17 Burst results for "Katrina Spayed"

"katrina spayed" Discussed on Nobody Listens to Paula Poundstone

Nobody Listens to Paula Poundstone

08:14 min | 5 months ago

"katrina spayed" Discussed on Nobody Listens to Paula Poundstone

"With hellofresh. You get fresh premeasured ingredients and mouth-watering seasonal recipes delivered right to your door skip trips to the grocery store and count on hellofresh to make home cooking easy fund and affordable and. That's why it's america's number one meal kit. I have cooked any number of hellofresh recipes. I discovered that. I enjoy grains that i thought i didn't like but it turned out i either hadn't tried them before or hadn't tried them prepared these ways and nama big green lover and when you say these ways you mean your ways you did it. I did it. I did it. Following the hellofresh so be hellofresh offers more than twenty-five recipes to choose from each week from vegetarian meals to craft burgers and extra special gourmet options. There's something for everyone to enjoy with all recipes designed and tested by professional chefs and nutritional experts to ensure deliciousness and simplicity. Hellofresh is fresh ingredients are sourced directly from growers. Like a guy will have just pulled like a stock a corn off the corn stock and hellofresh takes it and delivered from the farm to your front door in under a week context. Free of course go to hellofresh dot com slash twelve paula and use code twelve bala for twelve three meals including for gibbering. Try hellofresh america's number one meal kit by visiting wait for it. Hellofresh dot com slash twelve paula and use code twelve paula for twelve free meals. That's a good deal including free shipping. If you're gonna try it anyways use our code and and we are back with katrina spayed katrina you. Have you have said that you find that. Today's funeral industry is alienating and And doesn't really do it right. What is it that recompose does. How do you talk to me about my recompose funeral. So i think that is sad about today's funeral industry. Broadly speaking is that. It's become this thing where you as the consumer like. You're not really supposed to know everything that's going on about everything and someone should probably hold her hand through making these decisions and so much probably tell you what it means to be dignified and so much probably tell you what to wear to the funeral. You know the whole thing. And what kind of casket to buy etc. And i think that would be great if instead person was given the The empowerment to decide what they want for their own body when they die to think a little. Bit about roy. Tally and What it means to be alive and then to do something that really feels authentic at the end of it all. Yeah i would agree to tell us. I like okay so so. I fall off a cliff in paula. Paula looks into what the arrangements are for me. And i've commissioned recompose. I am i think he referred to it as pre composed pre compose is if you are not falling off cliffs yet but you decide you want a plan to be with to be composted when you die you can sign up today for that service in fifty years if you want and then after that i'll give you directions to that cliff. Gabe going keep going. What louis saint fell off a cliff in new york right now. This process is not legal in new york. So we're not there yet. So why isn't it legal. Well who been question. Every state has different funeral laws different. There's there's no federal laws really around funerals and But most states say that you can bury someone. You can cremate them. You can donate your body science. And then there's another form of death care called alkaline hydrolysis which is like people call water cremation. It's a way to kind of melt. The body that's legal in seventeen states but recompose. Let's let's also be able to Turn bodies into soil. Here's how we do it. We proved safe and effective. And then we realized we had to legalize it because it wasn't legal anywhere yet so we started with washington state. Because i live here in seattle in companies based here and we frankly i mean we walked around the halls of olympia before covid happened. This was in two thousand eighteen. And i had a little baggie of soil that was created from cow manure. It wasn't legal and a little baggie of wood. Chips fell in straw. That's the plant material. We live body. And i would just we would talk to legislators. Show them those two bagging. This is before. This is after straws. Before here's the compost created from a cow. You can smell it you can touch it and half of them would be like no thanks but neither even so it just made. It seem like not scary. I think and then the other thing is well we talked about. This is about choice about your family and friends having another choice for your body when die. It's not required. But shouldn't we all be the ones that decide and then it ended up being very bipartisan. Bill here in washington partly. Because all you know whether you're environmentalists in seattle or a farmer in out employment you see the benefit of this. You might love the land in different ways but farmers compost animals all the time so they really get it and so there was like a nice really wide swath of people who wanted this to exist out here. I thought bipartisanship had died and i guess we were. We were mulching. we're mulching bipartisanship. So this is really kind of an uplifting story in that way maybe new bipartisanship has bloomed out of that. But but let me go back to the question before. After i fall after. Paula pushes me off that cliff. What is what is The endgame looked like for me. Should i go with recompose okay. So let's say the clippers in new york so you would literally go to our website recompose dot life and call the number on the on the screen and then we would help you arrange for someone to transport your body here to seattle. that's fine. i live in california. I don't know why. I have to go to new york to get to that. I think it's important because like you know we only have one location right now but we have had. We have had folks transported from all over the country to us basically because of covid. We decided to try zoom services and so On the day of the service Let's say your your friends and family provided with a couple of good songs. We would blast those songs And we would play the role. Yeah played music. While our services manager morgan would be basically on camera there'd be this array of ten hexagonal vessels and a bunch of plants and then your body lying in what we call the cradle and covered with a sheet. And then morgan comes on the camera and she talks to you your family on zoom and maybe a couple of your friends say something and morgan talks about how your body's returning to the carbon cycle and the beauty of the forest and then she lays some wichita in straw around your body on this kind of cradle which is like a sokaia trae on meals of but more than that and then a couple more of us come on the camera and we actually load your body into one of these vessels in the array of ten and close the door. So and that's when you hear a voice going well seriously. I am not joking. There's gotta be a tiny subset of people who are terrified of being buried alive cremated alive. We can totally help you with that. You would just knock on the vessel. It's fine in there. Just be like hello could. That's like our tiny. I was really just kidding. I don't have that some people much. If i'm if i'm not dead.

Paula new york california Gabe washington seventeen states seattle Today paula more than twenty-five recipes fifty years each week america today twelve three meals one location Hellofresh dot com ten hexagonal vessels one two thousand
"katrina spayed" Discussed on Mornings With Gail - 1310 KFKA

Mornings With Gail - 1310 KFKA

08:18 min | 5 months ago

"katrina spayed" Discussed on Mornings With Gail - 1310 KFKA

"Vote. Why kids come on outside to the back yard. Look that's your aunt edna right over their own lookout green grasses and grandpa bill. Well he's right here okay. Is it just me. Or is this bill to legalize human composting in colorado. Just plain creepy subjects of my facebook question this morning. Where do you stand on. This human composting bill. Far far away. Eight hundred eight now thirteen ten. Kfi a thirteen ten f k dot com northern. Colorado's voice morning. So what do they come up with the stuff from the auto collision specialists studios the something that you would do if a colorado indeed legalizes human composting well. According to a hindi in the denver post colorado is just a couple of votes and one signature away from joining only washington state in offering you the option to turn your body into pounds of soil after death. Now on the plus side uses little energy and would cost about as much as a cremation but it would take some time for funeral. Homes there crematoriums to implement before colorado could actually spread their wealth. But if this entire conversation seems somewhat redundantly familiar. That's because it's come up before it didn't make it through the session. Last year Do to the Shorten session as a result of covid nineteen so sponsors decided to bring it back. They have company and other states as well with california oregon and new york. Also considering human composting this year and one of the bill's sponsors a democratic senator robert rodriguez of denver saying. It's an innovative idea. You think in a state that prides itself on natural beauty and opportunity. Let no opportunity. Go unturned now. Rodriguez interestingly enough. He was raised catholic. And why does that matter in this equation. Well because he said that because of his religious beliefs his faith he believes that it's not necessarily something he might want to do for himself but he believes that we colorado and should have a choice. He's had that other sponsors of the bill said that they have heard from people who are quote excited about the option. Now keep mind. The colorado bill does not allow for the soil swell the greatest nope the soil of multiple people to be combined without consent. If this bill passes the soil cannot be sold and the soil cannot be used to grow food for human consumption now. Some in the post death business are excited to get involved while others. Well they're just kind of keeping their powder dry and holding out for more specifics. Ohlinger funeral cremation cemetery. Crown hill told the post in a statement that it needs to learn more. I think we all need to learn more but believes in the importance of offering choices. The colorado funeral directors association did not did not return requests for comment colorado catholic conference. They said they oppose it because the church quote teaches that the human body is sacred and the dignity of the human person is the foundation of immoral society adding in a statement that there's just not enough research on what the practices will do for health and safety now. The company recompose offers human composting in washington state. Already and it does so at something. They refer to as a natural or ganic reduction facility out. this is pretty similar to crematory founder. Ceo ono her name truly is katrina spayed. Well she dug up the idea after learning about green burials and decided. She wanted to similar option. That could save space in urban environments. So a friend of hers apparently told her farmers have been composting livestock carcasses for several decades. So she thought well if it can be done for livestock. Why not humans because it's not right in my humble opinion about you nine seven three five three thirteen ten. drop me. A text thirteen ten k. A text line so apparently it took about ten years to come up with a process that would make a body decompose faster without chemicals. Spayed then went on to explain how it works. I'm not sure we really want to get into those Those details but she said she thinks of it too because apparently they put body crate on and into a vessel over a bed of what chips alfalfa and straw and then these vessels are stacked vertically and there are ten in the facility in washington spade. And i'll spare you something. More specific details spayed says she thinks as it as a hotel for the dead Because that's where the body will stay for about thirty days and greenhouse facility as transferring to into soil recompose employees focus on fine tuning the environment to allow already existing crabs on the body too. Well do their organic work. Apparently the type of composting occurs naturally but recompose his process is accelerated to some degree recompose. Because on to say the process requires one. Eighth of the energy used in conventional burial or cremation also saves one metric tonne of carbon dioxide per person. Really know what to do with this. I just i. I understand options and yeah. I'm all in support of having those options. I mean choices are important particularly when it comes to our eternal resting place. But i don't know it's such a great idea for bodies to become garden soil. What am i missing here. Nice seventy three five three thirteen. Drop me a text on our thirteen ten. Kfi a text line as always if you've been part of our texting family for quite some time. That process remains the same. You can just text away to your heart's content but if you're thinking about joining our thirteen ten. Kfi texting family out a brand new number for you. Nine seven four seven eight thirteen o one and all you have to do the first time used. That number is text to k. f. k. two nine seven hundred four seven eight thirteen a one. But what do you think about this bill. In colorado. To legalize human composting stick. It's wrong multitude of levels..

robert rodriguez Spayed colorado spayed washington spade Rodriguez facebook washington denver Last year new york Ceo ono nineteen this year Eighth about ten years Colorado katrina spayed one signature one metric tonne
"katrina spayed" Discussed on Seattle Now

Seattle Now

01:39 min | 6 months ago

"katrina spayed" Discussed on Seattle Now

"Hey it's patricia murphy. it's monday. This is seattle now. What happens after we die is an unknown but our physical being just organic matter here in washington. Some people are choosing to stay that way after death in a minute. We'll talk with katrina spayed about recompose and her new approach to end of life. But first let's get you caught up. Don't go breaking all the rules just yet. King county's top doctor is warning. There's a good chance we're headed into a fourth wave of covid infections in a briefing friday. Dr jeff do chen said new cases are up forty three percent from two weeks ago and consider this less than half of the adults in king county have received their first shot. Just thirty three percent do chin says co variants are still a concern including two new variants from california seattle preschoolers and some special ed students will get to see their teachers and classmates in person today. They're headed back. I as the district gets ready to return grades k. Through five next week. The district and teacher's union are still negotiating about how to bring back middle and high schoolers governor. Inslee says he wants it to happen. By april nineteenth and the gonzaga bulldogs keep chasing history. In the men's ncw bracket they still haven't lost a game all season breezing past sweet sixteen opponent creighton yesterday. Eighty three to sixty five. That puts the zags three. Wins away from being the first unbeaten national champs since the indiana hoosiers did it in nineteen seventy-six..

jeff do chen katrina yesterday april nineteenth friday thirty three percent monday Inslee washington patricia murphy two weeks ago today first forty three percent sixty seattle King first shot fourth wave sixteen
"katrina spayed" Discussed on Pen Pals with Daniel & Rory

Pen Pals with Daniel & Rory

02:36 min | 1 year ago

"katrina spayed" Discussed on Pen Pals with Daniel & Rory

"Jaradat. That's his head inside these cartner rutter. We got a guy voter. Sit On that buoy out there. We gotta go out to that buoy and we gotta pull them off. We're going to need a bigger boat poker so we can kind of sweep him away Quit so old day. Get over here so the sea burial you gotta think about your as host. Sure you're dead and gone but you can't have drinks out there on the on the water. People are puking left and right right. I'm anti burial. I don't know I wanna US though to write a comedy where that's our business. That's what we do is not even the shows about. He's got something good Hook. That isn't what the show's about but his wildly interesting. Whether it's it's not about these two guys that run the sea burial business. But they do. Yeah but they show up at the diner a lot. They always have a story always story. This one is called re composing. Okay body composting or recomposition could be the future of green barrel at least once. It's legal interesting. Seattle based Architecture Grad Katrina spayed. Got A got a light bulb idea in twenty twelve could she create a space space and method for returning bodies to the Earth naturally sands concrete steel in carcinogens? The answer came in the form of human composting. The process of transforming bodies into soil naturally farmers of practice livestock composting for decades Wood chips moisture and breeze combine to expedite the natural process of decay into nutrient rich soil. Spain has become a pilot has begun a pilot project of Washington State University with bodies pledged by elderly and terminally ill fans of her. 'cause IF AND WIN. Human composting is legalized. The urban in-depth project dreams of a brick and mortar re composing facility. Families will ceremonially lower the shrouded corpse into the re composing vessel in covered with wood chips. As they say goodbye. I I'm into that. That's my third or fourth for me. Do you want to? Do you want the bonus? One that they offer in this article having come home play. This one's called bog bodies. What let's see you're already read it yet. The fuck a bog but I think they literally put you in a bog. They put Taylor asked on the Louisiana. And put you ask you this. Or what's more fun me reading it right now on? Us knowing or me not reading it enough never knowing what a bog.

Taylor Spain Seattle Jaradat. Louisiana Washington State University
"katrina spayed" Discussed on Short Wave

Short Wave

03:04 min | 1 year ago

"katrina spayed" Discussed on Short Wave

"Okay so I get it. Some of you are probably like why. Would somebody be into composting in human remains well. Typical ways of dealing with our bodies in the states have their downsides there's the carbon footprint of cremation the hundreds of thousands of tons sounds of wood and concrete that we put in the ground with caskets. And just the sheer amount of space graveyards. Take up there are increasing numbers of cities where where they're no longer allowing extension of cemetery grounds so before she got into human composting Lyn Carpenter. Bugs had a long career helping farms. Compost compost dead livestock. That were caught the attention of Katrina spayed the founder of the company recompose and one of the people behind the whole effort to legalize human composting in the state state. She recruited Linda prove that you can safely compost human body. But for sure composting. Humans feels way different than composting livestock. Oh Duff indefinitely yeah just doesn't feel right. It feels like a sort of a too little little to natural method You know it. It feels very very agricultural And most people people are just not familiar with how composting works. And you know. It didn't seem like anybody would ever really accept it as as a method so take the concept in the basic principles that we know work really well and put it into a really different context where it becomes not only acceptable but a really beautiful process. That has been the goal. The first thing that happens is that the body is placed based in this long barrel. Light container so what. It looks like is that the body is laid onto a bed of plant materials else and then more plant materials are laid on top of the body and the doors closed one of the important parts of this equation. Asian is all that plant material it has to contain a special ratio of carbon to nitrogen to give the microbes of the energy. They need to be super active and that it also creates high temperature from there. They tweak the airflow even rotate the container all to keep those little bacteria feasting. You know breaking everything down. Well you know I don't WanNa get too gross. I get a little remnant. Go well or gross as you're comfortable trouble with most of the activity is by bacteria and they don't have mouths like the larger organisms resumes. We think about they release enzymes outside of their bodies so essentially you have trillions of little enzyme acid acid making machines that are leaking out these enzymes and acids and it's that chemical mix that primarily makes.

Lyn Carpenter Duff Katrina Linda founder
"katrina spayed" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

03:39 min | 1 year ago

"katrina spayed" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"Of being gay today a judge ruled in favor of Exxon Mobil in a lawsuit brought by New York state accusing the oil company of hiding from investors the true cost of addressing climate change the Manhattan Supreme Court ruled that the New York state Attorney General failed to produce any evidence that investors were misled the case filed in October of twenty eighteen was the first of several climate change lawsuits against major oil companies to go to trial all right now to what happens when we die surely of course work our bodies are buried or there's cremation and now there is going to be what's known as human compost okay so the world's first funeral home dedicated to composting human beings set to open in twenty twenty one allowing those left behind to turn their deadly departed into soil that's how this works so the name of the company is called recompose they're gonna be able to turn deceased into a cubic one cubic yards soil over a period of about thirty days all right well we'll get into how they do this in just a little bit because I know that you're dying to know how they go online to know yes but on bond but before we do that here's Katrina spayed she's the founder of this company called recompose they've actually been conducting what they call a pilot program this is been going on in North Carolina in which six bodies have been covered in wood chips this pilot program has allowed us to demonstrate that it's possible to harness the incredible power of natural decomposition to turn human bodies in the soil so they say they use one eighth of the energy of cremation they save as much as a metric ton of carbon dioxide for being produced compared to other forms of burial well I'm sure it's great for the environment but what do you do with the soil you know at a I've been no one is going to want to grow back each carton with at that time on that's up to the family yeah after thirty days and the decomposition takes place there's just been reduced on the circle honestly you get to go in and they give you the soil do whatever you want okay grow tomatoes not crowded at staples and that's a little Soylent green for me you can put it in and earned by the fire yeah I guess you know that a lovely lovely flowers like maybe your loved ones favorite flowers I'm just detecting maybe a tad bit of cynicism in here you know maybe maybe I you know I'd love to know the cost but they're still building there are they're working on a model but here's someone who is interested in it Leslie Christian here's what she told CNN sometimes people just need to think about it but it doesn't feel odd or weird to think about a body returning to the earth and a very very natural way it happened in Seattle Washington first place that's been greenlighted by lawmakers in Seattle and twenty twenty one is the date well you think of you know how much a funeral costs amiss expanse of the half dead and even even the cremation services all of that is pretty pricey this seems like it would be I mean if you are environmentally conscious right you know why not didn't you do a segment like a couple two three months ago about burials in forest yeah so in up in you know basically emerald triangle and you know humble medicine of that area right there are forests where you can pick a treat to be buried under sold so kind of same thing you say you're gonna feed the tree eventually right but it's you know for people who are environmentally conscious it's it's a good way to go okay so that's coming up in twenty twenty one in the state of Washington out of the road to go to check in with Brian nobles other things look up.

Exxon Mobil New York thirty days two three months
"katrina spayed" Discussed on Quirks and Quarks

Quirks and Quarks

04:07 min | 2 years ago

"katrina spayed" Discussed on Quirks and Quarks

"Fears wow that's amazing so the game is actually sort of raising their emotional state as they're playing yeah that's right we kind of call the brain a joystick in these video games you know one of the things that's really lovely to see is these kids start to take the metaphor of mind light into their everyday lies and this is really important to us we don't wanna just teach them skills that are relevant for the video game we want to generalize into their everyday life and so these kids start saying you know i can use my mind light on the school yard i could use my mind like before test and so on and so i think that's really what's very optimistic about this idea of using video games to train up for real life as well well how effective are the games are treating anxiety so the four randomized controlled trials that we've run on mind like a really promising the last two showed that we are decreasing anxiety by house and this is we compared to cognitive behavioral therapy were able to do as well as a therapy that is the absolute gold standard in the field we do it in eight six sessions which is about half the time and at one tenth of the price of what a therapy session would be and also of course kids were playing a video game so there's no stigma associated to the video game and they feel a lot better better and empowered by plane themselves on these games for inclusion in what potential do you think video games have for treating things like anxiety so what i'm really excited about is the potential for video games games to treat all children in general in young people because we all struggle with anxiety we all struggle was sad days and learning how to regulate those emotions learning how to deal with stress in our everyday life if we can do that in context text that's playful that allows us to be delighted at the same time is were actually learning these skills i think when there's a men's potential to reach people that otherwise would be stigmatize photographic thank you very much fear time thank you very much canadian psychologist isabella granik is chair professor in the developmental psychopathology department at red bull university in the netherlands my name is katrina spayed and i grew up in a medical family where it was fairly normal talk about death and dying at the dinner table but i didn't know this woman giving a tedtalk is the driving force behind a movement to transform what we do with our bodies when we die instead of embalming or bodies with toxic formaldehyde and burying them in a sealed casket instead of cremation an energy intensive process that contributes the climate change katrina speed is interested in an environmentally benign carbon been friendly way to dispose of our bodies after death it was inspired by a call from a friend she was like hey have you heard about the farmers who are composting whole house like turns out that farmers and agricultural institutions have been practicing something called livestock mortality composting for decades that's right composting dealing with human remains just the way many of us do with kitchen scribes turning what is essentially organic waste in tougher tile soil just last week washington state became the first place in north america to sign a bill into law allowing the composting of human bodies doctor lin carpenter bugs a soil scientists from washington state university studies the composting a farm animals and she was recruited by mispaid to do a pilot project were six human cadavers doctor carpenter bogs is also the research search adviser for recompose reorganization run by mispaid that's developing a

"katrina spayed" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

10:02 min | 2 years ago

"katrina spayed" Discussed on KTOK

"For more news without the noise. My favorite story of the week has to be this human composting story Washington has become the first day in the country to legalize human composting before that, the only acceptable means of disposition of human body was burial or cremation. And now we have this income, natural organic reduction the process involves wood chips. It takes about four weeks and the yields about two wheelbarrows worth of soil everything. It's broken down even the bones Brendan Kiley. He's a reporter for the Seattle times spoke to us about this new alternative to burial or cremation. The first point is at alkaline hydrolysis in natural organic production, two separate processes alkaline hydrolysis. They've been trying to legalize that for the past few years in Washington state, and it's legal in some other states as well. But here, it got tacked on our what got added was natural organic production or colloquially known as human composting. And so this process, I think the easiest way to think about it is like a urban crematorium except using the slower. Composting. Decomposition process instead of the faster flame process, we do have green cemeteries in Washington state, where people can be buried without without expensive caskets, and so on. But this being one site where bodies would go in and human remains come out, is totally new the idea in the United States specifically, how does this work. I just seen what chips straw and other materials. So what do they do to naturally, decompose the body that way? The dates back a little bit a few years back to something called livestock mortality, composting, which is something farmers. And ranchers began to experiment with researchers as well and found as a and environmentally friendly means of decomposition of large animals and found that one could with the proper mix of starter elements, the right area, managing it for the right temperature. Could reduce fifteen hundred pounds steer into totally clean. Usable nutritionally rich soil in about a few months. They ran tests research program at Washington state university with human remains people who were terminally ill and supported the project and wanted to donate to the research and found that using a similar process human bodies could become vet kind of clean. Rich soil in about four weeks. Yeah, it is pretty quick, and that's bones and all it requires, again, the right starter elements, the right to keep the microbes happy, and it's relatively speaking less odorous than people would think if the microbes are really happy and working really officially, they do their work quickly and they don't produce a lot of that off gas odor that we associate with something Roddick because that was one of my questions. What about the bones? Obviously, they're, they're tough to break down. So I didn't know that even in that short of time you know, four weeks. It's pretty quick. The bones. Yeah. And again, it's a little different than just a green burial where you dig a hole and lays someone in just a cloth, shroud, or something that process of decomposition takes longer, because the conditions are different, but the right temperature moisture the rates starter elements the process moves pretty fast. Now traditional ways of disposing of the bodies cremation usually burns to full SUV tank's worth of gas. They say that emits two hundred fifty thousand tons of carbon into the atmosphere each year traditional barriers, the body is pumped full of embalming fluid, obviously skits. All of these measures slowly decompose the body and it produces a lot of methane gas, things like that the traditional ways environmentally are not necessarily the best was this Bill introduced specifically to address those issues it was, and it was one of the founder, Katrina spades main divisions when she grew up in a farm in New Hampshire or fathers pirates physician mother was a physician's assistant environmental activists. So familiarity with. Life death composting new growth, plants and animals. That was all part of childhood coming up. And when she was studying architecture, she was thinking about death modalities what we use to deal with human remains and wondered if something more farm, like might be good both environmentally and two people stays if people don't want to spend a lot of money on tarnished. Caskets blind with expensive cloth and it'd be embalming process and all that kind of thing. So this is Katrina vision, and state senators and the governor agreed was simpler, less expensive less complicated. More natural more environmentally friendly option for people's remains after they pass away Katrina Speights. So she's the developer of the urban death project is she the one behind this recompose company, who's going to be building kind of these new burial, plots for this. Katrina spayed nonprofit called urban death project. I think around twenty fourteen and began the process of talking to scientists and attorneys and death care experts from around the country. A lot lot on the west coast and formed a board and they moved into a four profit model. Small business model to have recompose and now that the legislation passed and the governor has signed it the next step is for them to develop the rules, necessary with the department of licensing, all that kind of stuff and finding a site and start building, you know, when people get cremated oftentimes they spread the ashes, maybe their loved ones favorite place. Loved ones are allowed to keep this soil that has made body would create about two wheelbarrows full of soil, and you can take it to a home guard in wherever you want to put it to plant a tree plan vegetables. So that's kind of a cool notion to read the life out of somebody's passing as well. Well, that's absolutely a case. And part of the attraction behind him as to one older gentleman, who's a big supporter of this from Washington. There's been a career nurse. All his life working in intensive cardiac care units vision is to have a memorial treatment of something that you can hang a swing on, and maybe grandkids, great grandkids down the line could swing on and have his body come nourishment for that tree itself. It would be a living testament him as opposed to, to a headstone in a cemetery. Now, the next step is, I guess, to see if other states will propose similar bills. And, and see how this takes off across the country. At me, it sounds like there's some interest bubbling up maybe a little bit, Massachusetts, and Michigan Joshua Slocum of a funeral consumers alliance at New England certainly knows about this, and this following this people are quite interested in this is a relatively simple viable alternative to what we've done in the past Brennan, Kylie reported the Seattle times thank you very much for joining us. Thank you. The other top political stories of the week are the increased tensions in Iran. President Trump warned Iran, not to threaten the US again, or it will face it's quote unquote, official end that happened. Shortly after a rocket landed near the US embassy in Baghdad around quickly responded with a hashtag saying, never threaten an Iranian, the US deployed bombers in an aircraft carrier to the area. And Iran is increase its uranium enrichment production. We spoke to hall Tuesday, foreign affairs. Correspondent at politico for more on these rising tensions tens kind of back and forth right now between the Iranian leaders and President Trump on Twitter feed, and it's very strange because President Trump recently has been trying to calm things down. He has said things like I want you to call me. I just want to talk to them. He has flat out said he does not want to go to war with Iran. And yet he puts out this threat out there, and maybe it's because he was sitting there thinking you know what I need to be tough again. I can't seem like I'm coming across. But when you say something like this is going to be the official end of Iran. That's a pretty loaded statement. And it actually offends a lot of Iranians, including like ordinary Iranians that the Trump administration says that they want to support Iran is a civilization. It's been around for thousands of years, so saying that you're going to officially end. It is quite the claim and I think he might have undercut himself with a lot of ordinary. What started all of these tensions, because we heard that there might have been some Americans that were being targeted. That's why the president sent over some bombers carriers to the area. But did all the stem from us being pulled out of the Iran nuclear deal? Really been building up for month to month the United States pulled out of the Iran, nuclear deal impose a ton of these sanctions, damaging your aunty Konami, and then recently United States, Trump administration announced it was going to declare a major piece of Iran's military as a terrorist group. Now, the Iranians you know, they've been still sticking with a nuclear deal, but recently, they said, they are going to take steps to reduce their commitment to the deal. They also pretty upset about the terrorist nation of one of their major military units. And so this has just been a situation where now they are apparently, making moves that the US feels are threatening. Whereas there's also the argument that the US has making moves that the Iranian steel are threatening. And so it's kind of becoming the question of the chicken or the egg, which came first threat came first, and which one is going to lead to what running officials have said that they've quadrupled their uranium enrichment production, there uranium that they would not would still be enriched, only to that three point six seven percent. Limit that was set under the nuclear deal, but they could go beyond their stockpile, limitations pretty soon. How does this figure into the whole discussion hoping to do is they've given the Europeans and other parties to the deal, like Russia and China couple of months to find ways to ease the economic suffering that they are facing right now as a result of US sanctions? So they said, look is to help us get out of this economic otherwise, we're going to start walking away from the deal and enriching uranium and doing other things that puts them in violation of the deal because the way they run is look at it is, look, we signed up to the deal, saying, we would eliminate our nuclear program, so that you guys would lift economic sanctions that were already earlier and start economy would improve. It's become a very one-sided deal. And I just don't see how the Europeans are going to be able to pull together anything that helps you wanted to kinda me in the next sixty days. I just don't understand how that's going to happen because European governments cannot force their businesses to do business..

Iran United States Washington Katrina Seattle times president President Trump Brendan Kiley reporter official Katrina Speights Washington state university Trump administration Roddick politico New Hampshire developer
"katrina spayed" Discussed on The Ladies of Strange

The Ladies of Strange

07:16 min | 2 years ago

"katrina spayed" Discussed on The Ladies of Strange

"Ooh. In. Seattle based architecture grad Katrina, spayed got a idea in two thousand twelve could she create a space in a method for returning bodies to the earth naturally? Sands concrete steel carcinogens, the answers came in the form of human composting the process of transforming bodies into soil naturally. That's farmers have practice livestock composting for decades wood chips and moisture and breeze. Combine to expedite the natural process of decay into nutrient rich soil. She is working on a pilot project with Washington state university with bodies pledged by elderly and terminally ill fans of her caused that's question about that. Yes. Did you find out about how long it takes for that to happen? Yes. Okay. If in win human composting is legalized the urban death project dreams of a brick and mortar recomposition facility families will ceremony Lee lower. The shrouded corpse into the re compos ING vessel and cover it with woodchips as they say goodbye, as soon as thirty days later, they can collect the remains now transformed into roughly a cubic yard of soil, which they could take home gardens. That's really fast I'm intrigued by this. And I think it's a great idea. I think I would be thoroughly creeped out, and I don't know why this creeps me out over cremation. Yeah. Which is essentially, let me just run. Yeah. The differences cremation. You're putting the ashes somewhere this version. The recomposition is, you're reusing your family member. Yeah. Which is I, I would have problems with that. I mean I could see the benefit. It's kinda like giving back I wouldn't necessarily want my family to get it. But, like put me in, like California where they had the forest fires, and they need all the nutrient rich stuff to regrows the or the botanical gardens. Yes somewhere where they could benefit from having that extra put mini are cactus. So I am. Yeah, I'm all for that idea. I think it's wonderful. I think that you hit the nail on the head. I think it'd be weird to just be like, all right, family. Here's her decomposed body goes some cucumbers to feed your children. Yeah. But I do think it's a really cool concept. And a great use of all means a great idea, especially in highly populated areas where you don't really have the area to have people buried buried. Yeah. That was another thing. I ran into I can't remember what country it is. But there's a law in one not a law, but old tradition. And Asian countries were bodies are dug up after sixty years and disposed of basic. Because they don't have enough room to people in the ground. So I'll have to put a link to Viking funerals. All right. So next we have cremation where of course neither a casket or embalming fluid is required. If the body must be held for several days, refrigeration, or bombing may be necessary. Cremation burials can be followed by a funeral. And in his also possible to have an embalming viewing ceremony and then the body actually be cremated. Due to the every time I think, of cremation now, I think of meet the parents. And my dad telling me I want to be cremated and plays earned than you can place me on the fireplace. So I can keep an eye on y'all. Like my, sir. My grandfather is in a earn with a deer on it. And my grandma said when she goes she wants to be putting earn with the hunter on it. And she wants pointed at my grandpa, that's incredible. That's relationship goals. No. And I shouldn't have gotten the giggle so much about this. But do you know what they call the substance? That's left after a body is cremated ashes dust. Cremades. Cremated remains are cremations? I could see. And I, I saw those like Shirley, not. And then it just kept coming up in a bunch of different articles, Tiffany made up that words. Traditionally are either scattered in various locations, can be kept at home or can also be buried in a cemetery or entered into a column barium, which is like a mausoleum. But for Crimmins. According to the natural death center, a single cremation can use as much gas and electricity is a five hundred mile road trip as it also emits about two hundred and fifty pounds of carbon dioxide, which is on average the amount of an American Home produces in about a week. Oh my gosh. Wow. All right. And so even Dyeing's not sustainable. No. Man, this is kind of making me reconsider my plans, I it was fascinating, some of these Viking funeral play selene Dion for you. Oh my God. Yes. And I will sing it for you. Thank you. But you can't die before me, so okay, so just be Rebecca on a beach by yourself. Recreating it for both of you floating. What does the movie where they old where he holds a beat box said? Oh, say anything. Rebecca standing on a beach shooting arrows at two P bull floating out to those, and trying to hold a stereo over. What are you doing? It was dying wish me a low. Don't bother me. I have Aeros. Gazza's over dean up in here. All right. So got that was considerate. You're welcome. Considerate. And I appreciate that you're doing a great job. I'm glad you will what we taking care of this. Yeah. Just know that my ghost will be standing beside. You singing selene, oh. You'll be going over Niagara Falls while zillions playing. Are we gonna have Viking Kunal at Niagara Falls that happened? Ooh. With fireworks? This quickly you'll have today. Rebecca's got big plants. So if you are cremated and you don't want your ashes just sitting around there's a couple options on things that your loved ones can do with your ashes. They can use it to grew a tree. There's a company called living earns and they have what is called a bio earn. And it's basically just a biodegradable urn that your ashes are put into or excuse me, your Cremades. You basically dig a hole in a well at area. So you plays the bio, earn into the whole ad provided proprietary growth agent soil and wood chips, and then lower the provided seedling of choice into the earn and a baby group. This

Rebecca Cremades Niagara Falls Seattle selene Dion Katrina Washington state university California Lee Aeros Crimmins Tiffany Shirley Gazza dean fifty pounds sixty years thirty days
"katrina spayed" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

03:17 min | 2 years ago

"katrina spayed" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"When you die. How would you like to be disposed off Washington state in the US could become the first to allow the composting of human bodies is an alternative to burial and commission. It may be the most affordable death auction and the most environmentally friendly. Katrina spayed woman who can make this happen six planes to me at I'm the founder and CEO of recompose, which is a company that's been developing over the past few years, a new form of death care for humans, and specifically we've developed a way to turn human beings into compost or soil. Why would you want to do that? Well, back a few years ago. I started researching the options for my own body when I died in you know, as most people know, we've got pretty much two options. We've got cremation and burial. And neither of them felt very meaningful to me at the time. And I also did a bunch of research and. Found out that they each have a pretty significant environmental footprint both cremation and burial harm the earth in different ways. You'll method how how does it differ from burial? So the basic concept, I think actually you might imagine what we're doing more like cremation because you put a body into Invesco and then families are given back material. So instead of ashes we give families back soil that they can use to nurture a tree or or a garden. But the basic concept is what we're doing is taking what happens on the forest floor, natural decomposition, and the creation of topsoil and were exceleron by creating the perfect environment for microbes to do their work. And so specifically that means laying a body into a vessel with wood chips and straw. And then over about a month, we area that vessel. We provide plenty of oxygen to the microbes and they break down the body into a really beautiful rich compost or soil when you give that back to. To the people because this is always being the thing that slightly concerned about cremation. They give you some ashes. I don't know hundred percent on this. But I am told that you may or may not be getting the ashes of your loved one. When people come to your process, they get the the compost of their loved one. Definitely yes, we have one body per vessel and between use of of the thirty day period. We do have a full cleaning of that vessel. So there wouldn't ever be an opportunity for it to be more than one person's soil just one month. It really happens quite rapidly on people though, essentially going to end up burying a corpse in the Reagan or whatever it is. I mean, you'll creating trouble police forces for years to come on. Well, the the fascinating thing about the composting process is that the change really happens on a molecular level, so at the end of this three day process are molecules have been rearranged and created into new molecules, and we are no longer human. So I guess you could say yes, that's a problem for the police force. But in reality what we're putting on our gardens is simply compost the aptly named Katrina spayed Mogollon smoking glowing needs a little something. So maybe I need to get in touch with Katrina Gina stood on Westminster bridge the other day and someone through a pot of ashes into the river at blue back.

founder and CEO Katrina Katrina Gina Invesco US Westminster bridge Washington recompose Reagan hundred percent thirty day one month three day
"katrina spayed" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

09:20 min | 2 years ago

"katrina spayed" Discussed on KTRH

"Company to come post, you turn into dark quick action put together with trial alpha and what chips and they make you into. You know, what chip fodder the aliens did in war of the worlds, they sprayed all that? You know, effluent human effluent everywhere. And created that red vine stuff. Now, look, you know, I'm not really dogging on this. But I am kind of I'll tell you the truth. I don't feel that good about it. Because look if you wanna look at the environmental perspective, which they are obviously the idea of compost human bodies in nutrients for plants isn't a stranger might sound. You know, in fact, we should all be aware of what embalmed bodies to the environment pumping dead bodies full of embalming fluids and burying them in caskets overpriced. And all the other stuff the steel in the woods and all that it's toxic to the planet. It really is. In fact, cemeteries in the future will be nothing. More than toxic playground aliens arrive, and they see cemeteries, they decide to start playing the man it would be horrible for them all the things that are being kept in the cemetery. I mean, what you're that figure that if we were taking ten acre cemetery and dig up all the bodies wooden casket we'd have enough wood to actually construct forty homes that would be magical the steel and the concrete that in these cemeteries, imagine how much embalming fluid we get extract something to fill the whole swimming pool. Then of course, there's methane and other gases that released for the decomposition process. And no, you don't always turn to when you're your casket. No, you've got these embalming techniques keeping the body pretty much. Keeping it is a wax dummy underground for long period of time. And a lot of people are okay with that. They leave it at that. But of course, over the past decade, we've been seeing an increase in people requesting cremation, and there are people who are climate change. People say that's not good for the environment it releases too much carbon emissions. So. But when you go when you do research on cemeteries in how how toxic they may be there is if you love this little research says been done on the subject. There have been elevated levels of contaminants that are detected some gravesites contamination. Generally decreases significantly the get away from a Metairie and overall. There's little evidence that cemeteries that much impact on groundwater. But you know, I don't know. I mean, there's well water near cemetery. I I'd be kind of weirded out by that. As I said decomposition today is opposed to many years ago is different because believe it or not bodies don't readily that actually decompose. They don't they don't turn into soupy, yuck. They basically remain together. And for reasons still poorly. Understood corpses, don't invariably decomposing potting soil as many people think it doesn't happen. I know that it was apprising the JR you said, well, we all go to anyway. No, you don't usually if you're this way, if you're embalmed, I mean, all the fat tissue on your body when you die usually in. You know, when it comes together with the moisture sometimes turns into a solid soap like substance that makes the cadaver look like something you'd find in a wax museum. It's called all out of here. And if you need to look it up on Google if you have a stomach they can handle it, look it up. I mean, so from the point of view, at least the intention of the urban death project and those who want to do this. I mean, you can't fault them for trying me Katrina spayed. I mean, she appears to be approaching this form of from an environmental environmentally better way to do this and it's holistic solution. I mean Earth Day we just had a couple of days ago figure the earth the plan stick with the plan. Anyway, what do you think? What would you would you let your family member or are you or someone be turned into compost, sticky or or weird? I'd like to hear from you tonight. Triple eight six seven three thirty seven hundred that's triple eight six seven three thirty seven hundred zero to Candice in Washington. I can't as you're on ground zero. Tonight. Good. Because I heard you talking about this, and I know politics, no green earth. Whatever thing about this. Just sounds like a lily lovely idea. You don't have to get embalmed. Just think Nicole. You're not getting burned. You get a go back to the earth. And you made your body may be able to do something after you're gone. I think it's great. Yeah. Live. It's a great idea. In I guess practice. Maybe. But I mean, long term. I don't see a good idea. The only problem like you said the cemetery and the the burning, you know, that's the that's not good for one time. Well, it's been another option. Well, I'll tell you. I am not a person who would say, you know, embalming and bombing bombing because I know that puts chemicals into the soil. I don't see a problem with burning bodies. I just don't I I don't see this this worry about carbon emissions from a body being burned. I don't I don't get. The the personal preference to also. Also think myself that they haven't weighed in the possibilities of of heavy metals being put into the soil because of the corpses that they basically burner turn to compost. Compost to look at. We don't break down in a compost pile. We don't break or heavy metals. And so I mean long-term if we're using it to put on vegetables and fruits, if we're if you're if you're doing that, I mean, we run some risks here. I mean, we run some risk of prion disease. We run riff of, you know, talk city with regard to heavy metals in the bodies. I mean, we could be killing generations by composting are dead. Any really good to get rid of bodies. You know, earning the burning them burning them is a good way. I mean, you know, carbon emissions be damned. It's a good way to let off is is burnt. I mean, I mean, I I for vanity sake. I wouldn't mind being embalmed putting the ground, but I also kind of like the idea of being shot up in a firework kind of a fun idea. Yeah. I mean, you know, get everybody barbecue. It's my wake say great guy. All right, everybody. Let's get together and shoot them up into space. I mean, that's that's a good way to go. I think but in the meantime, Kenneth thank you for your call. I really appreciate it. Let's go to LeicesteR in Tennessee. Hi, Lester, young ground zero. Hey, what's up? I was I was thinking what what I have decided to do is to have a carton pocket donate, my body decides university of Tennessee. What do you do with your body? Once they get it. Well, way I understand it is you know, experiment where it studying that what's left they cremated it send it back to your family. If you if you family won't feel into what they cremate back after their. That's the way I understand it. Pretty healthy. Seventy nine and I'm still fairly healthy. That's good. So yeah, your body would be a great specimen to show how eighty year old has superhuman strength like, you know. Right. And and and I didn't know composting deal. I think it's a good idea of what I understand because I believe that. Once we leave the body, we still exist. Somehow or another the body doesn't matter. Interesting interesting, but matter because we the way I understand it. We always will exist, and we always have exactly. So I don't have any problem with my family and my family's. Okay. With it. As far as how it sounds like this come posted may even be a better way. I don't know. Well, maybe very popular. Maybe very trendy. I mean, like I said you can't fault them for trying. But I just don't feel that in the long run. It's a good idea. I in fact, you know, as much as I hate to say this. I think the burning is the best idea we have. I can understand right now think Bernie's probably the best way. Yeah. Iran concerned about I am more concerned about what happens to the planet for children. Media affect me because I don't have any problem. What what's going to happen to me you'll be gone anyway? But I'll still, you know, we're just temporary Ferreri houses we're in. We're made the buddies made up of chemicals. Sure. Chemical compounds organic microbes. Yeah. It's all there. So we turn it into compost when we contributing to the compost. Well,.

Google prion disease Katrina Metairie Iran Tennessee university of Tennessee Bernie Ferreri Candice Nicole Lester Kenneth LeicesteR Washington eighty year ten acre
"katrina spayed" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

WHAS 840 AM

06:31 min | 2 years ago

"katrina spayed" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

"You can take a look at how toxic cemeteries can be pumping people full of bombing flu put them in a luxury casket, and we're just leaving them there and all the methane collects cemetery. I mean, these are talks equates dumps way read having their landfills for the dead. And so in grave matters by marquess. This is what I read. This is really interesting. This is a fascinating fact about cemeteries. It says here, quote, the typical ten acres of cemetery ground, for example, contains enough coffin would to construct more than forty homes nine hundred plus tons of casket steel and another twenty thousand tons of vault concrete to that Atta volume of embalming fluid sufficient enough to fill a small backyard, swimming pool and untold gallons of pesticide weed killer to keep those graveyards. Nice and green. Like the contents of any landfill. Embalmed bodies toxic cash escapes. It's hosted eventually reaches or leaches into the environment tainting surrounding soil. And groundwater. Cemeteries bear the chemical legacy of their embalmed dead. And we'll and well after the grapes have been closed, so. This is his interesting about how much would steel and embalming fluid is underground cemetery. Ten acres of debt I've been to that place in San Francisco where it's the city of the debt wall dead. It. It's really weird, and you can smell the chemicals coming up from the ground in that area. Colbourne is that of the place? It's I went there with Brad Olsen. I got a t shirt, and it's a blue teaches people are dying to go to Coleman fans. I'll have to look it up. But it's a it's a city of the dead. And we know that, you know, those areas, you know, probably have what Harris says they have is a lot of wood in a lot of embalming fluid, and we know that methane is released during decomposition, and so while it's not entirely benign it won't cause disease, but methane deposits could be incendiary if an open flame or spark it's Lucinda ground. Imagine washing watching tombstone shoot up in the sky from explosions, and and caskets flying everywhere. I mean, the real danger of there is one with a with a cemetery is groundwater contamination. Because well, I mean, if you're if you're looking at regulations on how to bury a body, there's all kinds of things first of all you have to you can't bury a body. Below the water table. You can't do that. And in some places, they require that you put the casket in a volt. But sealed tight cement vault that keeps the casket from, you know, raising or rising out of the ground. You know, if there happens to be a flood and also protects if there's any kind of. You know moisture that gets in the causes the body to reduce down to liquid compounds that doesn't happen often. But it can and for a long time, you know, people just happy with that. You know, they're saying, well, you know, I don't mind being in the ground. Bury me embalming what you want with me. But now, it's changed. People are becoming more environmental friendly, and they're saying, well, you I wanna I wanna be burned. I want to be cremated. But. Then we go back to the climate people. Now, saying that release a six hundred million pounds of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere every year. So what's Well, the solution is this in Washington state governor Jay Inslee. He's running for president, by the way, you've probably seen see on the democrat side democrat. He's running for president governor Jay Inslee. But he wants he wants to be more green friendly AMAN. Sure, he's all about green deal, and it's all about the climate change. That's his that's his platform for his, you know, for his presidential run. And he's about to while he's reviewing Bill now, and they get a sign it into law. It's basically a law that will allow something called low impact alternative cremation or or it's not really cremation. It's it's low impact composition or decomposition. Basically what he's saying? Is that they wanna make it. Okay. To turn. The human body into compost. And other wording of the bills little more exotic. So it doesn't shock people. But just the idea that you will have the ability in Washington state to have another alternative to being cremated in that is being turned to compost, which basically. He ended up turning into one cubic yard of compost today. They take you and you can sprinkled on your garden. In fact, they encourage you. I say, well, okay. We'll take some of this Compostable put it on in a four somewhere or you can take a little bit of it. You can use it for plants, you know, your own plans. So the Bill would be actually the Bill to allow humans returned to compost will be the first Bill of its kind. Washington state will be the first legalized natural organic reduction, which is an accelerated composition method. And it'll transform the remains into soil. So the human compost project recomposition is a process that takes between four to seven weeks and produces roughly a cubic yard of compost and Jamie Smith who's spokesperson for Inslee says that this is a thoughtful effort to soften our carbon footprint. So of course, you know, guy who's wanting to do this, you know, platform of against global warming. He wants to pass it. But there are a lot of people are on support it because there are many cultures that find the idea comp of the human remains is repulsive and against the religious beliefs. I mean, nothing sounds, yuck. Your fertilizing zucchini tomatoes with you know, Louis. No, you don't want that. You can't. No, I I don't think that sound but see it's for the reduction of of Louis footprint reduction of grandma's footprint reduction of your friends footprint, right the carbon footprint, even after you die. You can say a nice thank you to mother earth by getting turned into compost turned into a compost pile of Ensley signs that Bill as expected recomposition will be allowed in Washington as I twenty twenty. Now, this is the brainchild of Katrina spayed who's the CEO of this alternative barrel company called recompose. Back in two thousand fifteen they call it the urban death project. They've changed the name urban project sounds a little morbid. This is a project urban death project..

Washington president governor Jay Inslee Bill Atta Jay Inslee Brad Olsen Colbourne Coleman San Francisco Louis Harris president Katrina Lucinda Compostable
"katrina spayed" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

10:43 min | 2 years ago

"katrina spayed" Discussed on KTRH

"Zero. Numbers to call tonight. Triple eight six seven three thirty seven hundred that's triple eight six seven three thirty seven hundred. Are we talked about what happens after you die? And this isn't one of those esoteric show supernatural shows that quantum immortality is just about death. Plain truth lights. Go out you're done become more end up in the ground or end up burned in oven somewhere or you'd be cryogenically frozen or you can be turned into a diamond you can be put into a rocket and fired into space. You can be put into a mortar and be shot off during the fourth of July celebration. Whatever you wanna do. It's fine. In fact, when you look at cremations. People deal with the dead. Cremations now are outpacing burials for the first time in the United States. It's the truth. I mean here in Oregon. I remember the day, my friend, Dave, you know, he's he's now older than I am we both laugh each other being sold. He's he doesn't strike me. As being an old, man. He's very in fact, one of my old friends thought he was still hot in his age. So Dave listings, probably laughing really hard. Here's a guy that goes kayaking, and he gets into kayaking accident and yet he saves his life and his wife's life. I mean, the guy is the guy has some amazing stuff going for him. I really love the man. He's awesome. But he then he shows me. Hey, CLYDE, look at this. He shows me cremation card. I'm going. No god. Here's a here's a guy that when you had a bad knee. He was walking on a cane. And I was like, oh, no, please. No is this guy's got so much young him. I don't want to look old when I walk with a cane, I feel the same way my knees been bothering me to get old your brain still around seventeen your body says no you're ordering off the the old Pearson's been you. Now, CLYDE figure it out. No, my wife tells me some days, I'm not old at the time. She tells me Amel went to the doctor get my knee look at but I'm doing fine now, by the way, thank you for asking. But this car day Paul does this card. Look, this is in case of my death. Please dispose of I remains at crematory bub-bubba phone number everything. No, you know, it's like what we're out together. Very is. And I have to call this number and say, hey, take my friend away in Burnham. Thanks. Suck that would really be the worst. But see it's not out of the norm for people to say, I want my remains cremated. And so if you read the national unit rectors association says this upward trend is set to continue over the coming decades national cremation rates are predicted to reach nearly eighty percent by twenty thirty five. So eighty percent. In twenty thirty five. We'll prefer cremation over burial. So you think? As well as I would think that having your body burned would be good for the environment. Right. You just burn your body. And then you take the ashes you spread them somewhere. Nobody needs to know. You back into the soil. Everything's cool. But the idea that we're going to be reaching an eighty percent tile for cremation by twenty thirty five is alarming climate change believers. You'd think that cremation would make you earth friendly after death. But the climate cult was pointing out now. The cremation releases six hundred million pounds of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere every year. Every year. Now, what's even more interesting? And I was telling you about. Tell you about a book called grave matters by marquess. If you wanna look at environmental perspectives with regards to dead bodies. You can take a look at how toxic cemeteries can be you know, we're pumping people full of bombing flew to put them in a luxury casket, and we're just leaving them there. And all the methane collects underneath a cemetery. These toxic waste dumps way read having their landfills for the dead. And so in grave matters Marquez. This is what I read. This is really interesting. This is a fascinating facts about cemeteries. It says here, quote, the typical ten acre swath of cemetery ground, for example, contains enough coffin would to construct more than forty homes nine hundred plus tons of casket steel and another twenty thousand tons of vault concrete to that Atta volume of embalming fluid sufficient enough to fill a small backyard, swimming pool and untold gallons of pesticide weed killer to keep those graveyards nights and green. Like the contents of any landfill. Embalmed bodies toxic cash escapes. It's hosted eventually reaches or leaches into the environment tainting surrounding soil. And groundwater. Cemeteries bear the chemical legacy of their embalmed dead. And we'll and well after the graves have been closed, so. This is his interesting about how much would steal and embalming fluid is underground cemetery. Ten acres of debt I've been to that place in San Francisco where it's the city of the dead wall-to-wall dead. It's really weird, and you can smell the chemicals coming up from the ground in that area. If he's Colbourne is that the name of the place. I went there with Bradley. I got a shirt and blue teaches people are dying to go to Coburn fans the name of it. I'll have to look it up. But it's a it's a city of the dead. And we know that those areas, you know, probably have what Harris says they have is a lot of wood in a lot of embalming fluid, and we know that methane is released during decomposition, and so while it's not entirely benign it won't cause disease, but methane deposits could be incendiary if an open flame or spark gets Lucinda ground. Imagine watching watching tombstone shoot up in the sky from explosions and and classic. It's flying everywhere. I mean the real danger there is one with a Finnish airy is groundwater contamination. Because well, I mean, if you're if you're looking at regulations on how to bury a body, there's all kinds of things first of all you have to you can't bury a body. Below the water table. You can't do that. And in some places, they require that you put the casket in volt. But sealed tight cement vault that keeps the casket from raising or rising out of the ground. If there happens to be a flood and also protects if there's any kind of. Moisture that gets in the causes the body to reduce down to liquid compounds that doesn't happen often. But it can and for a long time, you know, people just happy with that. You know, they're saying, well, you know, I don't mind being in the ground. Bury me me what you want with me. But now, it's changed. People are becoming more environmental friendly. And they're saying, well, you know, I wanna I wanna be burned. I want to be cremated. But. Then we go back to the climate people. Now saying that released a six hundred million pounds of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere every year. So what's the solution? Well, the solution is this in Washington state governor Jay Inslee. He's running for president, by the way, you probably see see on the democrat side. He's democrat. He's running for president governor Jay Inslee. But he wants he wants to be more green friendly AMAN. Sure, he's all about green deal, and it's all about the climate change. That's his that's his platform for his first presidential run. And he's about to well, he's reviewing Bill now. And they think he's going to sign it into law. It's basically a law that will allow something called low impact alternative cremation or it's not really cremation. It's it's low impact composition or decomposition. Basically what he's saying? Is that they wanna make it. Okay. To turn. A human body into compost. And other wording of the bills little more exotic. So it doesn't shock people. But just the idea that you will have the ability in Washington state to have another alternative to being cremated in that is being turned to compost, which basically. You end up turning into one cubic yard of compost today. They take you and you can sprinkle it on your garden. In fact, they encourage you. I say, well, okay. We'll take some of this Compostable put it on a four somewhere or you can take a little bit of it, and you can use it for plants, you know, your own plans. So the Bill would be actually the Bill to allow humans returned into compost will be the first Bill of its kind. Washington state will be the first to legalize natural organic reduction, which is an accelerated composition method and you'll transform the remains into soil. So the human compost project, or we composition is a process that takes between four to seven weeks and produces roughly a cubic yard of compost and Jamie Smith whose spokesperson for Inslee says that this is a thoughtful effort to suffered our carbon footprint. So of course, you know, guy who's wanting to do this, you know, platform of against global warming. He wants to pass it. But there are a lot of people around supported because there are many cultures that find the idea comp of the human remains repulsive and against the religious beliefs. I mean, nothing sounds, yuck. Your fertilizing zucchini and tomatoes with uncle Louis. You don't want that? You can't. No, I don't think that sound but see for the reduction of a Louis footprint reduction, grandma's footprint reduction of your friends footprint. Right. The carbon footprint even after you die. You can say nice. Thank you to mother earth by getting turned into compost being turned into a compost pile Ensley signs that Bill as expected recomposition will be allowed in Washington as I twenty twenty. Now, this is the brainchild of Katrina spayed who's the CEO of this alternative burial company called recompose. Back in two thousand fifteen they called the urban death project. They've changed the name urban project. Sounds a little morbid. This is a project urban death project. This was actually in the Smithsonian. The article was in the Sony of the other day, and I read it, and it was like floored, in fact..

Washington Bill president governor Jay Inslee United States Oregon Dave national unit rectors associat CLYDE Jay Inslee Amel Pearson Burnham Sony uncle Louis Paul Marquez
"katrina spayed" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

02:23 min | 2 years ago

"katrina spayed" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

"You can come post. Ed. Well, but you die. What are you talking about? What is that Oprah? What are you trying to do? You could become you become your your bag of mulch here begging of mold. I think this is a great idea, by the way. I don't understand what you're what what's what's the whole up with you being able to post your friends and family members. If that should pass here, you know, what's really interesting Leising, human compo. Yeah. That's a shame. The on this last time it was shaming. I don't know. Validate my feelings. No. Why is it sharing? What you what the holdup? Okay. So my concern was the respect for human life. But then you guys said, look what happens in nature you die you roll on the grounds you decompose as ashes dust to dust. I actually don't know what my generation to this is rebuilding human life. Right. Although not human trafficking, your tomatoes are not human. So you could be an I guess, maybe I don't wanna eat tomatoes at grown inhuman mulch. But then again, we're a planet rebuilt from dead species. So what? Why don't I like this skin? Why don't I like this might be a little futuristic clingy? What I have no idea. I didn't know last time. You said no light on at this time. Views. I mean, this kind of beautiful the way that they would they say the process will go and they become one with the earth. You know, what I remember when they were first talking about this. They talked about like having a big tower of mulch that they were going to have some big edifice in downtown Seattle. And we'll take the bodies up there at all seem very planet of the apes to me. I don't know. No. I mean that wasn't exactly what she said. Is that that the the person who's been pushing actually one person Katrina spayed gets enormous credit for that she's been hammering away at this for years with the urban death projects. He's here in Seattle. And she's the one who's been saying, look, we come post everything why not compost human remains. There's plenty of people get burned. It's not like there's sanctity for the human body in regards to that. So why not actually you may use it for something useful and turn it into something? We can use. If you die in the woods. And no one recovers your body. This is what happens to you out there. I mean, why not maybe it's maybe it's my my.

Seattle Katrina Oprah
"katrina spayed" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

01:32 min | 2 years ago

"katrina spayed" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"Offering apology to affected customers. Nearly seventy percent of those asked support California governor Gavin Newsom first budget proposal, that's to the nonpartisan public policy institute of California governor is two hundred nine billion dollar budget, which he unveiled last month includes more money for early childhood and higher education. It would also expand developmental screenings for infants and state subsidized child care programs. Did you knew it's illegal to refuse to help a police officer California's posse Comitatus act makes it a misdemeanor for able bodied person older than eighteen to refuse a police officers. Call for assistance in making an arrest capturing a fleeing suspect or preventing a breach of the peace the eighteen seventy two Bill dates back to the wild west when it gave community sheriff's the legal ability to rapidly. Raise and use a posse, California sent majority leader. Bob Hertzberg is calling for an almost full repeal a dozen apply to the modern day, the California chief of police chiefs association says that Bill is on their radar, but for now they have no comment a Bill that would make it legal to compost. Human remains has just passed. The Senate in Washington state is being promoted by recompose Pounder, Katrina, spayed company officers people a chance to decompose and soil where they died the Bill in another one dealing with human composting are making the way through the legislature. All right. The Dow is down almost four hundred points right now to twenty five thousand and some change the NASDAQ off one hundred thirty eight two seven thousand two hundred and thirty eight and it looks goal is down just about twenty five cents or so thanks for being with us this morning. Our next update coming up at nine. Thirty news alerts immediately at KF PK dot com. Appreciate you fill in for Christina status morning. Thanks very much. Russia's next here on KFI Sacramento's.

California Bill officer Gavin Newsom institute of California Bob Hertzberg police chiefs association Sacramento recompose Pounder Christina Russia Katrina Senate Washington two hundred nine billion dolla seventy percent
"katrina spayed" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

03:01 min | 2 years ago

"katrina spayed" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

"For too many of my relatives in a cemetery of Roslyn their lives cut short by smoking. So an efforts to raise the vaping age. Mike in Olympia is this a chance down there are people talking about this and Olympia. Yeah, it's a Bill. Sponsored by Representative of the coal macrey. She's from Seattle. Is to raise the the debt. The problem now really isn't kids and regular lit up tobacco. Use. It is it's vaping the that the tobacco use has been declining. Rapidly vaping is the problem now with being the problem. Now, the feeling is that it's widely disseminated distributed on high school campuses because you just need an eighteen year old who could supply everyone all of their friends with with the with the vaping products. And so they want to raise its twenty one they feel like you can you can carve out at least the teens who have been the biggest growing problem with vaping. You can carve them out. If you move that age up to twenty one weirdly enough Philip Morris completely sports that interesting. Well, you know, I know where our prohibitions here. So good thing you can't vape the heroin now, speaking of death, and I don't mean to do that. And after Dr radio, but can't you've been on the death beat this week. Yeah. Sure. We're not. You do what you can to be environmentally friendly. Right. You forget your reusable bags in the car like everybody. But Washington state could be the first place to take it to the next level and allow you to compost you that's what they're looking at right now. Katrina spayed owns recompose. She does recomposition compositions, natural and sustainable, it provides significant savings in carbon emissions which is especially important because Washington has the highest rate of cremation in the country at seventy six percent but cremation requires fossil fuels and has significant carbon dioxide emissions. Recomposition is one eight the energy of cremation and saves over a metric ton of carbon dioxide per person who chooses it. Okay. So your body's put into a tub, they want me to call it a vessel. But it's tough. And then you rotate a little bit with wood chips thirty days you turn into one cubic yard of soil. What happens next in this is where Olympia got a little tripped up them. Themselves. They want the state wants laws on where you could then spread you. That's where the question is similar to what we see where where you can legally spread ashes that everybody just just doesn't want to. But that is what they're looking at is the law of where you can then spread that soil. So then I could use me to grow fair trade coffee, so fair trade coffee beans with one hundred percent more Herman a little bit. A little bit curious about when they're going to expand it to curbside. Enough of a pickup problem today was my garbage day. So wouldn't that make it even more convenient than a little less of a problem if you could just do curbside composting, which is why they want these that been I I have at my house easily big enough for Utah. Probably big enough for the two of you. I would be not only what to feel happy. It would be nice little reminder sitting out there in my driveway, heavy to move around that I'm giving something fat. And now, you know, what.

Olympia Recomposition Mike Roslyn Representative Seattle heroin Philip Morris Katrina Dr radio Washington Utah Herman one hundred percent
"katrina spayed" Discussed on KMJ NOW

KMJ NOW

04:13 min | 2 years ago

"katrina spayed" Discussed on KMJ NOW

"Yeah. Getting back to human composting. Up in the state of Washington mixing mom or dad with a little bit of Lyon water and wind till we get an lovely liquid mixed with bone to mix with some soil and plant a tree, ladies and gentlemen. Would you do this and yeah? So you brought up some good points about this. Matthew, you're on Cam. Jay. Hi. I was going to it's going. You know, I think that probably probably open to fix nation processes they have now don't like JD of being suit instead of a chamber. I don't like the idea of cereal right now. So the I mean, you're basically not being buried in the if genitalia concrete box, and you're basically being mummified. So in that sense. I've always liked being returned to the soil because that's the cycle of life. So I guess that'd be kind of open to a little sleepy though, me personally. I'd I'd like the burial ID either. There's no way I'm freaking getting buried. No, how no way I don't like the idea taking up space. So I kind of like the return to earth routine to I've already I come from a long family of let's be cremated and get it over with. And then I told my daughter here my ashes, you decide what you wanna do. You wanna keep them? Great. I think that's kind of morbid if you wanna toss him somewhere. Great just make sure it's not in somebody's garbage. Can you know kind of where I'm at? And I think that's I you know. To each their own on this. But to me. Cemeteries. I think it's just a waste of space. You know? But I certainly can appreciate the value. That's what somebody's into Matthew. But I'm like you. I don't want to be in a box freaks me out. Even though I won't be around a freakout. Thanks, man. Remember when they used to have coffins with little bells in just in case, you were still there. Good, man. Ding, ding, ding, ding, ding. Can you imagine if you were burying somebody back in the day, and that bell started ringing in countless movies made without affecting it haven't they? Right. The woman who you're gonna hear the punch line on this who developed this process. I was talking about the news break the Seattle based designer she was a designer before she got into Ag Katrina spayed, she said she shouldn't report a friend introduced her to the farming practice of composting, she did this with livestock after they died was called mortality composting. The practice was shown to safely keep pathogens from contaminating the land and a richer soil. It was like a light bulb went off. And I started to invasion the system that used the same principles as mortality composting that would be meaningful and appropriate for human beings. So she introduced the Bill, blah, blah, blah. She called the the subject the excuse me, the project recompose, she initially called it the urban death project. Sounds like a metal band doesn't it in concert the urban death project? So recompose is much nicer the one thing I thought of the could be problematic. You your family if you're going to use you as somebody as compost, you're gonna plant something right tree? I would imagine that to be the number one thing shrub, camelia, Bush, whatever. What happens when you move? Are you going to leave mom or dad in the backyard? No, I I don't think you would. Right. I mean that Birch tree or that Modesto ash, or whatever it is that you planted with compost. Mom, dad. Uncle Ernie whatever grandma grandpa, God forbid, a lost child or something like that that's going to have huge. Meaning so you're gonna have to dig that tree up taking away..

Matthew Ding Washington Jay Lyon Modesto Ernie Seattle bell Katrina Bush