min | 2 years ago

"kawasaki" Discussed on The Ziglar Show

"Would not have quit apple that's one thing for sure i think your priorities change in life i'm sixty three years old and what i have a good twenty years left i've made some rules like i get requests for speaking all the time right and i have a rule in the rule is other than social media market world and south by southwest i do not get on a plane for free i don't care you know how to teach telling me how great it is don't care if it's still the greatest resort in the world i will not get on an airplane for free at it's not just about the money you know actually it is about the money it's also because of if you really want me you'll pay and if you don't wanna pay it's okay make a decision got it well hey the next spoke is mental what does guy kawasaki due to keep himself on keep that edge mentally and keep yourself well there nothing i i do not i'm doing crossword puzzles or anything i i just never addressed myself i am i am constantly curated content for social media so by definition it means i need to be up on the times all the time i'm constantly reading but i can't tell you that i have you know sit aside the specific time for mental gymnastics and i know professor of neurobiology or something worldfamous and i once asked them so you know do i do i do so doku do i do crossword puzzles do i do all this stuff and he said the only scientific proof or keeping your brain active in good and all that is physical exercise.

apple kawasaki professor physical exercise sixty three years twenty years
"kawasaki" Discussed on The Ziglar Show

The Ziglar Show

02:06 min | 2 years ago

"kawasaki" Discussed on The Ziglar Show

"Would not have quit apple that's one thing for sure i think your priorities change in life i'm sixty three years old and what i have a good twenty years left i've made some rules like i get requests for speaking all the time right and i have a rule in the rule is other than social media market world and south by southwest i do not get on a plane for free i don't care you know how to teach telling me how great it is don't care if it's still the greatest resort in the world i will not get on an airplane for free at it's not just about the money you know actually it is about the money it's also because of if you really want me you'll pay and if you don't wanna pay it's okay make a decision got it well hey the next spoke is mental what does guy kawasaki due to keep himself on keep that edge mentally and keep yourself well there nothing i i do not i'm doing crossword puzzles or anything i i just never addressed myself i am i am constantly curated content for social media so by definition it means i need to be up on the times all the time i'm constantly reading but i can't tell you that i have you know sit aside the specific time for mental gymnastics and i know professor of neurobiology or something worldfamous and i once asked them so you know do i do i do so doku do i do crossword puzzles do i do all this stuff and he said the only scientific proof or keeping your brain active in good and all that is physical exercise.

apple kawasaki professor physical exercise sixty three years twenty years
"kawasaki" Discussed on The Ziglar Show

The Ziglar Show

01:37 min | 2 years ago

"kawasaki" Discussed on The Ziglar Show

"Stage in life where we're no longer defines me there wasn't time where work doesn't define the anymore though not i take a break from serving in my family to right which is different than saying i take a break for writing sir my family welcome to the sigler show where we inspire true performance i'm your host kevin miller today we go behind the scenes with guy kawasaki who we interviewed in our previous show number five five seven it was an incredible interview you won't want to miss today we follow the seven spokes on the ziglar wheel of life and find out guys challenges and habits in the seven areas some highlights as you're in the main interview he is a huge surfing fan and that's a main thing he does the stay in shape he's resolved not to eat a french fry for three years or drink a coke for two family vacations are big priority for his family health he's a christian but doesn't claim to be a great role model and he really separates god from traditional religion he attributes his career success much to luck but he admits to working very hard and working a lot you can connect with guy at guy kawasaki k w aka i dot com tom a note you'll hear about the seven minute mark a question in the interview coming from someone else is a bill who's an integral part of the ziglar show team and a huge fan of guy before we dive in i have a couple of great offerings for you.

kevin miller guy kawasaki seven minute three years
"kawasaki" Discussed on The Ziglar Show

The Ziglar Show

01:46 min | 2 years ago

"kawasaki" Discussed on The Ziglar Show

"It if you're making a computer the computer that you want to use and just all you're not the only person got it that's a quote right there and it's even better than the phone ringing in the background which is used shows us were candid that guy was a we'll title that candid a guy kawasaki is hotel room there you go i feel like we were sitting at the feet of the humble professor thank you i do want to ask one more question okay so looking at you yesterday just can review and all your stuff i saw this what looks like a fairly new effort this show on facebook wise guy and i want to ask you real quick about that tell people what happened in on there i liked what i saw but also i will admit my ignorance in that type of a john and format on facebook so some insight here yeah so hey spoke is kinda going after you to educational video and so baseball is kinda going after you too and so for facebook to go after youtube they need content producers and so for example might grow is doing a show for he goes around america uh and interviews all the people who are doing good at so i wanna those people who facebook wanted to create content so my content is about entrepreneurship and innovation and disruption so that's supposed to be uh you could a ten minute video sales voter short courses this is how you off the visor social media platforms this is how you do something they're very contain it think of it each session as one chapter of.

kawasaki professor facebook baseball youtube america ten minute
"kawasaki" Discussed on The Ziglar Show

The Ziglar Show

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"kawasaki" Discussed on The Ziglar Show

"Absolutely with guide looking at you're looking at your work that year uh that that that supports your family blesses your family me of over ten million followers over your social media outlets you're a massive influence our where did this start i don't know that part of your story when did you become the guy kawasaki we all know now it's at some point you were a kid like years just some young ponca what happened the catalyst for this journey for you as the king of enchanting chanting evangelism well which region of this story want the one that like i planned it i i all intellectual or lost a dj of a true i'll let the the to operate here okay up yeah i want the ugly sordid store educated yogi hollowed afghanistan not long as you want this year so this is your show you set to make your flight later on asa so the list that i i'm from honolulu and i went to school other mainland at at stanford in its effort i made a guy who was my lifelong friend and after at the time that i was at stanford this is the mid 70s if you're a nation america your parents wanted you to be a doctor lawyer dead this okay so i at stanford i took this course as an underground where you go to stafford hospital and you walk around uh the hospital and the first day of that class i fainted so i knew i couldn't be a doctor at the end of the next thing you know i saw it will do you want to stick your hand at people's miles your whole life the dentistry was up meanwhile my father was a legislator in hawaii so he wanted me to go to loss loose i go to law school i quit after two weeks i could not stand.

kawasaki honolulu stanford hawaii stafford hospital two weeks
"kawasaki" Discussed on Dorm Room Tycoon (DRT)

Dorm Room Tycoon (DRT)

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"kawasaki" Discussed on Dorm Room Tycoon (DRT)

"I think that's a very rare gene today specially it just seems like everywhere you go that dez already a products surfing the market um but there's always new innovations in the market rightly there's always new ways to think about how to solve problems this all the winners that you ever see are the ones that think about this way right like netflixing beat blockbuster because they said hey yeah people are renting movies today but to lay they're doing it if kawasaki and there's this whole new delivery model that we can try which is mailing dvds the people like let's not make him go to the the store let's let it come to them uh so you know it's very easy to say like oh that's been done before right and we see this all the time like um another example by tight form fantastic product before tie form launched i would've said why would anyone make another form software forms have been done before there's dozens of foreign companies that are all fine they all work like us is and consumers we get will we need were happy right taifour comes along they reinvasion what the form actually looks like they changed up the design the roof they become more of this fund experience to work with and as a result they blow up the june fantastic and i think that's just a great example of hey there you can come into competitive spaces in be really successful if you have a new take on it.

kawasaki