35 Burst results for "Kaufman"

US official: Russia plans to annex parts of eastern Ukraine

AP News Radio

00:35 sec | 3 weeks ago

US official: Russia plans to annex parts of eastern Ukraine

"Russia Russia Russia Russia is is is is intending intending intending intending to to to to annex annex annex annex much much much much of of of of eastern eastern eastern eastern Ukraine Ukraine Ukraine Ukraine according according according according to to to to a a a a top top top top US US US US official official official official Michael Michael Michael Michael Kaufman Kaufman Kaufman Kaufman said said said said US US US US ambassador ambassador ambassador ambassador to to to to the the the the organization organization organization organization for for for for security security security security and and and and cooperation cooperation cooperation cooperation in in in in Europe Europe Europe Europe warned warned warned warned Russia Russia Russia Russia we we we we also also also also recognize recognize recognize recognize the the the the southern southern southern southern city city city city of of of of Casson Casson Casson Casson as as as as independents independents independents independents carpenter carpenter carpenter carpenter believes believes believes believes Russia Russia Russia Russia has has has has been been been been planning planning planning planning a a a a sham sham sham sham referendum referendum referendum referendum in in in in Donetsk Donetsk Donetsk Donetsk and and and and Luhansk Luhansk Luhansk Luhansk regions regions regions regions in in in in order order order order to to to to create create create create a a a a video video video video of of of of electoral electoral electoral electoral legitimacy legitimacy legitimacy legitimacy there there there there are are are are also also also also signs signs signs signs that that that that Russia Russia Russia Russia is is is is intending intending intending intending to to to to engineering engineering engineering engineering independents independents independents independents voting voting voting voting Kasen Kasen Kasen Kasen carpenter carpenter carpenter carpenter confirmed confirmed confirmed confirmed that that that that night night night night the the the the move move move move would would would would be be be be recognized recognized recognized recognized by by by by the the the the United United United United States States States States or or or or its its its its allies allies allies allies I'm I'm I'm I'm Karen Karen Karen Karen Thomas Thomas Thomas Thomas

Russia Ukraine United States Donetsk Europe Michael Michael Michael Michae Kaufman Kaufman Kaufman Organization Organization Orga Carpenter Carpenter Casson Casson Luhansk Luhansk Luhansk Casson Kasen Kasen United United United United St Karen Karen Karen Karen Thomas
Wokeism Is Splitting Democrats and Uniting Republicans

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:47 min | Last month

Wokeism Is Splitting Democrats and Uniting Republicans

"One thing that strikes me in all of your works and let's list them again. So you've got the return of Christendom. These are the essential reads from doctor turley. You've got the new nationalism and beauty matters. And it's clear from your podcast and from your videos that you are a real optimist, Steve. Your man of faith, you believe the secularists can be challenged. And you have a very positive attitude to this challenge. What makes you think that they can be defeated? Because I look at the last 5, 6 years, and I see a man who garnered more votes than any other incumbent president who was banned from Twitter, who was probably removed from office illegally in that election. I see a handful of maga candidates who are denuded of their committee membership who are lambasted by the mainstream. What makes you think that beyond the personal life, the religious life, the family life, that this revitalized conservativism can actually win politically as well. We can look at it so many different angles. I'll stick with one that's wraps up nice bow, everything we've been talking about. And that is the reality that woke ism, which is the value system of our political elite, whether it's politics, corporate, you name it university and the like. Wilkinson is unsustainable. Absolutely and totally unsustainable. And we have data on that, which is really fascinating. Eric Kaufman of the University of London wrote in very fascinating article on the data that he analyzed that found that when you ask any amount of Democrats, whether they support any woke issue. So CRT to kids, transgender athletes and women's sports. You name it. They're always split on their answer. It's about 50 50, 60, 40, that kind of thing. We're actually seeing it in the Disney in the parental rights bill or now law in Florida, where a fox poll found that 52% of Democrats actually supported that. It was really fascinating. However, when you ask Republicans the same question, do you support teaching CRT in our schools? Do you support transgender athletes in women's sports? What answer do you think you get? And I've done this. I've done this in one of the American freedom tours. In Phoenix, 3000 people, I said, you know, what's your answer? And it a whole stadium would know what we're finding is woke ism is splitting the Democrats and its uniting the

Turley Eric Kaufman Steve Twitter Wilkinson University Of London Disney FOX Florida Phoenix
Smylie Kaufman Discusses His Spring Break Trip

Fore The People

02:24 min | Last month

Smylie Kaufman Discusses His Spring Break Trip

"Think we wouldn't be good credible journalists if we didn't talk about smiley's partial nudity, it's spring break. Yeah, we need to talk about partial nudity here on spring break. How did that trip? How did that trip come? You've probably talked about a million times, but the people want to know more than anything. How did that trip come about? That was the week after Augusta, wasn't it? It was two weeks after. So I think Ricky and JT decided to play Hilton head the following week. And JT, thanks to me about going on to bakers. I guess I was first alternate and got in. The fourth was at the time. And I was at it as a fourth. Which was awesome. I was like, cool. Those three guys are great. Love them all. And so we had known were going on this trip prior to Augusta. So going into the final group of Augusta, I've known Jordan like casually, but I had been on a trip with them. We went to different schools, you know, we didn't really talk a ton in college. So our first really time we played together was at Augusta on Sunday and so we knew we were about to go drink a lot of beers together, but we knew it was going to happen later. So we were like, all right, and so after that trip, you know, hey man I both obviously had steam we needed to get out. And just from playing bad. And then I think JT or Rick both shot a million at Hilton head. We get to baker's coming in hot. Like, I mean, all four of us are white. We played some really bad golf. We need to drink a million beers. And yeah, we just had a hell of a time. And Rick was pretty big on social media at the time, obviously. He's always been pretty big on it. And so is JT. This was kind of when Rick was a big social media guy. And Jordan really didn't do a whole lot. I had probably 5, 10,000 followers at the time at the end of the trip. I had so many. It was just like, what is going on? A lot of people here. People like the content. We were just being, you know, I think it was just we were being ourselves and it was a

Augusta JT Smiley Hilton Ricky Rick Jordan Baker Golf
ESPN Are Innovating With Their Commentator Selection

Fore The People

01:42 min | Last month

ESPN Are Innovating With Their Commentator Selection

"I love how ESPN and their team of networks is getting guys that currently play and former play, but they're not so far out like a Kurdish strange or a Dottie pepper. They're younger guys and they're getting them with their takes live. It's like the mayonnaise getting on Monday Night Football. It's similar to that in that it's way more interesting to hear Peyton Manning and Eli Manning, bullshit with young jock or whoever the hell they brought on that. I think they brought on Nelly and got Nellie's opinion on the last throw by someone in the playoffs. I don't remember who it was. But that telecast that Monday Night Football with the mannings got higher reviews. It got higher ratings than anything they've ever done because that's more interesting. People want to hear current guys that can kind of talk, the public through the mindset of what's going on on the telecast. I think it's cool. I think when I've always watched golf on TV or coverage, I come at it from a more of a different way of how I look at a golf course. Sometimes I want to know more information about the conditions that day or that pin location and specific the green speeds. What that person's got going on in that day as far as their a stuff. Those are the things that I don't really ever know while watching. Just assume you just see the best shots that day and sometimes you just don't catch on with some of the things those players are going through that day. So I'm looking forward to kind of maybe telling that side of the story a little bit and see how it goes.

Football Espn Eli Manning Peyton Manning Nelly Nellie Golf
Smylie Kaufman Believes Seeing the Best Play in Person Is Key

Fore The People

00:51 sec | Last month

Smylie Kaufman Believes Seeing the Best Play in Person Is Key

"I tell you what I love watching the best players in the world play too. You learn something every time you go see some of those guys play. You're like, you just kind of take a couple of things. I always just so impressed with I watched JT on Saturday and Augusta and I've known JT forever and when you haven't seen a guy like him playing a while, it wasn't just his golf that impressed me. It was just like the way he carries himself. And I think that those are the things you kind of you don't see just on regular TV. So as a current professional golfer, I learn, you can kind of take tidbits from things that you learn from those top players in the world. So I'm kind of looking forward to watching those guys carry themselves and seeing how close I really am to be back to compete with those guys.

Augusta Golf
Smylie Kaufman Turns PGA Commentator

Fore The People

00:35 sec | Last month

Smylie Kaufman Turns PGA Commentator

"So you're going to go commentate at the PGA. You're going to sit in the you're going to sit in the booth, a booth, abuse. I can do some PGA Tour live. Yeah, it's either booth or on course reporting. I'm not, I think it's it might be on course. But it's ESPN+ coverage of the PGA Championship. Going to be there all week. Don't really know more than that. Just that I'll be there with a mic and hopefully some hot takes here and there and I'm sure there will be plenty degenerates that'll have the group bets out watching and hopefully I can provide good coverage

PGA Espn
Anheuser-Busch vs Coors Brewing Company at Augusta National

Fore The People

01:42 min | Last month

Anheuser-Busch vs Coors Brewing Company at Augusta National

"That reminds me of a story from Augusta national, actually. When I was playing a practice round there, it was how quiet it is. There are SK what normally. And I was there in March, the month prior for my last trip there before the masters. And you have to be with a member if you're bringing anyone to play. Jeff Knox came out and just the token Augusta national member. And we were talking and he was telling me some stories about that place. He was telling me who was on site that day. And apparently the guy that owns Anheuser Busch is a member there and Peter kurz, the guy that owns Coors brewing, they're obviously competitors, but they're both members at Augusta and they were the guy that owns Anheuser Busch was there that day. And Peter kurz had gotten wind that the guy that owns Anheuser Busch was going to be on site that day. So he called the day prior. You know where I'm going with this. He called the day prior and bought all of the Coors light on the property. All of the coolest products. He spent like $30,000 and bought all of their products and had them shipped off. So when Peter corris got there the next day to play golf at Augusta national, there was no course products. He had to drink Bud Light or Budweiser or an Anheuser Busch product. That's the kind of shit that doesn't happen anywhere else in the country. But like a little snicker ha ha, I made him drink my beer. That happens all the time at Augusta national. There's little bitty things where they run their, it's like their own government inside those gates. They have no rules except for what they want to do. It doesn't even feel like they have anyone over them. They are the rules in Augusta,

Anheuser Busch Augusta Peter Kurz Jeff Knox Coors SK Peter Corris Bud Light Budweiser Golf
Smylie Kaufman Loved Being a Natty Light Salesman

Fore The People

01:32 min | Last month

Smylie Kaufman Loved Being a Natty Light Salesman

"You sign a natty light deal. And that's incredible because that's some for the people shit right there. Talk about the natty light deal. How'd that come about? I remember when one of the guys that works at our agency brought it up and at this time, I've worn polo my entire professional career. And so when you start kind of putting brands together, when I first heard about natty, I was interested in getting in the golf space. I'm like, well, that would be a good fit personality wise, but I don't know if that matches up with a conservative strix on it in a pretty conservative polo, if you will. And eventually, after talking to the guys, I'm like, the deal made sense. I'm like, if you all can get it approved by all the other people on associated with and I'm in. And I think luckily I had a great group of buddies that kind of ran with it as well because they thought it was their deal as well. They get to rep all the natty gear and get to go to they get the product and they actually had a pretty big, it's called smiley's army, Twitter account. I don't know if there was a pizza army. I'm sure everyone's got their own army. And they love putting up content themselves. So it was really fun. Great, great, great copy to work with. And I had a lot of

Polo Golf Smiley's Army Pizza Army Twitter Army
Augusta's 12th Hole Is Notoriously Tough

Fore The People

00:28 sec | Last month

Augusta's 12th Hole Is Notoriously Tough

"About. Dude, that whole so dirty. I mean, remember, remember when Tiger one, 2019, molinari was, he had a multiple shot lead in that hole, and he just, I mean, he tried to flag it and that's how Tiger freaking won. And I think molinari hit the tree on his third shot on 15. And then it was just over, but yeah, Tiger hits it to like 50 feet on 12 or whatever. And that hole is so dirty. I mean, it seems tough. I'm glad that I'll probably never have the opportunity to play it and be

Molinari
Changes to the Masters Course Are 'Perfect' According to Kaufman

Fore The People

01:46 min | Last month

Changes to the Masters Course Are 'Perfect' According to Kaufman

"But what's your perspective on the setup of the masters this year? So 15 was like straight into the fan. We barely saw anybody go for it and they added all these new teas. I mean, when you played it, you obviously loved it. Did you think it was perfect or did you say, man, this place would really be the nuts if they added three or four more teas? I thought it was perfect. The way I was. I didn't really get a great look at number 11. But from what I did see, like I did walk on 11, but I didn't believe it was really pay attention enough to dissect the trees that they took out on 11. But I think I do like the changes on 11. I think that ship before right of the green was always incredibly hard as it was, but to make it even harder to tempt guys even more to try to hit that green in two. I think it's a good thing for that whole because I think the challenge of taking on that green should be, it should be a huge reward rather than bailing right and still having an easy bump. I think they've made that I mean, I can't remember what day it was, but Scottie hit it way right Saturday. Who we are. In the auto up and down. That was probably the silliest up and down. I've ever seen. That is such a hard shot. And I think what a lot of people don't get is the wides around a gust or not like the most pure wise you've ever had in your entire life. I remember being like, it's kind of tough to spin stuff around the greens. Like it's just, it doesn't sit up like that Phoenix chipping, you know? Like we're just like, you can't screw it up chipping. You could screw up chips out there.

Scottie Phoenix
Changes to the Masters Course Are 'Perfect' According to Kaufman

Fore The People

01:46 min | Last month

Changes to the Masters Course Are 'Perfect' According to Kaufman

"But what's your perspective on the setup of the masters this year? So 15 was like straight into the fan. We barely saw anybody go for it and they added all these new teas. I mean, when you played it, you obviously loved it. Did you think it was perfect or did you say, man, this place would really be the nuts if they added three or four more teas? I thought it was perfect. The way I was. I didn't really get a great look at number 11. But from what I did see, like I did walk on 11, but I didn't believe it was really pay attention enough to dissect the trees that they took out on 11. But I think I do like the changes on 11. I think that ship before right of the green was always incredibly hard as it was, but to make it even harder to tempt guys even more to try to hit that green in two. I think it's a good thing for that whole because I think the challenge of taking on that green should be, it should be a huge reward rather than bailing right and still having an easy bump. I think they've made that I mean, I can't remember what day it was, but Scottie hit it way right Saturday. Who we are. In the auto up and down. That was probably the silliest up and down. I've ever seen. That is such a hard shot. And I think what a lot of people don't get is the wides around a gust or not like the most pure wise you've ever had in your entire life. I remember being like, it's kind of tough to spin stuff around the greens. Like it's just, it doesn't sit up like that Phoenix chipping, you know? Like we're just like, you can't screw it up chipping. You could screw up chips out there.

Scottie Phoenix
Smylie Kaufman on Jordan Spieth's 2016 Masters Collapse

Fore The People

00:30 sec | Last month

Smylie Kaufman on Jordan Spieth's 2016 Masters Collapse

"You had to watch Jordan Spieth one of your best friends make a huge number on 12. What was that like from a front row seat? It was just weird, you know? That was so sad. I was so sad watching that. I wanted to cry. After he hit it in the water the first time, I didn't think he had lost the jammy chip at that point. You know, I still thought he was, in my mind, I still thought he was winning by a million because he felt like he was beating me by a million that day. So I was like, he's got to be winning by a lot.

Jordan Spieth
John Peterson on Holding the Solo Lead of the 2016 Masters

Fore The People

01:53 min | Last month

John Peterson on Holding the Solo Lead of the 2016 Masters

"So you teed off Thursday morning, Pete. I was the first group off on Thursday. Do they are the first three groups on the board? Or do they, when do they decide, we're going to start putting guys on the leaderboard? First of all, no, that's a good question. Because we made it I teed off. I teed off right behind Arnie Jack and Gary. So I sat there and watched them. Tee off from the front row. That was just the coolest shit ever. And then all of a sudden it hit me that I had to hit next. It's like, oh, fuck. So it was one of those days like this year's masters where it was 45°, and it's 7 a.m.. It's cold and Augusta, Georgia, sometimes this time of year. And it's overcast, 45°, and there's now driving. John Peterson, and I was like, oh, jeez, here we go. That bunker on the right is like 305 yards to carry. It's 45°. I've never carried it 305 yards in my life. It doesn't matter if I have a hurricane behind me. I hit this bitch and it miscarrying this bunker by like two feet. At 45°. And I'm like, I don't know what happened there. But I've never carried a ball 340 yards at 40° in my life. So after I hit that tee shot, I settled down. Sure, solo leader at the masters credit to myself. But I did get around to like the 8th. I think the atoll was the first time I saw my name on the big board because they have that they have that leaderboard there on the left. So they did have you on 8. Okay. They had me on 8. I had made all pars. I had made all pars until 13. I burned 13, and then I buried 15. So I was two under through I was 200 through 16. And of course, I three put 17 and ruined the bogey free round. But yeah, I opened with one under. I was pretty happy with that. And then I just kind of partied the rest of the week.

Arnie Jack John Peterson Pete Gary Augusta Georgia
Smylie Kaufman Looks Back on His 2016 Masters Battle With Jordan Spieth

Fore The People

01:58 min | Last month

Smylie Kaufman Looks Back on His 2016 Masters Battle With Jordan Spieth

"Then you go to the masters and everybody remembers watching you battle with Jordan Spieth that week. Yeah. Talk about that. Oh, God. Just an incredible week. Really felt like that place set up well for my game. Drove the shit out of it. That entire week. Like, as good of a driving week as I've ever had. I remember. They didn't have like the strokes gained thing on the master things. You couldn't see how well you actually did drive it, but it was so windy. And it was just like this past year. At that shot, 69 on Saturday. And I went to Augusta this year for the first time since that masters. So I was out there on Saturday this year and I think it was probably eerily similar to the Saturday that I shot 69 and was the low guy. Cameron Smith shot 68 and being outside the ropes and seeing, you just didn't see a four under that day. So obviously I was in a good frame of mind because I was, you know, I just really felt like I had control of the golf ball. Good wind player. It was blowing 30. Just didn't screw up any. Just put it in the right places and it was an awesome week till Sunday just kind of ran out of gas a little bit. It's one of those days until you experience that final and you've experienced final rounds of majors. You just gotta have those momentum pots to keep you going. Just to keep the mojo going and I kept missing the mojo putts and eventually by the end of the day, I think I was four or 5 over going into 16 and just finished four over on the last four. So this work kind of got over hyped for what I actually did shoot but the thing for three to 5 three putts that day and I'm not a three

Jordan Spieth Cameron Smith Augusta Golf
The Fall of 2015 Was a Golfing Dream for Smylie Kaufman

Fore The People

01:14 min | Last month

The Fall of 2015 Was a Golfing Dream for Smylie Kaufman

"Get your tour card obviously that year, right? And then you go, and then you go win in Vegas. And you say to hell with this, this is the easiest thing ever. What was I doing in college trying to play top 5? I could just come out here and win right away. Yeah, you know, that fall, man. What a dream fall, huh? Well, I was playing so well. And the guys coming off of the web really like, you don't have a break. You just go straight into playing. That's the best thing that could ever happen for a young pro is like playing a smaller, not the biggest tour event, but still the big, the big show. And you get out there and you're just like, all right, I'm still in playing mode. It's not like when you got your card in years past where you had to wait all the way till Sony. You wait three or four months and you're not, you know, you're not as fresh as you were coming off a web tour finals, which we were. You know, we had a week off then went to Napa. It's like, you're still in a pretty good golf shape. I think that was an advantage for me that I finished tenth in Napa and then when the following week and just had an awesome fall, it was the best. Some of the best golf I've played on tour was that fall and into all the way into Augusta.

Vegas Napa Sony Golf Augusta
Smylie Kaufman Talks About Going Pro

Fore The People

02:08 min | Last month

Smylie Kaufman Talks About Going Pro

"The lightbulb kind of came off for me, spring semester, my senior year, put a ton of work in that off season, from a swing perspective. I was always not the most weight ball striker. In college, I was probably one of the better putters in short game guys in college. I think that's what kind of chuck saw in my game as well, our coach, and he just always said if he can get on the green as much or more than everyone else, then you're going to be there and then a golf tournament. And eventually, I started getting control of the golf ball, you know, where I could kind of point and shoot where I was looking and then from there I was able to be on the green as much as everybody else and quickly I started getting a lot of confidence. It kind of belief in myself. Kind of had took a lot of ownership and my golf swing. And playing week to week, that spring of my senior year just building confidence is a week, weeks came on, was able to qualify for the U.S. open right out of school. That's right. Yeah. And that was like the big, I think it was I qualified in locals while I was in school and then right after NCAA's did sexual and made it through pretty easily. And at that point, I was like, I was still thinking about doing another summer of amateur golf. Because I was like, I'm so ready to get to the top of amateur golf because I really just hadn't broken through yet. And I was like, at this point, I make the U.S. open. I'm like, well, that decision's made easy. I'm going to definitely turn pro now. And from there, just had a really nice summer. Didn't make the count to be open, but it felt like my game, you know, when you get to that was the best thing that could happen to him. He was playing practice rounds right out of school with PGA Tour players and seeing like, all right, my stuff matches

Golf Chuck U.S. Ncaa PGA
Talking About That Time John Peterson Was Arrested

Fore The People

01:58 min | Last month

Talking About That Time John Peterson Was Arrested

"Only played, I think. One or two events together like in the lineup because I was in and out. I didn't really play, but a couple of events to fall, that freshman year. And then I think one of them that you were going to play. And you were excused as a no, I got arrested. I got arrested. I got arrested for public intoxication. Let that stand on the record. And somehow we got out of that situation. But I was suspended, yes, for the colonial Ohio. I was just saying I was an innocent. I was a witness to the whole scene. Honestly, you were in the you were in the right. Okay, well tell me what happened then, because I don't remember it at all. Well, all right, so you had a couple of man sodas, if you will. And where were we? Where were we? The Tiger stadium. We're always on the front row that's Tiger stadium student section. We held that down pretty well. And they always, there was a couple sheriffs that always wanted the traffic of just people going up and down the stairs to stay off the fence. They just needed a walkway, basically. And Peterson had just gotten back from getting some nachos, the concession stand before the game. And he's leaning up against the fence, which is a no no. We had to have some of the cool cops and the cool sheriffs to be like, yeah, you're fine on the fence. But they didn't like us there. And the guy came up to Pete and told him, hey, you need to get off the fence. And he's like, no, I'm good. The next thing you know, a couple of minutes later, like he takes his nachos and then Pete just goes into full just give me back my nachos. There may have been like a little shoulder nudge to assault. Well, we're not going to call it a song called a little bump in a flop by the cop. He was out of there and we're like, all right, I guess Pete's not going to a lot of

Tiger Stadium Ohio Peterson Pete
Junior Legends of Their Era: Philip Francis and Rickie Fowler

Fore The People

01:11 min | Last month

Junior Legends of Their Era: Philip Francis and Rickie Fowler

"You know who else was there was that was like an elite junior player Philip Francis. I remember seeing him thinking like this guy is national junior golf scoreboard numero uno and then Ricky, it was just like those two guys were Tiger Woods and Phil Mickelson out there. They were. I remember stepping on the first T playing Ricky. I was dude. That's probably one of the most nervous first tea tea shots I've ever hit. And I step up on the T and I look around and there's probably 50 college coaches. I mean, no less than 50. And 49 of them were for Rickie Fowler. And then the chuck with chuck was over here. Let's go JP. They had the local juco guy out there for Petey just like he was close. He's like, I've never been in Rancho Santa Fe. I'm not allowed. I might as well go out here and we'll pretend I'm watching somebody. Yeah, Philip Francis. I just looked it up. Dude, he won. Phillip Francis won this, yeah. I would do that. You didn't even go to college. Didn't he turn pro like right after you went to multiple schools. Oh, he did. Oh, it's one of those. No, he committed to Oklahoma state and then he decommitted went to UCLA. Remember, Ricky committed to UCLA and then decommitted it with the Oklahoma

Philip Francis Ricky Phil Mickelson Chuck Rancho Santa Tiger Woods Rickie Fowler Phillip Francis Golf Petey FE Ucla Oklahoma
"kaufman" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

The Rich Roll Podcast

02:50 min | 2 months ago

"kaufman" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

"Also, tell me a little bit about this new I mean, you move from the east coast, you're no longer captured by the Ivy League institutions, you're free on the left coast. And you've got this like you open up this institute, right? Yeah. I started the center for the science of human potential. And we do courses like we were doing 8 week transcend course to help people. We're working on all sorts of collaborations and working on a collaboration with second city involved to do self actualization. I'm working on a self exclusion coaching certification program. That can be used in different sectors of society, including education. I'd love for teachers to start to rethink their role in the classroom or self actualization coaches. Yeah, I really feel like I'm living my values. The things I want to do to help people realize their potential. And you know, I get to do a lot of edibles on the beach. So that's good. Am I allowed to say that? Good for you. Hey, listen, I would if I could. You know, I'll just leave it at that. Awesome. Well, let's do this again sometime soon. You can learn more about Scott at his website, Scott Barry Kaufman here. I have the hype. It's got very coffin dot com. But I have a book coming out this year called choose growth that I think it will help a lot of people. It'll be it's the workbook companion to transcend. Transcend was published during the start of a global pandemic, would not wish that anyone publishing a book. This one was a little more forethought planning. We actually have a book that can help people grow from the pandemic itself. So what I did is I used the situation and I made women out of lemonades. I published a book that of course Nolan read because it came out the day, the pandemic started. And I used it as a way of like, you know what? I'm going to work next couple of years on a book that I'm going to get ahead of this. I'm going to get ahead of this. And really help people specifically who had some sort of setback during the pandemic. As I did, with lots of things, and we all had so I think we can really grow. So yeah, it's called Jews growth. Cool, man. When's that coming out? That's coming out September of this year. I co wrote it with Jordan finegold, who's the founder of a field called positive medicine. And she was also a former undergraduate student of mine at Penn. She came into my office as an undergrad, telling me that she wants to go to med school and well as positive psychology. And I was like, you should start a field positive medicine and she's like, really? I was like, yeah, here we are almost ten years later. She has her MD and she has the leader of the field of positive medicine. Could be more proud of her. So we teamed up on this book. To really figure out how we can help people, not just body, not just mind, but body as well. Cool, man. Well, when.

center for the science of huma Scott Barry Kaufman Ivy League east coast Jordan finegold Scott Nolan Penn
"kaufman" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

The Rich Roll Podcast

07:20 min | 2 months ago

"kaufman" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

"The psychology that is driving so called heterodox gurus and various culture war battles. And many other very interesting topics. I found Scott to be really engaging Frank, vulnerable, like I said, fun. I really enjoy talking to him, so this is me and doctor Scott Barry Kaufman, coming at you in three, two, one, go. Well, Scott, I'm so happy to meet you. This has been a long time coming. Yeah, it really has, and it's a real, real honor for me. It's an honor for me. There's so many things that I want to talk to you about, you have written extensively on subject matter that is dear to me personally. That I'm excited to explore with you today. Of course, self actualization and transcendence, which you explore beautifully by extension. Of the work of Abraham Maslow, who we were just chatting about before the podcast and how meaningful he's been in your life. By dint of this fantastic book that you've put out recently transcend. But prefatory to that, I think it would be really interesting and also to help kind of contextualize your background a little bit to talk about being a late bloomer because that's something that I'm familiar with. We have different versions of late bloomer stories. But I think your story and the work that you've done around late bloomers kind of help set the stage for talking about these other things. Yeah, sure. I'm really interested in potential and studied things from prodigies. These kids who really start really, really young and how the heck did they able to play a complete piano sonata without ever taking any lessons to savants to all sorts of things. And so there's different ways of thinking about late boomers. In my specific case, I was in special education very young because I was essentially deaf, the first three years of my life. I made it very hard for me to process things in real time and teachers took that as an indication that I was stupid. Not just teachers, but bullies and everyone, everyone. And my mom believed in me though. That's important. Yeah. That is super important. So I repeated third grade. So a late boom in that sense as well. So I was delayed there. And I was kept in special education with it's a very heterogeneous group in special education. So I was with a problem kids, you know, who the most acting out kids in the school so that they would bully me in special Ed. Why did you put me with my ball? In the same room. Thank you. Thank you, school. But to autism spectrum, there's such a wide range of people that were put into put in there. And I was kept there always till 9th grade. But always did feel as though I was capable of more. I really was confused that on the one hand the way I was kind of treated by the school, but on the other hand, I knew my inner life had a rich inner life. I just loved fantasy and imagination. And I would act out like soap opera plot lines in my head where I was like the leading man and I would be to be continued every day and then the next day I would pick up in my head. It's all in my head. I would like great stories and novels and things. So there was really this duality within me that was really frustrating and confusing because of those can I question the authorities at all? Everyone thinks I'm dumb. But I do feel like there was greater potential within me and it really it really took feel free to stop me anytime, but yeah, no, no, no. At some point, you have this teacher in 9th grade who believes in you and that becomes kind of a lever for you to break out of this paradigm. But what I find interesting about this and I haven't heard you talk about is the origin of that belief in self that persisted despite all this kind of external input that was trying to tell you that there was something wrong with you. I think about that a lot. I've had some great conversations with Angela Duckworth who wrote a phenomenal book called grit. About this, because my office was right next door to hers when I was at Penn. Oh, wow. I was running the imagination institute while she was running the character lab. So we were like, oh, we should team up and see what the conjunction of imagination and grit would be sort of thing. But we would have lots of walk home. It talks, as we walk home from after a long day of work, try to just understand what was it that was really going on with me in my personal life. I think grit is a big part of the story. I think I'd be remiss not to say there was this confluence of passion and perseverance within me. And it's the confluence of the two that I think is really important. Any one without the other is if you just have perseverance without passion as just like duty, if you just have passion without perseverance, what is that? That's just excitement. Right. But then the question becomes are those inbred traits that you just had coming out of the womb or was there something about the resistance that you were meeting in your world that emboldened them or strengthened them? Yeah, I think that it got in a walk to use a bad scientific metaphor. It's not like a key that gets in love. But there was a point in my life where this special teacher took me aside in 9th grade after class and she asked me, what are you still doing here? She saw all my Friends. She was the first one to really just even ask me that question. Like in the coaching world, we talk about powerful questions. Questions that really cause you to have a huge self transformation. We'll talk about a powerful question in my life. This woman all she asked me, she's like, what are you still doing here in special Ed? And I thought to myself, what am I still doing process to what you said? And I said, you know, what the fuck am I still doing here? And something really got unleashed in me. In that moment, something I had been building up for many, many years. It's almost like I just needed some catalyst or someone to just even question that I maybe had more potential. And from there, it was wildfire. I called my mom. I ran to the pay phone called my mom. And I said, hey, I'm not going to special it anymore. She's like screaming. She's like, what did they do to you? I set up a meeting with the school psychologist, the administrators, the special teachers. And they had nothing in the rule books of our school system for that to be the case for us, a special student to break out by themselves. So you had to litigate this. It was the first time they were walking through the what do we do with this situation? And so what they decided on is they were going to let me out on a trial basis. So I was like, thanks for the vote of confidence, guys. They said, we're going to let you out. Take mainstream classes, even I know you want to honors classes, fine. We'll let you take some honors classes. But if you fail, you're coming right back in. But in that moment, I will tell you my attitude was, oh, I'm going to prove them. Yeah. I think a big part of my 20s and from high school from that point up to maybe the end of my 20s was really driven by the underdog motivation, which is a phenomenon really fascinated about and I write about and I'm actually working on an article bigger article about it right now, but I think it's huge. Yeah, I mean, I can certainly relate to that..

Scott Barry Kaufman Scott Abraham Maslow Angela Duckworth imagination institute Frank Ed autism Penn
"kaufman" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

The Rich Roll Podcast

02:28 min | 2 months ago

"kaufman" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

"We're going to explore the road map for finding more purpose, more fulfillment through the psychology of self actualization and transcendence and what a good one it is. Our guide for this examination is Scott Barry Kaufman. Scott is a cognitive scientist and humanistic psychologist who has taught at Columbia University, Yale, NYU, the University of Pennsylvania, and elsewhere. He received his PhD in cognitive psychology from Yale, a masters in experimental psychology from the University of Cambridge, and a BS in psychology and human computer interaction from Carnegie Mellon. Currently, Scott is the founder and director of the center for the science of human potential, and in honorary principal fellow at the university of Melbourne's center for well-being science. He hosts the number one psychology podcast in the world, the psychology podcast, and in 2015 was named by Business Insider as one of 50 groundbreaking scientists who are changing the way we see the world. Doctor Kaufman's writing has appeared in the Atlantic, scientific Americans, psychology today, and Harvard Business review. And he is the author and editor of 9 books. The latest of which, and a focal point for today's discussion is entitled transcend the new science of self actualization. Wherein he presents this really elegant new hierarchy of human needs for the 21st century, one that allows for the fulfillment of individual potential as well as the actualization of transcendent purpose and peak experiences. As always, a couple more things to add before we engage the Vulcan mind meld, but first. We're brought to you today by athletic greens, newly rebranded as AG one. I've been a daily consumer of this product for somewhere between four to 5 years at this point. And consider it to be the premiere all in one non negotiable daily nutritional supplement. It's important to understand that even for those who have their nutrition totally dialed, certain deficiencies are the norm, not the exception. And it is with this in mind that AG one was founded, creating an exceptional and constantly improving formulation based.

Scott Barry Kaufman Carnegie Mellon Yale center for the science of huma university of Melbourne's cent Business Insider Scott Doctor Kaufman NYU University of Cambridge University of Pennsylvania Columbia University Harvard Business review AG
"kaufman" Discussed on One Life Radio Podcast

One Life Radio Podcast

02:03 min | 7 months ago

"kaufman" Discussed on One Life Radio Podcast

"And we are live from dallas texas junior. And i thank you for that rolling stones music junior. I'm so excited about the concert tonight. I really am. And i'm really excited about this show and the content that we're putting out today. It just feels so good. It feels so right dr kaufman and marcy cravat are with us. They have They they made the film terrain. It's a movie preview That's going to be here in dallas this weekend at the western price Conference the foundation conference and it's november. Four th what is it. It's november sheet in front of me. Whatever the date is on. It starts friday right friday through sunday. I believe right. Yeah i think so. And i think this screening is open to the public. Is it not indy. Live that's correct well and it's a fascinating film it is and and i'm i'm not even sure where to go next. I have a ton of notes from watching it. You know one of the one of the things on my notes is the seventeen models of cell membranes that no one has ever seen a live cell membrane. We've only got about three minutes so that's probably not the best use of time. Maybe you can come on again and we talk about that because it's very complex. That's what i was kind of referencing two earlier. Right when i said about the going back to the moon and back like thirty times the length of a dna I don't even know what you call it. Because i'm not a scientist. What is it called you guys well. I'm sorry andy. Go ahead say the overall point is that oftentimes we think we know some certainty about something in science but if we go look at it we see that it's actually not the case like with the cell membrane was taught it was a plasma lipid by layer But but turns out like you said they're fourteen other models and it's never been actually directly observed so we don't really know which one is correct and there are many many things like that including the paradigm of genetics that every protein is encoded.

dr kaufman marcy cravat dallas texas andy
"kaufman" Discussed on One Life Radio Podcast

One Life Radio Podcast

04:29 min | 7 months ago

"kaufman" Discussed on One Life Radio Podcast

"Himself. So they're what they show in the electron microscope. Images are simply the particles of dying cells when cells die. They always break down into particles to protect the environment from just releasing their corrosive contents and causing damage to the surrounding tissues. And you can look at virtually any Microscopic evidence of dying tissues and you can find all different sorts of particles that have been misinterpreted as being viruses. So that's why they say there are so many of these things and also through their genetic testing which are simply generating computer models of little fragments of genetic material and putting them together in ways that are kinda to say that they're viral in origin. And they even say that there are viral sequences incorporated in our own You know dna in our nucleus and in our own particles and essentially what they've done is just take our own genetic material and relabel them as these imaginary agents of disease which are used to create the demand for vaccines and create the premise for a psychological operation of a pandemic that has other Intended purposes it's very complex. It's very complex. I'm recalling apart in the film where it was an image of dna. And i think that. I it said in the movie or the film that you could take that. Dna and spread it out and it would go back to the moon to back and forth to the moon like three hundred times or thirty times. I can't remember the. Do you know what i'm talking about. Marcy and and dr kaufman about the dna and then how they slice it all up. It's very complex. It is and that's why there's so much confusion around this topic right germ theory of versus terrain there. You know i. I would like to say from a layman's point of view that germs viruses are just cell debris they're just decaying cells and they see them under the microscope which that also is a pandora's box but they see them on the screw up and then they blame them for the disease If you from just a layman's perspective..

dr kaufman Marcy confusion
"kaufman" Discussed on One Life Radio Podcast

One Life Radio Podcast

04:42 min | 7 months ago

"kaufman" Discussed on One Life Radio Podcast

"Oh man i love that. I just love that. Song i two. I'm so excited. I'll be at that concert tonight with the rolling stones here in dallas texas. Everybody welcome back. We have a fantastic show here today with marcy. Cravat and dr andrew. Kauffman were talking about the movie terrain a movie premiere germ theory and covert nineteen. Which will be premiering this weekend at the western price foundation a conference. So let me reintroduce you a little bit though you guys a read a short bio for people just now joining us. Maybe or getting in their cars. Marcy is the co founder of apostle londe pictures producing and directing such films as the award winning environmental documentary angel zoll and the documentary terrain which is currently in production and dr andrew. Kaufman is a medical doctor and a public speaker researcher. Natural healer business and education consultant inventor and covert nineteen whistle blower. Dr kaufman has a b s from an it in molecular biology and completed his psychiatric training at duke university medical center after graduating from the medical university of south carolina. And as. I said we're talking about the movie to rain okay. So marcy in the film there are scenes from the two thousand twelve olympic games opening ceremony in london. It's this bizarre spectacle featuring a routine routine celebrating the national health service england state controlled healthcare system so what was the symbolism of this performance. And why did you include it in the film. Well that was two thousand twelve and you can see all the way back in two thousand twelve. And i'm quite sure even before then we were. Actually they were actually disclosing to us the narrative that was really coming down the pike. So how imagine the effort. The effort of money that goes into creating an opening ceremonies olympics the detail of every single aspect from the confidence the the messaging to the lighting to casting to every graphic. That's included. You have to ask yourself the question. Why were they showing this quote. Spike protein virus. Why did they have nurses acting like lobotomize robot taking commands. Why did they have a wuhan reference And why did they have. World leader references Shown in this opening ceremonies. Why did they show these monsters. Coming out of the sky which were more or less the enemy attacking children. Why was this choice for an opening ceremonies out an olympics. I mean generally when you see an opening ceremonies at a how in a host country. They're trying to show you know something. They're proud of about their country. Why instead was this the content. So i put that in to help people ask those questions to try and understand that this is a plan denic and you know when you do things like that. It just the sort of rings through like planting seeds absolutely. Yeah and that's not the only one there were there. Were other ceremonies. That were equally as haunting You know this wasn't the only one but this one's stuck out to me. In fact there were one that when factor earlier olympics. I was one of the ones in I can't remember maybe spain. Barcelona can't remember But you know these are ways that these these plans disclosed to the public pays the way and prepare minds to accept rain. Watching tactic is what it is..

dr andrew western price foundation apostle londe marcy angel zoll Dr kaufman national health service englan Cravat Kauffman Marcy duke university medical center medical university of south ca Kaufman dallas olympics texas olympic london Barcelona spain
"kaufman" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

07:16 min | 9 months ago

"kaufman" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

"Kaufman in Roland Varga dish with you, Roland. All right. You mentioned this right before Josh Suggs scored the go ahead goal that the switchbacks had really been the better squad for much of that first half, But unfortunately, uh one Sequence has them trailing at the break. Yeah, I thought they dominated large swaths about first half after going behind that opening goal. We saw the switchbacks kick into gear. We saw them using their speed. We saw them using their quality. They just weren't able to take advantage of it until the own goal from New Mexico United. Then after that, I thought they were also the better team until just that sucker punched him. Josh thugs right toward the end of the 1st 45. Well to recap. The scoring. It happened early for New Mexico United. It was Chris we hand off a great crossing by Josh Suggs. Making it one nil and the switchbacks doing a good job after that of of battling and his, Rowland said, really took figure first half for themselves for much of it and And you pointed this out, and I think expertly, so Roland, you know that goal in the 23rd minute is going to get credited to where she today and it's going to go down as an own goal. Right? That that's just kind of the trivia around it, because, as you pointed out, Michi Galina has made that play a lot. And if it didn't end up on the feet of the head of today, Um, it probably would have ended up with the switchbacks player putting in the back of the net so really an own goal on the score sheet, but an earned gold by the switchbacks. You talk about forced and unforced errors, you know, and that was certainly a forest error. I mean, today I had to do something with that. Obviously, in a perfect world. He's heading that one up over his own goal post. But he had to do something about that because there were a couple of switchbacks on the door. All because of that great play once again from Mickey Galina, and he just saw his header fire into the back of the net. But That all came from the switchbacks pressure that they were applying time and time again against New Mexico United Well and then the next goal happened in the 42nd minute. It was Josh Suggs, making a nice run and getting a goal for himself got in behind the defence and chipped it over a diving abroad. Re guez Into the far part of the goal made it to one and that's a That's a tough goal to concede because it's so late in the half and we saw one week ago, the switchbacks and how they were able to just grab momentum. From Austin. Bold with those back to back goals in rapid succession late in the first half last week, switchbacks are going to really have to shake this thing off and get out there. With the purpose in the second half and not let the momentum that New Mexico United just grabbed away from them faster and build into the second half. 100% correct. It's going to be interesting to see exactly how New Mexico United start the 2nd 45. Are they going to maybe leaning back a little bit because they've got that goal, But I think the switchbacks have to attack on the front foot. They're leaving themselves a little bit vulnerable. Defensively already in this match that could happen more and more as we go further in the switchbacks are going chasing that goal, but the switchbacks have to get on the front foot have to try to play their soccer and get him behind. It adds up to a 21 score at the break. When we come back, we'll look at some of the first half stats and also at some of these scores from around the USL championship. A couple of mountain division teams also in action tonight, But they are playing teams not in the mountain division, but we'll let you know how they're faring regardless when we return here to the halftime show. On extra sports 1300. Listen to the switchbacks on Alexa. Just say Alexa Open extra sports 1300 halftime down in Albuquerque switchbacks trailing by his score.

Josh Suggs Michi Galina Mickey Galina Chris Josh New Mexico United 100% Rowland Roland Varga 23rd minute 2nd 45 Kaufman second half Roland first half 42nd minute today Alexa tonight last week
"kaufman" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast with Scott Barry Kaufman

The Psychology Podcast with Scott Barry Kaufman

04:06 min | 10 months ago

"kaufman" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast with Scott Barry Kaufman

"You know and then you can generate up a defense theory of conservative ideology. But it doesn't look to me like it's fear related because it doesn't manifest itself in neuroticism at all and it should if that theory was correct. There's something about disgust. It's crucial that that has been under study so far. But that's i think that's super interesting. And i've also been interested in the At the aspect level analysis of these things so the overall agreeable to mean is is not a good player. But once you look at the aspect of what you find that they diverged. Politeness is higher among conservatives and and compassion is higher among Liberals i should just point out for everyone. that's listening. Is that work. Done in my lab by calling diong particularly. We showed that you could break the big five down into ten sub aspects. We call them. So you get some additional predictive utility. Sometimes if you use the more differentiated scales. We did investigate us as dr kaufman just mentioned we did investigate the effects of that on political belief and we did find as you said that conservatives are more polite and that liberals are more. Empathetic are more agreeable. And we don't know what to make of that partly because we don't really understand politeness exactly. It's it has something to do with it. Something related to deference to authority politeness. But it them just respect. Respect for authority is seems a little bit different in deference it could could be respect. Sure sure but but then you. It's complicated because of conscientiousness is also associated. I would say to some degree with respect for authority right. And so what's the difference. What is politeness. adding that conscientiousness doesn't already cover so. Yeah yeah yeah well it it it it. I was really excited by the political research Hartley that was done in my lab but also elsewhere because it's really it's quite revolutionary. I think to think through the implications of the fact that your political viewpoints are determined by your by your temperament and because what it means. Is that your biology in large part has provided you with a filter for the facts right so we like to think. Well you derive your rational conclusions from the set of facts that you're exposed to but unfortunately you have to choose the facts because there's just too many of them and so temperament is playing a major role in determining what you expose yourself to. We found that with fiction preference. For example like open people are much more likely to read fiction and fiction of certain sorts and so the differences start with the information gathering process itself. Some of the work with mar-. Yeah was that. I love that Well that works so much by the way we had a hell of a time getting that stuff published although it's crazy when you publish what it's going to be published and what's going to have an impact you certainly can't predict it but yes that that all worked out quite well so okay so back to. Let's go back to the if you don't mind unless you want to somewhere else. Let's go back to the humanism issue okay. Let's central to your new book. So you've got interested in what. What was it about the humanist..

dr kaufman Hartley
"kaufman" Discussed on Meet the Thriller Author: Interviews with Writers of Mystery, Thriller, and Suspense Books

Meet the Thriller Author: Interviews with Writers of Mystery, Thriller, and Suspense Books

04:32 min | 1 year ago

"kaufman" Discussed on Meet the Thriller Author: Interviews with Writers of Mystery, Thriller, and Suspense Books

"With nasa nasa a few years ago ten years ago and she was talking about some situation and some guy just cut her off in the middle for explaining something and he said you know. You're you're wrong about this. You should read. And he mentioned an article he said you should be whatever is mcdonald at all etc. So this woman said so. I pulled my hair back away from my name. Tag pointed to my name tag and she said i am mcdonald all anyway. It was just a great example of privilege at work. He felt that he could you know he was the one that should be in. Charge be listened to so i think as writers it just means to to approach when we write about a group that has had Who does face brutality. Or discrimination or racism or homophobia or sexism approach it with a spirit of humility of listening and but also know that You know their limits on on the experience that i have you know there's just my life. Yes as a writer. We tried to imagine as much as possible. Thank goodness otherwise. All of our books would be about city. Someone's sitting in front of a computer. It'd be incredibly dull so it's true you know. Virtually all writing is an active imagination. We graft on bitten our own experience and history but ultimately it's filtered through own experiences and our own the world we've lived in so we've got to assist we step out we'd better be damn careful We better ask questions. We better get feedback and we should. We should also respect when the maybe limits And not to place places in advance but there may be limits or moments perhaps. I don't think it's a permanent thing but moments where some of us just say okay. I'm stepping back. This is not my day. Or my issue or my. I'm gonna let other people do the talking here. It's complicated of so. Did you always before you wrote. This book published it to the always wanted to be a fiction. Writer is that..

mcdonald ten years ago few years ago nasa nasa
"kaufman" Discussed on Meet the Thriller Author: Interviews with Writers of Mystery, Thriller, and Suspense Books

Meet the Thriller Author: Interviews with Writers of Mystery, Thriller, and Suspense Books

04:36 min | 1 year ago

"kaufman" Discussed on Meet the Thriller Author: Interviews with Writers of Mystery, Thriller, and Suspense Books

"Aside from writing has been as an adviser and an activist working on issues around engaging men to promote women's rights I've worked over the years extensively around the world in the un system with different governments. Ngos and so. I wanted to bring the issues. I'm interested in onto the pages now. It's not this is not a this is not a nonfiction book. It's you know this isn't homework to read this book. It's fun but wanted to engage readers conceptually as well as you know getting people turn the page and so it just seemed that this sort of cross genre approach would allow me to both have a lot of fun first of all entertain people but also to explore some real issues that face us as as well not just as readers but as citizens and human beings. You mentioned that you have the climate change then equality. That's self stuff that that's been going on for years but he's also through the virus in there. Was that before the tried this before. All this and you know it's funny i. I was talking to someone who just to reader. Who didn't didn't know. And there's no reason why they would know the laborious process to go from writing a book to an agent already. But you know then going through the you know working on a book with it with your agent and and And others and then you know then they pitched the book they sell it and you go through a whole year with your publisher so yeah this was written back in know started in two thousand eighteen twenty nineteen wrote the bulk of it and and they were saying but listen. It's got this virus. And in fact i it's funny alan on the second page of the book. There's a scene. My detective is wearing an end..

second page both two thousand eighteen twenty n first years
"kaufman" Discussed on Good Life Project

Good Life Project

02:04 min | 1 year ago

"kaufman" Discussed on Good Life Project

"Is good life. Project.

"kaufman" Discussed on Welcome with Karim Kanji

Welcome with Karim Kanji

04:15 min | 1 year ago

"kaufman" Discussed on Welcome with Karim Kanji

"Today. Today's episode i speak with author and professor frederick. Kaufman frederick has written the brand new book the money plots a history of currencies power to enchant control and manipulate might sound a tad boring to you but it is a fascinating read. And this is a fascinating conversation so professor kaufman tonight. We talked about barter. We talked about gold. We talked about cryptocurrency in bitcoin. We talked about the gold standard. Just a fascinating conversation And really what drew me to want to speak with professor. Kaufman was just this whole idea of how as a really as a global society. We've all agreed that these coins and these this paper currency actually has value. When really when you take a look at it. Why it has value has really nothing to do with gold because no one's on the gold standard anymore. We talk a little bit about How us president. Nixon on august friday the thirteenth in one thousand nine hundred seventy one basically told the world. Fu we're not going to honor your american dollars and give you gold for. It's we're we're not in the gold standard anymore and so it's like why have we all agreed to this whole concept and idea of money and it's just fascinating so enjoy this conversation and if you could please if you haven't already subscribe i really would appreciate a rating a review especially on apple podcasts. It helps this. Podcast became discoverable by more and more people. So thank you for that. And here's my conversation with professor and author of the money. Plots frederick coffin our you where are you what's going on. I'm doing well We are. I'm in toronto Older yes but not know what. Not as cold as it could be. You know so. I go outside and my face doesn't freeze which which troubles be because it just means that It's coming yeah you know. But everything is good. Everyone's keeping safe and healthy in a new york got vaccinated on monday. Oh.

new york Today frederick toronto august friday kaufman tonight thirteenth Nixon Kaufman one thousand monday frederick coffin apple nine hundred seventy one barter american
"kaufman" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:41 min | 1 year ago

"kaufman" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Kaufman W. B z Boston's news radio Back to those arrows, traffic and weather together, the Subaru retailers of New England all wheel drive traffic on the threes and good morning once again, Kevin where you taking us? Good morning, Suzanne will take it south of town here. That expressway North bound. Still some brake lights coming up past Columbia Road. Then you're lookingood heading up into the O Deal tunnel South bound. You got your heavy brake lights here from east built in square getting down to a crash at Furnace Brook Parkway. Once you clear that you're okay into the brain tree split that no reported troubles down on route 3, 24 or 95. Roadways are wet and could get some slippery conditions out there, especially with some of these leaves a little extra caution on some of the ramps And a lot of the second every road ways out to the West Mass. Pike Westbound. We're gonna clear that disabled truck we had on that ramp 2 to 90 exit 10 here in Auburn. That ramp has been reopened. Whatever is it Well, delays have already eased down for 95 looking good to and from the pike that the mass pike close to the home downtown. You're jammed up westbound inside the Pru tunnel to a spin out just after the Pru tunnel. We got that center right lane blocked there, so stay to the left to get around it once you come out of the tunnel itself. This report sponsored by the Empire State Building, looking for a safe way to have an adventure. Empire State Building Observatory is open, joined them now and enjoy the great outdoors. Open Air 3 60 degree views Security reservation today at Empire State building dot com. Open daily availability is limited. Kevin Brennan. W B Z is traffic on the threes window world of Boston is the choice to make to save on energy bills every season. Beautify your home with award winning windows, doors, siding and roofing. A.

Pru tunnel Kevin Brennan Empire State Building Empire State Building Observat Boston Furnace Brook Parkway Empire State Suzanne West Mass Subaru Kaufman W. B Auburn New England
"kaufman" Discussed on The Toxin Terminator

The Toxin Terminator

06:26 min | 1 year ago

"kaufman" Discussed on The Toxin Terminator

"Listen if you're my age, your generation x woman I've been going through my menopause for couple of decades now and. I would like to think that I'm over with, but I'm not in. This is such a trying time for so many of us women in honestly. You know I think society looks at it as this is just normal how we all view menopause. We're, GONNA have hot flashes. We're GONNA. Have memory loss we're going to have. The teague were not going to be able to sleep is just one of those things that we just have to plow through and get through to the other side in here to tell you that's not true. There are ways that we can. Can Get through this process in. Have it be a better experience for US overall? And that is why we have Jennifer Kaufman here today. She is going to be helping us. Learn how we can get through this process from everything from makeup to skin-care toe are wardrobe needs our health in our quality of life with all of it gets impacted as we move through the shift in her mission truly is helping women. Go through this with Grayson. Ease with all the tools that she has her arsenal. To go through this I keep saying go through this. But honestly you can't. You can't escape that right Jennifer. We're all going to have to do it some day. were so excited to have you here were excited to hear your message and on your tips that you have for us in your. What shall we do as where were? You know going getting through this to the to the other side you. This is kind of live. We've worked hard our entire life. And now it's it's that Golden. Age Right that we all hear a bank get referred to. And we want to enjoy life, and then boom slants in our lap, right. Right and we're not really prepared for it because no one talks about it, it's a sort of a hidden shameful thing to do is into menopause and. It's not I mean it's probably the best time in a woman's life because she's not taking care so much of other people, but she's allowed to spend energy and effort, really cultivating who she is and getting offering out to the world so I i. myself have been in a positive. I was thirty because I had a hysterectomy in a new wreck me. I was thrown into the whole. Dang I head no guidance at all, I had chemicals thrown at me and all sorts of stuff, and it took me a long time to figure it out, but when I did, I started to realize it's just a balance. It's maintaining A. Also shifted in your life. And it's a stage of life and attorney. That everyone every woman goes through period. I don't care when you go through it. I don't care if you're surgically induced, induced or naturally induced. There's basically three stages to it, so you're. You'RE WALKING UP TOWARDS CAROLINA PAS. If you go in naturally, you can sort of arrive at your path when you go out and based on how I I like to say. How broken are you? surgeries you've had the more chemicals you've had the more stress. Mental emotional physical, those things all can sort of come into play with how you enter menopause. But You can get their own speed, or you can be thrown directly at the door in what I call the tunnel transformation. Is that that here everyone talks about? That sounds so very terrible. I'd like to encourage women to look at it differently. We need to look at this time period as you are allowed to let go up. Everything doesn't work for you. From this point forward, you can go mental thoughts. Emotional issues family issues. You can change your diet exercise patterns because you need to. Your body is shifting were drying out where. We're literally shifting our focus on how life is and. You pay attention to the fact that even if you plan to live a hundred years, you're in the second half. Are Not going to go into college. You're not gonNA have kids. Now you're gonNA, have grandkids, but that's a different thing entirely right right a so. This is I just love this. I dreaded getting into this in honestly changing that mental shift with this was. Was You know I get to have this metamorphosis I? Get to go through this transformation, and it really is a transformation, and I know for me I'm a surrounded by a tribe A. Great Great. Women that are just so empowered now that we're not looking at this as the step to old age. Not at all. Not, at all, you know, this is a step towards more freedom. Absolutely enough any more freedom in so many ways I mean. So my my joke is, it's your freedom to wear jeans because you were white teams anytime you want to. You don't have to worry about your period. Come you off to worry about anything. Like never everything it's not about sex. No longer have to worry about having children you can be. Now I'm not encouraging promiscuity. More. Than Free and less worried about consequences I mean that's huge, but people think of it that way they think. Oh, Minna, dry up. Never want sex gamble I. gotTa Tell You that is not. Exactly? The attention to the fact that you're. You are literally drying out. You are supposed to be drying out because you're going backwards in an you will end up completely dried out when your spirit goes back to wear her ups right night, Ratto so to pay attention to these things but I mean it's literally like your sovereignty when you get past the tunnel transformation intimate if you do your work. You're right, sometimes cry without it. Yeah, let's let's talk about..

menopause Jennifer Kaufman US teague Grayson attorney CAROLINA Ratto
"kaufman" Discussed on I Run Because

I Run Because

07:28 min | 2 years ago

"kaufman" Discussed on I Run Because

"Inspiration the joys of achievement of all tonight we have one of achilles probably most famous athletes. and somebody. if we're talking about achilles we have dimension allan kaufman from achilles queens with. Alan was the first person that came to my mind when you set up the list of people. Oh yeah ladder flattered thank you. Hey alan how you doing good guys. Hi christine hi joe. Thanks so much for having me Listen when this this podcast talking about people's why of why they're running would not be complete. If we did not have alan kaufman on our podcast that i mean your story is one that inspires moves and is at the heart of what achilles is about and really at the heart of what this podcast is seeking to find so with that being said alan. Why don't we start with why you started to run. I remember specifically when i started to run and y wanted to start. Why went to begin running. I was in seattle in early. Nineteen ninety-one downtown and there was a five k. going on along the waterfront. It was an absolutely beautiful day. And i thought to myself it would be great to be a runner and of course i did nothing until my wife pregnant. A couple of months later in may ninety one and the elevator was at our building. So i decided i'd run up four flights of Steps to get to her apartment. And i was completely i couldn't catch. My breath was gasping for air. And i thought if. I'm going to be a dad. I need to get in shape. And that's when i began running may first nineteen ninety-one we. We just passed your anniversary. Twenty nine years. Wow twenty nine years. What's happened in twenty nine years. But i remember running. I walked a block. I ran a block. I walked a block. And then i vowed in eighteen months in the guess was the one thousand nine hundred city marathon. I was going to be an entrant and that was my goal. Eighteen months later. I went from doing no running to my first new york city marathon. You went from climbing a flight of steps being at breath to saying. Hey we're gonna. I'm gonna do the new york city marathon and eighteen months. I was completely. I was completely smitten. I you know the running community back in the pre internet days meant you'd send in a postcard or you'd get a flyer at erase. Fill it out. Mail it in with a check and then you do the race and get the t shirt and in those pre internet days. All you need to send in a postcard to roadrunners and you were pretty much. Guaranteed an entry into the marathon. So you were still on the west coast ninety two no. I was living in new york but traveled to seattle. And so that that's kind of where the seed was planted on a road trip. I worked for nickelodeon for many years. And i was always travelling and i later learned. Once i was a runner. It was a joy to go to different cities and run. So i was completely hooked. I think about the movie brittany runs a marathon. And like what you just explained was almost like alan runs a marathon. We watch the movie christine. And i laughed the whole same thing. I was amazing. I was slightly overweight within i. I dropped twenty five pounds in three months and got to fighting. Wait almost instantly. But there's that moment when you decide you need to change something in your life and me. It was just being expect apparent to be and living in queens. Where i live. There's is wonderful places to run flushing meadows. Park forest park. So isn't a great place to be a runner. And you did your first marathon. Nineteen ninety two and then did you stick with it or was that a one and done no i. There's always a moment when you run a marathon and you think what was i thinking. I'm never doing this again. The elation for the one mistake i made was like never predict what your first marathon times going to be. Because you're going to be awfully wrong. And i was pronouncing a three and a half hour marathon. I came in just shy of five. But i was. I vowed to do it again. The following year and i have to tell you from one thousand nine hundred ninety two until this past year. I did every marathon except the year superstorm. Sandy cancelled and the year. That i got sick but i was completely hooked both as an entry and then i didn't get in. I decided that was that was the change in my life. I became an achilles guide. You've done every marathon. Since ninety two. With the exception of the year they cancelled and my cancer diagnosis in two thousand seventeen. My doctor looked at me and said You may want to sit this year out so that. But otherwise i've done i just completed. Might well this past. November was my twenty six new york city marathon and hopefully if all the hysteria and i know that fifty three thousand people converging new york city from all over the world seems very counter. Intuitive right now. I am hoping that marathon twenty sevens in the offing for me in six months so alan. When did you start guiding. Do you have a year of when you start guiding it was either ninety six or ninety seven what had happened was the marathon was getting increasingly popular and i think roadrunners realized that a guy like me doing the marathon pays the subway fare goes to the expo goes home and contributes nothing to the economy. So they started limiting the amount of local runners to a certain amount forgot. What but the. I did on the marathon. I seen all these people that killy shirts and was completely i was. I was fascinated by the whole achilles program so the the first year that didn't get in and this is kind of self serving. I admit i decided. Hey this is the year. I'm going to volunteer his achilles guide. And i did and they took me and i foolishly over underestimated my overseer. I said i'd do. I can do the marathon a three and a half hours so they paired me with two very fast blind runners from thailand. There was a complete disaster. But after that i learned you know whoever would be i started guiding ninety six ninety seven and a half to save the twenty six marathons. They've done eleven was as an entry official entrant. Fourteen was a guide as guy as a guide and then one is an an achilles athlete. So once i started guiding this is for me. This is a wonderful way to do the race so just out of curiosity. There's a lotta charities that you could run with an especially in new york city. What was it that drove you to achilles. It was the site of bill. Reilly the first year. I did it if you don't. Bill got cerebral palsy. He's in a wheelchair and he goes backwards in his chair. I saw bill. I saw the achilles shirt is this man is my hero. If i'm going to volunteer with any charitable organization people disabilities and various challenges. It was going to be achilles international and even in the first year going with runners who are too fast for me. I realized that in years. After that i would just i. I started doing the race with members of achilles japan with blind runners from that team and they would ask for me every year they would look they reach out to me in april. Or you're going to be available in the fall. And i always said yes you know when i ran the new york city marathon in two thousand fifteen bill was my inspiration for joining. I saw him on a bridge. I forget what bridget was and he had to guides and he was going backwards over the bridge. And i remember thinking to myself. That's what i wanna do next year. And every time i see him he reminds me of why i did it right. And what a and what a thrill christine for to have him as a teammate net to be on bills team another fellow. Member of achilles queens..

alan allan kaufman christine hi joe alan kaufman new york city Park forest park seattle Alan nickelodeon west coast christine queens new york Sandy cancer thailand Reilly Bill bill
"kaufman" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

07:03 min | 3 years ago

"kaufman" Discussed on KCRW

"At Kaufman Donald it's a twenty two it's morning edition from NPR news I'm Steve Inskeep and I'm no well king good morning Montana governor Steve bullock started his presidential campaign late and so he missed the first democratic primary debate his campaign says he's qualified for the next round later this month not the center of his campaign is dark money in the latest installment of morning edition's opening argument series our policy conversations with twenty twenty candidates book says he thinks anonymous money from corporations and lobbying groups has corrupted our democratic process any started with an example think about the first George Bush George H. W. bush said we will lead on climate change and lead from the top that was thirty years ago and now Republicans candy rig knowledge that climate change is human cost or real because of the outside spending in our lecture if we can't take care of the corrupting influence of money our elections everything else is the Democrats are talking about we're going to run into the same problem can I just ask what reforms you would make specifically on dark money what what are your plans for day one I'd signed executive order that says if you want to contract with the federal government I can't tell you can't spend or donate but you have to disclose every single dollar that you are either spending are donated influence our elections adding that sunshine and transparency will make a difference my legislature's about two thirds Republican when we passed a bill that said ninety days out from election yeah after slows every nickel that you spend never forget when I was run for re election day ninety all of the dark money spending Stockton if we could kick the Cole brothers or other groups out of Montana we ought to be able do it everywhere in the country let's turn to foreign policy which is something that is a governor you haven't had a tremendous amount of experience with would you and US military support for Saudi Arabia's war in Yemen I would what's happened in Yemen is been failed from the beginning so I think that we actually need to actually be withdrawing the US dollars but try to bring the U. N. in together for more of a peacekeeping role would you withdraw US troops from Afghanistan I would want to make sure that we are completely out by the end of my first term twenty twenty four twenty twenty four you are one of just four democratic candidates in a very large field not to pledge that you will not take money from the fossil fuel industry why not Y. a N. look at the overall efforts in trying to make sure that all monies discloses been the fight of my career and what I've said from the beginning is all disclose every single dollar that stone age to my campaign with full transparency no PAC money no corporate money but haven't said this industry that industry we just want except all not to be candid I don't even know if I've gotten one nickel from anybody in the fossil fuel industry we could certainly check and get back to you but it's just if it's an individual giving a donation I'm not going to put these lines round here's who's worth the two given who's worthy not to give and I also think that there's something about this to like you know Montana it's the call state yeah we have taken immediate and durable action on climate change but I think at times Democrats will turn around and say you know folks this example that power this country for their whole lives more toward the times is perception the Democrats think something's wrong with those individuals so I think that we have to be careful especially the workers that were not demonizing what they've chosen to do to actually feed their family but we're trying to make this transition fast you said we should rejoin the Paris climate deal we should know that even if the signatories to that deal meet their goals which they're not on track to do global temperatures will still rise over what scientists refer to as the threshold of catastrophe what else will you do to make sure that doesn't happen you bet and the scientists say we have to be net zero emissions carbon neutral as a world by twenty fifty I think we could do it by twenty forty are even earlier if you're the president how what's your plan we need to make federal investments in everything from those opportunities upgrading the grid to investing in agriculture their sustainable agriculture in the Gerry counsels examples arctic saying here's how they can be that zero emissions we can't do this alone as you know China minutes twice as much as we do we know that we have to take about a billion tons of CO two out a year before going to actually meet these targets and I think bringing together for everybody from conservationists to labor to utilities and say let's actually make this track an opportunity you are an interesting candidate in a very specific way you're a politician whose mind has changed on a very real topic which is gun control you used to not support a ban on assault weapons and universal background checks but you change your mind now you do what year did you change your mind seventeen or eighteen is when I said universal background checks are just last year on salt weapons and that puts you behind a lot of the country though and I wonder why why that is what it take you so long so we had a March for our lives in Helena in Montana I was asked to speak and is supposed to speak I went with my children and I listened it is these kids are saying enough that's where I finally said enough with the assault weapons because I know was a gun owner I know it's not for hunting I know it's not for self defense there's no reason to continue to sell these when you talk about dark money you talk about how Americans are supposed to count equally and that dark money sort of perverts that there is a norm that you are very clearly seeking to return to in the United States I wonder what do you think American democracy looks like in the wake of the trump presidency are there norms to return to or has this country inched forever there has to be I mean I think that we are a tenuous time this two hundred forty three year experiment called represent democracy and that's one of the reasons why I got into this because I think that things fundamentally change if this guy's reelected the norms and expectations and the behavior that's been normalized the lies and misstatements to divide us by race by gender by geography I think that there are norms to be returned to and I think that we've got to make sure that people don't know that there's important as any corporation election day in every one of us have the same amount of influence over elections the ads how we make sure that the norms were stored that people feel like that they have a role in a voice in this.

Kaufman Donald Steve Inskeep Steve bullock NPR Montana two hundred forty three year billion tons thirty years ninety days
"kaufman" Discussed on 850 WFTL

850 WFTL

13:25 min | 3 years ago

"kaufman" Discussed on 850 WFTL

"Now back to Joyce Kaufman on NewsTalk eight fifty W F T L, but tell you there are so many things going through my head right now. I mean, first and foremost to trying to figure out what it was that. The listen Milana thought she was accomplishing when she called for a sex strike of still trying to figure that one out. 'cause like wouldn't that gonna happen come on? Well, but even if it did. So if you if didn't, you know for years, I thought the way for us to handle teenage pregnancy was to teach abstinence, you know, say don't have sex or if you have sex, you must have some form of birth control. Right. Otherwise it results in pregnancy. Which results in a birth? So that seemed to make perfect sense to me. So here, I guess extensively. What she's saying is, you know, don't have sex. Well, if you don't have sex, then guess what you won't have pregnancies. And then we won't have to debate. You know, how many weeks are this should there be or any of that other stuff? Just. I hit the button. Just saying by the way, does she live in Georgia. No. So it's really none of our business is it, but she keeps his sticking her needs a hobby knows where it doesn't belong to go back to acting the last time she's done that she's on that show. Foot show. I don't know. No, isn't she unlike then she played like the witch or something. I don't know. I thought she was on your show. Tis not on a show anymore. So holding sex hostage stops women from being treated as second-class citizens. Does anybody take that kinda crap? Seriously. You know, never mind don't answer that. Now, you have attention. Our reproductive rights are blatantly and systematically being stripped away before our very eyes abortion care is a normal in that times necessary medical procedure at first and formats, you know. Hi give. I really do. I give up. By the way, the other thing I saw last night that was worth the price of admission or worth listening to MSL estate for a few minutes was Rachel Maddow. Completely flipped out over attorney general bar appointing. John dunham. To investigate the Russia probe. I think I had the sound for that. China's He if I kept it 'cause it was I was worth the price of admission definitely. But you know, they just they they're completely out of the minds. I can't wait until that night in November. When Donald Trump gets reelected, right? I'm I'm afraid for them. I think some of them may completely go off the deep end that there may be actual life upticks in in in, you know, self-flagellation even suicide there just so crazed. They just they can't handle anything, you know. It's like they just fall apart and not even snowflakes. They're like melted. Snowmen Stephanie become a mental disorder. Oh, it's beyond the mental disorder. It's like a psychotic break with reality. This so misinformed and sell ignorant. You know, by the way, aren't they the party of science and urine other one with the like, oh, Bill Nye said what we all were thinking, you know, you guys is the party of science. And yet, you you don't understand that the science has now firmly established that conception is the point at which life begins. I I've never I've never been one of those. Okay. But, but do you realize that you know, that your side the whole climate change in that point, though, it's nonsense. What they're saying. But if there's it's not it is life. Right. But this is more than a cell. It's a it's a humid once is a heartbeat. It is you know, even before there's a heartbeat. It has all the DNA. It has all of the blueprints to become a humid. Well, look at Joe Biden that what did they do to his face classmates beat up catcher's mitt? No, no, he's in bad shape there. He he looks like an old woman. I know they've been saying you put both talks on them. But is more than Votaw. I think they use like one of those Sanders. A lot of makeup Philip. It's sad. I mean, Joe, we all know how old you are. There's no hiding anyway. So they had all these green machine crazies out there Okaz he'll Cortes and Bernie Sanders and without a new green deal. We'll all be dead. Maybe twelve years, what are you morons? You thought. I really meant twelve years. We'll that's what you said you said twelve years. So we thought you knew what you were talking about. And then we realized you'd never know what you're talking about. He said twelve years he said, we need a new green deal. There's nothing short of a new green deal will save the planet in analysis. And there is some stuff that I am in total agreement with I think, we gotta stop, you know, with all the plastics that is crazy the amount of plastic debris. That's in the oceans is crazy. That's just article where they found a cave, the deepest cave and Oceana whatever. And it had plastic latch. Yeah. No. There's no question. I mean, the amount of plastic in the ocean is absurd, and we could have some control of that first and foremost to stop using plastic. I'm looking at all these bottles lined up here. Now, you know that I buy water, and I made by a big plastic jug or big plastic bottle. But I then use a, you know, I refill my my things over and over again, which is why I hate me. Being lectured about recycling and climate control. Because I do my part. And if everybody did their part, look, it's your generation that insisted on having these little one size bottles of water. We used to just open up the tap and Philip glass or worst case scenario Philip a thermos, which we used forever. I think I had the same thoroughness throughout elementary school. Okay. Thermoses back. Why still have the fashionable soup? Yeah. Right thermoses, and and reusable bottles. I mean, everybody, I know has a reusable bottle, and they don't use it. They still walk around with a bottle of you know, whatever the brand the border. Yes. Polar springs and zephyr hills and all all of this jazz. And I got news for all the people out there who drink that stuff. I'm not positive, but I think that you know, they just fill that from the tap. You know, you're paying for it. You know for the luxury of having it in that. Small container now I like to drink this. What you call alkaline water with nine and a half ph. I just I don't know. I know a lot of people don't believe in lot of people say that. But I know I feel better. I feel more hydrated. My skin is better. When I drink the alkaline water. That's got more alkalinity in it. I'm a very acidic person. So I have to you know, overcome that with the alkaline. And and so I do that I buy it. But I buy it in big quantities. I don't buy like a little bottle of drinking than by another little bottle drink, then another little bow these this is your generation not mine. We always recycled made no sense to me. I grew up, and we got milk delivered to the house. It a glass bottle. Those always something always wondered like complaining about plastic. Why don't you just go back to glass glass bottles? We I mean, this is like a little bit of Barras thing. We had an icebox when I was little then then we got a refrigerator shortly after I guess has four when we got her officiated icebox was just like a box and a guy brought a big chunk of ice around with big ice tongs. And you stuck it in the top part of this box. And it kept the box. Cold. But it didn't keep a cold enough to like put meat in its the shop every day. And you shopped at little stores in the neighborhood. There's a butcher Baker candlestick maker, you know, you didn't have a supermarket. Speaking of that. I always wondered I think it'd be healthier if everybody did that. Of course, it would be maybe should be like little shops and everything around a little bit closer. And you get your stuff daily like whatever you're going to eat that day. Go ahead fresh. I listen, you know, this is how it was done. But we got too big, and we got to modern, and we got to advanced and you're no way than train up. My my grandchildren to to go. Well, I don't know about that. Maybe delivery services and everything I just don't understand why somebody hasn't come up with something. Civil delivery services like nine different ones. Look laser Americans. They the homeless situation is so out of control in so many cities in America today. I mean, I think Tucker started a special, and he started with San Francisco, and he was showing the tenderloin which is an area where I have walked it's not far from my daughter's first department went that's the name of the area tender line. Yeah. And she was in union square. So tenderloin is a walking distance to everything's pretty much walking distance in downtown San Francisco, but she you know, I would walk in the tenderloin pushing the stroller. When my oldest grandson in California was baby we go for these long walks because I nothing to do when I was there. I was just hanging with him. And he liked to go look for diggers. You know, the machinery that that's on this in the parks and stuff for the roads. Yeah. So we would go walking walking until we found diggers and men working with diggers and all. All the rest of it. And I would walk in the tender line. Because what do I know that was shops and stuff, and there were a couple of homeless people, you know, you know, more homeless people than one would want to see, but I went to the tender line. The last time I was in San Francisco in October of last year. There was nothing. But homeless people they were shooting up on the sidewalk they were literally shooting up on the sidewalk they were like, they would drape a sheet over them. And and it was I've never seen anything like that. And that's San Francisco one of the richest cities, do you know that more billionaires in San Francisco than any other city because of all the tech Silicon Valley people with other taxes, you'd think they find solution? But don't you in the sand? There's two California's there's the California of my children, and then there's the California of the homeless drug addicts and illegal immigrants, that's a whole different California. And they don't care about them. They really don't they pretend they care about it. But they don't go ahead and vote for Bernie Sanders, but they won't want to implement any of those they feel guilty. But they don't wanna live, you know, next door or anything like that. NS keep the homeless and the tender line. Trump says he's not planning to send one hundred and twenty thousand troops to the Middle East. He may not be planning it today. But it certainly on the table. I would venture to say because it's been slipped by others. I'm we'll find out. No. Some of the funniest stuff. I've I've ever seen these the video of of the mama duck with the ducklings that Jim Acosta had pointed the other day they were at the White House. Yeah. It will walking across the street from I guess they were in. What is the park Lafayette there? They're walking from Lafayette across the street towards the White House. And he Jim Mukasa took some video of this mama duck and the baby ducks of is definitely a cute little video, but he couldn't help but make it political. Right. You know, presumably the ducklings will be separated from the mother once they crossed the fence. Give it a rest just give it a rest. The White House immediately separated the mother from her ducklings, and then Stephen Miller and John Bolton flip the coin to see you got to throw the grenade. He does they all lead. They all need a life. People are weighing update. The mama duck has been deported in the ducklings currently in a camp in the desert reciting, the pledge of allegiance under threat of violence. Those kind of funny though. That wasn't Jim Augusta. That was somebody weighing in. They also weighed in with Stephen Miller is gonna bite their heads off. But we know how the story ends. They're gonna toss the, mama. Duck back over the fence. Keep the babies and cage them of cheese people, really. Bless they hearts in. They just they know not what they say..

San Francisco California Bernie Sanders White House Donald Trump Joe Biden Philip glass Stephen Miller Milana Joyce Kaufman Rachel Maddow Bill Nye Lafayette Georgia China attorney John dunham Jim Mukasa