17 Burst results for "Kaufman Dot"

"kaufman dot" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:52 min | 9 months ago

"kaufman dot" Discussed on KCRW

"Employees or entrepreneurs more online in kaufman dot org's and American Jewish World Service supporting human rights advocates worldwide as they respond to covert 19 and defendant democracies. Maura age aws dot org. This is morning edition from NPR News. I'm David Greene and I'm No well King. Good morning. American tourists are not allowed in most countries right now, But Mexico is an exception, and people are going despite what the CDC says, which is, of course, don't do that. Here's NPR's Carrie Kahn. Charlie Watkins and her friends all in matching neon sleeveless T shirts down beers at a restaurant overlooking the Marina and Kopelson Lucas, one of Mexico's top three tourist destinations. Look at it out here. It's beautiful and warm, says Watkins, Back in Boise, Idaho. It's in the thirties, and the months indoors have been tough. There's no restrictions. It's beautiful. We feel safe. Mexico doesn't require travelers to show proof of a negative covert tests nor the quarantine upon arrival. So when two of Watkins friends decided to tie the knot and wedding venues at home were closed because of Cove in the group went south. Steve Edwards, who builds homes back in Boise is performing the nuptials. I'm a ordained minister, the Internet Internet minister, he had a couple jot down their vows of the bar. Nearly 80% of jobs in Los Cabos depend on tourism. The region shut down for three months at the onset of the pandemic, causing huge losses nationwide. Tourism took an $11 billion hit. Lure tourists back close couples officials tout tough safety protocols like in this beautifully shot ad before you visit. Get to know the rules In those cub US. One frame highlighting mask wearing shows a woman snorkeling among fish self distancing, is urged with a scene of a lone surfer and vast blue waters. The state's tourism secretary, Louise Umberto. Hard drives a says safety really does come. First. Hotels and restaurants are limited to 50% capacity. Temperatures are taken before entering any stores and masks are mandatory indoors. Officials are also helping pay for widespread testing of industry employees making the state's second on Lee to Mexico City for covert testing, says Arriva Know some of the immense evil is simple, the most. We aren't invincible. Sure you can get infected, but the risk here is much less than in other places, he says. And indeed, covert cases did spike once of three months. Lockdown lifted the summer. Dr. Enrique Hernandez, a trauma specialist, got Cove it back then and says he saw many colleagues die. He's just one man responsible, he says. It's frustrating.

Charlie Watkins Mexico Boise NPR News American Jewish World Service NPR Dr. Enrique Hernandez Maura David Greene US Mexico City Carrie Kahn Los Cabos Idaho Lee Kopelson Lucas Steve Edwards Louise Umberto
"kaufman dot" Discussed on What Got You There with Sean DeLaney

What Got You There with Sean DeLaney

07:22 min | 1 year ago

"kaufman dot" Discussed on What Got You There with Sean DeLaney

"Yeah you and I work in similar fashions here. Which makes more intrigued intrigued by this? And so I always try to figure out that. Blend between inspiration serendipity but then actual actually having a routine and I feel like I'm always nervous when I'm not feeling inspired that potentially if I just sat there and worked on those ideas little bit longer. That true inspiration might come. So how do you handle that? How do I handle it? When the inspirations not coming is that the question correct yep well it's okay. I are sleep all day. It's okay inspiration doesn't strike every day. It's not actually something that that happens. It's actually need to build into the process that you'll have roles and moments were a dozen because your needs time to work on things sometimes and these things are cyclical anyone. Who's it's fired every single day? Their lives tends to have manic things. That probably aren't they're not enjoying their lives so no I do think that we need. We don't see a problem. Actually I see it as as as a required part of the whole creative process and I usually my Magara sources of inspiration. Usually follow my darkest days to be dramatic about it. No no no. It's so funny so I asked the question. I mean hoping that you have some unbelievable answer that I can tap into. But but you're so right sometimes that subconscious just just need some some rooms and free space though that just going along. Walk Nature Shower where those ideas can ruminate So so I'm. I'm glad that you provided that little refresher there. I know we've got a rap appear in a minute. I have a few kind of quick questions for you. I would love to hear your thoughts on so if you're on the other end of the microphone and I know you host a fantastic podcast. I enjoy listening to but if you could just sit down with anyone dead or alive. Who would you be sitting down with? And what would you wanna ask him while the winners Abraham because I just spent entire five years of my life studying him in researching his life? But the interesting question what. I won't ask him because I feel like I've I've plumbed the depths of of his existence so much that I were all the answers through his private journals and everything but maybe I would wanna ask him whether he was happy in his life like did he feel fulfilled and went and what points in his life did he. Did He feel most fulfilled? Yeah when I when I wrote this question down. I was wondering if you were going to respond with Maslo or not. Because of the depth you went Research so if it wasn't going to be him who else would it be? I'd love to sit down the Dalai Lama and have a like a like a real conversation with him like Blake. Come on Bro. Like let's let's cut cut cut the bullshit like let's let's let's be for real and and be like you know what what pisses you off man you know? What because the thing is there's no he's he is. He's quite enlightened in self actualized in and for sure and you know no detail disrespect whatsoever to the Dalai but I he's human too and I'm always interested in seeing what the what what what how integrated human handles the inevitable anger and frustrations and things and he seems to handle it very well. I WanNa know how you know. What what do you do when you feel that way because you know you? Must you must feel that way sometimes. Yeah that'd be a fun conversation to sit on sit in on Scott you crack me up your funny guy one thing. I know you're interested in a lot of different things. And you talk to some unbelievable people On the psychology podcast. But what about something? That's kind of outside your field of expertise that just really fascinated with all I. I'm actually fascinated with physics and time travel. Admit that too much but I really. I really geeked out a lot in that. In growing up Easter rate lots of stories of time travel. I actually Rhodia actually got a pretty good grade in college. Visits class where I came up with plans for time machine really. Yes yes do you. Do you ever post any of that stuff. No this is. This is just secret secret stuff that we'll we'll we'll let the secrets remain secrets. I know you're incredibly. Well read any books that you've gone back to over the years so many books. I really like the art of loving Eric from start there. We need more of that in the world right now. We're toward a psychology of being by Abraham as well or loving will buy role May Or the scene society by Erich Fromm as well. It's another chromebook rate. Four books that have been mentioned so I know everyone's going to enjoy. This is the Scott. This has been too much fun for me I I meant that. I really enjoyed reading the book. I just got it and it was fun. Exploring some of these ideas and been a fan of your work and your writing. So where do you want the listener? Stay connected with you. I know the book comes out April seventh his transcend the new signs of self actualization. Anywhere else you want them Exploring and just staying connected with you though a appreciate that. Well they may want to check out. The psychology podcast. We release episodes on Thursdays. Might your audience might also In May be some overlap there in interests and Scott Barry Kaufman DOT COM is. You can pretty much follows a lot of my stuff on scuppered when Kaufman Dot Com. I guess I should also say I'm also very active on twitter if anyone wants to just see my half-baked ramblings that on twitter that that's a good place to always see someone's half-baked ramblings awesome. Well I'm going to have all that linked up in the show notes but Scott. Thanks so much for joining us on their thank you. I had a great time. You guys made it to the end of another episode of what got you there. I hope you guys enjoyed it. I really do appreciate you taking the time to listen all the way through. If you found value in this the best way you can support the show is giving us a review rating it sharing it with your friends and also sharing on social. I can't tell you how much I appreciate it looking forward to. You guys listening to another episode..

Scott Barry Kaufman Abraham twitter Kaufman Dot Com Erich Fromm Maslo Rhodia Eric Blake
"kaufman dot" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:55 min | 1 year ago

"kaufman dot" Discussed on KCRW

"And be more successful more online at Kaufman dot org right now seventy five in Anaheim this is All Things Considered from NPR news I'm Mary Louise Kelly in Washington and I'm ari Shapiro in Pablo Colorado this is one of more than a dozen states that will vote next week on super Tuesday and it's one of the places where we're launching a year long and P. R. series called where voters are between now and the election we will be returning to a handful of communities that reflect the range of people and issues shaping the country today we'll talk to voters about where they are on the selection and where they are in the country and are you you have spent the last several days in Provo that's right to get here you drive about two hours south from Denver it's wide open plains stretching for miles mountains off in the distance and then popping up out of the horizon you see the stark vertical lines smokestacks there's a sign that you are approaching Pablo and the mill that gave this place its nickname steel city but today only about six percent of Pablo's jobs are in manufacturing old timers like rod slide off can trace the change back to one day in nineteen eighty four for guys like me it's it's in my mind all the time he's president and CEO of the public chamber of commerce yeah I believe it was in March of sixty five hundred pink slips were issued to the employees and our economy changed drastically in one day Donald Trump has built his presidency on promises to bring back those kinds of jobs in fact just last week trump held a rally in Colorado springs about forty five minutes up the road from problems remember they said the kid do manufacturing jobs anymore really tell me about it unemployment has reached the lowest rate in over one half a century those promises sound good rod slide off it shows that we have a president that's that's interested and knows it in that.

Anaheim Mary Louise Kelly Washington Pablo Colorado Provo Denver Pablo president and CEO Donald Trump president Kaufman dot NPR ari Shapiro P. R. Colorado springs
"kaufman dot" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

11:26 min | 1 year ago

"kaufman dot" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"At Kaufman dot org it's All Things Considered from NPR news I'm Audie Cornish in Washington and I'm ari Shapiro in Manchester New Hampshire where people have been voting all day in the first primary contest of twenty twenty for more on what to watch for tonight here in New Hampshire other than whether we will actually get results we are joined by NPR's Mara lies and I'm Mara hi ari okay so we have to remind people once again just like in Iowa there's not a lot of delegates on the line tonight nobody is coming close to getting the nomination yet so what is important as we watch this race and the results that are gonna be coming in one thing that's important is turn out that's pretty basic overall turnout was about two hundred and fifty thousand votes for Democrats in the twenty sixteen primary and turn out as a measure of enthusiasm and it's also Bernie Sanders electability argument he says that he can turn out bring millions of new voters into the process he couldn't do that and I or where turnout was disappointingly flat about the same as twenty sixteen he managed to get a tiny uptick in the eighteen to twenty nine year old boat about thirty percent but they're only one percent of the electorate so we'll see if he can do that tonight will also find out of Bernie Sanders is a strong front runner he did the same in Iowa as he did in twenty sixteen he tied for first place but in New Hampshire he has a tough act to follow his own because he beat Hillary Clinton by twenty two points in twenty sixteen and he's been leading in the polls all along so one question tonight is how close will near P. booted judge finished two Sanders who has clearly consolidated the left wing of his party if Sanders has clearly consolidated the left wing of his party the center left of the party is a little less clear what you looking a lot less clear ever since the guy who was supposed to be the most electable Joe Biden came in a disappointing fourth in Iowa the big question is whether Democrats would consolidate around the center left candidate and alternative to Bernie Sanders and who would that be right now booted judges the strongest competitor against Sanders but he appeared to lose some ground in recent days to Amy Klobuchar since the last debate the club which are has a lot of ground to make up Elizabeth Warren who was trying to present herself as a kind of unifying balance between the center left on the left has made just enough big strategic errors to slip into a battle for third place and that's not good for a senator from next door Massachusetts so the bottom line question is will we get more clarity after tonight or will a lot of candidates continue slogging for word and that really worries Democrats because they are desperate to unify and get going in the battle against trump I want to ask you another candidates looking forward who has not competed in these first two states but who has spent a lot of money former New York City mayor Michael Bloomberg is facing some fresh scrutiny today what's going on yes a lot of scrutiny there's tape of him saying that back in the nineties we put cops in minority neighborhoods because that's where all the crime rose was course black leaders will tell you that's also where the victims of crime were but that policy had the unintended consequence of arresting more black kids for marijuana than white kids and that is going to be a real issue for him in this primary so given how fractured the race is who's going to take advantage of this do you think we'll Bloomberg's relationship with the black community is clearly going to be part of the big battle in the primary especially when you get to super Tuesday states with large numbers of African American voters his competitors will draw attention to it but right now the person really working this is Donald Trump he tweeted the Bloomberg is a total racist kind of just like he used the nineteen ninety four crime bill against Hillary Clinton to great effect he is now trying to use it against Bloomberg he's not just tearing Democrats down he's also trying to boost Bernie Sanders here's what he said about the muddled Iowa results at a rally he held last night in New Hampshire I think they're trying to take it away for birdie again I think Bernie came in second can you believe it they're doing a jig Bernie they're doing did you get so he's clearly trying to appeal to Sanders voters a lot of them are in his white working class demographic he wants them to be upset and angry at the democratic establishment he's trying to create as much discord and disarray within the democratic primary as he can at the same time undermining whoever might cut emerge as a threat to him NPR national political correspondent Marc alliance and on this day of the New Hampshire primary thanks Mara thank you Harvey Weinstein's defense team has rested its case he's the former Hollywood film producer accused by more than eighty women of sexual misconduct he's charged with five counts of rape and assault against two women in New York City I want to know that this next are obviously deals with the subject of sexual violence is NPR's rose Friedman who's been in the courthouse each day and joins us now to talk more about the story rose to begin we've heard from a number of women in this trial meaning they've taken the stand I'm saying they were raped or assaulted what did the defense have to say well once the inside doesn't actually have to prove anything all they have to do is make the jury doubt that he's guilty so they try to knock holes in the women's testimony by calling people who could refute different parts of their stories Weinstein is charged with raping a woman named Jessica man in two thousand thirteen with forcing oral sex on a former production assistant name Merion Haley in two thousand six and reaping actress Annabel ashore in the winter of nineteen ninety three story actually is in its own charge is being used to bolster the most serious charges and once you has just maintain that all of those were consensual how did the defense actually make that case though I mean were there witnesses that the call yeah they started making the case when they got to cross examine the women by trying to damage their credibility suggesting they don't actually remember the incidents or that they've changed their stories over the course of the investigation and then when it was their turn to call witnesses they began to bring in people who were around at the times that these things were alleged to have happened who could say you know it didn't happen that way to have it all it couldn't have happened that way so that included two different friends of Jessica man's one friend said man's relationship with Winston had seemed consensual at the time and that man had once called Winston her spiritual soul mate another said man wasn't acting abnormally right after the alleged rape they also called the building manager who said once dean would not have been able to come up to Annabella shores apartment unannounced and they called a male friend of yours who said that her incident was consensual I want to talk about how this is playing out in in court an actual courtroom verses that the court of public opinion obviously one seems cases is so high profile in so many women have come out with allegations what does that mean here in this courtroom yeah in court this is a really hard case to prove there's very little physical evidence so the prosecution is hoping that the jury will find at least some of these women credible they've asked the judge to allow three other women who aren't part of the charges to testify in order to establish a pattern for instance behavior but these are crimes that allegedly happened in a room between two people so it really comes down to whether the jury believes that these encounters were on wanted and when do jury deliberations begin the start next week if one scene is convicted on the most serious charge he could face life in prison and then after that he still facing charges in LA and will follow up with you of course also for closing arguments in that case it's NPR's rose Friedman in New York thanks for your reporting thank you Venezuela's opposition leader one quite L. fresh off a warm bipartisan reception in Washington has landed back home to a chaotic scene at the Caracas airport supporters of president Nicolas Maduro screamed at the opposition lawmakers who come to greet quite and yours Phillip Riese was at the airport and joins us now and Phil can you just describe the scene of this arrival yeah it was pretty chaotic I'm somewhat of a hostile reception must be said why don't want to see last year Kate back to a cheering crowd of supporters this time he came back to a large crowd but among the crowd there were a lot of supporters of the government of Nicolas Maduro who's trying to oust the government of the dodo clearly mobilizing supporters to get this all star section to go I go they John did hostile slogans they called for him to be imprisoned we arrested there's another reason those of a big crowd here I'm a couple of days ago the US sanctions the Venezuelan state run Alan called Yasser I'm this is exactly what is the right book on the after a many victims Wally's well out there waiting to greet why go in a hostile manner quality to protest the sanctions but also to protest against his return how did quite respond to all this it moves through the apple very quickly he was being hacked the body the dose of folders you walk through a people were throwing plastic water bottles when he talked to his car and drove away someone threw a plastic show that it was very cold tile see he there was some opposition supporters not with his supporters who came to the apple to to welcome him including members of the National Assembly who support them I they say they were stopped by the police and the the Venezuelan military also stations and armored vehicles on the road from the apple in a show of strength which I think is designed to intimidate why does he as he moved away from from from the apple pie between supporters of white though as well to the government it really was a pretty chaotic see at the same time there was speculation that the Maduro government we had plans to jail quite the moment he arrived what happened to that where did quite ahead after he landed well the main debate about whether the Maduro government would do that or not and I think the majority view was that the Matilda wouldn't do it because he regards well I go as much we can now but he was a year ago and that by resting him he would be playing into the hands of white gold because they'll be an enormous international outcry from the sixty also countries that recognized why does the magenta the directors of this country however in a situation like this nothing is so and there are certainly concerns among the opposition that that might happen and so what's why does strategy against all this it's a very big challenge now why go to because it's been a more than a year since he really launch this campaign to oust Maduro and he has now to find new ways of applying pressure to Maduro at a time when he's wait Rica and the economy yeah those still in the process the mission has somewhat stabilized with Europe is strong though now that he has been in the recent past but if you are speaking what those ways are you it's very hard to get a straight out from them they tend to say why go will show us what he tends to do when he arrives back in this country which he has to stop that's in here is Philip freeze in Caracas thanks for your reporting what you're listening to All.

Audie Cornish Washington Manchester New Hampshire New Hampshire NPR Mara Kaufman dot ari Shapiro twenty twenty
"kaufman dot" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:30 min | 1 year ago

"kaufman dot" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"A day for seven and a half years Sephora didn't want to give her last name came to the event from borough park in Brooklyn and said she was not worried about security I feel safe because god above is protecting us she also said she felt confident in the security at Barclays center the next see all my shots takes place in seven and a half years after the daily reading of the tallit is completed again starting next year some new Yorkers who get by on tips must be paid the minimum wage or more governor Cuomo issued an order this week phasing out lower tip wages for workers at businesses like nail salons and car washes but the move does not cover restaurant workers at the admin cool works with the advocacy group restaurant opportunities center is United he says thousands of people in food service are being left out in the cold that means that the governor actuate their vulnerability to labor violations around the workplace currently employers in some fields can pay workers less than the state's minimum wage of tips make up the difference labor advocates argue that these tipped employees open to wage theft and abuse it's a new year but in old tradition dating back more than a hundred years at Coney Island thousands of brave swimmers hurled themselves into the freezing Atlantic for the polar bear plunge yesterday WNIC producer Lydia McMillan layered was among them this year for the second time all the way to start the new year is to really find just kind of new Yorkers some of them are in class with you everyone's really excited to go into the water I prefer to be inside but whatever floats your boat according to the Coney Island polar bear club donations race did this year swim will support neighborhood organizations including the aquarium and the Coney Island history project for today if you're into that kind of thing it's gonna be cold if you wanna hop in the ocean sunny today high near forty eight degrees wind chills between twenty five and thirty five for tonight rain is likely probably after midnight otherwise increasing clouds tonight with a low of about forty two degrees you're listening to morning edition on WNYC it's eight oh six support for NPR comes from the Kauffman foundation working together with communities in education and entrepreneurship to create uncommon solutions and empower people to shape their lives and be more successful more online at Kaufman dot org on the next all of it New York times contributor and host of the podcast ask a clean person Joe leaker helped us get clean for the new year with tips and tricks and we'll take your call.

Sephora Brooklyn Barclays center theft Coney Island Lydia McMillan NPR Kauffman foundation Joe leaker governor Cuomo producer Kaufman dot New York times
"kaufman dot" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:02 min | 1 year ago

"kaufman dot" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"More successful more online at Kaufman dot org it's morning edition from NPR news I'm Steve Inskeep and I know will king what does an inheritance and a last name enable you to do Abigail Disney has thought a lot about that you probably recognize her last name she's the granddaughter of Rory Disney who co founded the Disney company with his younger brother Walt and Abigail says her net worth is around a hundred and forty million dollars but in a new profile in The New Yorker magazine out today she describes herself as an uncomfortable heiress she's lent her name to a group of millionaires who are speaking out against rising income inequality she'll call had Kerr wrote that profile for The New Yorker and she started by telling us about a story from Abigail disease childhood Abigail had very fond memories of her grandfather Roy E. Disney who co founded the company and she said that he used to take her to the theme park when she was a child this was a cherished memory but that they could just March to the front of any line of any rider traction they wanted to go on and of course all of the other families attending the park we're standing there baking in the sun waiting their turn and she said she felt really bad an awkward and when she pointed this out to her grandfather he said well I worked so hard all these years building this company specifically so I could do that so I could take you to the front of the line what was the moment that she decided she was going to go from being just a shareholder who wasn't really active in the company who wasn't particularly politically active to being someone who is going to start saying things like Disney needs to pay its employees more what was her turning point she was always up much more politically liberal than the rest of her family there was a moment in two thousand and eighteen when a worker at one of the Disney properties in California reached out to her through Facebook message and told her that you know the union representing workers at the theme park had been fighting with management over a new contract they have been trying to negotiate a fifteen dollar minimum wage and he said well we're not getting any traction with the company can you help us she then flew out to Anaheim and met with a group of Disney workers and some of these workers told her really upsetting stories about people who said that they were sleeping in their cars and they had become homeless she eventually ended up making some public statements about how she felt that it was wrong for a company that was making billions of dollars in profit and whose brands was centered around the idea of happiness and joy and family togetherness was paying so little to its workers that they were not really able to live stable middle class lives how did the Disney company feel about her coming out and being critical of the company in that way the company was not happy at all about this Disney management pointed out that they feel that they do take care of their workers they provide a lot of educational opportunities and opportunities for advancement to their workers although Bob Eiger the CEO of Disney had been paid around sixty six million dollars that year which seems like an astronomical sum so they were quite outrage and of course they have their their point about how many of these workers are biased or that the union has its point of view it's trying to push I think that Abigail feels really bad about this but she also sees her role as creating a sort of public pressure on them to reconsider some of their policies Abigail Disney belongs to a group called the patriotic millionaires this is an interesting bunch who are they and what do they want the patriotic millionaires is a group of wealthy Americans who are concerned about wealth and income inequality and you are so concerned about it that they have decided to band together and lobby for the kinds of economic policies that you do not normally see members of that economic group lobbying for such as raising estate taxes raising taxes on the wealthy and on corporations raising minimum wages and we should note that the name patriotic millionaires it's not symbolic it is not a metaphor these people are millionaires you have to be earning at least a million dollars in income or have a net worth of five million dollars to be eligible to join the group has around two hundred issue members there are many more millionaires than that in the United States I guess that tells you something about the popularity or lack there of of this group well I think the title of the group is a little controversial answer has some well there are people who find the name a little and sensational out a little garish a little tacky perhaps now the founder of the group acknowledges that the name is a little flashy and it makes a lot of people are comfortable but she feels that that's exactly what gives the group its power rich people calling themselves patriotic millionaires just catches people's attention and they end up generating a lot of sort of free press coverage which is how they get their message out there is a a final really interesting theme running through your story which is about what happens if the system is we now live it this system where we have this great inequality breaks down some of the patriotic millionaires at least one told you that they're worried about a revolution like you know the working class rises up in the streets and we see protest like we saw in Chile or even worse based on the research you've done are we looking in the United States of America do we need to worry about a class war the historians and experts I spoke to about this all pretty much agreed that we are unlikely to see a mass social uprising they all acknowledge that inequality is at a historic sort of alarming level but they said that the government is simply too powerful it is too easy through technology and other means to control citizens the population is simply too varied and spread out they did say however that we could continue moving in a direction that we perhaps as Americans do not want to move in where you end up with a small group of very wealthy people living in gated to states having to invest in personal security crime could go up kidnappings and we do see that in other countries and one historian a particular told me you know what could happen is rich people could be limited in their ability to enjoy their wealth they would they would barely be able to leave their homes without you know not armed guard at their side and many of the patriotic millionaires said this to me as well they said this is self interest I do not want to live in a country like that do you think in the end Abigail Disney would say that she is self interested I think she would she draws a lot of personal pleasure and satisfaction from this political work that she does and she's the first to acknowledge that it makes are incredibly happy to give her life meaning and if at the same time she can help push the country in a better direction you know she would argue why not why not your local had car writer for The New Yorker thank you so much for joining us it was great to be here thank you.

Kaufman dot NPR
"kaufman dot" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:42 min | 2 years ago

"kaufman dot" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Uncommon solutions and empower people to shape their lives and be more successful more online at Kaufman dot org it's morning edition on W. NYC I'm Kerry Nolan sweeping reforms that will end cash bail for all misdemeanor in non violent felony charges in New York state take effect in January but some law enforcement groups are objecting saying the changes go too far Karen dewitt reports the new law still allows for cash bail to be set in the cases of those accused of violent crimes it is expected to significantly reduce the number of pre trial prisoners in the states jail system but district attorney's county sheriff's domestic violence victim advocates and some Republican state senators say the new law goes too far and need some revisions before takes a fact senators to Serena out from the Hudson Valley offered a measure to give judges more discretion to determine whether a defendant is potentially dangerous before waving bail you think about our judges a lot of these you have repeat offenders they know the histories they are the best ones to make this judgment call senator Patrick Gallivan a Republican from the buffalo area and a former state trooper in Erie County sheriff says the bail changes will affect public safety the repeat drunk driver is free to go back out and drive drunk again the repeat burglar a person who is inclined to violence but not quite violence with a gun or a knife that might want revenge and people they will continue to go out there a second proposed change to the bail reform laws would ensure that people accused of domestic violence and sex related crimes continue to qualify for bail in pre trial detention Leah Feldman is with the domestic violence victims advocacy group community programs at family services in Poughkeepsie she says domestic violence is a pattern of power and control which escalates over time the pre trial phase the time between an offender's arrest and sentencing is known to be the most dangerous time for a victim of domestic violence this is a time that a victim is most likely to be killed she says the victims also have breathing room to seek help and protection while their alleged abuser is in jail before trial advocates of the bail reform law say the senators and law enforcement officers are missing the point Amy Jones with the reform group citizen action stood outside the press conference with the small number of protesters Jones says under the old bail laws richer privileged and usually white people can afford to meet fail while lower income black and brown people cannot their poor people so this is trump style rhetoric the Senate Republicans are using their president's rhetoric to lawn order is fear mongering and it's not going to keep our communities safer what's going to keep our communities safer is having people home with their families still employed still in their housing still being the fabric of the society president trump weighed in on the changes to the state's bail laws in a tweet on Tuesday saying governor Andrew Cuomo in New York City mayor bill de Blasio are quote letting out nine hundred criminals some hardened and bad under the sidewalks of our rapidly declining city Cuomo answers that similar bail reforms are already in place in a neighboring state and were signed into law by its former Republican governor essentially the same bill was passed by New Jersey several years ago signed by the governor of New Jersey Chris Christie person who I worked very closely.

"kaufman dot" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:37 min | 2 years ago

"kaufman dot" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"There's also. one. we have a remembrance coming up in just about fifteen. clouds today highs near sixty six degrees tonight mostly cloudy with a low around sixty one and tomorrow Tuesday more clouds with a high near seventy four degrees sixty two degrees fair skies right now New York. support for NPR comes from member stations and from the Carnegie corporation of New York supporting innovations in education democratic engagement and the advancement of international peace and security more information is available online at Carnegie daughter work progressive insurance offering snapshot a device that it just insurance rates based on safe driving habits now that's progressive learn more at progressive dot com or one eight hundred progressive and the Kauffman foundation working together with communities in education and entrepreneurship to create uncommon solutions and empower people to shape their lives and be more successful more online at Kaufman dot org. it's morning edition from NPR news I'm no well king and I'm Steve Inskeep here's a story for you a Jewish girl begins a diary just as World War two was about to start in Europe she records the details of daily life but more and more the war takes over the story and eventually the diary comes to a heart breaking an this is not in Frank's diary.

NPR Carnegie corporation New York Kauffman foundation Steve Inskeep Europe Frank New York. Kaufman dot seventy four degrees sixty six degrees sixty two degrees
"kaufman dot" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:16 min | 2 years ago

"kaufman dot" Discussed on KCRW

"And empower people to shape their lives and be more successful more online at Kaufman dot O. R. G. right now with the hills eighty one degrees it's five or six KCRW. it's All Things Considered from NPR news I'm Marty Cornish and I'm ari Shapiro we are remembering our colleague Cokie Roberts throughout the show she died today due to complications from cancer at age seventy five she was a leader in two of America's main news organizations but calling her a journalist is not fully capture her remarkable life here's NPR's Steve Inskeep on the radio at morning edition we Caulder N. P. R.'s Cokie Roberts on television the Calder ABC's Cokie Roberts neither designation was wrong though as well here both were in complete at birth in nineteen forty three her family gave her a string of names and an interviewer once wondered why she did not use any of them merry Martha Karan Morrison Claiborne Boggs Robert. where to Cokie come from my brother Tommy was three years older than me and when I came home from the hospital he couldn't say covering and he christened me Cokie and I've been Cokie ever since her maiden name was box as in Hale Boggs her father a very powerful Louisiana congressman in the nineteen sixties Boggs was able to persuade the exceptionally strong willed president Lyndon Johnson to do what bugs need it in nineteen seventy two Boggs was campaigning for a colleague in Alaska when their plane disappeared without a trace his daughter Cokie was just under thirty I lived in California at the time I was a young mom I had a couple of kids I had a a child who just turned two and my little boy turned four while I was in Alaska looking for my father cookies mother Lindy Boggs ran for and won her late husband seat in Congress Cokie return to Washington and met an NPR reporter named Nina Totenberg in the late seventies Steve Roberts who then work for The New York Times her husband delivered to me her resume and I've and brought it to the head of news at the time and he hired her on a temporary basis and you think of an important story in our national life over the last forty years or so Cokie was part of it president Carter said that he is committed to a universal comprehensive plan that will provide basic health coverage to all Americans the card at the hearings have been about more than the sale of arms to Iran and the diversion of funds to the contras the events surrounding the Iran contra affair they've been about to do then what happens well it's most likely that there are not enough votes in the house of representatives to impeach the president in the nineteen eighties her NPR reporting on Congress caught the attention of ABC news. and ABC did something that was still relatively new it included a woman Cokie Roberts among the male panelists on a Sunday morning news show she worked for ABC for more than thirty years Cokie Roberts ABC news Capitol Hill even as she continued with N. P. R. critics of reporting sometimes argue that she was too close to the Washington political figure.

eighty one degrees thirty years forty years three years
"kaufman dot" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:28 min | 2 years ago

"kaufman dot" Discussed on KCRW

"To shape their lives and be more successful more online at Kaufman dot org. this is All Things Considered from NPR news I'm ari Shapiro and a merry Louise Kelley hurricane Dorian has weakened but on north Carolina's Outer Banks the storm has left flooding in its wake some residents who defied mandatory evacuation orders were surprised by the high water and had to be rescued further south in the small town of Carolina shores residents were prepared for the hurricane but they did not expect a tornado as in pairs Jeff Brady reports this morning Mike Terry walked out of his damaged house and hugged a neighbor healthy we replace realized. we're live Terry says he was having coffee in the living room when the tornado came through his neighborhood early Thursday morning I just heard his noise and I just jumped up and got my wife out of bed she ducked down required is the one to blow out. I don't know how I didn't get a scratch on me must be an act of god it out and get a scratch on me thirteen year old Madison gun solves says she saw the tornado all of a sudden I hear she like it sounds like an airplane and I'm like is there an airplane going like around like above my house and I look outside and there is a tornado right there across my pond Gonzalez says their house is fine but she keeps thinking about the scary image of the twister it was pulling debris was like shooting it out and pulling it in I'm looking and all of a sudden I see pine trees part of it like flying out and lots of leads to some citing as well that were from other people's houses the tornadoes path through this neighborhood is clearly marked some houses are on touch and next door windows are blown out the roof is collapsed exposing bare lumber and insulation work trucks lined the streets. workers are installing a blue tarp and carmine's our dollars through somebody's father somebody's roof came in and slammed on the top of my will I had a opening about a ten foot long by about five six feet wide. so they're securing it water tight until insurance company comes in we can argue and out. one street over sisters Kate Hale in Jane Keller are waiting for a contractor to show up part of the rough separated. and now we've lost probably sixty percent of the siding the.

Mike Terry ari Shapiro north Carolina Kaufman dot org. Carolina shores Jeff Brady NPR pond Gonzalez Louise Kelley Dorian Kate Hale Jane Keller five six feet sixty percent thirteen year ten foot
"kaufman dot" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:03 min | 2 years ago

"kaufman dot" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Continue while Purdue is at the center of the nation's opioid epidemic other drug companies are looking to cut deals north country public radio's Brian man has more a government source close to the negotiations confirm to NPR produ farmer was in talks of state attorneys general a federal judge and others at a location in Ohio published reports suggest the deal could involve payments of up to twelve billion dollars and the bankruptcy process that would force the sector family give up ownership the same source said settlement talks with Johnson and Johnson scheduled for Thursday this follows a five hundred and seventy two million dollar ruling against Johnson and Johnson in an opioid case earlier this week in Oklahoma the company says it will appeal but an email to NPR said they are open to a settlement to smaller drug firms elder Ganon endo have reached tentative deals all ready Brian man NPR news he was senator Kerr Stangel of renters ended her bid for the democratic presidential nomination noting that she doesn't have support or funding to continue children campaign on the issue of women's equality this is NPR news the trump administration is releasing new guidance on its immigration policies this time its unveiling rules that no longer guarantee US citizenship for children born to American government workers or military personnel stationed abroad children born overseas to non military non government parents still automatically gain citizenship if at least one parent is an American citizen who's lived in the US for five years or more a hundred thousand people whose personal information was shared with immigration authorities can file claims for share of a twelve million dollar settlement and in Paris bracken Booker reports that it's part of a deal between Washington state and the national hotel chain motel six the entire settlement is worth twelve million dollars and it's open to guests who stayed at one of seven motel six locations in Washington state between January twenty fifteen and September twenty seventeen the state Attorney General Bob Ferguson says guess personal information was handed over to immigration and customs enforcement officials without their knowledge or consent I see then use the lists to investigate guest with Latino sounding names in a statement the attorney general's office says those who faced questioning arrest for deportation will receive more restitution for quote the serious harms they suffered as a result of motel sixes actions Bracton Booker NPR news on stock markets in Asia shares closed lower following gains on Wall Street the Dow Jones industrial average rose two hundred fifty eight points on she Stevens NPR news in Washington support for NPR comes from NPR stations other contributors include the Kauffman foundation working together with communities in education and entrepreneurship to create uncommon solutions and empower people to shape their lives and be more successful more online at Kaufman dot.

Bob Ferguson Washington Asia Attorney bracken Booker Paris NPR Kaufman dot Kauffman foundation Purdue US senator Kerr Stangel Ganon endo Oklahoma Johnson
"kaufman dot" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

09:50 min | 2 years ago

"kaufman dot" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"At Kaufman dot org on a Friday it's All Things Considered from NPR news I'm very that was killing and I'm ari Shapiro this week's smaller testimony brought the same words over and over again like an echo collusion obstruction and also read the report people receive the special counsel's testimony very differently depending on who was listening it is a moment which people will be talking about three four hundred five and years it is definitely time this should be the end of the chapter of this book that we put America we had a very good day today president is not exonerate halting and slow and shut up expecting a Broadway show sure you may have been disappointed reaction the special counsel Robert Muller is testimony there from lawmakers cable news analysts and of course the president another word that hung over Wednesday's hearings impeachment and that issue still divides the Democrats no I'm not chairman at hot we will proceed one we have what we need to proceed not one day sooner house speaker Nancy Pelosi there NPR's impeachment tracker says the number of Democrats supporting impeachment has just crossed over into triple digits and this is where we will begin our weekly political roundup our guests this Friday are Kristen soul to Sanderson of the Washington examiner and Jason Johnson politics editor at the root welcome to both of you so the Democrats began the week expecting that Muller's testimony would be a turning point in the conversation about Russian election interference in the president's possible involvement in it Kristin do you think the Democrats over promised at Muller under deliver what I think they over promised because mother was very clear about what he was going to deliver which was read the report when he came out and gave his press conference shortly after the report's release to try to clarify what he had felt was some perhaps the mis reporting a misunderstanding of what the reported said he was very clear I said what I meant I meant what I said and I want to talk about talk about before Congress but if I'm going to I'm just going to say I would refer you to the report so nobody should be surprised by the performance that Miller gave because he was very clear it well in advance that this was exactly how he was going to handle this case and what do you think these two hearings did for the democratic push for accountability well I I don't think they really did much of anything there's nobody in America who was convinced by the smaller hearings because if you either read this report you already know that the president engaged an impeachable offenses and if you haven't read the report and you're going by what's on television you're driven by whatever your political ideology is so I don't think it changed anything what I did think was interesting from the sort of pure strategic standpoint it was like watching this really really bad game of charades with the Democrats think what sounds like second syllable trying to do it Robert Muller to say impeachment he was never going to do that that is the responsibility of the Democrats in Congress and he's made that clear he's given them tons of recommendation so nothing changed both sides are just the settings that were before him well far from putting the issue to rest this week has been more impeachment talks and smaller testify than ever I'm speaker Nancy Pelosi had has been asked about it repeatedly Kristin do you think Democrats risk being overly defined by this debate I think every time another Democrat comes out and says that they would like Nancy Pelosi to begin impeachment proceedings Republicans are the ones that are celebrating because this in public opinion poll after poll after poll shows that there are large majorities of Democrats that would like their elected officials to begin this process but independents are much closer to Republicans on this question they're focused on other issues they would like Congress to be tackling other problems they may not like the behavior that trump engaged in that is detailed in the report but don't believe that impeachment is the way forward as of this puts pillows in a very tough position J. son of a Christian is pointing out an important divide here where the base that might decide the twenty twenty democratic primary really supports impeachment but the independents who helped Democrats win back the house in twenty eighteen don't so what do they do impeachment is is is more popular among all voters now that was before the next minute pizza you can pack your head and rub your tummy I don't think the Democrats put any risk impeachment is actually more popular now when the affordable Care Act got past net cost of Democrats thirty something seats so I don't think that the Democrats are in any danger what so ever if they go through with impeachment even for the Democrats who are in the seats that trump one in twenty twenty I don't think that there's anybody in those districts who's going to decide I will not vote for my representative again because they voted to have Donald Trump impeach really boils down to is it's a responsibility it's whether or not the Democratic Party wants to take on the responsibility for oversight or they won't put politics a lot of negative things have been said about Nancy Pelosi but most people agree that she's pretty good at political calculus do you think a political calculus is just wrong here yeah I do I think a political calculus is wrong I think she's what would have been a smarter decision for her to make is from the very beginning say Hey look when my caucus comes to me and wants to do this we can't she's been throwing water on it from the very beginning she's been trying to have the sort of chilling effect because she believes somehow some shape way or form that there has to be this magical number of consensus in order to get this done there's a reason that you have an actual trial I think this is a mistake on her behalf because at the end of the day you are dragged over the line by your base the Republicans understand that their base will drag them overlie the Democrats seem to think that they want to keep running for a middle and an independent or virtually not going to be the decision makers in twenty twenty anyway I want to move on to one topic that was central to the mother hearings which was Russian election interference and Miller said that did not stop with two thousand sixteen they're doing as we sit here and they expect to do and and during the the next campaign hours after Miller finished testifying Republicans blocked legislation that would have provided standards for reporting interference and given states millions of dollars to protect voting systems here is what Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell Republican said about that bill it's just a highly partisan bill from the same folks who spent two years hyping up the conspiracy theory about president trump in Russia and who continue to ignore this administration's progress at correcting the Obama administration's failures on the subject and the twenty eight K. Alexa in response to that Senate democratic leader Chuck Schumer tweeted the McConnell is quote standing in the way of common sense action so Kristin why do you think Republicans are blocking this if you take a look at the vote in the house on the bill that was sent to the Senate as a factual matter it was a very party line vote so this is the sort of issue that I think is going to require a bill that starts off with bipartisan support and what Democrats and put on the table just wasn't something Republicans thought was appropriately tackling the issue would you understand why I mean Republicans say Congress has already done enough Congress objectively speaking hasn't really done very much I think one of the bills that's being talked about in the Senate which is being put forward and if they believe is in the works by senator Lankford a Republican of Oklahoma and center in the clover char this is a bill that would look to give I think some funding but would also I think change the way that the federal government support states and localities that's the bill that I think you're more likely to see come out of the Senate if something or just Jason and I last thirty seconds I'm I'm gonna give you the final word on this Mitch McConnell is able to do anything about election protection because he knows the all the way down from gets elected is by supporting suppressing minority votes in making sure the voting systems can easily be corrupted everybody knows that it's not complicated this is not about patriotism is not about partisanship it's about the future of this country image McConnell doesn't care that is Jason Johnson politics editor at the root thank you for joining us thank you and Kristin psaltis Anderson of the Washington examiner have a great weekend you too I will to another story now this has been one of the wettest years on record so far some towns in the west to though are just a few unlucky incidence away from a wide scale water shortage earlier this year faucets in a small western Colorado town ran dry for nearly two weeks the water is now back on but it has left residents feeling and secure for member station K. U. N. C. Luke Runyon reports if you wanna get somehow life can night unfurls a map in his office in downtown pay on your Colorado this is the town in stride in yellow it shows a separate Rawling network of water pipes criss crossing this agricultural community about four hours southwest of Denver night is the town administrator meaning he's in charge of making sure it's water system works and earlier this year it didn't if we had had only one of the things happen at each time we would not have had a crisis we had all three things happen and we had a crisis those three things work to massive leaks and a lingering drought from the year before it all started on Valentine's day a tank that stores the town's drinking water was dropping fast after a few days of searching for the leak they found a fire hydrant near the banks of the river that flows through town and the water was going straight through the river rock into the river so was not only to the surface most of the time when you have a big leak it pools in the street but not when it's flowing into a river so they patched it up the tank was still dropping other burst pipes were draining it and because the town was coming off twenty eighteens record breaking hot and dry conditions the mountain springs feeding the tank were running extremely low and I said okay we're shutting off that meant for more than a week there was no run ng water at all for most of the town sixteen hundred customers instead the town park to big water tanker at town hall and because it was February people used melted snow to flush their toilets and wash dishes this shortage wasn't just hard on residents downtown Paeonia is lined with brightly colored shops and restaurants to cater to farm to table tourists without water many had to temporarily shut down Tyler timbral manages living farm cafe so we probably last five or six twelve hundred dollars that would have been enough money to cover a month's worth of their utilities servers and cooks to count on ours and tips were told.

special counsel Kaufman dot NPR ari Shapiro six twelve hundred dollars thirty seconds twenty eight K four hours two weeks two years one day
"kaufman dot" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:57 min | 2 years ago

"kaufman dot" Discussed on KQED Radio

"From the Kauffman foundation working together with communities in education and entrepreneurship to create uncommon solutions and empower people to shape their lives and be more successful more online at Kaufman dot org then from Americans for the arts it's morning edition from NPR news I'm no well king I'm Rachel Martin and I'm Steve Inskeep that phrase about one small step for man is about to be out of date the trump administration is promised to put the first woman on the moon by twenty twenty four the new plans for space come amid celebrations of the anniversary of the first moon landing fifty years ago that feat grew out of the U. S. space race with the Soviet Union the changed much of American life here's president Dwight Eisenhower talking about Sputnik one the satellite first launched by the Soviet Union in October nineteen fifty seven we congratulate OB obrien on putting a spotlight into orbit United big battle right program has been the dying from it in fact for maximum results in plant typically start now the U. S. is turning its eyes upward again in space is our topic as we ask Cokie Cokie Roberts joins us regulated talk about our politics in the government work I Cokie hi Steve and here's our first question I'm Bridget how can of two more in Iowa is anyone actually still interested in going to space or what space exploration offers us it seems the hype was huge when the program started years ago but appears it's become a joke with space force actually recent polling stations a good bit of interest in the program a CBS survey conducted in June char fully three quarters saying the moon shot was worth it in terms of time and money at about the same number said they favored sending astronauts to explore Mars and close to that number favor sending national it's back to the moon although almost as many said they personally would not like to go okay not for everybody now in terms of a space force that's a whole new branch of the military proposed by president trump a pew survey in may and June does show significant opposition to that about sixty percent but people still strongly supported US leadership in space although clearly is not what it was back at the beginning of the program when the whole country sat up and took notice how to the country take notice we now after World War two the Soviets once was repeating this and suddenly we heard that they've sent these beach ball sized objects way more than a hundred and eighty pounds store over the years am I remember well it was a huge shock Senate Majority Leader Lyndon Baines Johnson called extensive hearings then the US tried and failed to send up our own satellite so we rushed to set up massive to formally launch a space program in nineteen fifty eight then the Soviet shocked us again by sending a man into space in nineteen sixty one which led to president Kennedy's famous call from putting a man on the moon by the end of the decade one of the question comes from Vance controller who wants to know if there is political support for space exploration today is there any congressional appetite to actually allocate funding for the next moon shot whatever it might be a trip to Mars or a different project if you go by the budget numbers there absolutely is congressional support analysis been getting what it asked for and Maureen recent budgets and it's aggressively promoting the moon shot and a human on Mars the language Steve is so similar to what I heard in the nineteen fifties the program will provide for American leadership in space expand the US global impact but also that it will create a whole new generation of science technology engineering and math stem learners and really that's part of the original space program they might have had the most long lasting effect okay thanks as always good to talk to Steve counter Cokie Roberts and you can ask your questions about our politics in the government work by tweeting us with the hashtag asked this is NPR news more morning edition just ahead now the fingers crossed for hopefully a smooth Friday morning commute once again let's say good morning to Ted Anthony right down to San Jose stole some activity this hit and run accident as mentioned south down one oh one before the Santa mas expressway the vehicle that is out there went off the roadway from the shoulder just in need of a tow truck first reports of an accident out index and westbound eighty of milk farm road no other details but teach we headed out towards the area we do have delays of the bay bridge toll plaza backed up westbound eighty two the a Grand Avenue over crossing the metering lights are often once you're past that traffic is light on the way into the city I'm Ted Anthony or KQED and more traffic from Ted in ten minutes.

Kauffman foundation three quarters eighty pounds sixty percent fifty years ten minutes milk
"kaufman dot" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:06 min | 2 years ago

"kaufman dot" Discussed on KCRW

"Will impact the game plus local news weather and traffic it's All Things Considered from NPR and Casey are W. I. Thursday edition starts at three now this from KCRW news a conservative group is applying for a permit to stage a straight pride parade in the Central Valley city of Modesto next month it's been described as a heterosexual answer to LGBTQ celebrations and the news has sparked a storm of social media KCRW Eric Roy has more pro claiming that it will be a celebration of life a group called the national straight pride coalition is planning to hold the first ever Stanislaw county straight pride parade and event on August twenty fourth in Modesto a flyer says the event will celebrate heterosexuality babies born and unborn western civilization and Christianity one of the group's leaders Linda Mason tells the Modesto bee that people in the L. G. B. T. community have quote had their free speech but our speech is the one that's being impeded on the city's reportedly in the final stages of approving the permit but has been inundated by calls and emails a similar but unrelated parade has been approved by the city of Boston for next month Eric Royer reporting you're listening to morning edition on eighty nine point nine KCRW NPR news for southern California it's three twenty one support for NPR comes from this station and from Dana Farber Cancer Institute with more than twelve hundred cancer clinical trials in progress physician researchers are working to unlock the cancer code more at Dana Farber dot org slash beat cancer from the Kauffman foundation working together with communities in education and entrepreneurship to create on common solutions and empower people to shape their lives and be more successful more online at Kaufman dot org from the Walton family foundation where opportunity takes root more information is available at Walton family foundation dot org I'm from the William T. grant foundation at W. T..

California W. T Kaufman dot Dana Farber NPR Central Valley KCRW William T. grant foundation Walton family foundation Kauffman foundation Dana Farber Cancer Institute Eric Royer Boston L. G. B. T. community Linda Mason Stanislaw county Eric Roy Modesto
"kaufman dot" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:58 min | 2 years ago

"kaufman dot" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Kaufman dot org from NPR news I'm no well king and I'm Steve Inskeep of five years after Eric garner died after a choke hold while in police custody federal prosecutors have made a decision they will not charge in New York City police officer involved in his death prosecutors cited insufficient evidence against Daniel Pantaleo garters dying words I can't breathe what you said again and again became a national rallying cry in a flash point in the black lives matter movement those unhappy with the lack of federal prosecution include Josie Duffy rice president of the appeal a news site that focuses on criminal justice she's also co host of the podcast justice in America good morning to you good morning thanks for having me what led the justice department to look into garner's case you know it was that of a long process of five years over four different and attorney generals have been looking into this case and at the DOJ and that came in in and in kind of after that Staten Island district attorney decided not to charge Daniel Pantaleo in this case almost five years ago in December of two thousand fourteen so I'm kind of in light of the moment of police brutality and being found a scene case after case of of men and women being killed by the police especially unarmed black and brown men and women and the department of justice decided that they were going to bring an investigation okay but not now let's look at this decisions we now have two different prosecutors we have a local prosecutor we have federal prosecutors have looked into this and both said insufficient evidence I realize there's a video people have seen it people heard garner's words people feel they know a lot about this but twice now prosecutors have looked into this and just found there's not enough to charge the officer who says he thought he was doing his duty as he sought at the time is there any justification for that point of view well first I'd say that while to prosecutors both the Staten Island and the and the US attorney in Brooklyn have decided not to bring and charges we also saw that the office of civil rights at DOJ did think that this is a case that deserved charges to be brought so there is some back and forth on on how prosecutors more broadly are looking at this case but it's very difficult right to charge police officers and in these cases because functionally they have to prove that they use they willfully used excessive force and that's a very very high standard to have to prove how she has yet to know somebody's intent but was in their mind at the time right and as long as an officer can make a case that he quote unquote feared for his life he has a very very high chance of getting off we see it time after time and in cases across the country where prosecutors are very very hesitant to even bring charges against someone like officer Pantaleo could the Attorney General though have made a different decision within the law even giving they get given what the law says about police officers absolutely he could have brought charges right that's not and that doesn't mean a conviction he could have made a case that there is an argument that the officer acted out of hand that he violated the civil rights of Eric garner and caused his death and and and he could have brought charges in fact and that if they office of civil rights I DOJ recommended that that what we see is that the Attorney General Barr has has decided that he doesn't think that that's that that he can win this case or he doesn't think it's a case for spring okay ms rice thanks so much thank you Josie Duffy rice is an attorney and journalist who advocates for criminal justice reform the US space and rocket center in Huntsville Alabama celebrated the anniversary of the Apollo eleven launched yesterday by trying to set a New World record pretend hill from W. L. R. each has the story.

Steve Inskeep Eric NPR five years
"kaufman dot" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"kaufman dot" Discussed on KCRW

"For NPR comes from NPR stations and from the Kauffman foundation, working together with communities and education and entrepreneurship to create uncommon solutions, and empower people to shape their lives and be more successful. More online at Kaufman dot org. And from the Andrew w Mellon foundation guided by the belief that the arts and humanities are essential to the well-being diverse democratic societies. Learn more at Mellon data walk it's five forty six..

"kaufman dot" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:09 min | 2 years ago

"kaufman dot" Discussed on KCRW

"To operate the missile defense system will acquire secret information from the jets aired on says the belated US offer still isn't as good as the Russian deal. Peter Kenyon, NPR news is STAN Bill, and you're listening to NPR news. Taiwan's president is using the thirtieth anniversary of the brutal crackdown on pro democracy protests in Beijing's Tiananmen Square to criticize China and Facebook post today time, wind said China has no intention of reflecting on what happened and plans to continue to cover up the truth. China has never released a full death toll but estimates range from several hundred to several thousand as part of President Trump's state visit to the UK. He'll take part in Britain's d day ceremony tomorrow in Portsmouth. That's where the invasion of Normandy was launched Trump will then travel to France. For more commemorations reporter Jake's again, rose in France. He met with a group of young history. Buffs from Denmark, today, who say they've come to honor the sacrifice of American troops, seventy five years ago. The group of twentysomethings dressed in US, GI, uniforms, from World War, Two were smoking in the street and Baio. But they were not Americans away from Denmark, and like every night, getting will living history group, portraying us servicemen a serviceman bus during the second, we'll well in Europe Magnus hill said they were wowed by the heroism of Americans because the Nazis conquered Denmark, very quickly, it gets rid of just about honoring the men that helped liberating Europe from the Nazis, especially because we were occupied by the Germans in nineteen forty and yeah. Grateful will make in Europe. The way it is today. They said they hoped to meet some of the US veterans. They admire so much for NPR news. I'm Jake's again, or in by you, France and I'm Joel Snyder. This is NPR news from Washington. Support for NPR comes from the Kauffman foundation, working together with communities in education and entrepreneurship to create uncommon solutions, and empower people to shape their lives and be more successful. More online at Kaufman dot org..

NPR US France Jake China Denmark STAN Bill Trump president Europe Peter Kenyon jets Tiananmen Square Kauffman foundation Kaufman dot Normandy Facebook Beijing Portsmouth